By on January 30, 2021

Ford

Ford announced that a Chinese version of the Mustang Mach-E, also known by some of us cynical scribes as the Mustang Mock-E, will be built in China by Changan Ford.

Ford

It had to happen. Demand for EVs in China are reportedly at an all-time high. Time to strike while the iron’s hot, and the pony car EV which we’ve profiled previously, will sell in the PRC just like L.L. Bean, Converse shoes, iPhones, and some Ray-Bans, all iconic American brands made in China. Ford believes the E-Stang will be a home run at the high end of the Chinese EV market, when it hits the streets later this year.

Ford

Ford may not be the first carmaker to offer American EVs made in China to the Chinese, but they are the first auto manufacturer to offer cellular vehicle-to-everything (C-V2X) technology in a massed-produced vehicle in China. Using C-V2X in the Mach-E will help Chinese drivers anticipate driving hazards and improve traffic safety, no doubt a problem there as it is here.

The E-Stang is an EV trading on the Mustang’s legendary performance and name. Localizing production of the Mach-E’s performance edition in China is a bold move to boost revenues with a high-performance edition in a foreign country. The GT high-performance edition will be something of an anomaly on the streets of Shanghai sitting alongside Buick Regals and Veranos. Ah, we’re living in a strange world indeed.

[Images: Ford, Buick]

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29 Comments on “Ford to Offer Chinese Version of Mustang Mach-E...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    If Tesla can do it, Ford figures it can, too.

    But Tesla built a whole factory there which was producing cars 11 months after breaking ground. Is Ford going to do that?

    • 0 avatar
      4onthefloor

      @ SCE,
      Yup. For such a smart guy, Musk made a serious mistake, and with intellectual property theft, they now know everything he knows. We made China, and now they are using the kindness we showed them, and our tendency to share what we learn, against us. Lord help us!

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        “Musk made a serious mistake, and with intellectual property theft, they now know everything he knows. ”

        Like they couldn’t just buy a Tesla and reverse engineer it or read the patent filings? In fact, you want some of the secrets? Here ya go: http://www.powersourcesconference.com/Power%20Sources%202018%20Digest/docs/3-1.pdf

        Here’s a paper on their motor technology: https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/5709981

        • 0 avatar
          4onthefloor

          There are always manufacturing techniques and ideas, and possibly software, that are proprietary, you need to make them work to make their copy.
          You leave out or have overlooked one critical piece of information in your idea. The Chinese have begun to punish intellectual property theft, because foreign companies we’re becoming reluctant to partner with them. If they copy your design, and software that’s intellectual property theft. If you partner with them, you’re just handing them the information. Big difference, and their courts are starting to recognize the difference. They didn’t want to do this, they had to because the Chinese are very good at copying the ideas of others, not very good at original ideas. Always remember that suppression stifles innovation, and duplication is much less work than innovation. If you get the chance, travel to China. Everywhere you go, you will see copies of someone else’s work, from all over the world. Why do you think our US customs always seizes incoming copies of handbags, sneakers, brake rotors, airplane parts, o LOT of auto parts etc. they copy because they cannot innovate, and their copies are usually inferior. Can they make a great quality item?, yes they can but you will pay so close to what the real thing costs, that you might as well buy the real deal. Hopefully I’ve clarified things for you.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “There are always manufacturing techniques and ideas, and possibly software, that are proprietary, you need to make them work to make their copy.”

            Again, those techniques can be reverse-engineered. Even manufacturing processes can be reverse-engineered.

            “not very good at original ideas”

            That’s incredibly racist and flat out ignorant to say. I’ve seen some of their original work and they are very much capable of doing it. In fact, we reverse-engineer some of their original technology that could be used for applications like missile guidance systems. They do have some very formidable home-grown technology. I’ve seen it and had my hands on it. They can also produce quality work as well. I’ve seen it. I keep an eye on all of my competitors and will never discount their capabiity based on race, color, or stereo-typed national culture. The “put-your-kid-in-every-sport-possible-and-hope-for-sports-career” culture I’ve seen in some parts of the US doesn’t inspire a lot of confidence either. It’s really good career prep for an amazon driver, but not good training for future technology innovators.

            “and duplication is much less work than innovation. ”

            That’s not always the case. I’ve definitely been in situations were building from scratch was easier than trying to replicate someone elses work. Another dynamic is that you see the inevitable flaws in original work and want no part of the flaws. In fact, I’ve had cases where I’ve had legal access to use a particular software library but have completely coded an in-house replacement because we wanted no part of the flaws. Actually, I’ve definitely seen several examples of the Chinese making significant upgrades of devices based on US and European designs. Really good improvements.

            As far as handbag duplicates etc. go. Americans either lack the skill or are too lazy to do it. Playing soccer or hockey, no problem. Sewing a handbag or knowing how to align a 3d printer bed is a big problem. Before you start throwing stones, you need to realize you live in a glass house.

            We do need to get much more economically agggressive towards China. Additive printing technology makes US production of small plastic parts here in the US economical and convenient. I make lots of parts that normally would have been made offshore inhouse now. My daughter has come in and made numerous household items including some carbon fiber additive print bike parts and dog accessories (admittedly, some were copies of Chinese parts). I’ve made efforts for find US suppliers for things like bearing balls (bearing races etc. made in house of course). Semiconductors from non-Chinese sources in Asia and Europe. The computer I’m working on right now is US designed and assembled with components from Vietnam and Singapore. I do have the capability and facilities to create my on RISC V or RISC V based CPUs and producing Linux distributions to run on them.

            Hopefully I’ve clarified things for you.

          • 0 avatar
            4onthefloor

            Ah, the old fallback, “ you’re a racist” argument. Gotcha. Anything you don’t agree with, the person who said it is a racist. That used to carry weight. It no longer does. Something about a boy crying wolf one too many times. People who throw that around, without knowing anything about the person they are directing it to, are immediately ignored. Bye!

          • 0 avatar
            Nick_515

            4onthefloor,

            he didn’t get frustrated and throw “racist” at you to silence your opinions. he clearly and calmly demonstrated that 1) your lack of evidence for your claim, and 2) your causal inference that country of origin is the reason for said lack of (utterly unproven) assertion amount to a false correlation that far too often borders on racism. Overgeneralization of a supposed national “shortcoming” is, in fact, one of the bases of racism.

            In fact, your response is far more typical of a bigger problem, which is, snowflakes who simply want to say whatever they want, but get their panties in a bunch the moment they actually get challenged in reasoned ways. So don’t get your panties in a bunch, don’t say “you were joking,” and know that when you say dumb stuff in a public forum, you should expect to be challenged. And maybe count your lucky stars your challenger was a class act like mcs. God forbid… you might learn something.

          • 0 avatar
            4onthefloor

            @nick_515
            When engaging in a battle of the minds be sure not to leave you ammunition at home next time. I know what I don’t know. The same can not be said of you and your friend up there. Your ignorance is astounding. Stick to something you know next time.as you are the only two that don’t get it. I anxiously await you next display of toolery.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @4onthefloor: What you said was racist. To say that individuals of a particular race are “not very good at original ideas” based on their race is racist. You also seem to be unaware of the accomplishments of numerous Chinese scientists and engineers who are very capable of original thought. They’ve accomplished some amazing things in physics, engineering, and medicine. Assuming an economic competitor is inferior and incapable of original ideas is an incredibly dangerous thought.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Chinese is not a race, it is a nationality.

            grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not-od-15-089.html

            census.gov/topics/population/race/about.html

            Saying “the Chinese are not very good at original ideas” may not be an accurate or friendly thing to say but it isn’t any more *racist* than when you commented in response “Americans either lack the skill or are too lazy to do it. Playing soccer or hockey, no problem. Sewing a handbag or knowing how to align a 3d printer bed is a big problem.”

            You seem to be unaware of the accomplishments of numerous American artisans and engineers who are very capable of more than playing sports.

  • avatar
    4onthefloor

    This will sound political, but I can assure you all, it’s not. It’s about human rights. I decided to limit my purchases of products from countries that don’t value human life or freedoms. After seeing people being beaten ant tear gassed in the streets of Hong Kong, i decided to only purchase form countries that do not treat their citizens like cattle and deny their basic right to be treated humanely. I realize that it’s basically impossible to do because globalization, but if I know the item comes from a country with these practices, I will only purchase if absolutely necessary, and there is no other alternative. Why we allowed some of these countries to supply critical medicines to our to our citizens, with no other supply chain, shows the type of politicians, regardless of party, we have allowed to run our country with no regard or consequences for their actions. We all know it’s about money, but when you sell your own citizens out, the people who pay your salary, and you are supposed to be working for, that’s treason in my opinion, even if we are not at war with these countries. Sorry if this sounds political, but again, I can assure you it’s not. The companies that get in bed with these countries have made a deal with the devil, and I for one will not buy anything from these companies. Now before anyone poses the inevitable question of whether or not I purchase from Amazon, yes I do, however I have cancelled my prime subscription, and limit my purchases to those that are absolutely necessary, and for which there is no alternative, after seeking an American made alternative first. Politicians telling me they are “ not bad folks, folks “ are not to be believed when my own eyes tell me differently. I wish to clarify that I am not talking about these countries citizens, I am referring to their government’s. How we got ourselves into this situation, I’ll never know, but I strongly believe that it involves that universal lubricant, filthy lucre. I do not hold it against anyone that does not agree with my practices, and that may be impractical for some because of this awful pandemic we are currently facing.

    • 0 avatar
      lmike51b

      Well spoken,and my sentiments exactly.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Should countries engage in “ethical importing” as you suggest? Perhaps. And the idea is well intentioned. Here’s the problem: other countries might just decide WE are the unethical business partner because of the stuff we do (none of which is as obviously bad as what you’re talking about with China, but it’s bad enough).

      Are we prepared to judge not, lest we be judged? And are we prepared to hold OURSELVES to these higher standards you’re talking about?

      Those are both good questions.

      • 0 avatar
        4onthefloor

        @FreedMike
        You make good point. Much better than the fool who called me a racist against the Chinese, when Chinese are engaging in ethnic cleansing against Uighur Muslims. Those Chinese? Yet according to the Luddite posting above, I’m the racist? For saying they can’t innovate? Like I said earlier, my comments are directed against the Chinese Government, not its citizens. From what I have seen with my own eyes, and heard from people who actually live there, they are more afraid of their government than we are. These comments were, and are not directed to you at all. It is my hope that people who don’t want to read through my previous posts will see the previous poster, obviously a democrat because Conservatives just don’t use the word in the incorrect context, or throw it around with abandon.
        Now to get back to your question, after rudely interrupting you.(sorry!) You have to look at the tremendous trade imbalances we have with these countries. We buy lots of their stuff, they buy very little of ours. They might decide we are a little unethical at times, however, they still want to sell us things, because we are their largest market,
        Where else will they sell their goods? Anybody can improve their ethics up to a certain point, but whose to say what’s ethical? With people like our current administration moving the goalposts several time a day, what’s ethical today, may not be ethical tomorrow. How can we know? If other countries want to cut off their nose to spite their face, I say, let them! If Germany ( and I’m German) wants to cut off our imports because they think we are unethical, we can cut off their imports of parts for all of the BMW’ they sell here. However this will hurt us, because these countries had the foresight to construct factories here. US constructing in China is < them constructing here, because we are not communists, yet. Unless our new administration just made an announcement I’m not aware of. I was taught at a very early age, when faced with two evils as your only choices, always pick the lesser evil, and as the great Winston Churchill one said “ appeasement is feeding the alligator, hoping he eats you last” Look the only person I agree 100% with is me. And the only person you agree with 100% is you, metaphorically speaking. Compromise is the only way a team moves the ball forward, and if it doesn’t happen between the people in our country, or between countries soon, bad things are going to happen all over the world. No one wants that. It’s just that some are more willing to compromise more than others, and when that happens, people just bunker up, and nothing gets done, just like in our country currently.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “Are we prepared to judge not, lest we be judged?”

        I would be 100% fine with this system. And moreover I think history shows that this sort of thing actually works. Any country that finds another morally abhorrent should not be doing business with it. Even if that feeling ends up against the United States.

        Both the Trump admin and members Biden admin have publicly used the word “genocide” to describe China’s behavior. I don’t see how the government can make those sorts of statements and then continue on with the economic status quo.

  • avatar
    watersketch

    4onthefloor –

    Appreciate the comment and I support it entirely. Have been trying to make similar purchases and have found that there is lots of info available about ethically-sourced and locally manufactured items.

    Here in the Detroit area we can buy clothing, bicycles, furniture that is made locally.

    I expect to pay at least double the price for these items – if they are priced the same they are probably just relabeling items from China, Vietnam, etc.

    Cars I have always purchased seeking at least 50% domestic content, but that will be more difficult with EVs that are not Tesla. Perhaps upcoming Ford and GM products, and startups Lordstown, Rivian will move the needle.

    Electronics is another story – have spent lots of money lately on laptops, monitors, TVs, headphones, cellphones, and I have not found a way to purchase such items without sending my $s to China.

    • 0 avatar
      4onthefloor

      @ watersketch,
      Thanks for the support! I didn’t know what to expect when I fired my tablet back up to have a look. I have the same conundrum as you, in there are so few sources of electronics outside of China. I have thought a lot about this, and my plan is to just keep fixing whatever I have, using discarded old phones and tablets. Some of these I can do myself, some I can’t, but I don’t want to use new new parts, because those too come from China. It’s a bad situation, be then I think back to when I was a younger man, and we survived just fine without all of this stuff. When I bought our Mazda several weeks ago I considered in not only because it was a good car, I also bought it because it was made in Hiroshima, Japan. Now I know the electronics components are from China, I’m not a total luddite, but at the component level, it’s China or nothing, but I’m hoping other countries pick up on the desire of people like me not to do things that benefit a dictatorship, and will also consider making these components, but the cost of admission is very high to do this, and without financial collaboration among several countries, almost impossible. What really upsets me, is that we did this to ourselves, and once we knew what is going on over there, we continued to do it. My father was a blue collar tool and die man, and he saw this coming in the late 80’s early 90’s, when NAFTA infuriated him, and he started doing some research. No internet then of course, and I remember him going to the library in our town to do some research for a few days straight. I didn’t understand it then, but I sure do now. Thanks again for your support, and I thank the moderators of this site for not banning me, but I think this needed to be said, because it not only affects out future, but our children and future generations. Our men and women died so I can have the freedoms to write this, and I respect that, and appreciate, and will always appreciate their sacrifice. If we don’t wake up soon, we better all start learning mandarin.
      The only solution is to hurt them, economically, but when our leaders on both sides are taking money from them to in effect, sell out our country, I don’t see that happening. A person can say what they want about Trump, but he understood this. Yes, he is a narcissist, but he is a competent narcissist, and guys like Cuomo are incompetent narcissists. I’ll take the former please, whether it’s Trump or someone else. With our leader selling us out, what chance do we have? I firmly believe that if we all got together and just stopped buying, within a year or two, we would start to see results. Sadly, the world has changed while I wasn’t looking, and we are where we are. There is still a chance to change this, but time is rapidly running out. With what is going on in our country right now, I don’t think we will ever get it done, and I can hear the laughter, and clinking glasses in Beijing from here.

      • 0 avatar
        NN

        4onthefloor–I also share your thoughts, and have personally acted this way for many years. Hong Kong for me was absolutely a line in the sand. It’s a city I love and know very well. I’m also a licensed US import customs broker so I know much about trade laws and protocols. Pretty much every good imported into the USA with packaging on it is required to have the origin noted on the packaging, so you can increasingly find more non-China produced items. The 25% tariffs have really shifted production chains already–things that can move fast (like textiles, shoes) are now more commonly from Vietnam, Indonesia, etc. More electronics final assembly is quickly moving to Malaysia, Indonesia. Sporting goods and other electronics to Taiwan. No, these jobs are not coming to America, American consumers have voted with their wallets for imported low-value production goods, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing, really.

        Also, don’t buy the crap about the new administration selling us out to China, that’s BS. The tariffs aren’t going anywhere, and Biden has shown more support for Taiwan in 10 days than any American president has since Nixon turned to China. Biden is more likely to get allies to join and stand together, which is the only way to counter China. Trump was right to start a hard line, but I believe Biden’s strategy so far looks like building upon it.

        • 0 avatar
          NN

          Oh, and since this is a car site, it makes sense for Ford to make a Mach-E derivative for the China market in China. Otherwise they will apply a 35% import tariff and price them out of the market. I believe the US should be reciprocal and raise our tariffs on imported vehicles from China, in the very least, to prohibit the wave of electric cars they are making from being competitive here. If they want to build factories here and hire American workers to build them, then great.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Mockstang Mach-E

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Build ’em in the USA and ship ’em over.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Cuautitlán Stamping and Assembly Plant (Planta Cuautitlán) is firmly inside the borders of the United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicanos).

      https://corporate.ford.com/operations/locations/global-plants/cuautitlan-stamping-and-assembly-plant.html

      Extra Credit: What percentage of Ford Motor Company vehicle assembly plants are located in the USA?

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        I would guess suprisingly low. But we have the capacity to build the Chinese market Mach-E right here in the U.S….

        https://www.pantagraph.com/business/ford-confirms-more-production-cuts-uaw-layoffs-at-chicago-and-ohio-plants/article_13d4d589-78fb-58d0-8a2f-2c1f1d3f6933.html

        Build back better! I hope the new administration is looking into this and will approach Ford about keeping the jobs here.

        • 0 avatar
          Oberkanone

          Asia has every manufacturing advantage vs. USA in the field of EV. USA & Canada have superior engineering and software design. China obtains this IP illegally and legally, at lower cost of acquisition than it costs to create it.
          Ask yourself, how many Iphones are manufactured in United States?
          Ford manufacturing EV in China gives them a toehold to future survival.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            Ford manufacturing in China further advances our submission to China. If Ford cannot find another toehold to future survival, let them fail.

            Build back better. The new Administration should incentivize/motivate China to accept EVs built in the US via tariffs and other negotiations .You just acknowledged they steal our technology So it does not seem to be in our national best interest to continue to move manufacturing there.

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          No need to guess – it’s right there at the link.

          8 out of 35 = 22.9% of Ford Motor Company vehicle assembly plants are located in the USA.

          https://corporate.ford.com/operations/locations/global-plants/cuautitlan-stamping-and-assembly-plant.html

          (I’m not telling anyone what to think about this, just pointing out something many people might not be aware of.)

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Ford has more vehicle assembly plant workers in Kentucky than in Michigan – who knew.

            (Doesn’t count Engine, Forging, Stamping, Transmission. Wouldn’t be far off even counting those, but I haven’t done the math.)

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    I’m not surprised by these statistics. You obviously would like to see more production in the U.S. but when it comes to China, even if you don’t give a whit about creating good paying factory jobs in the United States, or think automation would limit actual jobs, fine. This is becoming a strategic issue. If we cannot build things, what will happen if there was a war with China?

    They will roll over us like a we’re a bug that’s what. We couldn’t even make our own protective equipment against the COVID until the former President essentially forced it. We may not have that kind of time if there’s a major military threat.

    If Ford wants to make cars with robots, then let them make cars with robots, in the U.S. We have to stop rewarding China and giving them so much sway, and industrial capacity, And if you care about the environment that’s yet another reason, given China’s lax pollution standards and increasing reliance on coal.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    So are they sending product from Mexico to PRC or is it being built in country and sold there? I ask because building it in Mexico not only makes more sense but will allow Ford to keep the factory going if (or when) it doesn’t fare so well in the US. Though usually PRC forces foreign companies to give them 50% stake in a join venture in order to build it and sell it there without an extraneous tariff. Funny that, either build it in my country and give us 50% stake or pay 25% (15% for non US companies as of 2018).

    https://www.autonews.com/automakers-suppliers/new-china-tariffs-hit-75b-us-imports-including-extra-25-car-duty

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-46531803

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