By on July 9, 2021

Ram

Lost in the shuffle about Stellantis’ EV Day yesterday — and the weird slogans, especially the Dodge eMuscle thing — was another bit of news we weren’t able to get to yesterday.

Ram has an EV truck planned for 2024.

It’s all part of Stellantis’ plan to have EV coverage in every segment by 2030.

The truck will be body-on-frame and Ram is claiming up to 500 miles in range.

Predictably, Ram has released few other details other than a promise to outdo the planned EV trucks from rivals Ford and Chevrolet. That would mean beating Ford’s promises of up to 300 miles of range and up to 10,000 lbs of towing capacity from the upcoming Lightning.

For its part, General Motors says its Silverado electric is targeting 400 miles of range and an on-sale date of 2023 or 2024.

Ram did make mention of on-board power, fast charging of up to 150 kWh, some sort of advanced autonomous driving, and navigation that plans routes based on range and charger ability. A plug-in hybrid was also mentioned.

It’s good to see that no matter how the transition to EVs plays out, the truck wars remain alive and well.

[Image: Ram]

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36 Comments on “Ram EV Appears Imminent for 2024 Model Year...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    This is the only BEV they talked about this week that I think will actually exist in 2024.

    But will it be good like the Lightning? Or will it be some boutique wankery like the Hummer?

    • 0 avatar
      Lynchenstein

      Or slick as heck like the Rivian R1T. I wonder if Ford used any Rivian tech in the Lightning. I remember they were planning to build a derivative off the R1T before they went with their own design, and since they’re a pretty sizable owner in Rivian I think it’s at least possible they have a tech sharing agreement.

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        Rivian, so far, has produced only excuses. Their promised low entry level price is unrealistic. Their claims of “tech” are just words. Ford, on the other hand, actually builds a lot of vehicles and I do believe that the Lightning will be delivered. I also believe that Rivian will deliver more excuses, and more excuses after that, and delays, and even more excuses, etc, etc, ad-nauseam.

        • 0 avatar
          Lynchenstein

          I saw a Rivian tooling around Tofino, BC for a few days and it’s very much real and pretty freaking great looking.

          They may be delivering excuses right now, but the prototypes are very real and very nice. I sure hope they get some production units out the door soon, and with the huge piles of cash they’re bound to get their eventually. Lordstown hey are not.

        • 0 avatar

          But Ford can help them with production process. Wasn’t that the idea behind sharing?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    If it comes in that pleasant blue color, I might consider it.

    That big battery will be useful when towing cuts the range by 1/2 – 2/3.

    Maybe RAM is taking the Dodge Hemi approach to EV trucks – bigger is better. If they don’t mention saving the planet, it could be a winning approach.

    Although 150 kW charging is crap for a battery that big; even the Ioniq 5 is going to have 350 kW charging.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I wonder how many people will cancel their Cybertruck reservations in favor of a more mainstream brand and look.

    I doubt Stellantis can go from zero to full EV portfolio in a few years*, but this mythical truck might end up being the best of them all.

    Maybe they can take over the Lordstown plant to build this product.

    *Seriously, they’ll need the promised gigafactories pronto if they want to build EVs in any volume.

    • 0 avatar
      Imagefont

      Or maybe they can just pass their cyber truck reservations down to their children? Or grand children perhaps?

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @Imagefont: The building of the factories continues, so the cybertruck is going into production. The steel is coming from the new Steel Dynamics plant in Sinton Texas. There is also photo documentation of the equipment for building the cybertruck arriving at the Del Valle factory construction site. The giant bridge cranes and the Idra presses used have arrived. All the photographic evidence is there that it is indeed going into production for both the truck plant and the stainless steel supplier. The only wild card as far as I know in all of this is 4680 battery production, but they’ll still probably manage to get a few trucks off the line before the end of the year.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Not sure why Ram has to jump into the “useless non-truck” arena but I’m sure a few fools will buy it…and then trade it in on a real truck when they realize how compromised it is.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Bookmarking this comment for when BEV trucks completely take over the local fleet market thanks to high uptime and low TCO.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        Because low margin fleet sales are how automakers keep the lights on.

        During chip shortages, automakers did not focus chips to high-profit retail units. Instead, they built low volume, low margin fleet models because they are so beneficial.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          That’s entirely irrelevant to your original comment, which was that an EV truck is a “useless non-truck.” Within the next decade BEV trucks will be the norm in a lot of the hardest-working truck applications. Near-zero maintenance, essentially unlimited low-end torque, and in-truck high-amperage AC power will guarantee it.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “That’s entirely irrelevant to your original comment”

            Correct. I didn’t bring up fleet sales you did. I was replying to you not my original post.

            Try and keep up.

            “Of those, even the most basic of base pickups are still very profitable, by default. Plus not all fleet pickups are strippers.”

            Ok show me numbers. I know what a the state bid cost is for an F150 in my state. $33k. Same for an F250 (and oddly the garbage Ranger). Ford isn’t making any appreciable amount of money on these units. If they were they would prioritize those units. They don’t.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            What specific state office uses $33K pickups? Show one. I’m sure there’s few but your “proof” means nothing. It could be a handful of trucks. But look around and the Police department and Sheriffs pickups are 4X4 crew cabs. Having inadequate trucks is like having inadequate guns.

            It’s the same with utilities. The 4X4 crew cab is more the rule than the exception, even in FL, TX, CA, etc. Except most all infrastructure work is subcontracted out with white-collar positions that don’t come with stripper pickups, crank window, etc.

            What makes you think base/stripper profits aren’t appreciable? We’re not talking ordinary vehicles when it comes to making (printing) money for the automaker. It’s an obscene amount in this case that has to bleed over to the strippers. How can it not?

            The part that costs the most is shutting down the line to switch to different models. It’s fine but Ram/Stella builds all all their RCSBs in Mexico, partly for that reason. If any of the Big 3 are building more than 25K fullsize RCSB pickups a year I’d be surprised, although that’s more than some car models, but if they can do 5K units in a row, there’s no way it’s not extremely lucrative.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ But look around and the Police department and Sheriffs pickups are 4X4 crew cabs. Having inadequate trucks is like having inadequate guns.”

            $33k gets you an F-150 crew cab with the 3.5 Ecobust and 10-speed. These are *state bid* prices. So any agency, whether it be a municipal public works department, a police or fire department, state DOT, etc can choose to buy a vehicle off of the state bid. The price for a Ranger, F-150, or F-250 is the same at $33k. You can add different options ala cart but they all start around $33k.

            Why is this so hard to understand?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            They’re not forced to accept the bid. And why would they if it doesn’t generate healthy profits? Did I mention they’re the most profitable vehicles in the world?

            Or should I say it again since you’re not getting it? 33K isn’t bad for trucks that sell for about 35K retail after rebates. Except the automakers can to hundreds or thousands in a row, all identical and fleet-white. That’s a huge savings of time and labor vs. retail spec. and the dealer isn’t walking them through the normal “retail” steps/staff/expenses/floor-plan/etc

            It’s a win/win all around, but of course you know fullsize crew cab 4X4s including 3/4 tons and duallys are still widely utilized by federal, military, state and local offices/agencies, so what happens then?

            Special purchase orders? Doesn’t that alone defeat your whole “bid” proof?

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ They’re not forced to accept the bid. And why would they if it doesn’t generate healthy profits? Did I mention they’re the most profitable vehicles in the world?”

            You clearly don’t understand how state bid fleet sales work. The cheapest crew cab F150 with the 3.5 EgoBust and 4wd is $45k. The SSV and PPV versions have more than that so it’s a reasonable assumption that the closest thing you could get as a civilian is around $47k-$50k. Ford sells it at fleet pricing for $33k

            They are not making much. That’s also a reasonable assumption.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            What you’re assuming isn’t compatible. Not when talking the most profitable vehicles on earth. And it doesn’t get any easier/cheaper than fleet; from assembly to end user.

            So there’s no direct comparison, fleet vs retail, even if you get the options close. But what would that fleet 33K F-150 retail for after up to 25% rebates?

            What makes them so insanely profitable is how cheaply they can be produced, thanks to ridiculous volumes, including fleet and base RCSB strippers.

            Every sale is a good sale and it’s what makes a $40K all-electric crew cab 4X4 possible. A Tundra of the same would start no less than $60K.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          You’re thinking fleet Malibus, Fusions, etc.

          The Top-3 pickups are the Top-3 most profitable vehicles in the world, while only selling in a small part of it.

          Of those, even the most basic of base pickups are still very profitable, by default. Plus not all fleet pickups are strippers.

          Subcontractors for utilities, infrastructure, mining, etc, put their managers, inspectors and supervisors in mid-trim crew-cab 4X4 pickups.

          It’s the same with rental pickups. They’re not strippers either. Law enforcement pickups, like the Department of Fish and Game, perhaps they do have rubber floors, but also crew cab 4X4 pickups. Or the Department of Forestry and many others, Federal, state and local. Military too!

          So what’s that you were saying about “keeping the lights on”?

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      …Not sure why Ram has to jump into the “useless non-truck” arena but I’m sure a few fools will buy it…and then trade it in on a real truck when they realize how compromised it is…

      Try to have an open mind – it’s not a Ford so give it a shot – and realize for those who use their trucks as family and (ugh)”lifestyle” vehicles – that’s probably more than half for sure – might find that the electric choice is more economical over the long haul and is not compromised. If you are a distance tow guy there are better choices. It needs to be marketed properly as noted by SCE to AUX; truck buyers for the most part couldn’t care less about preserving our environment. Green resonates well in the right market, think Toyota and Subaru, but not here. Trucks also have more capacity for large battery packs than smaller cars so packaging them will not compromise interior space, something that can’t be said for all BEVs…if this is implemented correctly and not overpriced it will sell.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        “trucks also have more capacity for large battery packs”

        They also might be good candidates for lower-cost battery tech. like lithium iron phosphate and sodium-ion. LiFe is already used in some vehicles including low-end Teslas produced in China. Sodium-ion cells are just now starting mass production and are expected to be even cheaper than lithium iron.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          The range of the Lightning was around 330 miles or 528 km. The biggest drain is high speed highway traveling. Even if one said there was a 40% hit due to load and off-highway driving, I can get into some fairly remote areas with a 264 km point of no return. I do it all the time on my motorcycle with a 240 km range.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “ Try to have an open mind – it’s not a Ford so give it a shot –”

        We learned 120 years ago electric vehicles are garbage. It’s the same today. Automakers doing the same thing over and over (ie producing EVs that have horrible ranges, long recharge times, lose a considerable amount of range in the cold, cost too much etc) and nothing is changes. So a crap vehicle with and F150 or any pickup body makes all the difference? No…it’s still crap.

        • 0 avatar
          RHD

          We learned 120 years ago that tobacco smoking was a healthy thing to do, and bloodletting would be a therapeutic medical practice. The zeppelin would be the future of air travel. Bayer Heroin, to be used as a sleep aid for babies, was widely available on drugstore shelves.

          We have learned, hopefully, to proofread our online posts before hitting “POST COMMENT”, lest our dubious closed-mindedness be supported by equally dubious grammar and spelling.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I wonder when GM and Toyota will announce EV trucks?

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Toyota is exiting the automotive business, one segment at at time. [Don’t believe me? Try to buy a new Scion.]

      Does GM still produce fullsize pickups? [How many, I wonder.]

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        If you want a new Scion, you can find a couple of them at your Toyota dealer. One is called “Corolla Hatchback” and another one, all-new, will be coming next year and called “Toyota 86.”

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The Hummer is launching this year with a truck bodystyle and as this article states GM has already announced an “Silverado class” EV truck as well.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Imminent
    2024

    It’s 2021 Tim.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Ford set the bar pretty high with the Lightning. They made sure it was a real truck first, and showed how going electric opens up a bunch of new opportunities, from worksite power to powering your home in an outage. Hopefully Ram and GM also come up with work first designs, and develop some innovative uses for the EV tech that you can’t do with an ICE truck.

  • avatar
    mcs

    I thought of a good question to start asking EV makers. A number that should be on the vehicles window sticker. The expected life of the cells in charge cycles. It’s a known number and gives a buyer information needed to make a purchase. I monitor battery patents and one of the things you see is additives that increase cell life. If a consumer is looking at 2 competing trucks at the same price, it would be good to know if one truck had a 500 cycle capacity and the other 800 or 1000. On a 300 mile range truck, 500 cycles is 150,000 miles and 800 is 240,000 miles. They test the cells and know what the numbers are for a particular formulation. They should disclose those numbers.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Mfrs like the obscurity of reporting they are required to do. They are all guilty of it. Dieselgate turned out to be a conspiracy of silence by most mfrs, for example. For a long time, I really thought it was just VW.

      I agree with your idea. Personally, I’d like them to publish data on cold weather performance and various load conditions such as speed and payload, and towing.

      Unfortunately, they’ll never publish data on battery cycles. It’s more convenient to just talk about range, which of course is just a starting point to describe an EV’s performance.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    All I know is that we need some nuclear power plants pronto. We kind of learned that that wind and solar crap isn’t the answer…at least not yet. Not at the scale we need them to be.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Solar energy is more economical than nuclear, and doesn’t produce hundreds of tons of highly toxic waste that will remain toxic for hundreds of centuries. How economical is it to store and keep that garbage safe?

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