By on June 15, 2021

Flint Truck Assembly is the only standing reminder of General Motors’ formerly impressive commitment to Genesee County, Michigan. Other representations include a myriad of crumbling factories that were closed decades ago and the area’s preponderance of vintage, high-mileage Buicks retained out of utility after the employment situation turned sour. Saying that the region has fallen upon hard times would be a grotesque understatement.

But that doesn’t mean there still aren’t still automotive jobs to be had. Despite GM reducing its Flint workforce from roughly 80,000 in the mid-1970s to fewer than 10,000 in 2010, the truck plant is still operational and reportedly looking for 450 temp workers to help fill in scheduling gaps for the 5,100 union-represented staffers it currently employs. Unfortunately, it’s been having trouble finding enough bodies, though the UAW has a solution. It believes that General Motors should stop drug testing, especially now that Michigan has legalized recreational marijuana use. 

“When you have a line of people waiting for a job, then it’s OK to test [for marijuana]. But, if you don’t have enough candidates, testing for marijuana might turn people off from applying,” Eric Welter, the UAW Local 598 Shop Chairman, recently explained to the Detroit Free Press.

He’s worried that younger applicants probably won’t bother to apply at places where they’ll be drug tested, adding that GM is needlessly handicapping itself by using hair-sample tests that would come back as positive for pot use even if someone had consumed marijuana several weeks prior. But the larger issue is that smoking weed is becoming normalized to the same degree as alcohol consumption in increasingly more states, with 16 having legalized it totally. Others have actively decriminalized its possession for medical purposes or lightened punishment for its possession.

While General Motors is also seeking several hundred temporary employees for its Fort Wayne Assembly plant in Indiana, where recreational THC use remains illegal, it confessed that it’s considering changing its drug-testing rules. But it doesn’t see that as the core problem. GM seems to think it’s having difficulties reaching the right people and has been trying to make people aware that it’s hiring by ensuring recruiters appear at employment fairs and remaining active online.

Welter thinks finances might also be a contributing factor and recommended that the automaker start paying more. The Detroit Free Press estimated that the average GM hire makes about $16.60 an hour with benefits kicking in within the first six months. Those that last for two years can also petition the company to become a full-time employee. But the UAW has stated that most new hires won’t last that long.

“You have to start treating people right, improving your compensation and doing something different to attract employees because you’re competing with every major employer in the area,” he said. “Nobody has workers.”

That’s true. Staffing agencies have suggested that it’s become increasingly difficult to find people willing to work, despite pandemic restrictions ending and job openings becoming more common. GM has only been able to find 22 to 25 new people a week for Flint, according to Welter, and many end up needing to be replaced after a short stint on the line. Though the biggest issue for most businesses is finding seriously interested applicants.

“[People] are telling us they’re making an average of $16.05 an hour on unemployment, so why would they work for anything less than that? I’ve been doing this for 29 years, and I’ve never seen anything like it,” Gail Smith, the staffing manager at Snelling Staffing in Roseville, Michigan, explained.

Things have gone better in Indiana, though not by much. The automaker held a job fair for the Fort Wayne Assembly plant last month and only managed to get 60 people. UAW Local 2209 Shop Chairman Rich Letourneau said that would likely be insufficient in keeping the facility operating smoothly.

“We’re looking to hire temps like crazy, we just can’t get them,” he told the paper. “Nobody wants to come to work here.”

LeTourneau agreed with Welter by also hinting that GM could tamp down its drug testing policies. Though they seem to be only interested in the rules pertaining to marijuana, suggesting that it “doesn’t create the problems that opioids, cocaine and other drugs do.”

[Image: GM]

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78 Comments on “Report: GM Needs More Manpower, UAW Suggests It Stop Drug Testing...”


  • avatar
    Rick T.

    This alludes to the main issue the advocates of a UBI don’t address or advocates of really any big shifts in society. Nobody puts much thought into the transition period.

    As an aside, we built over 100 carriers and nearly 4,000 B-29 Superfortresses in a handful of years during WWII. Now we can’t even assemble some vehicles. Not sure what that means but it probably means something.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “Nobody puts much thought into the transition period.”

      I think some people did, and what we have witnessed 1/1/2020 to present is the start the transition period. How it ends, remains to be seen.

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        28-Cars-Later

        “How it ends, remains to be seen.”

        Judging by the pattern of how things are progressing it isn’t at all difficult to see where it’s going. This same basic method is all too familiar. Of course, most people can’t see it…

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Most people do not wish to see.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            I suspect if, one wants to get into the psychology of it, that they do know but, since the truth is unacceptable to them, they keep it repressed. This is, of course, in line with the state of mind that those behind the “Great Reset” want to create in the populace. People who are too afraid to look at what is really going on are very docile and will do whatever Big Brother tells them to do as long as Big Brother assures them that it will make them safe. They also become hysterical when anyone fails to follow the directives of BB, and often will do horrible things to those who fail to stay quietly in the lock-step-shuffle — for fear that the dissenter will bring the wrath of BB down on everyone.

            The basic concept involves coercing the populace to believe things that are almost impossible to believe. Doing this requires that the individual be in a constant state of stress. A great deal of psychic energy is used to intrapersonally and interpersonally uphold the “proper” beliefs.

    • 0 avatar
      zerofoo

      When everyone is on UBI – who grows the food?

  • avatar
    tallguy130

    “You have to start treating people right, improving your compensation and doing something different to attract employees because you’re competing with every major employer in the area,” he said. “Nobody has workers.”

    Anyone else notice how the market is great at solving these kinds of things till the answer is we need to pay people better?

    • 0 avatar
      kjhkjlhkjhkljh kljhjkhjklhkjh

      “”Anyone else notice how the market is great at solving these kinds of things till the answer is stop paying greedy stock holders and executives billions in perks then claim there is no more money to be had””

      Fixed it ..

      • 0 avatar
        Syke

        Both answers are correct. Yours is poetic.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Or we should simply add building cars to that list of things like picking lettuce and putting roofs on buildings…you know, jobs Americans aren’t willing to do anymore and allow undocumented laborers to do this. What is the unions stance on that? does it mirror the views of the politicians they support?

          Amazing how people support that sort of thing when it means they can score cheaper vegetables, but not so much when someone figures out their job can be done by those laborers and given the existence of auto plants in central and south America I’m going to assume they are perfectly capable.

          But we only want them to come here and do certain jobs, right?

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            I remember when Verizon came through my neighborhood installing fiber optic. All the workers appeared to be hispanic. They worked at a pace I have never seen any other people work. The speed with which they hand dug was stunning.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Last year during the pandemic farmers in Southern Ontario were complaining publicly that without temporary foreign workers they could not get their crops harvested.

            Finally in desperation they offered ‘higher’ wages to anyone willing to help harvest their crops.

            They were shocked and surprised when so many members of the local population applied for thee jobs that they had a surplus of workers.

            Yet when things ‘normalize’ they will again resort to hiring temporary foreign workers and people will complain that ‘Canadians’ won’t do the work.

          • 0 avatar
            brn

            I think you’d find plenty of US citizens that would take the work if they weren’t earning just as much on unemployment.

            I support unemployment, but not the way we’re doing it in 2020/21. It should incent you to get off of it, and that doesn’t seem to be what it’s doing.

  • avatar
    crtfour

    Again, another reason I won’t buy a UAW built vehicle…especially GM.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “He’s worried that younger applicants probably won’t bother to apply at places where they’ll be drug tested”

    We’re living in the Idiocracy.

    Some McDonald’s are paying $15/hr for new hires, so it makes sense that a new hire wouldn’t want to make $16.60 in a car factory. But let’s rewind: McD’s shouldn’t be paying – or have to pay – $15/hr. Except for a small subset of workers, minimum wage should be a pathway, not a destination.

    With the surge of minimum wage increases occurring across the country, it won’t take long before top wages rise and inflation pushes up the cost of living. Then we’ll be told (again) how unfair it is that unskilled dope users can’t get by without a ‘living wage’.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      A shortage of employees is a concern for employers across the spectrum. The workforce is aging and there aren’t enough replacements especially skilled labour.
      Attracting unskilled labour is an issue due to poor wages and a lack of job security. The “gig” economy is now starting to hurt employers.

      Marijuana isn’t a drug of concern. Alcohol and other drugs are a big safety issue.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Why should unskilled workers expect good wages and job security?

        Why should an employer tolerate having its workers assemble cars while high on marijuana? Is that the car you want to buy?

        Behold the great political chasm on these issues.

        • 0 avatar
          spookiness

          “Why should an employer tolerate having its workers assemble cars while high on marijuana?”

          They shouldn’t. They should fire them, for the same reason a person caught drinking on the job should be fired. If a person partakes of weed off the job but still performs on the job, what s/he does off the job should remain irrelavant.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I think this is reasonable though marijuana use/possession is still technically illegal in most states.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            @spookiness: Agreed, but the only way to be sure the workplace is clean is through random drug tests, which people will say is unfair.

        • 0 avatar
          Russycle

          Testing positive for MJ doesn’t mean you’re high, it means you’ve partaken at some point within the past few weeks. Which should be none of your employer’s damn business.

          If someone shows up for work stoned, fine, fire them. Drug testing without cause is an egregious violation of privacy, which many people in the Land of the Free are totally OK with.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            “If someone shows up for work stoned, fine, fire them”

            And how is that determined – by someone’s opinion? An eye pupil test?

            No, best to wait until an accident happens, then we’re allowed to check. But the UAW will support and defend them anyway.

            “Drug testing without cause is an egregious violation of privacy, which many people in the Land of the Free are totally OK with.”

            I don’t know – we do it in sports so players don’t achieve illegal first downs.

          • 0 avatar
            Russycle

            @SCE to AUX
            ““If someone shows up for work stoned, fine, fire them”

            And how is that determined – by someone’s opinion? ”

            Yup, just like we do for alcohol. Or is your employer administering random breathalyzer tests?

            “Drug testing without cause is an egregious violation of privacy, which many people in the Land of the Free are totally OK with.”

            I don’t know – we do it in sports so players don’t achieve illegal first downs.”

            Athletes are tested for performance enhancing drugs to make sure they’re not getting an unfair advantage (while also endangering their health). They’re tested for marijuana to remind them who’s in charge…unless you believe MJ is performance enhancing.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @SCE to AUX – any impaired worker is a problem but a urine screen for cannabis isn’t of much use. It has a long dwell time in the body.

          “Why should unskilled workers expect good wages and job security?”

          Reasonable wages should be expected. Job security is good for the company, the worker and society. Henry Ford paid high wages to ensure a stable workforce. If I feel I have a stable income I’ll go out and buy a house or car which is good for the economy.

          It’s only a political chasm if I chose to assume your opinion is invalid (or vise versa). There is always a middle ground.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          @SCE you are not making sense 1) the cannabis testing does not indicate that someone is impaired or their level of impairment. Just that they have used cannabis during the past few weeks. 2) Don’t conservatives claim that markets are self-correcting and that if you cannot attract workers then you should adjust your wages to reflect market rates. So why doesn’t GM just adhere to market requirements?

          And why should any worker accept less than living wages? This is not the 1950’s where everyone has a chance to stay with one company and work their way up the organizational chart. Now a great many workers are required to work at precarious jobs throughout their career.

          Finally this demonstrates just how far behind the USA is falling. Drug testing, criminal background checks and credit checks on potential employees have little correlation to how they will perform and have created a sub-class who are unable to find suitable employment. Just as importantly they demonstrate how the civil liberties of Americans are being taken away not by their governments but by corporations. With the exception of the 2nd Amendment Americans now in many ways have less rights than citizens of many other western nations.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            “why should any worker accept less than living wages”

            1. Because merely breathing doesn’t qualify as a useful skill set to a company.

            2. Because a ‘living wage’ is a moving target, subject to wide definition. A ‘living wage’ might allow you to live on food rations in an unmaintained apartment building in a bad part of town, with no TV, no cable, no cell phone, or car – alone. Add in some dependents and amenities, and suddenly the ‘living wage’ is altogether different.

            “Drug testing, criminal background checks and credit checks on potential employees have little correlation to how they will perform and have created a sub-class who are unable to find suitable employment. Just as importantly they demonstrate how the civil liberties of Americans are being taken away not by their governments but by corporations.”

            Are you kidding? Maybe, just maybe, current drug use and repeated criminal behavior has an impact on job performance. And by the way, drug use is not a civil liberty. You may feel free to do it, but then I’m free to not hire you.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            When you pay unskilled workers like technicians, then you have to pay the technicians like engineers.

            After that, you have to pay the engineers like doctors, and the doctors like CEOs.

            Increased demand and increased wages drive up prices. Then the $20 unskilled workers discover they can’t afford the $20 hamburger they are making, and so they demand a ‘living wage’.

            The hard truth is that different skill sets have different values. You can’t distort the market by declaring one equal to another, then expect everyone to tolerate it.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “When you pay unskilled workers like technicians, then you have to pay the technicians like engineers.”

            The great lesson of the ’50s and ’60s is that this isn’t actually true.

            While some groups were left out, for most, that period featured the greatest leveling of wages in the history of our country. Not coincidentally, it was also the time when the society was at its very most stable. There is massive social benefit in paying the laborers more and avoiding the vicious circle where all the pay goes to a few superstars.

            What was different policy-wise between then and now? A lot of things, but three of them are most important:

            (1) Truly progressive taxation, as opposed to today’s system where it is progressive only through the upper middle class and the rich basically don’t pay taxes

            (2) Labor policy not oriented toward busting unions

            (3) Antitrust policy that focused on competitive markets rather than only consumer prices

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @SCE
            1) If a job was not useful to a company then they would not hire someone to perform it. And as has been amply demonstrated during the pandemic the ‘essential’ workers were primarily the lower paid ones. Businesses and the economy were able to continue without the ‘higher paid’ help. You try working a grill or a take out station at a fast food restaurant and then tell me that it does not require ‘skill’. Or on an assembly line where you body breaks down after years of repetition.

            2) All wages are adjusted. Living wages are calculated using an accepted set of statistics. If all companies offered a living wage then they would not have to resort to hiring ‘illegals’. Which would then solve the problem without spending billions on a ‘wall’

            3) Drug testing, criminal checks, and credit checks have been proven to have little correlation to on the job performance. People who have ‘paid their debt’ or have ‘reformed’ have reduced opportunities. Amazingly these types of checks/tests are primarily performed on those applying for low wage jobs. CEO’s and Senior Executives rarely have to undergo them, as part of ‘the old boys club’. And contrary to what you believe, cannabis use is indeed a legal right in many areas.

            0 for 3 means I believe that you are ‘out’.

    • 0 avatar
      Snooder

      What idiocracy.

      This is how the free market works. People aren’t going to work for assholes who pay like shit and make em take pointless tests.

      And yes, drug tests, especially marijuana, are pointless.

      The issue is not people getting high for work. The issue is that people should be able to do stuff on the weekend, on their own damn time and not get dinged for it

      Nor is it that unemployment is suddenly a bastion of free money. Unemployment pays shit, always has paid shit, and always will pay shit.

      The base issue is that people looked around during a goddamn pandemic and realized that their employees do not give two shits about their wellbeing. Especially those who worked in factories where people fucking died while corporate just blazed on regardless. And a lot of those folks looked at their paycheck, realized that they are being underpaid, and said fuck that shit.

      Which, you know, I can’t blame em for. I refuse to believe that when MSRPs are jacking up 20 to 30%, car manufacturers are just too poor to raise their wages.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        The weekend = right up to starting time on Monday morning.

        No problem there.

        Paying more for unskilled labor only boosts their standard of living temporarily. Eventually, that tide will lift all boats, and the same people will discover that the market pays more for skilled labor. You can’t artificially shift the market without repercussions.

        If I was forced to pay $20/hr for unskilled labor, I’d suddenly become very picky about who I hire. Bad attitudes, late starts, and lack of productivity would be much less tolerated. Any sign of recreational drug use would be a problem.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Alcoholism is a bigger problem than cannabis. I can get wasted all weekend or every night on alcohol but pass a blood test or breathalyzer every day.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            Agreed, but that’s not what this story is about.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @SCE to AUX – It’s mostly about Marijuana testing. A person who heavily consumes cannabis is less of a concern than someone heavy into alcohol. Casual cannabis consumption isn’t much of an issue. Screening doesn’t correlate to job performance. Typical drug screens only say positive or negative. A joint Friday night will show up on a test Monday. It’s a sh!tty metric. Cannabis is demonized by old guys who still believe it’s a gateway drug.

  • avatar
    Scalewoodman

    AND here is the prime example of the Catch 22 legislations creates: Legalize drug use and sue the pants off the employer if the (drugged) employee loses a finger or worse. Of course the UAW doesn’t give a puff. Seems to me it’s in the employer’s best interest to have drug-free workers using dangerous machinery. Disgust.

    Hire- and be stuck with – a rash of slugs you can’t get rid of that love their recreational drugs. Right. Meanwhile consumers rush off to the Korean brands (non-Union plants in the South) and from Japan who have better perceived quality. Can’t win.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Once again boiling down to the fact big gubberment is handing out money hand over fist for people to stay home and do nothing. Until this changes it will continue to be staff shortages and a weak supply of vehicles for dealer lots for starters.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      Yup. One could have made the argument (though I’d argue with them) about the need for additional unemployment benefits when there was a shortage of jobs. Today, we’ve a shortage of workers. The additional benefits need to stop. Right now, they don’t serve a purpose other than getting certain people votes.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    LOL LOL LOL

    Come ye coke heads, crack addicts and tweakers and assemble Bolts!

    Prediction: The mild UBI was brought about in part to create a labor shortage in order to accelerate the need for robotic automation. In seven to ten years when 15-30% of the adult workforce is permanently unemployed it will be curious to see what happens next…

    “14% of jobs are at high risk of automation
    32% of jobs could be radically transformed”

    https://www.oecd.org/employment/Employment-Outlook-2019-Highlight-EN.pdf

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      A study done in Canada was predicting up to 50% of unskilled labour will be replaced by automation in the next 20 years.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Even ‘skilled’ employment in some areas will be either sent offshore or replaced by automation. This even includes some in house legal work.

        Throughout history technology has replaced labour.

        How many jobs that existed 30 years ago no longer exist or are on there way out. For example colleges in Ontario no longer teach TV repair. Or lithography/typesetting. There are many other examples.

        Yet there are dozens of occupations some quite high paying that did not exist even 20 years ago.

        Which is why an educated population is important. Those with higher academic/educational achievement are quicker to learn and more adaptable.

  • avatar
    36hp

    There is a corporate employment model of burning out your employees. Churn through them, fire them, and hire someone new. The management technique is unending hostility. This gets people running on adrenaline, which is good fuel in the short term.

    This is what minimum wage people experience. About a year ago I was working at Walmart — that is the setup I experienced. Harass people until they get injured or leave.

    This morning I read an article in The Wall Street Journal about dead peasants insurance. Corporations buy life insurance on some employees. If the employee dies, the corporation gets all the benefits — tax free. Bereavement benefits are tax free.

    No point in keeping your employees alive, if you can make a buck off of them….

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Damn.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      A friend worked at a Canadian Tire outlet where the owner went to great pains to look out for his employees. He had a relatively stable core group of employees and he did well. The fellow sold his franchise to a fellow with the view that everyone with seniority was a high cost liability. He drove out most of the senior staff. The stalwarts were bought out. That store’s profits dropped over time since none of the staff gave a sh!t. Customers weren’t happy.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I have a friend making 250k+ at Amazon (Corporate…not the standard warehouse stuff you hear about) and this is his experience so it isn’t just a minimum wage deal. Supposedly they want to run you off before your good benefits kick in.

  • avatar
    FerrariLaFerrariFace

    This is all fantastic news for those of us in the robotics and automation business.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Who ever designed the new Silverado had to be on drugs.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    after reading rivethead, i dont know why anyone would want to work there as a temp for $16/hr knowing the temp agency was getting a sweet cut and that there was no path to regular/full time status.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      If fast food is gonna pay 15 bucks plus bennies, stuff like unskilled factory assembly work is gonna have to be in the low 20s to get any kind of capable peeps.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        In Alberta at the time of “peak oil”, fast food outlets and retail outlets had a hard time getting staff since one could drop out of high-school and get a $45-60 dollar/hour oil patch job. Now that the high pay/low skill jobs are dying off the workers complain. One can swing the pendulum too far either way.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          At that time rather than raising their wages according to free market theory, the service industry brought in ‘captive’ temporary foreign workers. Another example of the hypocrisy of many ‘capitalists’.

          After the crash I had a student who returned to Ontario from ‘Fort McMoney’. He retrained for a new profession but had trouble getting hired, because recruiters kept asking how much money he made in his previous job and he answered them honestly. Starting in his new profession he would make a fraction of that and they were afraid that he would be ‘unhappy’.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Aurtur – yup. Bring in the “temps”. Saputo dairy was busted for bringing in Mexicans and paying them sh!t wages and making them live in squalor. The hypocrisy of capitalism indeed.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Why not? It worked, kind of, in the 1960s and 70s. I’ll never forget when my neighbor bought a new ’72 Hornet Sportabout with an upside down Gremlin logo in the passenger side door handle!

  • avatar
    steve1

    Once the states get unemployment bennies cut off, people will start coming back. Many like to say “well just pay them more”. The problem is, we’re in the USA where we buy the cheapest thing possible. Do you want to pay $12 for your value meal or another 5-600$ for your truck? Many biz models we currently have dont work when the labor is paid >20$/hr.

    • 0 avatar
      FerrariLaFerrariFace

      I just wanna live in a world where everybody earns a fair wage and knows to put the dollar sign to the left of the number.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The lesson we can learn from a lot of local minimum wage laws is that there is a point up to which yes, consumers will pay more. They’ll grumble, but they won’t stop buying.

      That point is going to vary from place to place but there’s no question it’s higher than the current federal minimum wage, or the current state minimum wages in a lot of red states.

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    just test for other drugs besides pot, problem solved.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Yeah yeah in a perfect world, but I’d rather have my truck built by workers on meth than them going through withdrawals and all they can think about is getting some more in them. The same goes for alcohol, cigarettes, chew, pot, redbull, whatever.

  • avatar

    Generation which still was willing to work is retiring and new generation demands bread and circuses. That’s the secret how to get elected.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Maybe we need to rethink the employment drug testing regiment which started in the mid 80’s. I know that it’s been upheld in the courts over the years but maybe employers ought to refine it for when they hire someone and random testing for certain line positions.

    Back in the late 80’s I was employed at a military contractor who manufactured engines and generators and didn’t require testing because it wasn’t practical or it didn’t dawn on them. “Hank in flywheel assembly smoked some bud, yeah whatever he’s doing a good job getting products out”.
    When they were subsumed by other companies due to bad management and fraud I was laid off and went to look for another position. An IBM microchip plant was hiring part time night positions so I’d figure that I’d apply for one as a way to tide me over until I got a new position. After I applied they called me back and I took the drug test. A few days later the personnel office called me in an apologetic manner telling me that my drug test results got mixed up. By then I managed to get another gig but always wondered how many errors there have been or they improved their systems and methods.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Thankfully in Canada employers are highly restricted regarding random drug and alcohol testing.

      Some American companies/managers have tried to transfer American business/hiring practices to Canada and were ‘shocked’ when informed that they were illegal up here.

      Americans do not even realize how many of their rights and liberties have been eroded or removed by corporations/employers.

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        Arthur Dailey,

        “Americans do not even realize how many of their rights and liberties have been eroded or removed by corporations/employers.”

        Yup, the US is becoming one big company town. You can buy anything you want with scrip at the company store.

  • avatar
    Ol Shel

    Everyone who doesn’t work as [insert other profession here] thinks that those other workers are paid too much, that they get too many benefits, and America would flourish if ‘other’ American workers made less and struggled more.

    That selfishness is why America is failing. We used to care about our fellow Americans.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      That is very true. People complain about lost jobs but then trundle off to Walmart for cheap chinesium and a Rotten Ronnie’s burger. It ain’t them unemployed or the working poor.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      If only we had some institution which we literally spent more money per individual than any other country in the world that could spend 12 years or so imparting both knowledge and some skills to American children. By spending more per pupil than any other country in the world we could expect a high caliber of employee. If only.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Art Vandelay – makes one wonder what’s wrong with the education system. Obviously the whole “reading, writing, ‘rithmetic” thing alone doesn’t cut it. “Shakespeare” or “To Kill A Mocking Bird” essays don’t cut it. There needs to be fundamentals like the ability to read and comprehend instructions or math. How does one teach work ethic, punctuality, problem solving and team work?

        Oh and I just doublechecked, the USA does not have the highest per capita spending on education. It’s more in the middle of the pack.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Add in the exorbitant cost for post-secondary education in the USA. Compared to most western nations which offer free or highly subsidized education.

          Ontario fell prey to this conservative ideology under Mike Harris, and we are still paying for it.

          Now the primary source of income for some Ontario post-secondary institutions is tuition from foreign students.

          Having an educated population benefits society and employers.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Arthur Dailey – On the topic of education…. Alberta has hit a wall with vaccinations. They want to pass the 70% of population mark and are stuck. It has been analyzed and the biggest determinate is level of education. The more educated one is the more likely they are to receive vaccination for Covid 19. Statistically the USA’s political alignment does loosely correlate to education and vaccine rates. This study did not delve directly into politics but did find more vaccine reticence based on politics albeit significantly less of a factor than in the USA.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          I was looking at an older table. You are correct…we aren’t first, we are 4th but hardly “middle of the pack” as we are 37 percent above average (as of 2017) and behind only Luxembourg, Austria and Norway.

          Our results are decidedly “middle of the pack” at best however. So why are we spending 37 percent more than average yet receiving barely average results? I’m going to need some answers before I support throwing more money at it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Art Vandelay – I wasn’t overtly being pedantic. I was curious how Canada stacked up and noticed that the USA wasn’t at the top. In some cases if one factors in private and public spending, that may be the case.

  • avatar
    C5 is Alive

    Well, I welcome this news. We all know if there’s been one overriding complaint about GM before now, it’s that its vehicles are built too well!

    America: Don’t fret about that bar you can’t clear. We’ll happily lower it.

  • avatar
    Itwasagoodrun

    They have it completely backwards. I was hired in at the Ford Kentucky truck plant about 5 years ago. I expected solid, working class dudes, focused on their work and families.

    What I got at the end of my work day was a rush to the exit that resembled court letting out on Monday afternoon. Pills, weed, trash music, yelling, whining. It reminded me of neing in the free cheese line when I was a kid in the early 80s. Same beautiful soul…

    This plant is filled with the dregs of society. Needless to say I quit and went into business for myself. I will never work for anyone again. The entire workforce nationwide is now this way.

    What these plants need to do is get rid of these parasites. Hire good workers and explain to them that change is coming, hang in there with us. That would have been the only thing that would have kept me there.

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