By on April 1, 2022

Ford Motor Co and General Motors will be individually suspending production in Michigan next week due to supply chain constraints. However, it’s difficult not to notice that the chosen facilities are responsible for lower-volume models they could probably afford to idle.

GM is stalling Lansing Grand River Assembly and Stamping, citing a parts shortage it said had nothing to do with the ongoing deficit of semiconductor chips. The company later stated that the Russo-Ukrainian war had not played a factor, abandoning the two most popular excuses for why something isn’t being done in 2022. Meanwhile, Ford has said the chip shortage has everything to do with its temporary closure of Flat Rock Assembly. 

“The global semiconductor shortage continues to affect Ford’s North American plants – along with automakers and other industries around the world,” the Blue Oval explained. “Behind the scenes, we have teams working on how to maximize production, with a continued commitment to building every high-demand vehicle for our customers with the quality they expect. All of our North American plants will run the week of April 4, except Flat Rock Assembly Plant.”

Ford’s latest closures will only affect the Mustang, which has become a lot less popular since 2015. North American deliveries currently represent about half of what they would have six years ago, suggesting that the company may have opted to let the Mustang take the hit in lieu of having to suspend truck production yet again. The manufacturer even issued a warning last month that the semiconductor shortage would continue to be an issue for the brand, followed by an announcement that it could lead to a decline in quarterly output.

General Motors suspending activities in Lansing will also have its production hit landing on the chin of some of its least-popular models – including the Cadillac CT4, CT5, and Chevrolet Camaro.

The CT5 sedan has failed to be a hit with Americans thus far, garnering only 14,711 U.S. deliveries in 2020 (it’s first full year on sale) and a paltry 9,446 in 2021. But the Cadillac CT4 is the model that really made me lose faith in the brand (along with the XT4) and has attained even fewer orders than its larger counterpart.

Meanwhile, the Camaro has suffered a fate similar to the Mustang with sales volume declining consistently since 2014. Despite both being solid performance automobiles, tastes have shifted and there’s less room for fun-focused coupes in an era where the wealth gap has broadened and there are fewer members of the middle class willing to purchase what are frequently secondary rides. This may also explain why the more-practical Dodge Challenger has managed to retain its volume better than Ford or Chevy’s pony cars.

Speculative to be sure. But both Ford and GM have recently hinted at plans to rejigger their production efforts to prioritize models with superior margins and reliable sales – basically, vehicles that cost less to produce, move reliably, and can be sold for juicier profits. This is especially important now that pandemic-induced sales conditions have mostly ended and there’s less willingness from the public to be gouged by dealerships devoid of product. As a result, companies have continued deprioritizing sedan and coupe sales in favor of more financially robust crossovers, pickups, and SUVs.

Analysts are expecting elevated vehicle pricing to persist regardless, citing rising material costs, ongoing supply constraints, and various industries’ say-so. However, they’ve also begun discussing manufacturers evolving their priorities in a bid to run lean and dealerships that will want to continue enjoying enhanced profitability per transaction for as long as possible.

Unless these are components unique to the above models that have gone absent, my guess is that GM and Ford are tired of having to press pause on their highly lucrative pickup trucks and needed to choose which products would take the hit. Assembly of the Chevrolet Silverado 1500 and GMC Sierra 1500 went down in Indiana last week due to absent semiconductors. Ford stalled production of the F-Series in Kansas City last February for the same reason. But it was hardly the first time either manufacturer idled truck assembly and probably won’t be the last until supply chains return to normal or manufacturers start building more of their own components.

Both plant closures are scheduled to commence on April 4th. GM said it expects Lansing Grand River to remain down until the 11th, adding that employees will still get paid at least 75 percent of their compensation from unemployment. Ford was less clear on when it expects Flat Rock to be back in action, though it likewise stated that it’ll do everything in its power to make up for product shortfalls – assuming there’s a need.

[Image: Ford Motor Co.]

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75 Comments on “Ford, GM Pausing Production in Michigan Over Parts Shortage...”


  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    This would be a perfect day for a Freedumb Convoy update.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I hear they found a first class strip club. Good thing, because…

      (BIG NSFW alert here…)

      youtube.com/watch?v=kMsrE-9CLFg

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        A heavy metal gay song “Ram Ranch” was used to troll the Freedumb Convoy in Canada. Counterprotesters would play it over their communications links and on hacked sites.

        • 0 avatar
          CaddyDaddy

          Lou, it’s unfortunate you celebrate the behavior that is the lowest common denominator. How can a civilized society tolerate forced chemical injections and then use filth to counteract the argument? Perplexing. What’s next, rounding up the people who wear eyeglasses.

          • 0 avatar
            JD-Shifty

            “Lou, it’s unfortunate you celebrate the behavior that is the lowest common denominator. How can a civilized society tolerate forced chemical injections and then use filth to counteract the argument? Perplexing. What’s next, rounding up the people who wear eyeglasses.”

            This was the trump vaccine. A wonderful vaccine he invented and took himself. are you saying mr trump lied?

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I just hope ii makes cars and driving more expensive so we have fewer poors and their crapboxes cluttering up our roads

      Hey as Canada got that squad of Laundry specialists ready to contribute to NATO yet?

      • 0 avatar
        Tele Vision

        @Art

        Ahhh. I remember MY first beer.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Naa. If people are going to hijack a thread to say “look at these dumb conservatives…gee I’m so smart” Im going to take the opportunity to point out that this one is quite wealthy and if they are going to be abject aholes by enjoying the dumb decisions that are making people sick I am going to return the favor by enjoying the benefits of not being poor and enjoying whatever dumb decision(s) they have made that has made them poor. And frankly, as I enjoy driving and we are nowhere close my not being able to do so I gleefully look forward to others losing that ability and making the roads a better place for the rest of us.

          I mean it’s not like I am getting satisfaction from people dying, right? You can get out of poverty. Not so much with being dead

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @Art,
            “look at these dumb conservatives…gee I’m so smart”

            Has it occurred to you that there might be a hole in your reasoning?

            Many pundits argue that everything should be viewed through left/right politics, but nature doesn’t care about that.

            Someone who insists that the course of a hurricane is a political question where all answers are equally valid *does* look pretty stupid — and they will be mocked by some.

            The way out of this mess is humility before nature (and/or god). The hurricane is going to do what it will do, and it’s up to us humans to figure out how to deal with it — not to argue over whether or not it exists.

            So, the question is: is the question on your mind about the existance/course of a hurricane which is easily answered by looking out the window? Or is it a question of values where multiple answers can be valid?

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            We aren’t talking about a hurricane. We are talking about a bunch of right leaning truck drivers.

            I bought away from the coast…don’t really sweat hurricanes anyway. Tornadoes on occasion.

            Anyway, go yell at the ones that hijacked a thread about plant shutdowns to talk about the freedom convoy. I just added my 2 cents. You can scroll by if you aren’t a fan.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @Art,

            The “Freedom Convoy” people already got everything they asked for policywise.

            As near as I can tell, they’re just protesting the existence of Democrats at this point. That’s why they look stupid.

            If they want to escape their stupid/reactionary image, they need to suggest actual conservative solutions to the problems our nation faces, like access to healthcare for poor folks (including some of their supporters).

            I’m one of the people whose existence they’re protesting, and I have absolutely no problem with conservative solutions to problems – assuming they might actually solve the problem. The stupid thing is pretending there’s no problem, because you don’t like the solution – which is endemic in conservative thinking at this point. If the Freedom Convoy people want to stop protesting me, and suggest a workable conservative solution to healthcare, COVID, volatile energy markets, or climate change – I’m all ears! Let’s do this!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “We aren’t talking about a hurricane. We are talking about a bunch of right leaning truck drivers.”

            Correct in as much as the freedumb convoy protesters were right leaning. Polling in Canada showed that the support for the convoy among the population was in the neighbourhood of 30%. That 30% number broken down showed 20% support from the right and 10% support from the left.

            I’m not trolling or mocking conservatives, just freedumb convoy protesters and supporters. They deserve to be mocked. Leaders from the convoy cited various incorrect sources and even the USA constitution to justify their protests.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Yawn. There is no problem. I can afford both energy and healthcare just fine and it’s not like I am descended from the Rockefellers or Political Royalty.

            If you are unable to afford energy or healthcare, I submit that the issue is not with those systems, but with you and the decisions you have made and the solution is for you to fix yourself via education and/or getting a skillet that gives you better income or improve your financial decision making.

            Why should systems that work just fine for the vast majority be overhauled for those that have made poor decisions?

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @Art,
            Wow, you walked right in to that one.

            I predicted exactly what you would say in my last comment.

            Denying that a problem exists can end an argument, but it doesn’t have anything to do with reality.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            No, I said if there is a problem, that problem is with you and your decisions.

            Typical that you expect everyone to rebuild society around your bad decisions because “it’s not fair” that others have made better (or at least less bad) decisions.

            Look man, if you are having problems affording things like gas, get good. Your inability to afford those items has nothing to do with me and frankly I already pay too much to carry others in society.

            Work harder or smarter. I don’t care but leave me out of it.

            But make no mistake, because something is a problem for you does not mean it is a problem worthy of government action.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “Hey as Canada got that squad of Laundry specialists ready to contribute to NATO yet?”

        I heard they had to deploy a younger squad. The old crew was all washed up.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      I saw some of the live streams where they’d be talking about the vaccine and how they’d never put a dangerous chemical into their bodies and then take a drag on a cigarette. Both the Canadian and the wandering US convoy.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    Mind wonders, is this the new norm?

    Will we ever get back to pre-pandemic times?

    Perhaps this will be a path back to in-source operations here at home? Why outsource everything we do and need to overseas? So what if our standard of living is reduced some. May be we can’t have luxury vinyl planks for cheap. Or granite stone in kitchens. or fancy hardwood floors. or myriad of LED lighting options. Or many decor pieces from hobby lobby.

    My first home, I had plastic vinyl for flooring in kitchen and bathrooms. I had thin carpet in all living area, no hardwoods. I had simple laminate for countertops. The house my nephew wants is way over the top.

    It is time to get back to simplicity but reliability.

    Same is true for cars. Forget stop/start technology. Forget lane detection and blind side monitoring and radar cruise. For the love of God forget autopilot. Get rid of complex infotainment systems with all functions embedded in them.

    Reduce the cost of entry. Make them simpler. Forget high mileage but allow simplicity of design of naturally aspirated.

    Alas, we want it all, and we want it cheap.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I’d gladly give up a ton of electronic gadgets in my vehicle for something less costly and more reliable.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        No way Lou. I’ll not have you omitting those complex emission control systems. You don’t get to pollute my air because you can’t afford a new car If you can’t afford a car I suggest public transit. I hear Canada is quite enlightened in that regard

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      pmirp1-
      HOW OLD ARE YOU?

    • 0 avatar
      aja8888

      I loved our 1950’s bathroom tile…..pink with small black flamingo silhouettes here and there. Vinyl flooring (light grey), blue curtains. Perfect. Now in this modern house, it’s just so 2020 dull.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      My house didn’t have any hardwood floors — until I bought a floor nailer. (Oh wait, you were talking about cars. Carry on.)

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Have had similar thoughts as these types of articles continue to pile up.

      Most of the crap, err safety tech, is not needed. ABS, airbags, crumple zones… sure, they’re all passive. Active safety tech might help the youngest of drivers who can’t put the phone down – or the older people with the same problem – but they’re not needed.

      If you can’t change the radio station/track, volume, hvac settings or cruise without using a screen, a designer screwed up.

      • 0 avatar
        CKNSLS Sierra SLT

        jkross22-
        I understand that all people who pontificate on this forum are skilled drivers beyond measure and feel that safety tech is not needed for them.

        Yea-OK.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          I feel like I’m talking with Cathy Newman.

          Me: “Active safety tech isn’t needed.”
          You: “So you’re saying you’re ok with people dying in a fiery car crash.”

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      @pmirp1–On my 2022 hybrid XLT Maverick I did not order the Ford 360,lane assistance, or adaptive cruise just to keep it simple and get my truck produced sooner. I did get a spray in bed liner, full size spare, and front and back floor trays. I ordered the XLT instead of the XL to get cruise control, power mirrors, intermittent wipers, aluminum wheels, and the key pad on the outside. Also preferred the gray and navy seats to the all black that comes on the XL. You can get a simpler less optioned model if you order one and with the Maverick I had to. My first house had vinyl floors, Formica counters, and shag carpet so I hear you. I was just glad to be able to afford a nice house. I would have liked to had a compact truck without the crew cab and a larger bed but they don’t make them and for the price I will get a decently equipped Maverick out the door for less than 26k which includes tax, title, and licensing which in today’s market is a bargain. I am happy with cloth seats and I don’t need heated seats since my wife’s CRV has all those features plus GPS.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      @pmirp1

      A single STM32 can eliminate a lot of mechanical complexity and unreliability.

      Modern cars are much more reliable than the old kid, because they’re better built and because the electronics can keep the mechanical parts within their design-limits.

      Electronics aren’t going away, because electromechanical machines are better and faster and cheaper than their purely mechanical ancestors.

      Simple low-cost vehicles will always have a place. But they won’t be the kind of cars that were obsolete before I was born.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Matt, MATT !!!!

    Cadillac CT products are SEDANS not crossovers. How soon you forget the Blackwings

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    What is the lead times on semiconductor chips? 2020 is getting farther and farther in the rear view. Should we not expect chip production for autos to have caught up by now? Seems contrived and convenient.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Posky

      The industry was reportedly looking at 25 weeks in December, which isn’t good. But I was also told that the situation was being dealt with at the start of 2021 by auto spokespeople. Contacts who actually work the lines said they felt like things were getting better by October of that same year. Granted, not every company had it equally bad. But it just feels like the whole industry (and plenty of others) have been in excuse mode for far too long.

      While I firmly believe a lot of these shortages are rooted in very real supply chain breakdowns that occurred during the pandemic, too much of what’s been going on seems predatory. Every company in the world just spent the last two years learning they can remain profitable by running extra lean and withholding product and I’ve been wondering why would they change course now if they didn’t have to.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @Matt-True and Ford’s new business plan is to sell more customer ordered vehicles. I ordered my hybrid XLT Maverick on July 26 and it was just manufacturered on March 11 and is in transit with an estimated dealer delivery date of April 8 to 15. By the time I pick it up will will be almost 9 months from the time I ordered it. Production was rescheduled twice.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        @Matt Posky:
        “But I was also told that the situation was being dealt with at the start of 2021 by auto spokespeople.”

        That was actually true then. Things were looking good, and lead times were tightening up and parts shortages were going away, at least for the kind of consumer electronics products I work with — which aren’t too dissimilar from what the car guys are doing.

        It was going great until the Omicron variant of COVID beat China’s COVID mitigation policies. Governments in Asia take COVID deaths much more seriously than we do here, and so the economic impact is greater. And, no, they didn’t ask Americans how to run their own country.

        So, we’re seeing electronics shortages again, because Shenzhen was shutdown for a week while they tried to find the COVID-spreaders in the population. Shanghai was/is next, and they have plenty of the supply chain as well.

        It is what it is, and it’ll take a while to get caught up.

        Global supply chains are *much* more efficient than doing everything locally here in the US, but it does require cooperation on a global scale to work. I’d love start up and own an electronics factory here in the US (and I have some relevant experience) — but I can’t find customers who want higher prices and investors who want flower returns, so it makes sense to stay where I am in the value chain. It is what it is, and it would take decades to relocalize everything.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    kcflyer-
    Everything I have read thus far says this “chip thing” will still be around in 2023-some are predicting 2024 until inventory levels return to normal.

    Dealership lots at least around here (Salt Lake City) are devoid of new cars. I doubt that it is “contrived and convenient” for dealerships to have practically ZERO INVENTORY on their lots. Many buyers (including myself) would like to buy a new vehicle but refuse to pay a mark up. I just called a Toyota dealer on a new Highlander and they will be happy to order me one and sell it to me at $2,000.00 MSRP. NO THANK YOU.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I’m seeing almost empty lots too but I get the sense that some dealerships are liking the fact that they do not need to sweat 90 day floor plans. If you want something you have to plunk down a deposit and order it. It can easily backfire on dealerships since that opens up the door for manufacturers to offer direct sales.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @Lou–Yes but Hyundai, Kia, and Ram could break this plan of dealers having lean inventories once they get more chips which would give them an opportunity to gain more market share. As for direct sales if dealers are going to charge above MSRP then I welcome direct sales from manufacturers.

    • 0 avatar
      kcflyer

      All I keep hearing is low inventory is producing record profits. So which OEM blinks first and goes for volume / market share?

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        KC>
        Someone will. Business school basics – game theory.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Seriously, these are manufacturing companies. They have HUGE amounts of capital tied up in land, buildings and equipment, all used in production. This isn’t just funny money – it’s real stuff they bought and paid for (and sometimes even pay interest on).

          Not utilizing this stuff costs money.

          I don’t buy the “they’re keeping sales artificially low” argument.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            If company A is locked into a pricing agreement to sell steering wheels at $50/wheel, but the material cost and labor to make the wheel went from $10 to $30, and for each wheel you produce, you lose money, why produce at all?

            Can’t say for certain this is what’s happening with cars, but it’s definitely what is happening for frozen foods.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Wait a minute FreedMike…They are in the business of making money…not making sure everyone can afford a new car.

            I hear Honda has CPO on some decade old stuff now if you are having trouble affording a new car.

            Besides, fewer cars is a win for Mother Earth, right? Oh you didn’t mean you wouldn’t be able to drive. Well, welcome to the future. Some people won’t be able to afford personal transportation anymore. But like Billy Zane said in Titanic…not the better half lol.

            You voted for it. Ask and ye shall receive!

            But hey, how about a “freedumb convoy” update so you can feel superior lol. I’ll just be driving my car instead, thanks

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @kcflyer – I agree. If one car company gains a “chip” advantage and a chance to gain market share they will flood the market with vehicles and discounts.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          @Art–How could Lou who is a Canadian voted for it?

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Oh I forget he’s Canadian with how much he comments on US politics. It’s pretty clear who he supports though.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            Voting for the guy who wanted to cut off trade with China would worsen this situation.

            Like it or not, China, Japan, and Taiwan have been investing in electronics manufacturing capacity since the 1980s – and they’re reaping the rewards of those investments today.

            We here in the US decided not to make those investments over the last 40 years. For private sector investment, it was cheaper to use the Asian manufacturing capacity. For public sector investment, we decided to save our tax dollars.

            The guy who started a trade war with China is not about to resolve the electronics shortage – because solving this problem requires helping Asian countries solve COVID problems in the short term (a none starter for Republicans), and massive government investment in American businesses (a non-starter for both Republicans and Democrats, though for different reasons).

            Trump (or a Trump Republican) would make the problem worse.

            Biden won’t make the problem worse, but he won’t make it better because Republicans reject government action and Democrats reject corporate welfare – both of which would be required to build a competitive electronics supply chain in the US.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Oh I forget he’s Canadian with how much he comments on US politics. It’s pretty clear who he supports though.”

            Someone does not like free speech in relation to politics? Feel free to comment on Canadian politics. Aren’t you doing that when you refer to the freedumb convoy? TTAC is a Canadian owned site.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I do…I am quite enjoying commenting on your country’s NATO contributions.

            Of course you are allowed to comment. I just find it strange. I guess if you are Canadian though US politics is important. You guys kind of need us.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Art

            Years ago when I was in Central Europe I interacted with a lot of UK (and occasionally Irish) expats. Given this was 2016, they all wanted to talk about US politics with me and I found it so odd because from my perspective I don’t have an opinion/push an opinion on UK politics etc. Finally one of them clarified, the reality was US politics could directly or indirectly impact *them* but their politics generally did not impact *us*. That simply never occurred to me and I understood their perspective from that point forward.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @28-Cars-Later – Thanks and100% correct.
            The USA is Canada’s #1 trading partner. US government policy has a huge impact on Canada. When I got out of college in 1982 US policy decimated the Canadian forest industry. I could not find work in that sector.

            Another factor is USA mass media. Whether it be TV, movies, news, or social media. It tends to overwhelm or permeate various areas of one’s life. A perfect example is Canada’s Freedom Convoy leaders trying to cite 1st Ammendment rights in court. Another example, I recall RCMP arresting an assault suspect. The dude complained that they had not read him his rights. Miranda rights is just a USA thing popularized by US TV.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I’m really starting to wonder if it’s all just a ruse to keep prices up.

    • 0 avatar
      kcflyer

      That’s what I’m saying.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Hope so!

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “I’m really starting to wonder if it’s all just a ruse to keep prices up.”

      Sure because this pandemic induced supply chain issue is only affecting automobile manufacturers!

      You guys really need to get off the internet & spend some time in the real world. I work in manufacturing and the supply chain issues(materials & labor) are real and they are everywhere.

      • 0 avatar
        CKNSLS Sierra SLT

        Carlson Fan- quote- “You guys really need to get off the internet & spend some time in the real world. I work in manufacturing and the supply chain issues(materials & labor) are real and they are everywhere”.

        That’s asking a lot for the majority of posters on here who croon for manual windows and an optional 5 speed manual in every vehicle produced.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          There’s a new brown manual transmission V-8 powered station wagon yet to be made with crank windows, no radio, no power brakes or power steering, rubber floors, and no air out there somewhere. Those manufacturers have conspired too long not to make one. It must be a conspiracy.

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        @Carlson Fan – 100% correct. I work for a large global logistics company and the warehouse I work at handles all of the online and store orders for a massive telecom company. The last couple of major phone introductions from Apple and Samsung have been down number-wise because the chip and parts shortages mean fewer phones and tablets produced and we don’t enough to ship so we get them in small batches.

        It’s taking us 4+ months for Dell servers to arrive, large batches of HP laptops are taking the same amount of time, and our Zebra label printers are 6+ months to arrive. All logistics/warehouse companies are competing for dwindling resources right now. And short of building new plants when parts and chips start flowing again, I’m not sure how the world’s manufacturing and logistics firms can dig themselves out of this because there is such a global backlog of pretty much everything and it’s only going to get worse as more manufacturing tries to rev back up.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “But both Ford and GM have recently hinted at plans to rejigger their production efforts to prioritize models with superior margins and reliable sales – basically, vehicles that cost less to produce, move reliably, and can be sold for juicier profits”

    Hmmm cost less to produce and sell for higher margins? Well that doesn’t sound like golf carts nobody wants, did they run this by Brandon for permission?

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    just went to the junkyard for the first time since 2015 and i couldnt find a parking space. super busy with people trying to keep their old beaters running

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Junkyards are a recession proof business. The worse the economy gets the better business gets. Where I live the parts shortages have gotten to where people have to wait months for some parts especially for catalytic converters. Many independent shops have been getting salvage parts.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Somehow Tesla just set another record for sales and shipments in Q1:

    https://insideevs.com/news/577387/tesla-q1-2022-deliveries/

    Good thing they’re not following the lead of the professionals.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      For those hot involved in engineering/manufacturing, what you need to know is that parts shipments to factories are planned ahead of time, often months ahead of time.

      If there’s a shortage, the parts seem to go to the buyers with the best contracts, the best planning/procurement team, and the highest bidder (in roughly that order).

      Also, when dealing with world-class companies, this stuff is sorted out weeks or months before the manufacturing happens.

      So, what SCE to AUX is really saying is that Tesla’s procurement team is beating the rest of the industry. Good job, team!

      The delivery of my Model Y has been pushed back to September, though, do they have more to do. That delivery day might-maybe move forward when Austin comes online? I’m fine with that.

      • 0 avatar

        Good point on the contracts. Suppliers fill their key contracts first in a shortage. The companies with the greatest volume of business or highest commitment to spend with them.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @Luke42–There is a lot of waiting which requires patience. My hybrid Maverick is being shipped and should arrive at the dealer between April 8 and 15. Ordered my Maverick last July so it will be about 9 months from when I ordered to when I get it. There are some who ordered the Bronco in 2021 that are still waiting. There was a auto manufacturing expert on another site who said that if a shipment of parts is 5 minutes late or more to a Toyota manufacturing facility that it would literally shut down the plant. You can imagine the logistical planning that goes into ordering components and making sure that they are delivered on time.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    It’s late, and I only have the energy to skim the comments. Same group of monkeys flinging poo at each other. Yawn.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Tim Healey are you still doing your job? Have you seen what is passing for comment on this site? It it pretty much accepted that a Russian troll farmer was posting here regularly prior to the invasion of Ukraine. And many of the alt-right/anti-vax/conspiracy theorists consistently endorsed and agreed with the disinformation being posted by an agent of a non-friendly nation. Now we see someone trying to drag this site down to the lowest common denominator. Flinging insults the same way that a monkey might throw their own feces.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Waaaa…someone posted “disinformation” (ie…something I don’t agree with) and for whatever reason I can’t just scroll past.

      Your boy is the one that injected politics into an unrelated post to feel smart. But that doesn’t bother you, does it? Of course not.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Or is it more that you are used to flinging the poo and don’t like it when some hits you.

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  • Adam Tonge
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