By on July 14, 2021

Jeep

Quick, when’s the last time you gave a thought to the Jeep Compass?

Probably several years ago when the last generation was introduced, right?

Otherwise, if you’re thinking about Jeep, you’re probably thinking about the Gladiator, Wrangler, Cherokee, or Grand Cherokee.

To be fair, buzz doesn’t always correlate to sales numbers, and the Compass has racked up seemingly respectable numbers, though it can’t hold a candle to the more popular Cherokee.

Either way, it’s redesign time, and new duds unveiled at the 2021 Chicago Auto Show should remind shoppers the Compass exists.

Jeep

The highlights include a 10.1-inch infotainment screen with the latest UConnect system, a 10.25-inch TFT gauge cluster, the availability of heated rear seats for the first time on Compass, two 4×4 systems, a new premium Latitude LUX trim, new exterior and interior design, a semi-autonomous driver-assist system, and changes in the suspension and steering tuning that are meant to improve ride and handling.

2022 Jeep Compass. Tim Healey/TTAC

A whole slew of driver-assist/safety features are now standard. They include full-speed collision warning with active brake and pedestrian/cyclist detection, active lane management with LaneSense lane departure warning with lane keep assist, and blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-path detection.

There are five trims: Sport, Latitude, Latitude LUX, Limited, and Trailhawk. Power will come from a 2.4-liter four-cylinder that makes 177 horsepower and 172 lb-ft of torque. Most Compasses will have a nine-speed automatic trans, but Sports and Latitude 4x2s will have a six-speed gearbox. Jeep promises up to 31 mpg on 4×2 models and a 2,000-pound towing capacity on 4×4 models.

2022 Jeep Compass. Tim Healey/TTAC

Both 4×4 systems can deliver 100 percent of available torque to any one wheel, and the Trailhawk model gets a low range, a 20:1 crawl mode, a Rock drive mode (the others are Auto, Snow, and Sand/Mud), hill-descent control, a one-inch lift, 8.6 inches of ground clearance, skid plates, the ability to ford up to 19 inches of water, front and rear tow hooks, and 17-inch wheels. It has a 30-degree approach angle, a 24-inch breakover angle, and a 34-degree departure angle.

Jeep

Other available features include a dual-pane panoramic sunroof, leather seats, heated front seats, heated and cooled front seats, heated steering wheel, remote start, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, 360-degree camera, traffic-sign recognition, LED lighting, LED fog lamps, Bluetooth for up to two phones, navigation, Alexa virtual assistant, UConnect app, type A and Type C USB ports, adaptive cruise control, 18- or 19-inch wheels, and in-car Wi-Fi.

A Jeep Wave customer service program is part of the deal with all 2022 Jeep models, and it includes three years of maintenance, same-day vehicle rentals, and 24/7 roadside assistance.

You can get in the door for $24,995 (plus $1,495 in destination). Limiteds and Trailhawks start at $31,395, before D and D.

[Images © 2021 Tim Healey/TTAC, Jeep]

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35 Comments on “2022 Jeep Compass Looks to Navigate Itself Into the Conversation...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    “Power will come from a 2.4-liter four-cylinder that makes 177 horsepower and 172 lb-ft of torque.”

    If you are into slow and adding oil between changes the you might as well buy a Subaru.

    • 0 avatar
      parkave231

      I admittedly don’t know much about Chrysler’s 2.0L turbo, but this thing is practically begging for it.

    • 0 avatar
      96red

      Unless you spend a significant amount of time off road, then yeah. You ARE better off getting a Subaru.

      • 0 avatar
        legacygt

        We’re talking about the Compass here. Not the Wrangler or even the Grand Cherokee. How many off-road situations are there where the Compass can outperform a Forester or Crosstrek or Outback? I think you’d have to work pretty hard to find the trail that the Compass can handle but a Forester can’t.

    • 0 avatar

      The interior is nicely updated, but why is the tired old 2.4 liter “Tigershark” engine still the only engine offered? The 1.3 liter engine would be a better choice and where is the 4xe version?

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    “Quick, when’s the last time you gave a thought to the Jeep Compass?”

    Just last month. Compass and Renegade… they have cute allow wheels in 16″ rim. I want to turn my ironic PT Cruiser into a faux trucklet, so I’ve been looking into slightly wider off-roady wheels I can throw all terrains on. Plus I want a push bar. The aftermarket is eerily silent on both fronts. Everybody tried to enhance the classic theme. Might have to give up on the idea.

  • avatar
    statikboy

    “20:1 crawl mode” What is the ratio referring to?

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      https://www.offroadxtreme.com/news/off-road-101-what-is-crawl-ratio/

      (I know nothing about this, because I am an adult and I drive on paved roads.)

      [If if did know anything about it, I would say that 20:1 is not much of a crawl ratio (if crawling is your thing).]

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    That’s it, I’m sold!

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    I’m sure it will have a lovely unresponsive touchscreen and a bunch of safety features that don’t work. This car is over weight and underpowered. I’ve rented several and the pushbutton start is very much beta. Sometimes it just doesn’t work and you have to turn it off and back on and try again. Also when the radio reads mp3’s it displays the wrong song. Because it doesn’t work.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      My Charger’s pushbutton start failed to work about 10% of the time.

    • 0 avatar
      SirRaoulDuke

      To be fair, their corporate infotainment touch screens have been among the best out there. Perhaps you rented some duds?

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I will say that my uConnect only acted up once in 4 years and restarting the car fixed it.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          I’ve had the 8.4″ Uconnect for 6 years now and while it’s acted quirky sometimes and is now slow to connect to my phone, it’s mostly been flawless in actual use.

          Probably at least as good as GM and far better than Ford systems that I’ve owned over the same period.

    • 0 avatar
      CoastieLenn

      My cousin has a 2018 Compass and her infotainment bricks itself frequently. Oh, and the car likes to turn itself off… while driving. Oh, and sometimes- like others have mentioned, the push button start sometimes just decides “nah”.

      She only has 30k miles on it and the depreciation has hit it so hard that she can’t afford to get rid of it. Sad. I recommended a strategically placed accidental dash fire.

  • avatar

    I really don’t like this segment of vehicle, but they nailed the looks on these. I find them very attractive. I don’t think I would really like driving one thou. I almost went and looked at a manual 4×4 one at a dealer about 40 miles away because they kept marking it down every couple weeks (about 6 months ago) until it got down to the low teens. I think that was a deal. Mopar (I have decided given all the variations on the company formerly known as Chrysler to just call al said vehicles Mopars) really needs to get a new 4 cyl to replace the 2.4.

    • 0 avatar
      eng_alvarado90

      The last time I thought about a Compass was when this generation debuted back in late 2017. The sole reason we would consider a Compass is the 6 spd manual. It’s an increasingly rare option in CUVs these days and my wife wants at least one manual vehicle before going all electric.
      She has a 2012 Fiesta 5 spd, hence most newer cars are an upgrade nowadays and the Compass would fit her needs. We may get a 2018 or 2019 in about a year when used car prices get back to normal. No hurry

    • 0 avatar
      CoastieLenn

      Manual 4×4? I thought you could only get the 6 speed in the 2wd’s?

      EDIT: I stand corrected! I didn’t realize you could get one spec’d like that!

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Agreed on the looks; this is one Jeep I would consider. They are also roomy inside.

      But per some comments above ^^, there are numerous complaints online about Compasses that fail to start – some sort of electrical thing with the starter or its circuitry. Some of them are just a few months old. I’d go out of my mind with that sort of problem.

  • avatar
    Daveo

    A much-needed interior update as most Stellantis models also need. But still doesn’t change the poor driving dynamics. I’ve always liked the looks of these and the Cherokee, but after having a Cherokee as a rental for the last two weeks I’m over it.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    The reason we don’t remember the Compass is because it’s squeezed by the Renegade and Cherokee. Jeep has 3 vehicles where it really only needs 2. They can solve this simply. Eliminate the Cherokee and rename the Grand Cherokee as “Cherokee.” Then call the Grand Cherokee L the “Grand Cherokee.” Now the lineup makes more sense.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This isn’t a segment that plays to Jeep’s strengths. I don’t understand why I would buy this instead of one of the entries from a manufacturer that’s actually capable of making well-built, reliable cars.

    • 0 avatar
      CoastieLenn

      To your point- Other than Wrangler offering something different, do ANY of their vehicles actually qualify as “well built” or reliable” and warrant purchase over another brand? The general Jeep owner pool wants the Jeep name, they don’t care what they can/can’t do well. If they make poor choices and still have it after the warranty runs out, many turn all “Joe Exotic” and realize they’ll never financially recover from this… so they go buy another newer Jeep. Rinse/repeat.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Grand Cherokee offering a V8 power and towing plus real off-road ability is a pretty unique proposition in its class.

        I would not buy a FWD based Jeep though.

        • 0 avatar
          CoastieLenn

          Oh, I agree that it’s pretty unique in engine size, but there’s plenty of other vehicles in that class that offer the same/more hp for similar dollars. The “Off Road” cred is the most unique thing. They’re still not considered “reliable” though. Beyond Wrangler buyers, most people that buy ANY OTHER Jeep product want a good looking, well appointed, reliable, and valuable vehicle. No CUV Jeep (so basically anything other than Wrangler) falls miserably short in two of those categories, yet they sell so many. Boggles my mind.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “plenty of other vehicles in that class that offer the same/more hp for similar dollars”

            Other than the Explorer ST which is also something of questionable build quality, what are you thinking of?

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            It’s more than HP (although the GC does offer more HP than any other SUV), it’s the towing confidence that sets the V8 apart.

            Some European competitors offer similar tow ratings around 7000 lb, but I personally would not feel as comfortable pulling a decent load with a smaller turbo engine in those vehicles.

            If you aren’t towing or going off road, I agree the GC doesn’t offer a lot to stand out.

            As for reliability, I read the same stories you do. I’ve only owned one Mopar vehicle personally and its been pretty darn reliable, though not a Jeep.

          • 0 avatar
            CoastieLenn

            I guess I’ll concede that the GC makes its case in some situations, mostly it’s ability as a midsize to tow nearly full size numbers.

            As for HP alone, other than the Explorer ST, ajla is right and my assertion was wrong. I didn’t realize the rating was 360, I thought it was still around 335. My fault.

  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    Since many of us have spoken about the Cherokee in these comments, what ever happened to Stellantis renaming the Cherokee? The last article I read about it was in March. I thought the push from certain populations was huge to rid us of evil consumer naming schemes.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      “Gladiator, Wrangler, Cherokee, or Grand Cherokee” – plus Thunderbird.

      All these names could be considered offensive at some level. [i.e. Wrangler -> animal captivity]

  • avatar
    sooperedd

    My Renegade was gutless, terrible MPGs, and lots of electronic glitches.
    Got rid of it.

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