By on March 2, 2021

 

 

Infiniti

Infiniti’s wanderlust has taken the QX80 to other faraway locations, but none quite as exotic as Privolzhskoe, Tver Oblast, Russia, to go glamping in Villi Ulei’s geodesic domes.

In what’s termed a comfort zone for climatic conditions in Russia, temperatures range from 9-degrees Fahrenheit in the winter, to a high of 66-degrees in the summer. As you can see, snowfall is abundant in the region, from a low of about 16 inches, to almost 32 inches, and it spans anywhere from four to five months of the year. Home to 1.35 million Russians, 30% of whom are Russian Orthodox, it might seem like a great place to go if it were summer at the Boishoe Zavidovo, when Nashestvie, the largest Russian rock festival, is being held.

Infiniti

Located in the middle of the East European Plain, Tver Oblast spans 161 miles north to south, and 279 miles east to west. Despite claims of having to test the QX80’s off-road prowess, Tver Oblast is mainly flat, with some alternating lowlands and highlands, from 200 feet near the Kunya River, to a high of 1,138 feet at the highest point in the Valdai Hills.  While the occasion to visit Russia was said to test the capabilities of the new QX80, let’s be clear that we were not among the media participants or others offered an escape from the nearby capital city of Moscow.

Infiniti

A watershed of the Caspian and Baltic seas, there are more than 800 rivers in the region that are longer than six miles in length, with the Volga being the main river at 425 miles within Tver Oblast. Infiniti mentioned the river possibly being frozen over, so fishing wasn’t the main attraction. No, Infiniti had getaways and what they call comfortable retreats in mind. This follows previous excursions in the Gobi Desert, Jordan, and the American West, none of which we’ve experienced, at least not as guests of Infiniti.

Infiniti

Historically, between the ninth and tenth centuries, there was a settlement already established where the Tamka and Volga rivers meet. Much later, a fort was built on this site, during the period when the Rostov-Suzdal princes and slavs from the Novgorod Republic were mixing it up. During World War II, Germany occupied part of Tver Oblast from 1941-1943. In 1966, the federal government signed a power-sharing agreement, granting it autonomy, which only lasted until 2002, when it was abolished. Tver Oblast is divided into two urban areas, Ozyorny, and Solnechny, the five cities of Tvter, Kimry, Rzhey, Torzhok, and Vyshy Yolochyok, and thirty-six districts.

Villi Ulei is located in a state park, and on a private beach. Area attractions include the Kimry Theater of Drama and Comedy, Kimry Local History Museum and the Kolkunovo Zoo Circus. What strange and far-flung location will Infiniti use as the next backdrop for their vehicles?

Infiniti

[Images: Infiniti, Expedia.co.uk]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

30 Comments on “Infiniti QX80 Goes Glamping in Russia...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Nice dome, nice car, nice area.

    The nearest Infiniti dealer is about 200 miles away, in Moscow.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I wouldn’t call 16-32 inches of snow per year abundant.

    • 0 avatar
      CaddyDaddy

      “I wouldn’t call 16-32 inches of snow per year abundant.” you would if the center of your world is Wilshire Blvd. and the 405.

      Once again Jason writes or “cuts and pastes” another Manufacturer Ad Agency press release.

      • 0 avatar
        C5 is Alive

        One can almost smell the gears in Sakurai’s brain grinding down to nothing as he’s very much in a “damned if he does, damned if he doesn’t” position. We complain when he cuts-and-pastes, and we complain when he attempts to add some color.

        Trouble is – especially for readers – is that disseminating and rewriting press releases requires skills he simply does not appear to possess. He doesn’t seem to understand he can edit out the OEM drivel, while his attempts at cleverness instead lead to baffling pivots like ranting about Xfinity customer service when the subject is tires.

    • 0 avatar
      ect

      “I wouldn’t call 16-32 inches of snow per year abundant.”

      Yeah, in large parts of Canada it would be called a mild winter – the kind you dream of having.

  • avatar
    redapple

    This article is GOVNA.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    I’m a little confused. Is this an article on a car or a place? It looks like something from Russia’s ministry of truth to get people to take a nice winter vacation.

    Was this article supposed to be submitted to Travel + Leisure?

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I think, the ministry of truth is permanently located in America. USSR propaganda pales vs what we have here today.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Slavuta you are as full of $#!+ as a Thanksgiving Turkey. Just shut the &^%$ up $#!+head.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Well, we did spend four years with our highest official serving as a mouthpiece for USSR nostalgists’ propaganda. Fortunately that time is over.

        • 0 avatar
          C5 is Alive

          I’m reasonably certain we’re all going to face far worse things than “USSR nostalgists’ propaganda” in the months and years ahead.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Actually, America today is way worse than USSR. It is actually a mix of USSR and Germany in 1930s. Book “burning” (digital) – Germany. Get your co-worker canceled – USSR. Call opposing party enemies – Germany. Call anybody who has certain attributes terrorist – USSR.

          You see, America soaked all the worst. Yuri Bezmenov was right in his assessments. I don’t know why for years nobody showed this https://youtu.be/DpRMFSi_OxU

          How is this related to cars? Very simple. A black car will stop at your home at midnight and people in black leather jackets will pick you up and give you what might be as well a last ride in the passenger vehicle. Never possible in America? Don’t lie to yourself.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            You would know you fncking worthless pig.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Loosing your wheels?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Art:

            Don’t get banned over this clown. Seriously…he ain’t worth it.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            “Actually, America today is way worse than USSR.”

            If you really believe this, you’re woefully informed of things like the gulag and stasi. I get being critical of our elected political leaders being bought by corporate donors and how our large media companies are run by sociopaths, but if you think that’s worse than the USSR, you need to hit the books.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            jkross22

            NBC reports that “FBI has received more than 200,000 tips that included digital photos and videos”
            This is about Jan 6.

            This is Stalinesque. And when part of people called (in America) “domestic terrorists”, just because they walked into that brothel on capitol hill; is exactly same as under Stalin people where called “enemies of the people”.

            And FBI today is at full service of political elites just like NKVD was. At least the department that worked with own population.
            What else I can learn?

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Coincidentally I just watched “the way back” again recently. Based on a purportedly true story of polish prisoners escaping a gulag in Siberia during world war 2. Walking 4000 KM over frozen mountains and dry deserts from Siberia to India. This Infinity would have be a welcome relief for those poor souls. But I’m sure Russia is all better now so lets run puff pieces like this.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Fiction. The GULAG break would look like this. Political would almost never try to run away. They were working hard and would be too weak for a long trip. Criminals would try to do that. They did not work, only “monitored order” in the barracks. They would take some common man or men with them, like somebody imprisoned for stealing something from a factory. And they would take him only for 1 reason – eat him on the way. Polish would be too soft to do what Russian crime members would do. And if they would come near any village, with their Polish accent, they would be quickly reported and picked up. And even if they had this Infinity and found gas, it would be 72 Gasoline that would render this car useless in the short order

  • avatar

    Kimri. You don’t want to visit that town, it is worse than Chicago downtown. BTW Tver too – too far from Moscow.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I just looked where Tver is. Never traveled that way. Interesting. How is this compare to Samara?

      • 0 avatar

        The problem with both Tver and Samara is that they are provincial cities far way from Civilization (which means Moscow and St.Petersburg). I heard that Tverskaya Oblast is a recreational area for Moskovites – the Masters of Universe).

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          I remember Samara to which I went at least 12 times in the summer with most warm memories. Beautiful old town, great Volga beaches…
          Speaking of cars, in the 80s they had green line system where on the each intersection they had a display showing which speed to travel with to go on green at the next intersection. I have never seen this anywhere else.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • 28-Cars-Later: 2020 data is a bit skewed all around but I believe EV marketshare was something like 2-2.3% in 2019...
  • theflyersfan: The only thing that would scare me about the IS convertible is the retractable hardtop. There are a lot...
  • RangerM: 40 minutes is actual charge time, correct? The assumption is you’re already parked at the charger, and...
  • Russycle: Yeah, if you’re dropping $30-40K on an EV, a couple grand more for the convenience of never needing...
  • Jo Borras: Agreed! That’s why they’re only like, 3% of the market right now.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber