Piston Slap: An Emissions Digression, Dodging Diverted Air?
TTAC Commentator Nate writes:I’m working on a 1979 Dodge D200 with 360CID V8 4BBL carbureted engine, automatic trans, A.I.R. pump, EGR valve, and charcoal canister for the fuel tank hydrocarbons. The underhood factory decal says “California Medium Duty Emissions” and it has no catalytic converter from new. So here’s my situation:
  • All hoses, pipes etc. are there and all valves etc. are working .
  • The A.I.R. pump works but the diverter valve has failed (vacuum diaphragm leaks) and is in the open position so it’s always blowing fresh air into the exhaust manifolds.
Is it likely to pass the emissions test like this? I took my Ca. smog tester license training in 1984 and honestly only remember bits and pieces. So far I’ve not been able to find a new or good used diverter valve. Please advise!
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Junkyard Find: 1960 Dodge D200 Pickup, With Genuine Flathead Power

Chrysler’s flathead (aka “L-head”) straight-six engine is one of the forgotten heroes of prewar and postwar Detroit, being produced from 1929 through some undefined year in the early 1970s (for stationary use, e.g., in generators and irrigation pumps). There was even a five-bank, 30-cylinder version made for tanks. It appears that it was possible to buy a new Dodge truck with the flathead six through the 1968 model year, though some say that Uncle Sam was the only buyer for the last few years of flathead Dodges. Most buyers opted for futuristic overhead-valve engines by the 1960s, anyway, but here’s a D-series pickup in a California wrecking yard that still has its L-head.

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Junkyard Find: 1975 Dodge D100 Pickup

Since many Dodge D-series pickup parts fit my ’66 A100 van I’m always on the lookout for members of the species while visiting the junkyard. Today’s D100, which I found in a Denver self-service wrecking yard a couple of weeks back, is a little too new to offer many bits for my Dodge, but it’s still interesting enough for this series.

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Junkyard Find: 1976 Dodge Tradesman Van

The Dodge Tradesman cargo van of the 1970s was quite popular among customizers back in the days of 20% annual inflation and talk-box guitar solos, as we saw with this ’72 Tradesman Junkyard Find last year. In the very same San Francisco Bay Area wrecking yard, here’s a Slant-6 Tradesman that doesn’t quite qualify as a custom van— not with just tinted glass and aftermarket wheels— but is still a nice time capsule.

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1971 Dodge D-100 Pickup

After yesterday’s 1972 Dodge Tradesman van, we might as well stick with Dodge trucks of the Nixon Era for another day. Big simple pickups remain relevant long after their car counterparts get discarded, but sooner or later every 11-miles-per-gallon old work truck develops some expensive problem and becomes worth more as scrap than as a vehicle. This Dodge held on for 41 years before washing up in this San Francisco Bay Area self-service wrecking yard.

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Junkyard Find: 1968 Dodge D-100 Adventurer Pickup

I’ve been finding quite a few vintage D-Series Dodge pickups in Denver-area self-service junkyards lately, which reminds me that I’ve spent too long ignoring Detroit pickups of the 1960s and 1970s in this series. I see them, but (unless an old truck has a GMC V6 and a bunch of ancient Deadhead stickers) I usually don’t photograph them. So, the Dodges: I shared this ’74 D-200 Club Cab and this ’73 D-100 Adventurer last week, and now we’ve got a ’68 Adventurer that shares quite a few components with my ’66 A-100 van.

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1973 Dodge D-100 Adventurer Pickup

Dodge’s D-Series trucks of the 1970s are still on the roads in large numbers, since there’s always someone who needs a simple work truck and doesn’t care if that truck is 10 or 40 years old. Still, you can always find another sturdy (if thirsty) Detroit pickup if something expensive breaks, so this Adventurer is now Crusher-bound.

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Special Electronic Quality Test Can't Keep This Engine From The Crusher's Jaws

You find some interesting historical documents in junked cars, and sometimes they’re glued to an engine’s valve cover.

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Down On The (Two) Mile High Street: 1947 Dodge Fire Truck

The street-parked old cars I photograph in my Denver neighborhood live at one mile elevation, give or take a few feet. Drive about 100 miles southwest from here, however, and you’ll end up in Leadville, which stands at two miles above sea level. Last weekend, I ventured out to Leadville and found this painfully original 1947 Dodge brush fire truck parked downtown.

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Burned Dodge Truck Makes Us Sad

After the Fourmile Canyon Fire in September, charred vehicle carcasses began showing up in quantity in Denver wrecking yards. Completely burned-to-hell-and-gone vehicles don’t seem to offer any usable components for junkyard shoppers, but they still show up.

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  • Garrett The only way to send a message is to pull out of the transaction when the fee is disclosed unless the dealer pays for it...or just walk out regardless.If this happens enough, eventually someone will get the message.
  • Sgeffe I pay for the Remote and Security HondaLink stuff (remote functions from a phone app; accident notification, etc.), at roughly $200/yr. That’s value-added stuff. (A nice addition is that I can enable the crash-notification on ANY Honda vehicle to which I pair my phone if I wish, as long as the vehicle supports it.) I can cancel this stuff at any time, though! It looks like you CAN’T with Mary’s Folly!Typical GM! 🙄
  • Jkross22 Just another reason to pick something other than a GM product. They'll be back at the government trough soon enough.
  • Corey Lewis I don't know a single GM owner who pays for OnStar. None.
  • Sgeffe Why, when we do edit a Comment or reply to one, can’t we insert a line break??!!