By on February 1, 2021

Cadillac

Last week, GM announced plans to go 100 percent EV with its light-duty vehicle fleet in less than 15 years. Tonight, Cadillac took the wraps off two high-performance luxury sport sedans that probably won’t pass too many gas pumps.

Talk about whiplash.

To be fair, development lead times are long – almost certainly longer than the time it took GM to come up with its ambitious EV goal. Furthermore, GM’s goal set a target for the dim, distant future, and there’s still room for high-zoot engines on the marketplace – at least in the short term.

Cadillac

The mills here are a 6.2-liter supercharged V8 for the CT5-V Blackwing and a 3.6-liter twin-turbo V6 for the CT4-V Blackwing.

Oh, hey #savethemanuals folks, you should take note – a six-speed manual with rev-matching and no-lift shifting is standard. If clutching is too much work for you, a 10-speed automatic with paddle-shifters is available.

Cadillac

There’s an electronic limited-slip differential, a suspension tuned for sport, magnetic ride control, structural changes that Caddy says will improve steering response and handling for on-track driving, large brakes (Cadillac claims the largest its ever put on a production car – up to 15.67-inch rotors), customizable digital gauges, launch control, and Performance Traction Management.

The V8 is slated to make 668 horsepower and 659 lb-ft of torque and will be hand-built in Bowling Green, Kentucky. It will even be signed. Compared to other versions of this engine, it has a higher-flow air intake and tweaked exhaust system.

Cadillac

It also has a 1.7-liter, four-lobe Eaton blower. Cadillac is claiming a top speed of over 200 mph and a 0-60 time of 3.7 seconds when equipped with the slushbox, as well as a 46 percent improvement in intake airflow over the CTS-V.

Track people, take note of the wet-sump oil system with external oil separator. Other goodies include titanium intake valves and aluminum cylinder heads that are supposed to be stronger and better at handling heat than conventional aluminum-alloy heads.

Cadillac

The V6 appears to be no slouch, either, with 472 horsepower and 445 lb-ft of torque. Intake airflow is projected at 39 percent better than the ATS-V, and the top-speed number is claimed to be 189 mph. Zero to sixty is said to flash by in 3.8 seconds if you opt for the automatic.

Manual-trans cars get titanium connecting rods, and cars with either transmission get a whole bunch of other tweaks, including revised crankshaft counter weights, better temperature control via piston oil squirters, and a cooling system that is meant to improve torque response.

Brakes are Brembos, naturally, with six-piston calipers up front and four-pistons out back, and available carbon ceramics on the CT5-V. Brake-pedal feel can be adjusted via the drive modes.

Both transmissions feature differential cooling.

Cadillac

The suspension tweaks include stiffer spring rates, unique hollow stabilizer bars, and higher-rate bushings. It’s a MacPherson strut setup in front and five-link independent setup out back.

Track rats will like the available carbon-fiber aerodynamics kit and Michelin Pilot Sport 4S tires. Wheels are forged aluminum-alloy (standard) and widths are staggered. V6s roll on 18s, with the CT5-V on 19s.

The grilles (yes, plural – the main grille is meant to improve airflow while the secondary grilles assist with airflow and cooling), rear spoiler, front splitter, rear diffuser, and fender vents are among the body panels/features that are tweaked, and all exterior lighting is LED. Underbody panels reduce drag and the aforementioned optional carbon-fiber aero kit reduces lift. The brake calipers are available in different four different colors, while there are three interior trims (base, mid, and top level). Wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are standard along with wireless cell-phone charging.

Cadillac

Interior options will include a head-up display, heated seats, cooled seats, massaging seats, carbon-fiber accents, performance steering wheel, sueded microfiber headliner, uplevel audio, and Performance Data Recorder for on-board video of all your track-day exploits.

If you want one of these cars, Cadillac will happily take your reservation 15 minutes after this post goes live, at 7:30 EST on Feb. 1, 2021. Pricing starts at $59,990 for the CT4-V Blackwing and $84,990 for the CT5-V Blackwing. That’s including the $995 destination fee.

Deliveries begin this summer.

[Images: Cadillac]

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41 Comments on “2022 Cadillac CT4-V and CT5-V Blackwing: Hold That EV Order...”


  • avatar
    tylanner

    The lines of these sedans are stunning in person.

    Benz-ish.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Is that splitter on the CT4 standard or is it part of some $5000 aero package?

    Anyway this is very likely the last V8 sedan GM ever builds. About $20K more than I can afford though. Could maybe do the CT4BW but I don’t know about that size class.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Sorry. Still not getting over the original “V” presentation, where Cadillac made a big deal out of the new CT5-V and CT4-V, and then had to scramble when the press was bad. So we get these mildly udated powertrains from the previous generation cars, not surprising since the CT5 and CT4 are just mildly updated CTS and ATS cars anyway

  • avatar

    Who cares about Cadillac. Its no Kia, Telluride. Judging by number of comments commentariat is overwhelmingly busy discussing CUV news.

  • avatar
    ttiguy

    @Inside Looking Out

    Great point!

  • avatar
    jack4x

    This will quite likely be the last V8 manual sedan ever built by anyone.

    As much as I can’t imagine spending $100k on a GM product, if it lives up to expectations I might need to find a way to buy a piece of history.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Agree. Based solely on memories and sentiment, if I had the disposable money then I would jump at the chance to own a v8 manual transmission example.

      But that is truly based on emotion and not on objective measurements or comparisons.

    • 0 avatar
      Tele Vision

      @jack4x

      People are getting 700 reliable horsepower out of the LS2 I have in my 2007 CTS-V. I’m keeping mine as stock as possible – but I have some headers in the garage… You could be into a HCI ( headers/cam/intake ) V1 for USD$10,000 easily. 500HP with a six-speed and RWD, not to mention the best front end this side of a contemporary M5 V10.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    I hate to be that guy.. If they were to offer this as a CT5-V + trackpack (i.e. bigger brakes / oil coolers, etc) but without the big engine for $65K, I think I’d be REALLY interested.

    $85K is outside of my budget by too much, and the rear seats in the CT4 are a bit too small for my kids. However, may still have to take a look and see how cramped it is. $60K for a track-ready car is awesome. I love my Stinger, but it’s not exactly 100% track ready, and not that much cheaper.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “and not that much cheaper.”

      You get an AWD GT2 with minimal discount? There’s a Camry SE of difference between what I paid for my RWD GT and the CT4BW’s starting price. Although if the ATS-V is a predictor there will eventually be discounts on the CT4BW.

      • 0 avatar
        turbo_awd

        I paid ~$40K for a ’19 GT1 AWD. But MSRP was $47 or $48K. MSRP for GT2 AWD is now up to what – $55K? CT5-VBW starts at $59K. But can get optioned up to $80K+? I could stretch a bit more, say $59K after a bit of a discount off $65K, but with all the track bits except the 3.6 V6. Or even the 3.0 V6. Kind of a Camaro V6 + track pack (is that 1LE?). 4-door + enough rear leg room is kind of non-negotiable..

  • avatar
    mcs

    Hold the EV Order? I don’t think so. It’s only 2 wheel drive and about half a second slower 0-60 than a Model 3 Performance. The Model 3 does need an aftermarket brake/suspension/aero/wheels/tires package to be truly-track ready, so the price is probably the same by the time you are done.

    If I was going to go with an ICE in that price range for the track/DD duty, I’d wait for the C8 E-Ray which will add AWD via electric motors. Not sure if it’s getting the Blackwing motor, but I’d be tempted if it did. That might get me to hesitate on the EV daily driver order, but not this. Once HP gets over a certain point, I really want it going to all 4 wheels.

    The other thing the Cadillac lacks is the instant response and torque from an EV. That’s one of the best features. Once you get used to something that doesn’t need to spend time downshifting to accelerate, you become addict to the response. Everything else starts to seem sluggish.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Once you get used to something that doesn’t need to spend time downshifting to accelerate”

      You can downshift this one by yourself though.
      It’s truly the end of the line for this kind of car. You must have some degree of recognition for that at least?

    • 0 avatar
      turbo_awd

      How many laps can an M3P do in a row without slowing down? IIRC, 2, maybe 3?

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        Definitely more than that, depending on the track. It’s fine for events like Time Attack. If you’re running the Nurbergring maybe 2 or 3 laps in that case. Also, I haven’t seen if there are improvements with the new battery formulations. As far as slowing down goes, I’ve had E-36 M3’s that would lose power on hot days due to engine management. It also wouldn’t be exactly unheard of for a V Series to overheat on the track. I’d rather have something that’s going to fast for what I want to compete in rather than something that’s going to be slower all of the time just to run in an event or place I’d never take it. There’s also the delayed response with the thing downshifting that you have to live with on a daily basis.

        If it was for longer events, I’d look closer at an AWD C8 that would handle a longer event and maybe give the EV performance and response as well. Then again, C8s seem to have plenty of issues, but most seem to be correctable so far.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          Also, I’m not entirely committed to getting a Tesla. I’m keeping my eye on the Mercedes EQ series and AMG versions of those and I keep going back and forth on the Taycan, but the price tag gets into the stratosphere to a point I’m not sure it’s worth it.

          • 0 avatar
            RHD

            In reality, who would buy a Cadillac to take to the track? A dedicated, built race car would do the job much better, for much less money.
            This is for spoiled young adults to do burnouts with, and the geriatric set so they can pretend they’re still young. Maybe a dentist or two.

            Kudos to Cadillac for making a manual transmission. It must be a hell of a car.
            However, GM of Australia already did this, from 2001-2005, but without massaging seats and sueded microfiber headliner.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “who would buy a Cadillac to take to the track?”

            Why would you not? I wouldn’t run an IMSA team out of it or anything but it was engineered for a racetrack so it seems like a waste to *never* do it.
            If you just want a burnout machine there are much cheaper alternatives.

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            “In reality, who would buy a Cadillac to take to the track”

            CTS-V coupes are not uncommon at tracks day’s I’ve attended. I see one or two at each event.

            Before getting my C7 I considered buying one since its basically a more luxurious Corvette. However like the Camaros these Caddys weigh so much that small moons are drawn into their orbit. Even so they corner better then SRT Challengers which show up slightly more often at track days.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            @MCS, the main issues I’ve seen with the Model 3’s on the track arent so much the slowdowns after a few laps (that is a thing though, but it isn’t like they are holding up traffic even with some degregation), it is first, you don’t see them around all day because they do have to recharge and at least where I’ve seen them, there wasnt a Supercharger or Fast Charger on site and secondly, while the weight is low it is still a good amount of wight and as such they are extremely rough on their tires. Most cars at the track are, but them way moreso.

            They definitely can put up some impressive hot laps, but I don’t think it would be much of a track day toy at this point.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Hi Art: I think the Model 3 really needs the aftermarket upgrades. My understanding is that the brakes were a major issue and that they would be a high priority to replace. Next is suspension. To be honest, I always did both on my BMWs. For cooling on the 3, there is an aftermarket cooler for the drive unit, but haven’t seen anything for the battery yet. My understanding is that on the 3P, the temp problems are more a summer issue. If I had the time to seriously track the car, I could take a look at improving or modifying the cooling myself. I could probably borrow parts and techniques we use for high performance computing these days. But, I remember slowdowns on ICE cars too. Especially with forced induction air-air intercoolers and I think the E-36 S50 would detune the engine on hot days. I could feel it, but can’t confirm if it was really happening or maybe my imagination.

            If I had time (and I probably don’t) I’ve wanted to do an FF 818C build, but with my own four motor drive independent wheel drive system. Apply my AI work to a torque vectoring system that would learn a particular road or track. I have the resources and knowledge to do it, but no time. People have done more conventional RWD electric 818 builds, so that’s an option as well. It would make a much better track car that a M3P.

            https://insideevs.com/news/361924/818c-tesla-electric-motors/

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      Not everyone thinks AWD is the performance be all/end all. Some prefer RWD and manual shifting for fun. And here in the upper midwest AWD isn’t needed because of weather for 363 days out of the year if you have winter tires. Though, I do see people drive their CUVs into the ditch and AWD certainly helps there.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    I. With that tastefully restrained grille*, at first I thought I was looking at an EV.
    *compared to a GX460

    II. Nobody likes Mitch McConnell’s home state until they need a high-performance V8.

    III. Nice car – makes me wish I was more successful. (Like the Chinese who produce [Jinqiao, Shanghai] and buy 3X more of these vehicles than are assembled [Lansing, Michigan] and sold in the U.S.)

    [see the tables at the end of these entries]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac_CT4
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac_CT5

    IV. If it is so good, why are they giving it away**?
    **compared to Plaid+ Tesla

  • avatar
    JMII

    These seem to be 4 door ‘Vettes given they have the rev match, mag ride, diff cooling, PTM system and PDR. Even building the big engine in Bowling Green adds to that. Downright shocked they offer it with a manual. I imagine the market for such a car is pretty small, its good looking inside and out so in a few years these will be amazing bargains.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Perhaps high mile or wrecked ones will be bargains, but I wouldn’t expect to find a 6 speed equipped car in good shape available below its MSRP 5 years from now.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        2018 CTS-V are down 30% per CarGurus based on their original price. And they were down nearly 40% before the COVID bump. Its a mass market GM vehicle, a price drop is guaranteed.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          You are drastically underestimating the manual transmission factor here. Not to mention the extreme unlikelihood of any successor. This is the Hemi Charger in 1970. Everyone knows the end is coming.

          The last CTS-V was as anonymous as any M5 or E63 and it’s not surprising it suffered the same depreciation curve.

          I think the closest comparison here is the 6 speed CTS-V wagons, and those approach MSRP even a decade later. Manual Chevy SS are still close to MSRP. Low mile G8 GXP are still over $40K.

          If they make 20,000 of these I might change my tune, but I doubt it.

  • avatar
    Nick

    I like the design. And they’d be a blast to drive. I hope it sells.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    This is the logical conclusion to the Pontiac G8 saga. First a there was a Pontiac, then a Chevy, and finally a Cadillac. Like most everyone else is thinking, this Blackwing will be a swan song for V8 sedans.

    These look fine, nothing earth shattering. But I really don’t like the LED tears. Though I didn’t like the Nike swoosh DRLs on my IS either and I put it aside. I hope the people who can afford to buy them do so.

  • avatar
    MoDo

    Typical GM marketing, besides these photos you wont hear of these cars again until they’re getting the axe in 3-4 years. Sad

  • avatar
    el scotto

    hands on my “weegy” board and channeling Deadweight.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    Every time I see a bad DLO, I think of Sanjeev.

  • avatar
    pb35

    The value of my V3 seems to be holding ok due to a lack of used examples. I think I’d do ok if I sold it. Of course, this also takes into account there was $15k on the hood when I purchased it back in 2018.

    Having said that, I’m ordering one of these as soon as I’m able to. I don’t have to worry about depreciation because I’m never selling it.

    Anyone want a gently used V3? :)

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