By on January 28, 2021

Hyundai

Hyundai Motor Company has trademarked an electric version of every Genesis model in their lineup, according to GVforums.com.

 

Hyundai

In Korea, the automaker filed trademarks for G70e, G80e, GV70e, GV80e, and GV90e, which would lead Genesis fans to conclude that there’s going to be plug and play variants at a future date to be determined. If Korean trademarks are time-sensitive as they are in the U.S., it would give Hyundai three years to use it or lose it. At that point, they would need to file once again to retain the trademarks.

Hyundai

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As we reported on Tuesday, President Biden is planning on using an executive order to replace 645,000 vehicles in the federal fleet with EVs. The question is whether this mandate will define what is American made by American workers, as foreign automakers have manufacturing and assembly plants in the U.S., and one, Stellantis, formerly FCA, is owned by a foreign company.

When you see a procession of large, black SUVs looking officious in the streets of Washington, D.C., will they all be GM, Ford, or Dodge products, or will this include vehicles like the Genesis if they’re assembled in the U.S., with at least 50 percent of their parts produced in America? With as many units as there are in the fleet, this could get political very quickly.

Hyundai

[Images: Hyundai, GVforums.com]

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15 Comments on “Hyundai to Electrify Its Genesis Lineup?...”


  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Smart naming strategy. (And no i’s anywhere, let’s be thankful for that.)

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “…will this include vehicles like the Genesis if they’re assembled in the U.S., with at least 50 percent of their parts produced in America?”

    Some people will declare that “American-built” means “union-built” – excluding Tesla, and possibly Rivian, Lordstown Motors, and Workhorse if they choose not to unionize. Not to mention the transplants.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Full electric vehicles work best when they are on a dedicated platform so unless Hyundai had an engineering breakthrough I expect these will be PHEV. Maybe an outside chance at being a conventional hybrid.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Trademarks for Genesis elwctrics have been known for about a year now (but for this filing, seemed to have moved the “e” from the beginning to tge end of the nomemclature),
      and there have been spy shots of the eG80 and eGV70.

      Genesis has already stated that they skipping hybrids (which think is a mistake) and they are dual-prong strategy when it comes to electrics – adding electric powertrains to existing ICE models as well as developing a separate lineup of dedicated BEVs.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Personally I’d be more interested in a G70e than some Genesis-branded Tesla copy with goofball gimmicks, but the converted vehicle would need to have reasonable range (at least 300mi on the EPA cycle), speed and price.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          It’s already been reported that the electrics built on the dedicated BEV platform will have 300+ miles of range (varying depending on size and bodystyle) and that the performance oriented models will have Taycan level performance.

          Hyundai and Kia, like Porsche, have an ownership stake in Rimac.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            We’ll see if that works out to a 300+ mile rating on the EPA cycle. The longest range Taycan right now is rated only for 227 miles.
            I’m also interested in what range/performance the *converted* ICE platforms would offer.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Gents, look at VW & Toyota’s percentage of EV/hybrids in their lineups. Any company saying they’re going to 100% EV will fail miserably. VW & Toyota sell the people what they want. Any other nonsense is corporate wishful thinking or lazy press releases. You decide.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @elscotto:”look at VW & Toyota’s percentage of EV/hybrids in their lineups.”

      Toyota is introducing 6 new EVs and they are the leaders in the number of solid-state battery patents filed. They are also heavily investing in battery manufacturing. VW has their ID lineup of EVs along with the Taycan, the E-Tron, and the shared Subaru EV. They also bought a chunk of Rimac. Their battery tech company is QuantumScape.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “Any company saying they’re going to 100% EV will fail miserably.”

      That depends.

      Companies converting from ICE need to go all-in so they achieve economies of scale. You can’t make a profit building 10k EVs a year. VW is moving rapidly towards an all-EV portfolio, and they could succeed. Hyundai seems to waffle on its EV commitments; they *could* do well if only they tried. Nissan squandered its EV headstart, and today they seem fairly uncommitted.

      Tesla has shown just how hard it is to survive in the EV business. They didn’t begin turning a profit until they sold 150k (expensive) EVs annually.

      But starting with 100% EV is no guarantee of success, either – Faraday Future is a good example. Rivian, Lordstown, Lucid, and Workhorse haven’t proven themselves yet.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      ICE remaining the dominant powertrain has a limited shelf life by govt. dictate.

      Europe, China, Korea, Japan and parts of the US (California) are phasing out ICE.

      If automakers want to continue to sell in those markets, they will have to offer electrics or other alternatives.

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