By on May 19, 2020

2019 Subaru Forester Touring

2019 Subaru Forester Touring Fast Facts

2.5-liter horizontally-opposed “boxer” four-cylinder (182 hp @ 5,800 rpm, 176 lb-ft @ 4,400 rpm)

Continuously-variable automatic transmission with seven-speed manual mode, all-wheel drive

26 city / 33 highway / 29 combined (EPA Estimated Rating, MPG)

9.0 city, 7.2 highway, 8.2 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $34,295 (U.S) / $32,995 (Canada)

As Tested: $35,270 (U.S.) / $35,099 (Canada)

Prices include $975 destination charge in the United States and $1,825 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

Subaru has a dual reputation. Car people know it as the company that gives us WRX and STi (and a good chunk of the BRZ/Toyota FT 86 partnership), while the rest of the world thinks of the brand as one that puts out a lot of wagon-esque crossovers that appeal to granola types, academics, and families that prioritize safety but aren’t in a Volvo tax bracket.

The Forester Touring definitely fits in to that latter stereotype. And that’s not a pejorative – it’s okay to embrace what one does best.

For the Forester, that means serving as a solid if not spectacular commuting wagon that’s road-trip ready.

By coincidence, I happened to have the Forester during a weekend I’d planned a short trip with an overnight stay. A trip that would require hauling the usual snacks and such and luggage for two. Oh, and at least one case of a certain type of beer sold only in Wisconsin would be coming back across state lines with us. It was like Smokey and the Bandit, but no truckers, no Firebirds, and actions that were completely legal.

That’s the kind of drive the Forester excels at – it swallowed up the cargo with plenty of room to spare and provided long-haul comfort from Chicago to east-central Cheeseland and back.

2019 Subaru Forester Touring

Not all was well. The 2.5-liter “boxer” four is a bit underpowered here, with just 182 ponies and 176 lb-ft of torque on hand. At least the continuously-variable automatic is inoffensive in its operation.

Standard all-wheel-drive probably doesn’t help with acceleration, given the extra weight and driveline losses endemic to such systems, but Subaru’s safety reputation is staked in part to the availability of AWD across so much of its model lineup.

Don’t expect enthusiastic handling here, either, though the steering is just fine for commuting and longer drives. The ride is on the firm side, but not punishing.

2019 Subaru Forester Touring

Subaru is proud of its EyeSight safety system, standard on the Forester. The system can alert the driver when it detects fatigue or distraction, but it needs work – it beeped at me at times when my eyes were firmly on the road, and other times, I intentionally let my eyes wander or looked down briefly (when it was as safe as possible to do so, of course – think empty highway with no cars around) and it didn’t activate. I suspect it will work better at some point down the road, and the driver-recognition ability (EyeSight can recognize who’s driving and set mirrors and climate settings accordingly) is a fine idea. For now, though, you’re best served using your own self-discipline.

My test Forester came well equipped, since it was a top-trim Touring. In fact, there’s no available options packages – just a few accessories. Standard equipment included EyeSight, rear spoiler, roof rails, fog lamps, 18-inch wheels, dual-zone climate control, navigation, dual USB ports, satellite radio, Bluetooth, keyless entry and starting, power tailgate, leather seats, heated front and rear seats, and heated steering wheel. That totaled $35,270 with destination fee.

2019 Subaru Forester Touring

The Forester isn’t the world’s sexiest tall wagon, thanks to a mish-mash of curves and soft angles and a boxy, snub nose. Inside, the buttons and graphics look like a bit like those pretend dashboards kids played with in the ‘80s, but I give Subie credit for integrating the infotainment screen.

Not that anyone expects the Forester to be sexy. You don’t buy this for sex, speed, or sport. You buy it to load up with gear, and you expect it to be comfortable, and should the worst happen, safe.

2019 Subaru Forester Touring

I’ll let the IIHS determine that last bit – we’re not equipped to crash-test cars around here. Comfort and utility, though, were on hand in spades.

Gliding along in the mainstream ain’t so bad sometimes.

[Images © 2020 Tim Healey/TTAC]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

70 Comments on “2019 Subaru Forester Touring Review – Slow, Safe, and Steady...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    The other day I commented that the Prius owned the left lane of life at 10mph under the speed limit. Well, the Subaru Forester is right behind it followed by the Honda CR-V

    To all that own the above, lead, follow or get out of my way, thank you :)

    • 0 avatar
      Imagefont

      I have a Honda CRV. A couple of years ago I was taking up ALL of the RIGHT lane driving close to the speed limit, like I had some God given right to do that, in heavy morning commuter traffic. There was a Silverado behind me that just HAD to go faster and I was inconsiderate enough not to speed up. So he passed me in the shoulder. Either that or his head was going to explode so I completely understood. He then started to get mad at the pickup blocking his path in front of me and started riding his bumper. Until, that is, the lead pickup dove on its brakes to avoid some road debris and they ended up colliding. Probably all my fault. I passed them both after they pulled over to exchange information, and I probably got to my destination first. When morons are in a hurry to get to the scene of the accident first I try to make it my policy to get out of their way.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I hope you know I was kidding, well, kind of, this morning on my way to work on a lonely country road with a speed limit of 55 I was behind a very nice lady in a CR-V who could barely manage to maintain 50mph. Just me and her plobbing along at 48mph without enough straight away to pass

        *sigh*

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          CR-Vs, RAV4s, and Foresters: the Holy Trinity of Left Lane Banditry.

          Sorry, but the stereotype exists for a reason.

        • 0 avatar
          statikboy

          So long as you understand that it is well within her rights to go 48mph and outside of your rights to go as much as 51mph and that “punishing” her for driving in a manner which she considers safe is not acceptable.

          Too many folks like the truck driver in Imagefont’s story seem to feel they own the road and have the right to vigilante justice on anyone who doesn’t meet their expectations.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Wow, you really added an awful lot to my story that wasn’t there. That really takes a lot of nerve on your part to assume I somehow “punished” her for going slow.

            You really need to examine your own motivation for filling in the blanks of MY story to suit YOUR narrative

            Let’s run this down…

            I assumed she was “a very nice lady” because outside of going slow she was doing nothing wrong.

            We “plodded along at 48mph” because WE had no choice because SHE was well within HER rights to go 48mph.

            I “*sighed*”, because under the circumstance I had no other choice

            Now, please do tell me how I “punished” her for going slow

            I’ll wait…

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I can’t speak for every state but I believe that nearly all of them have a “yield to faster traffic” statute (granted that ability depends on road conditions) for situations like “Lie2Me” described. Plus, a few states now have a statue against failure to yield in the left lane *regardless of the posted speed limit*.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            This was a 2-lane highway, ajla, had it been a 4-lane I would have simply gone around her and gone on with my day. As it was I patiently maintained the same speed at a safe distance behind her until our paths went in different directions, no big deal, no anger and God, no “punishment”. Just a *sigh*

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It happens all the time, I’m the unwilling partner with a Subaru in a rolling roadblock. It’s usually a Subaru but earlier in the week, I wasn’t paying much attention, I but hadn’t been passed on the left for a few miles.

            Yep there it was on my left blindspot just hanging out. I looked further back and there was some 20 cars being held up, so I sped up. Then the not that old lady, eyes just locked straight ahead, sped to match my speed, staying close enough to not let a car escape.

            I don’t think she was being passive aggressive, but I slowed down to unclog drain and of course she slowed up too. I did what I always do in that situation, stomped on the gas to get ahead, moved over and got on the brakes.

            They all flew by and I stayed in front of her, left lane for the next few miles until I got to my exit.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            That’s weird it’s like she was purposely pacing you. I really dislike that it’s like someone breathing down your neck

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            There must be some security to blindspots, I don’t get it.

            It must be scarier to ride alone. It’s like when you pick a parking spot far away everyone, so of course when you come out of the store, there’s a car parked right frickin’ next to you!

            It must be easier to gauge their place in space or lane, next to someone.

          • 0 avatar
            Flipper35

            Keep in mind there are laws in some states where you get a ticket for impeding the flow of traffic.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        LOL…Gripes about stereotype that is applicable to him while perpetuating other stereotypes. Awesome.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I can self-stereotype about Audi drivers too, you know…

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I was referring to Imagefront perpetuating all of the typical truck stereotypes. As a former Audi (or shall I say reformed) owner, yes, there are many that we earned lol. The one that hit closest to home for me would be broke.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Well, the truck stereotypes exist for a reason too.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            So what about racial and religious ones? Or that other one about a certain demographic that seems to prefer Subarus? Honestly the left lane thing with respect to these was news to me. I had only heard of 2: one regarding WRX/ST-i drivers and their vaping habits and the other involving a preference for the vehicle among lesbians. I believe that last one is well documented in the earlier days of this very site.

          • 0 avatar
            blppt

            Hey! Audi does NOT stand for “Another Useless Douchebag Inside”!

            (looks at B8.5 A4 in driveway, then reflection in mirror)

            Ok, maybe that does occasionally apply.

    • 0 avatar

      Why all this vehicles in this special rarefied group? Do they have weak engines?

  • avatar
    make_light

    I believe if this had a tiny bit more power, it’d be indisputably best in class (although admittedly I’ve never driven or ridden in the CX-5, which I’m sure is a great car).

    It’s noticeably smoother and quieter than a CRV or RAV-4, has a much nicer interior than previous generations of Subaru vehicles, and you can’t beat the practicality. It’s not a fun car to drive, but at least the handling is safe and secure, with less of that detached feeling common to some Japanese and Korean cars.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    Good choice on the Spotted Cow.

    The shutdown has interfered with my usually regular driving between Chicago and Minneapolis so I’ve been missing out on picking up my own case each time.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    My wife has a 2018 Forester XT. The last year the XT was available. For the most part it’s fine. She’ll never take it off road so it doesn’t need ground clearance, which is where my gripe comes from. People like the tall seating position and the Forest has a completely artificial one. Getting in is like getting into an old full sized van. The floor is high for no real reason and the seat are sitting on stilts. IT really is no higher off the ground than a sedan. Maybe a bit, but that’s what people want, isn’t it? They want to sit up high and pretend they aren’t driving a station wagon or hatchback.

    Personally, I find the front seats uncomfortable because of the upright seating position and the way I feel like I’m sitting in a kitchen chair without my legs stretched out in front of me. The seats are also fairly hard which compounds it. Granted, I’ve never owned a crossover so maybe people used to sitting in them would hate sitting in a sedan or traditional wagon.

    She seems to have a lot of trouble with the infortainment system. It seems to forget how to connect to apps on it every once in a while. Fortunately she’s very patient and it doesn’t bother her, he lied.

    Otherwise, it’s fine. I don’t have a problem with the CVT either. Though I don’t understand the point of paddle shifters on it. It accelerates well, though not what I would describe as fast for being the performance model. If you’re in the market for a 2020, you don’t get a choice in engines I don’t think, but for the type of car it must be absolutely overwhelming to choose one tall hatchback from a sea of tall hatchbacks.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenn

      This is the first negative comment regarding ingress/egress and seating position of a Forester that I’ve ever read. As someone who has periodic back and knee pain, sitting higher and more upright, while not having to fall into or climb out of a sedan, has nothing to do with “pretending.” The greater outward visibility is also appreciated.

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      Gotta agree with you on the Forester seating position, LandArk. They gave me a 2017 one as a loaner when my LGT was in a for a new brake caliper. Like climbing up onto a bar stool when I was 8 years old.

      Besides being dog slow because no turbo, it was a cold day and the heater was slow to warm, the engine idled all over the place on rpm at a supermarket I went to and sat trying to warm it up in the parking lot, while sitting on a stupid pole seat wobbling around like a drunk. Jeez, my LGT ran better than that at 10 years old and had real seats. Plus it, you know, moved.

      The Forester epitomized for me what useless cars Subaru’ have become. When I got for a new car, I went for a Mazda6 turbo. After 20 years of Subaru, no way I was going to wobble around in a Legacy or Outback or Forester, They’re cars for ninnies, IMO. Completely devoid of any interesting driving experience. Of course, they now sell well here in Canada to the grey office people, all religiously tapping away on laptops answering emails in the Service waiting area.

      Spare me the excitement!

  • avatar
    redapple

    Can we praise a couple items overlooked?
    – Real Knobs for radio and HVAC. Easy. Fast. No need to take eyes from road.
    – Huge un equaled greenhouse. I can see out of a car! Thank goodness.
    – Dead smooth and quiet-especially at idle/ near idle. (Trust me, you ll really notice how quiet when you fire up a new toyota 4 cycl at the rental car location.)
    – Best Resale, best crash worthiness, lowest first 5 year cost of ownership, Best passive safety system. (per NHIH, Kelley Blue Book and Car&Driver mag)

    I dont understand all the Subaru hate on this site. I think -$ for $ – they make outstanding cars.

    • 0 avatar
      make_light

      Agreed on everything you said here.

    • 0 avatar
      pprj

      Good point. I got a Crosstrek for my daughter and at the end of the day I’m the one who enjoy driving the car the most. These are great cars. Not fast – it was never the intention – but still great cars. And the cost of ownership is really good.
      I would buy another one, if you ask me.
      And yes, Eyesight works better than what have in my Genesis G80. No question about it.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike Beranek

      I can explain some of the hate. Subarus seem to have particularly fragile valvetrains, which require a lot of head work. Because of Subaru’s dedication to the flat engine configuration, any kind of head work pretty much requires the whole motor to come out. Quite the opposite on an inline-4, where the head is on top, as things called “heads” usually are.
      Take a peek into the service department at any Subaru dealer. You will see the cars in the stalls, with the engine on a stand sitting in front of each one. This combination of attributes (an OHC flat engine that needs frequent head work) represents a fatal flaw in my eyes.
      Don’t get me wrong, there’s lots of things about Subaru that I like. But I’ve heard too many horror stories about cam seals, bent valves, and worn-out lifters to ever own a Subaru-engined car.

      • 0 avatar
        bullnuke

        This is a new one on me, Mike Beranek. Fragile valvetrains and frequent head work? Cam seals, bent valves, and worn-out lifters? Come on, stick with that old saw about “HEAD GASKETS!”, or maybe the one about “CV JOINTS!”, and the ever reliable “WHEEL BEARINGS!”.

        • 0 avatar
          indi500fan

          I’ve seen a LOT about blown head gaskets, and obviously that’s an engine removal. However their market penetration seems really good which makes me wonder…are these failures not as common as the internet says, or are they at such high miles that it really doesn’t affect the opinion relative to buying new?

          • 0 avatar
            Mrb00st

            I think it was the older EJ series motors that had leaking head gasket problems – thankfully, they leaked externally (aka, onto the ground) and not into the motor. I know the newer engines have issues but not as reliably as the old EJ’s head gasket leaks.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          @Bullnuke, wasn’t the BRZ and 86 recalled for valve-train issues that in turn gave Toyota mechanics much grief because they weren’t especially familiar with the motor? I don’t know if those issues carried over to other Subarus using that motor, but valve-train issues in that motor aren’t exactly news to people…it was all over the place not long ago.

          • 0 avatar
            Mrb00st

            yeah, a lot of the FR-S’ that had the recall done at Toyota dealers came back with blown up motors because the toyota techs used WAY too much RTV to seal the front cover back on, and it got into the oil and then into the pickup screen and caused oil starvation.

    • 0 avatar
      jh26036

      My family has had a bunch of Subarus. I don’t hate them but also don’t plan to get another one either. After the warranty period is over, they seem to find ways to dig into your pocket from blowing head light bulbs 2x a year, oil leaks, eating sensors, all the way to one blown automatic at 80k and a blown engine at 55k miles. Awesome in snow though.

      New style Forester, fantastic visibility. Absolutely cannot be touched by the CX5, Rav4, or CRV. I also like their packaging too. I just hate they are so needy. It’s hard to depend on them once they reach higher miles.

    • 0 avatar
      teddyc73

      A lot of other companies make outstanding cars which look a lot better.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      Subaru is pretty much hated here as this site is usually TTAM (The Truth About Mazda) where folks laud and love all things about the continuously failing Mazda brand, make excuses for its shortcomings, and despise the smaller Subaru brand for being much, much more successful. Some of the disparaging commentary about Subaru’s is pretty laughable, usually second- or third-hand, “I heard about a guy who..”, or even actual owners of a second-hand Subaru from 15 or 20 years ago recounting episodes of woe from days far gone by. I’ve owned three, still own one (I had to trade my ’14 Outback because it failed me – it refused to tow a 16k lbm gooseneck horse trailer. IT FAILED ME!).

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Didn’t Subaru get called out for excessive oil consumption like 4 years ago? Did they ever fix or acknowledge that?

        Aside from the Miata, I think both Mazda and Subaru are overrated with the internet crowd. Mazda more so but at least the wood trim in the CX-9 Signature is nice.

        • 0 avatar
          bullnuke

          Yep, Ajla, they acknowledged the oil usage on the FB-25 engines and would replace the short block free of charge if the oil consumption exceeded 12oz per 1200 miles which calculates to a bit less than a quart in 3000 miles. Owners of the 2013 to 2014 vehicles with this engine got notices in the mail (I was one of them) that listed this corrective action of short block replacement (which I had done after the oil usage test – mine was 10 oz in 1200 miles) and extended the warranty. Ran the vehicle for another 30k miles with no usage between the recommended oil changes. I had a complimentary new 2015 loaner for the day it took to do the work. The oil level lights in the 2013’s and 2014’s were mis-set to come on somewhat before the proper 1 qt low point and this item magnified the issue causing concern many folks.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Prius owns left lane? Ha I’d pick a Subaru every time. Hands down the slowest drivers on the road. Always seem to be spaced out too.

    Really that, the styling, and the power are Subaru’s biggest problems. Living in Idaho they make a ton of sense here. Great in snow with ground clearance and can get you camping in the mountains with good mpg and space etc.

    But dang If I don’t find the Subaru “mystique” even worse than BMW drivers. I’m gonna say it but the way the drivers drive and the frumpiness and death grip on the wheel doesn’t make one eager to join their club. I swear every Subaru owner I know has been 65+ for 25 years and is on their 5th straight Outback and goes on about the car as if it is some kinda Bentley or something. Ok they’re good cars but jeez.

    And why do they have to be so ugly? Forester is so frumpy.

    These are really great cars that with a few style tweaks and just a small power bump would be hands down the best in class. Enough you might actually consider joining their club.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      “And why do they have to be so ugly?”

      Because driving a pretty car might make other people feel bad that they too don’t drive a pretty car and we can’t have that

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      I wouldn’t say they’re ugly….occasionally they’ll spring a visually-challenging model out there. The Forresters have been pretty consistent with decent style…nothing spectacular but unoffensive. The Outback came out with a beautiful style 16 years ago, Then they followed up with the aardvark generation (one of which I own); it’s an acquired taste. The last and current generations are pretty handsome IMO…..

      My only qualm with the Forrester Touring is that ventilated seats should be standard. H/K has them on vehicles available for $10k less….

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I’m always impressed with the fit and finish of Subarus and I like the large greenhouse of the Forester, but other then that these are dull as dishwater. Look up “generic compact CUV” and these pop right up

        • 0 avatar
          redapple

          LIE

          Subaru Lafayette Plant made 33% of all Camrys for a while. A JV with partner Toyota. Toyota studied in some depth Subarus practices in stamping / body show. Toyota was shocked how good the stampings were. Dimensional accuracy and repeatablilty was at World best levels. FACT. I was there.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      Jerry
      Forester – ugly.

      Really?

      RAV 4 is good looking? Grey plastic wheel opening plastic ‘frame.’ That floating roof? Ugh.
      CRV? Equinox? Really?

      I think these competitors show the Forester is better looking (in most fair observers eyes).

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    This just in: Subaru has introduced the “Pet Rescue Mom” Forester. This special edition has unique “Pet Rescue” graphics, including pawprint decals adorning the back bumper, and a special see-through pawprint blackout shade on the back window.

    This special edition has the same engine as a standard Forester, but to accomodate the special needs of the “Pet Rescue Mom,” its’ top speed is electronically governed at 57 mph.

    “We did extensive research among 60-year-old Pet Rescue Moms,” said Subaru spokesman Kombucha Smith, and the results were conclusive: the number one need they had was to go slower than traffic. The second need they mentioned was to completely block any following car’s view around theirs, and the blackout pawprint graphic on the back window does that splendidly. We look forward to these being planted firmly in the left lane of every freeway in America, and good luck getting it to move over without a Sidewinder missile.”

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      This sounds suspiciously similar to Subaru’s “Karen Edition”

      • 0 avatar
        teddyc73

        Let the “Karen” thing go. It’s stupid.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          hit a little close to home Teddy? Seriously, why do you care.

          • 0 avatar
            Blackcloud_9

            Because it’s becoming close to the most over-used catchphrase to pigeon-hole someone since Snowflake – closely followed by “OK, Boomer”. It’s annoying, over-used, and stereotyping especially since none of us really know anything about each other on this site.
            So back off Republicant! Wait, does that make any sense? Does this apply to you? Probably not. I’m just trying prove a point that it’s just too easy to throw names around.
            From, a Snowflake, libtard who is actually married to a woman named Karen who has nothing in common with the now perjorative use of the term “Karen”.
            Rant over.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            He was talking about something that was circulating for a while. Get over yourself.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            We could go with “Brenda” instead, you know.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Geez, why is everyone’s sensitivity chip on overload today? Another site I frequent has replaced “Karen” with “Ginny in Human Resources” and we all know what SHE’s like

    • 0 avatar
      Jon

      thanks for the laugh

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    This has got to be one of the laziest reviews of the Forester I’ve seen yet. You have to ask yourself, for all of a measly 625 words, is this a worthwhile guide to somebody asking if they want to spend $28,000 of their hard earned house hold income on?

    Come on, this is way late to the party, everybody else got their reviews in already. What are you adding to the conversation that is better or different?

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2005/08/subaru-b9-tribeca/

      The standard for Subaru reviews on this site. Authors should read and seek to emulate.

  • avatar
    Kenn

    “The system can alert the driver when it detects fatigue or distraction, but it needs work…”

    Yeah, it seems like these systems typically “need work.” I would be interested in knowing – in every review – how easily this “feature,” and all other annoying beepers (or start/stop) like it, can be deactivated. As someone who keeps his attention focused outside the vehicle when driving, these driver-assist functions would be a daily downer.

    • 0 avatar
      jh26036

      How do these features really get in your way if you just drive normally. Auto-brake really doesn’t happen unless you enjoy tailgating. BSM is just a light which you can learn to ignore. Lane keep assist tends to only be activated when ACC is active.

  • avatar
    teddyc73

    Along with ugly, dowdy and frumpy.

  • avatar
    ajla

    If I was buying in this class for some reason I think I’d end up with a 3.2L Cherokee. I’d lose mulch capacity but I’d gain 2 cylinders and 3000lbs more towing capacity versus most of the competition.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    TURBO TURBO TURBO!

    Subaru – where’s the damn turbo!

  • avatar
    tabaplar

    I’ve read widely varying opinions on the ride quality of this generation of Forester. From firm but ok (as suggested here), to excellent/ extremely comfortable. I test drove one briefly when they first came out in late 2018, at low speeds in an urban environment, and thought it was well-isolated and well-controlled but not plush (not as comfortable as a previous generation Outback, driven elsewhere on suburban roads). Curious if anyone has personal experience in a wider range of conditions; country roads, state routes, highways, cobblestones, etc.?

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • tobiasfunkemd: I recently bought a 2019 F-150 XLT, with a 2017 Tucson trade-in. After about a month of driving, I...
  • HotPotato: My Volt has been bank-vault solid — I credit the enormous T-shaped structural member down the center...
  • SV: “Your author has even grown fearful that the next batch of Volkswagens is really going to suck — despite...
  • Lou_BC: Family can be the worst. I had bought a brand new 1984 Ranger. It had pathetic tires stock. I let my brother...
  • Lou_BC: Hype is just that, hype. If it has the same off-road prowess as a Jeep and is more durable, it will sell. The...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber