By on March 18, 2021

Hyundai

Hyundai’s 2021 Kona Electric and Ioniq Electric now include 250 kWh of complimentary fast charging through Electrify America, with more than 2,400 ultra-fast chargers across the U.S. According to Electrify America, 96 percent of the population lives within a 120-mile radius of one of their chargers.

Hyundai

Whether it’s in response to concerns among potential buyers, or it’s an incentive to get more drivers to switch from internal combustion engines to electric vehicles, Hyundai is attempting to make ditching your gas-powered vehicle for one of their EVs a little easier.

Hyundai

To help clarify what Hyundai is offering, the EPA estimated driving range of both Hyundai EVs with 250 kWh of power is about 1,000 miles. There is the usual disclaimer about vehicle options, driving conditions and habits, your new vehicle’s condition, and that of its batteries, with anything not noted covered as other factors.

Hyundai

It takes about 54 minutes on a 100-kW DC fast charger or 75 minutes on a 50-kW DC fast charger to top off your Hyundai. Again, it varies depending on the battery level, the output of the charging unit, and the outside temperature. The 2021 Kona EV has a 258-mile, EPA-estimated range, based on a full charge. Fueleconomy.gov, the U.S. government’s official source, says the 2021 Kona with a 1.6-liter, 4-cylinder gas engine gets 30 MPG combined, 28 MPG city, and 32 highway, just as a point of reference.

Hyundai

The 2021 Ioniq Electric has a 170-mile, EPA-estimated range, also based on a full charge. The EPA uses an equivalent measure of gasoline fuel efficiency for EVs called MPGe, and the 2021 Ioniq EVs numbers are 133, combined, 145 city, and 121 highway MPGe. While we’re not inclined to trade in our gas-powered vehicles for an EV just yet, it is somewhat comforting knowing that in lieu of a gas card, Hyundai is prepared to give you a ‘charge’ card when buying a 2021 Kona or Ioniq EV.

[Images: Hyundai, Electrify America]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

19 Comments on “2021 Hyundai EVs Get Fast Charging Free...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “Hyundai is attempting to make ditching your gas-powered vehicle for one of their EVs a little easier.”

    If that was true, they’d sell EVs in every Hyundai dealer in every state and province.

    “To help clarify what Hyundai is offering, the EPA estimated driving range of both Hyundai EVs with 250 kWh of power is about 1,000 miles.”

    What??

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      To the first part, I think it’s not necessarily mutually exclusive to want to try to make it easier to own an EV even if you haven’t yet sold in all states.

      To the second, that number popped my eye, too, but here’s the press release copy, verbatim: “250 kilowatt-hours equals about 1,000 miles of EPA estimated driving range in a 2021 Hyundai Kona Electric or Ioniq Electric”.

      We’ve reached out to Hyundai to clarify.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Agreed on your first point. I’m just complaining about H/K’s mixed messaging of wanting to dominate the EV market, yet showing very little effort toward that end.

        Here’s my take on the press release wording: A 250 kW (not kWh) charger can provide 1000 miles of driving in one hour if you had 250 kWh of battery capacity. But of course, nobody has that much, so it’s just a clever math coincidence Hyundai thought they would highlight because their EVs are very efficient. But it’s not helpful.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      My simple mind:

      2021 Hyundai Kona Electric [all trims] has a 64kWh battery (where I am it would hold roughly $6.40 worth of electricity [charged at home], ignoring charger inefficiency).

      2021 Hyundai Kona Electric [all trims] has a ‘range’ of 258 miles (~2.5 cents a mile, try matching that with gasoline [Kona 4-cylinder fuel cost would be over 8 cents a mile], but that’s not important right now).

      250 kWh of ‘free’ charging would get you 3.9 ‘fill-ups’ and the resulting ‘range’ would be ~1,006 miles of driving.

      So the value of this offer is right around $25 (at home charging rates, significantly more if you had paid to charge on the road).

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        Ioniq Electric math:
        – 28kWh battery
        – 124-mile electric-only range
        – 250kWh is roughly 8.9 ‘fill-ups’ and gets you ~1,104 miles of ‘range’

  • avatar
    wolfwagen

    WTH?!

    “To help clarify what Hyundai is offering, the EPA estimated driving range of both Hyundai EVs with 250 kWh of power is about 1,000 miles.” (IS that each or together? I can read it either way)

    BUT

    “The 2021 Kona EV has a 258-mile, EPA-estimated range, based on a full charge.”
    “The 2021 Ioniq Electric has a 170-mile, EPA-estimated range, also based on a full charge.”

    I don’t know if it’s me, the unclear sloppy writing, or both.

    How about “If the Ioniq/Kona could store 250 KWh of power they would go approximately 1000 miles in optimum lab conditions) OR
    That 250KWh equals X number of fill-ups for the Kona EV and Y fill-ups for the Ioniq

  • avatar
    mcs

    Ultra fast chargers? WTF. An Hyundai Kona charges at a max of a 100kW rate. A Tesla Model 3 with the latest firmware charges at 250kW. A Taycan is good for a 350kW rate. A car with a 100kW max rate is considered on the slow side for quick charging, not ultrafast.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      YMMV, as you know.

      My little Ioniq 1 claims a max of 50 kW, but in the couple times I’ve tried, it maxed out at 35 kW. This is another area of misleading data from mfrs that hurts the EV cause.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        That’s another area where Tesla may have an advantage. I’ve never verified it myself. Apparently, you can set up the vehicle to pre-condition the battery prior to arriving at the charging station. You set a charging station as a destination and it uses the active cooling system and heating or cooling the battery to get it ready for the maximum charging rate. That’s a major feature I’m looking for, but… with the next car (whatever it is) I’ll probably have no need for public charging.

        In the past, I’ve given the Leaf a quick run-up to 90-mph to heat the battery a bit in the cold. That was when my destination’s level 2 charging wasn’t always available. Then they added 50 chargers so there was no longer a need for quick charging.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Ionic EV: $34k, 170 mile range.
    Ioniq Hybrid: $25k, and you can get it for $22k without even asking. Range is not an issue.
    The EV is still a bad deal, you have to want one to put up with it’s short comings.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Hyundai still gets the $7500 Federal subsidy, so there’s that.

      I’ve considered adding the hybrid to my fleet, but I don’t need two of the same body style.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @Imagefont: “you have to want one to put up with it’s short comings.”

      Plenty of shortcomings with an ICE. Torque-lag is a problem. Lack of range can be a problem there too since there are ICE cars with less range than some electrics. One of the biggest annoyances with ICE is that you have to take it someplace to fuel it. You can’t fuel unattended it at home. If 170 miles range is a problem, then buy something with a 400-mile range or wait until next year and buy one with 500-miles range. If you can only afford 22k, then wait for the subisidy to come back and get a Bolt instead. You can also probably pick up a 21 for that price without a subsidy.

  • avatar
    tonycd

    That statistic about Electrify America locations is a bad joke. 120 miles from a charger is uselessly far. Most trips are NOT cross-country.

  • avatar

    1,000 miles is a Bugatti territory.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Veyron fuel economy is 7 city, 15 highway.

      But unfortunately, at its top speed of ~253mph, it will empty the 26.4 gallon fuel tank in roughly 19 minutes – about 80 miles. (How good are you at coasting?)

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Steve Biro: “The president of the automaker’s joint battery venture with Panasonic, Hiroaki Koda, has even...
  • DenverMike: It’s only the ugliest car in the history of the world. Please take it off the screen.
  • 28-Cars-Later: “With regulatory pressures mounting” You misspelled “diktats”.
  • Socrates77: I miss my 1987 Supra with T-Top roof.
  • SoCalMikester: fell down the rabbit hole and ended up buying a 45 year old dealer plate frame. dunno if i should...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber