By on September 8, 2020

While Tesla’s Model 3 sedan is supposedly taking the world by storm, some hot competition has been reported in China. The Hongguang MINI EV has eclipsed the offspring of Elon Musk to become the country’s best-selling electric vehicle. Though at just 28,800 yuan ($4,200), it hardly seems a fair comparison. Tesla’s minimalist sedan is larger and costs roughly 10 times what SAIC Motor, General Motors, and Liuzhou Wuling Motors decided the MINI EV was worth.

That’s right, it took the combined strength of three automakers to birth this baby and we’re wondering what it would take to get you to drive one home if they were offered here.

According to data from the China Passenger Car Association (CPCA), Tesla only shifted around 11,000 Model 3s in August. But SAIC-GM-Wuling sold 15,000 of their two-door electric vehicles during the same period, making it the hottest little automobile on that market — at least so far as battery-driven cars were concerned.

Ludicrously low pricing seems a big help. While we’re fairly certain SAIC-GM-Wuling accounts for Chinese EV subsidies in its advertised price, offering a hatchback that seats four and costs roughly the same as a motorcycle is an achievement even if it happens to be the size of a Kleenex box. Measuring just 2,917 mm (114.8 in.) long, 1,493 mm (58.8 in.) wide, and 1,621 mm (63.8 in.) high, the Hongguang MINI EV is quite petite.

Targeting those trapped in an urban landscape, the MINI EV uses a 27 hp electric motor that’s optimized for efficiency. It pairs with a compact 13.8 kWh battery pack that delivers a claimed 120 miles of range. Basic versions, closer to that $4,200 starting price, don’t have as wide of an operating area and need to be charged somewhere around 75 miles — thanks to their less-advanced 9.2 kWh energy packs.

Assuming August wasn’t a complete fluke, it’s interesting to see a vehicle like this catching on. Chinese auto sales have been in a bad state recently, with electric vehicles taking a particularly severe hit as subsidies were walked back. Heavy discounting in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic has helped bring customers back into the showroom.

Data suggests August sales actually shot up by 8.9 percent against the previous year. But critics have claimed this is the result of the Chinese government pressuring the CPCA to enhance the numbers as a way to reduce the annual shortfall that’s already guaranteed. To be fair, we’ve found the China Association Of Automobile Manufacturers (CAAM) much more adventurous in its counting of cars than the China Passenger Car Association has been.

Shenanigans or no, both groups are predicting a return to strength for the Chinese automotive market and suggesting a sustained period of growth over the next few years.

While it’s certainly not designed for the North American market, what would it take for the Hongguang MINI EV to get inside your garage? Less Chinese involvement? Local manufacturing? A lower price tag? A tad more interior space? A new living situation for you and your ilk? Or would it have to be an entirely different vehicle for you to even entertain the possibility?

[Images: SAIC-GM-Wuling]

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63 Comments on “QOTD: Would You Ever Consider China’s Best-Selling EV?...”


  • avatar
    forward_look

    That would actually do for 90% of my driving. But I think it would disappear into the first American sized pothole, and I couldn’t get a tie rod end from Pep Boys, I’m sure.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    The communist Chinese tried to kill us, why would I want to give them money?
    :-/

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      @Pig_Iron

      The irony is thick!

      Have you forgotten that the device you used to typed this anti-Chinese snark was, in fact, Made in China?

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        zdnet.com/article/10-best-smartphones-not-made-in-china/

        It might not be possible to make my life 100% China free, but I’m certainly going to do the best I can to avoid enriching them.

        • 0 avatar
          R Henry

          While I fully share your desire to dis-empower America’s pre-eminent global rival, you will find it impossible to do so with your personal purchasing habits at this moment in time.

          –Ever since Richard Nixon and Henry Kissenger “opened” China in 1972, American government has bent over backward to heap money on China, in the misguided hope that such commerce would miraculously cause democracy, liberty, unicorns and prepetual motion to spring forth from the very foreign culture. It was a wrongheaded approach then, and the world is now experiencing the results.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Like I said, I understand that being “China Free” is basically impossible unless I want to be a forest hermit. However, I’m still going to limit my purchase of Chinese products as much as possible.

            I’m under no illusion that I’ll be personally bringing down the CCP with my decisions. It took 50 years to build up this toxic relationship, it will probably take at least as long to end it. But you have to start somewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            ajla, but you can still limit your Made in China purchases, if you have the choice.

            Often we, Americans, no longer have the choice.

            But I hope that will change. The sooner, the better.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            @ajla and @highdesertcat, I think the three of us are pretty close together on this one.

            Lots of little choices are like drops in a bucket, though small they’re real and eventually they add up.

            There are some things about Chinese society that I do find appealing. Their balance of harmony and collective good vs chaos and individualism has enviable benefits. What I don’t like is how much of that harmony is forced. We as a society aren’t even consistent about the little things like moving out of the left lane back into the right lane or putting the shopping carts back in the corral, and when it comes to the big things, the sheer numbers of our own people who are entangled in the legal system raises a lot of very, very complicated questions about “our” society and way of life…

            There are a lot of things in the world that I would like to see made better. Change can be scary. There’s an idiom I can’t quite remember but it goes something along the lines of weeks of change being spread out over years and years of change being packed into a few weeks.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @R Henry:

            Naw, Nixon “opening” China was never about hoping that it would somehow become a democratic nation – Nixon, for all his failings, was no idiot. He knew Mao was a despot and had no interest in letting the Chinese people usurp his rule. The move was made to turn the Chinese into a de facto American ally against the Soviets during the Cold War. In the short term, it worked.

            Then again, Nixon dealt with Mao, and didn’t foresee that in a few years, Deng Xioaping would take over and remake the country into being communist in name only.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        R Henry, politics and life in general is complicated. Sometimes you choose to compromise and other times you don’t. Circumstances change.

      • 0 avatar
        Pig_Iron

        My device says “Made in Mexico”. (I was surprised.)
        :-/

        • 0 avatar
          R Henry

          @Pig_Iron

          In my professional life, I am involved with marketing small electronic measuring insturments. I have learned, via MANY attempts to support domestic manufacturing, that manufacturing electronic devices in the contemporary world requires uses of China sourced components. Yes, some assembly is completed in Mexico, and even some assembly is completed in USA (usually using undocumented labor from south of the border!). While those products are labelled as “Made” in whatever nation they were assembled in, you can be sure the components are from China.

          China systematically dismantled the electronic component manufacturing infrustructure around the world by selling such components for less than their cost of production (legally defined as “dumping”) until all competitors were forced out of business.

          If you want basic electronic components, there really aren’t many viable alternatives to China.

          –Did you know that even Harley-Davidson, the most “murican of brands and products, uses Chinese electronics? Why? Because there is no alternative!

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Harley-Davison has been essentially “assembled in USA” for quite some time. As is the case with virtually all American automobiles. My Corvette is loaded with imported components. Starting with the transmission. Unless major things change in the global-political environment, and people are willing to pay more, that is the way it is going to stay. All that changes is the country that actually makes the components. Remember when Japan was “cheap”, and then Taiwan? And Malaysia? China will someday not be the cheapest as their citizens begin to demand a real wage and speak out against raping the country’s environment. There will be another country to take their place… nothing stays the same.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush/Bush, Clinton, Obama – all were fine with “communist chinese”. Moreover, in Korea, Chinese killed many thousands US soldiers. You can just say, “no”. But drop this stupid “communist” talk. China is not communist. Meanwhile what you wear on you, your Nike sneakers are probably made in communist Vietnam. You think, you’ve said something smart?

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        The US is always ranting about other countries “human rights” violations, and acting like the US is some great shining example of democracy, free speech, and all that good stuff. What little is left of free speech (and all that good stuff) is hanging by a thread right now. For decades now the erosion of rights has been going on in the good ol’ LAND of the FREE. Just remember: “Freedom Isn’t Free.” — how twisted.

        Before WWII Korea was occupied by the Japanese for 75 years. At the end of WWII the US “liberated” Korea. The US has occupied Korea ever since. The Chinese killed a lot of US soldiers, but the US killed far more Korean civilians than the Chinese did US military.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        ” China is not communist. ”

        Some people around the globe may disagree with you, staring in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          If you really think China is “communist,” then you have a poor grasp on what communism really is.

          But then again, the countries that call themselves “communist” didn’t have much of a grasp on what communism is either. They either were or are dictatorships, with some Marxist propaganda to distract their people. In fact, we’ve never seen a truly Marxist government. In fact, I’d argue the closest thing we’ve seen to Marxism is either on TV (“Star Trek,” which IS a communist society), or on an Isreali kibbutz.

          In the end, China is no more communist than it is a “republic.”

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            FreedMike,

            “They either were or are dictatorships, with some Marxist propaganda to distract their people.”

            Yup, that is true. By and large they have just been brutal dictatorships with a lot of Marxist blather. Mao, Lenin, Stalin… Unfortunately, there’s a lot of Marxist blather going on in the US these days. The people doing it are, as usual, extremely naive. They think that if their shadowy backers get into power that they will be haled as great revolutionaries. In reality they will be lined up and executed.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            The reason Kibbutz works, people submit themselves there voluntarily. It is not a totalitarian regime that we used to have in countries ruled by communist parties. Even China went through glorious transformation from Maoism to capitalism. I wouldn’t even call them totalitarian. They are not more totalitarian than Japan. Japan is also ruled by one (same) party since 1955. And China, and Japan are simply high-discipline states. Although China has a few items on its menu that look nasty for a Westerner. But if you know all the little things about Japan…

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      @Pig Iron:
      Yes, China was at war with us at one point. So has Great Britain. Heck, the Brits even burned down the White House. I don’t see your point.

    • 0 avatar

      You mean that little deadly fellas? According to reliable sources in NY they came from Europe not China.

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        “You mean that little deadly fellas? According to reliable sources in NY they came from Europe not China.”

        It had to have come from China. The US propaganda machine says it did, so it is the truth.

        What you hear about a country’s “human rights” record in the US media is strictly determined by whether that country caves to US/NATO aggression. You cave: good human rights record. You have the nerve to act like we don’t own you: bad human rights record.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Short answer is nope, nope, nope. My politics and their current mainland China regime don’t agree (not that our own regime is without its faults, but that is a different question…).

    If it was a Taiwanese (free China) company building a Taiwanese product, then you would have my attention.

  • avatar
    statikboy

    A longer, lower wagon body style, a highway-appropriate motor and about 40% more range. I’d be willing to pay about 10,000 of my own Canadian dollars (after subsidies) if it had cruise control and good crash ratings.

    Oh, and the handling characteristics of an early 90’s Acura.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Not a chance.

    You ask about 7 “ifs” at the end, all of which would produce a different product with a much higher price. It’s like asking if a Suzuki Samarai could serve the purposes of a Chevy Suburban, with a few changes.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    With its micro size and just 27 pavement ripping horsepower, this is an obvious city car. As a result it would suit very few usage cases in the US market.

    So no, hardly anyone here would consider it. I’m going to hazard a guess that crash protection wasn’t really a design criterion. It’s the EV equivalent of driving a tuktuk, and you don’t see too many of those here either.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Not disputing your assessment but it really depends on your city. In some places I’ve lived during my adult life, this would have been adequate for 90% of my driving (to include choices not choosing to take the expressway across town, which I occasionally did driving a “normal” car) and there were times that weeks could pass during which it could cover all of it. In other places I have lived, it would have been quite inadequate and untenable.

      (@schmitt trigger and @highdesertcat raise more valid points, below, on both sides of this discussion)

  • avatar
    David Cardillo

    Well, this ole upstate New York boy would entertain a vehicle similar to this, price point and range per charge withstanding. It’s a world market, so I’m not especially concerned with origin, as it’s mostly a smoke and mirrors thing, IMO.

    Ole Dave
    (Now) “Deep Woods”, TN

  • avatar
    jack4x

    Considering the average golf cart costs $5000 or more,has less hp&range, and doesn’t provide as much weather protection, I actually think there is a reasonable use case for this on the fairways of America.

    On the roads? LOL

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    China aside…….

    With 27 HP, this is not even a city car, it is a suburban vehicle.
    Sorry GM for the bad pun!

    Imagine merging into freeway traffic in any large US city.
    Or attempting to pass an 18 wheeler.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      The Villages in Florida, or the Del Webb Communities may find some buyers among their residents, especially those that already drive their own Golf Carts to and from everywhere.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      And imagine motoring along in this thing at (if you’re lucky) 50 when an 18 wheeler passes you going 80. You’d find yourself two lanes over from where you were.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        That depends where you live and drive. All of the big rigs in the eastern part of the United States seem to be governed to about 71 mph at the most… and whenever they’re passing anyone then more often than not they’re going about 61 up a hill and in a turtle race with one of their brothers, who can’t seem to go any faster than 60.5, both of them now making a rolling roadblock (I already know the other side of the story- hurr durr trucking gotta be on time, if truck one minute late then economy dies hurr durr).

        80… heh… you’re a funny guy. The last time I saw an 18 wheeler going that fast was five years ago when fuel was extremely cheap.

  • avatar
    mcs

    “what would it take for the Hongguang MINI EV to get inside your garage?”

    One or two of these would solve any power problems. Maybe two in back, one up front, a cage, and some better tires.

    https://www.autoblog.com/2020/05/27/swindon-electric-motor-for-sale/

  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    This little car would not work for me or my transportation needs, but I am more interested in de-coupling from China as much as America can, and then further boycotting China.

    The Chinese Communist philosophy does not mesh with the philosophy of most Americans, except those on the Left, the Far Left, the Progressives, the Liberals, and the Socialists – all in all a very small minority of American citizens.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Ah, I see…those of us “on the left” embrace the Chinese system of government. Bulls**t. I’m on “the left” and I don’t. Neither does any other liberal I know. China is a defacto dictatorship. You really think I buy into that? Not in this lifetime, friend.

      I don’t insult your beliefs even though I disagree. Try doing the same.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        FreedMike, do you support the rioting, looting, destruction, arson and reparations mayhem caused by “the left” in Portland and other US cities?

        Is cancel-culture totalitarian and communist in nature, aka Marxism?

        Maybe you’re not as far left as you want me to believe.

        I always thought you had a pretty good head on your shoulders even though we do not often agree on principle. And that’s OK. Different strokes for different folks.

        Keep in mind that “the left” is lumped in with riots, looting,arson and reparations, as supported by the ‘crats, because these are not Trump supporters.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Do you even have to ask whether I support violent protests or looting? I bust my a** so I can live my life as a filthy yuppie, complete with the overpriced German car, and you think I’m a Marxist?

          Seriously…?

          The idiots looting, rioting and burning stuff are no more “liberals” than the tiki-torch idiots at Charlottesville were “conservative.” They’re ALL idiots. The people supporting them are idiots. Period.

          You’re desperate to tag people you don’t agree with politically with the actions of people you despise.

          Right?

          Or maybe you should just try to do what I do and take people as INDIVIDUALS, not as part of a group. Try it sometime. Of course, that means giving some respect to a political belief you happen to disagree with. Easier to just tag everyone who disagrees with you – me included – as a “looter” or a “Marxist.”

          You want to see change? Change that attitude.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I’m greatly relieved after reading your comment.

            And I actually do take people as individuals and found they fall into three political categories: Democrats, Republicans and Independents (like me.)

            Political Independents are a squishy bunch because they are known to vote for both opposites, depending on what’s right.

            For weeks the ‘crats did not condemn the riots, looting and arson or the destruction at the hands of antifa and the radicals.

            I don’t care if others agree with me or not. They are their own persons.

            But I certainly can disagree with them. And I do, when they open the door.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Oh, nonsense…plenty of Democrats condemned the rioting. I was one of them. I jthink you were listening for what you wanted to hear, which was confirmation that somehow all that lawlessness was the love child of the Democratic Party. And apparently you found it.

            Like I said…you want respect, give respect.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            You absolutely knocked it out of the park, FreedMike. I’m also a leftie, and I have no use for Chinese-style of government. Authoritarianism is on the ticket – our very own Democracy is at a perilous crossroad. If he gets re-elected, we will slide into the abyss and the Great American Experiment will be over. Sad thing is the Senate Republicans could have forced much better control but instead they caved. They are very much to blame.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        Those who try to say what liberals are know absolutely nothing about the subject.

  • avatar
    aja8888

    Screw the car, how much for that pretty model with it?

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I am obvious pervert because that was my first thought :-) Actually, I had real life story like this. At the car show I came to some expensive car and in it was this gorgeous blonde. I asked her, what the price was. Her answer was something like $350K. Then I asked if she was included in the package. She said resoundly – “NO”. “Then, I am not interested”, I said; turned around and walked away

  • avatar
    Yankee

    Leaving aside the political and philosophical discussions above about buying a Chinese auto (JimC2 did a nice job summarizing the ideological differences above), a car like this would only be viable when the other cars on the road are similarly sized. Having driven a Fiat x1/9 for many years in my teens, I don’t buy cars based solely on what happens after I crash them. But a lot has changed since those halcyon days of my youth, including a drastic increase in the average size and weight of vehicles now on the road. While I refuse to be another lemming driving an SUV just because everyone else has one, safety has to be a consideration given the average bumper height and heft of the vehicle beside and behind you piloted by someone doing their eye makeup in their visor mirror (saw that at 60mph yesterday) or looking at their phone (see this every single day). I think the only things that would make such a vehicle viable on US roads would be a drastic change in consumer habits based on astronomically high gas prices and a re-lowering of the country’s speed limits, both of which are unlikely to happen anytime soon.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Lots of high-sounding words about how we all want to “boycott China”. And that’s great…as long as you’re willing and able to pay a LOT more for stuff you buy every day.

    People are looking at this problem the wrong way – they’re focusing on “bringing back jobs.” Well, that dog ain’t gonna hunt, unless a) as I said, people are willing and able to pay a lot more for American-made goods, or b) the American jobs brought back make working at Wal-Mart look like a high-paying gig in comparison.

    (Or, as a third alternative, we just create a massive cradle-to-grave social safety net for folks in newly re-Americanized jobs so they can actually live on whatever substandard wages they’re being paid, which I’m sure would be wholly satisfactory for the right-leaning among us…right, guys?)

    As Springsteen said, “those jobs are going, boys, and they aren’t coming back.”

    What we need to focus on is making high-cost, high-profit stuff that can ONLY be made here with our technology. We need to invest in technology and infrastructure, and use them to create jobs people can actually make a living off of.

    As far as the Chinese are concerned, they’re eventually going to fall into the same trap we did – there’s an entire world of undeveloped nations that would be willing to make stuff even cheaper than they do, and eventually, that’s exactly what will happen.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      For me it has very little to do with American jobs (although I’ve commented before that I’m fully in support of subsidizing domestic labor).

      I think doing business with the Chinese government is morally wrong and it is basically impossible to do anything in that country without partnering with the oligarchy.
      hrw.org/world-report/2020/country-chapters/global

      There are many other low-labor cost countries available that aren’t running religious detention camps, invading autonomous areas, and propping up North Korea’s dictatorship.

      I’m not wiling to shrug my shoulders and say “ah well, nothing we can do.” Doing business with China in 2020 is like doing business with South Africa in 1980.

      • 0 avatar
        Yankee

        Well put ajla. While I respect FreedMike’s point as well that one can’t control all one’s purchases in a global econonmy, I think big-ticket purchases like cars and appliances are well-within the power of the world’s consumers to decide to whom they would like the profits to go. We can’t boycott every country whose governments act dishonestly and unfairly (by that standard we’d have to boycott our own here in the USA), there is still a visible bar on basic human rights and decency which countries such as China and Russia have showed no shame about going below. Those that do should be made to realize the financial peril that may cause in the long run, since no other pressure forces as much change. Unfortunately, that will require an informed, involved, and principled population, which is not the Ideocracy that the US has become.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        @ajla:

        Agreed, the Chinese government is dictatorial and has zero regard for human rights. The same can be said of any number of other countries we have important trading relationships with. Mexico’s bought and sold by drug cartels. You mentioned South Africa; well, Israel its’ own defacto apartheid system (which pains me to say, as I’m Jewish, but there it is). Saudi Arabia…well, enough said there. I think you get my point.

        And then there’s this: much of the world deplores AMERICA’S record on human rights, and the fact that we prop up puppet regimes, just like China does.

        Your point is valid, as is the sentiment, but at some point you have to do business with the world, and a large part of the world doesn’t live up to our values.

        Perhaps if we want them to do that, we should do it ourselves.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          If China’s current actions aren’t enough for you to want to stop buying their products then that’s certainly your right. Everyone has their personal threshold.

          For me, China has passed the general “all countries do bad things” line and I’m going to do what I can to spend my income elsewhere whenever possible. China isn’t the only nation I feel this way about but they are one that offers enough consumer products that I can make a conscious effort to avoid.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            For decades, over different administrations, America’s national economic policy favored outsourcing jobs to China and other nations where products could be made cheaper.

            That has changed for the better by the current administration.

            But the damage is done. Heparin, Lowenox, Propofol and other critical drugs are no longer made in the US of A.

            I believe we need to bring back production of critical goods to the US, and bolster the supply lines with nations not hostile to the US, like England, Ireland, Israel, India, the Netherlands, et al.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            outsourcing jobs to China and other nations where products could be made cheaper. That has changed for the better by the current administration.

            Really?? I don’t think they’ve done crap. Just got a network adapter and it’s made in Vietnam. Pharmaceuticals are still coming in from China. Walmart is still filled with imported stuff. Is Harbor Freight filled with nothing but Made In USA products? Plenty of Chinese products coming in where they just pass the tariffs onto the US consumer. The same people that are paying for the wall. Buick and Volvo are still importing cars.

            Tariffs alone don’t work. You need a coordinated effort among different countries. You need to build competing industries here as well. Maybe go to a government run healthcare system so small companies like mine don’t have to deal with it and hundreds of millions aren’t getting siphoned off into the pockets of healthcare insurance executives.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            mcs, I like things better the way they are going under the current administration.

            Some of the things that Independents like myself were wishing for, have actually happened.

            And whether to buy foreign-made is often a choice, unless there really is no other option.

            The “no other option” has already happened with too many products no longer made in the USA.

            So I’m all for bringing it back to Made in America.

            For far too long America’s trade and economic policies put America last. For the past four years and for the next four years it will be America FIRST.

            And for most Americans, that is a good thing.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @ajla:

            I think you’re doing the right thing. But the changes that need to happen have little to do with deciding to “buy Chinese” or “not buy Chinese” – I think they have more to do with making changes in this country.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          “Perhaps if we want them to do that, we should do it ourselves.”

          That would be a nice change of pace. Lately, our much vaunted freedom of speech has been treated as a joke. I hate to tell all the haters, but if you want freedom of speech you have to put up with hearing things that you don’t like. It requires some maturity (something sorely lacking with a lot of people in this country).

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    You can find a pre owned Fiat 500e for around $8k. The range is 87 miles and it’s far more stylish, spunky and fun to drive.
    You can also look for the first Mini electric which was available a few years ago. Granted it’s a two seater because of the battery pack in the rear but also far more fun and serviceable than this glorified parks department or municipal vehicle.

  • avatar
    downunder

    If this is safer and cheaper to run than a scooter/motorbike/ my SUV to work then that’s the way to go. Perhaps GM could open a factory that they abandoned years ago and build them there, that may assuage some people’s fears about politcs and give the world what we need, a non-polluting (relatively speaking) city commuter car that goes to work, and comes home again. Leave the other vehicle for the 10% of journeys that take you far away.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      If GM were to build these here, they would come in CKD kits from China. The news would show the end of the assembly line, like they usually do, but not how short it actually is.

      This is a car for guys with no ‘nads at all, and women who think it’s “cute”. You would be better off with a used Camry for $2000, which in five years will still be worth $1500. Who would want a used Wuling?
      This is just the car to make your date come up with a spur-of-the-moment excuse to not go out to dinner with you.
      There will be exclusions in life insurance policies stipulating that if you die in an accident in a Wuling, they don’t have to pay.

  • avatar

    Why to compare with Tesla. More relevant is Leaf. Is it better than Leaf?

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Were it a 2 door, 2 seater Daihatsu I could see using this for my bumming around. I start working at 6 in the morning, 8 miles from home and hit the freeway before too many larger vehicles come out. The rest of my regular driving can be done without freeway use.

    My monthly trip to my brother’s would not work, but that’s what my ICE vehicle would be for.

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  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber