By on August 12, 2020

Ram has issued a succinct press release on the status of its answer to the Ford Raptor. The 2021 Ram 1500 TRX is now officially set to debut next Monday, ready to dazzle you with the volume of dirt it can kick up when asked.

Sadly, that’s about all we can tell you. Despite the concept (pictured) coming equipped with a healthy 6.2-liter V8 belching out nearly 600 horsepower way back in 2016, everyone and their mother now claims the production TRX will come with a Hellcat motor to ensure Ford is shamed into submission. While that’s hardly the only metric one could use to measure the total value of an off-road pickup, most seem to think it’s a good place to start.

Considering Fiat Chrysler’s track record with vehicles, its unfathomable to think Ram would install anything that doesn’t at least match the output of Ford’s 3.5-liter Ecoboost V6. But that sets a benchmark of 450 hp and 510 lb-ft something the brand could easily accomplish without having to roust the Hellcat.

However, FCA seems to be celebrating the end of an era and is trying to slot its mightiest motors into as many products as it can before emissions regulations catch up to it (or its new partner says to stop being so damn brash). Dodge is throwing the Hellcat into the Durango for one year only and continues pushing the envelope for what’s sane with the Charger and Challenger. A 700-horsepower pickup would hardly be surprising.

[Image: FCA]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

12 Comments on “FCA Confirms 2021 Ram 1500 TRX Debut for August 17th...”


  • avatar
    jack4x

    I’m irrationally excited for this thing.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      +1; it sounds pretty cool.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        They’re a lot of fun. My 2016 TRD+ Tundra was loads of fun off road but I never did it justice or pushed to see what exactly it could do.

        The downside is that the progressively-reacting off road suspension can be a wee bit rigid on the pavement, entertaining the occupants of the Cab to every ripple and bump of the pavement; kidney buster comes to mind.

        So this is a niche truck, not a daily driver, with one redeeming quality: that 6.2-liter (383 cubic inch block) monstrosity.

        Oh! Wadda feelin’!

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I really hope Stellantis doesn’t slap a lid on the fun. It will show a fundamental misunderstanding of the American market.

    Kind of like in the 80s when an American working for Toyota asked the Japanese executives about a V8. He was told: “What do you need a V8 for when we can build a 6 that will make the same power?”

    Eventually and before the LS400 was built, they came around.

    • 0 avatar
      zerofoo

      We did work for some local Toyota dealers around the time of the T100. Toyota reps went around asking dealers what they wanted in the new Tundra. Every single dealer said something along the lines of “if you aren’t bringing it with a V8 don’t bother bringing it at all.”

      I guess Toyota paid attention to that feedback. Hopefully FCA/Stellantis doesn’t forget the lesson.

      Sure – Ford was able to convince a bunch of people to buy an F-150 with an EcoBoost – but I’m not sure anyone else will be able to pull that off.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Kind of like in the 80s when an American working for Toyota asked the Japanese executives about a V8. He was told: ‘What do you need a V8 for when we can build a 6 that will make the same power?’ ”

      That’s an interesting response from Toyota considering that they gave the Century a comparatively lowish output V8 and V12. So they obviously understood there was some value or prestige in different engine configurations.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        It may be apocryphal but that’s supposedly the reason that the T100 from 1993 to 1998 didn’t have a V8 available.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        The Japanese are all about efficiency and effectiveness. But for many American males the automotive psyche is “the biggest, brawniest V8.” Or better yet, the V12 Packard.

        My dad’s hobby was dragracing and he and my uncle doted on a rail powered by a MOPAR 426 HEMI on Nitromethane. He told me when I was 12 years old, “There’s nothing like an American V8.”

        Times have changed because today I sure favor that magnificent Toyota Tundra all-aluminum 32-valve DOHC 5.7-liter (348 cubic inch) V8.

        The finest V8s I have ever owned in three vehicles – bar none.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    There’s no real reason to be 15 years behind Ford or anything pickup related and BOF trucks. They’re platforms licensed print money.

    If they’re so worried about CAFE/CARB, why all the V8 cars, certified gas guzzlers and Devil cars?

    CAFE/CARB has been laughable for decades anyway. With big-ticket autos, you sprinkle some coins on them and go away. Yes like panhandlers.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • sgeffe: Or the aftermarket will come up with a way, in the form of a doohickey which plugs into the OBD II port, as...
  • sgeffe: The Malibu is about the worst, with the Equinox second. When I’m walking to/from my work lot to my office,...
  • HotPotato: Having solar on your roof makes you MORE resilient if the power goes off (if you’re smart enough to...
  • HotPotato: Translation: California is paying me a fat union retirement pension, and I’m saying thank you by...
  • AthensSlim: When I renewed last summer (‘19) there was no option to renew without also ordering a new plate for my...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber