By on April 10, 2020

Image: GM

If you’re as paranoid as this writer, chances are your formerly daily driver has long since sailed past its last regularly scheduled fill-up date. The last time any fresh gasoline hit the innards of your author’s high-end motorcar was three and a half weeks ago. The needle’s now resting just north of a quarter tank.

*Gulp*

Frankly, it’s cause for concern, as adding useless miles to the odometer has typically served as a mental tonic for yours truly. At the same time, who wants to encounter people or things they’ve touched? That friendly neighborhood gas pump is no longer the welcoming monument it once was (with Doritos, no less). Wouldn’t it be great to drive past it without a care?

“Just give me 20 miles,” I keep thinking, hypermiling my sumptuous Cruze to my favorite running spot roughly 2 miles from home. “20 miles of range I can add at home, keeping that 1.4-liter BEAST in reserve. Why, oh why, did I purchase such a gas pig?!?”

The solution to my problem would be the sudden appearance of a plug-in hybrid in my parking spot. Sure, an electric vehicle would do the trick, and we’ve talked about that before, but a PHEV offers the best of both worlds. I could tool around the Omega Man-like streets of my deserted city, keeping my ICE and gas tank offline until called upon for some sort of emergency (or carefree road trips when borders eventually reopen).

People enjoy choice, but in North America the additional expense, weight, and trade-off in cargo volume (a less common concern nowadays) of PHEVs turns many consumers off. Why not flip the automaker an extra couple of grand for a conventional hybrid, or go all-in with an EV? How else to explain the decline and demise of the Chevrolet Volt?

A vehicle like the Volt (yes, it’s technically a series hybrid, but it works out just the same) would suit me just fine right now. Plenty of plug-in range and a gas generator waiting to fire up should I push it too far. Chances are I wouldn’t have to fill up till summer.

Plug-in hybrids probably aren’t your bag… and that’s okay! But no one likes pumping gas while wearing a t-shirt over their face and plastic bags on their hands, then watching their gas gauge like a cheating spouse. Just for today, put yourself in my mindset. Which PHEV currently on the market (or scheduled to land this year) would get your buy?

[Image: General Motors]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

79 Comments on “QOTD: Gas Pump Workaround?...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    330e is at least on my radar. I’ll have to see what sort of real world acceleration times it gets though.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I didn’t even know that was a thing. Looked interesting though.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I’ve driven the F30 version of the 330e and it is a nifty hybrid system that BMW offers. It felt pretty much exactly the same as a 330i and the price premium really wasn’t too bad.

        I haven’t driven one yet, but the G20 330i has largely received good reviews so if the 330e is just like it and it can trap at 100mph I think it is an interesting proposition.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The 330e is about a six second car to sixty mph. My CT6E is slightly quicker in the low 5’s, or a couple of tenths off of CT6 3.0TT. We picked up a 2018 CT6E with 575 miles for $38K or about half price end of March before retail closing started.

      On our 25-35 mph drives we can see 40+ miles on battery using regen at stops with only brake usage is to hold the car at stoplights.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        The “official” BMW times are like 5.9 but I’m seeing some European tests around 5.5 so hopefully that trasnlates over here.

        The CT6e is fine, but you can’t buy a new one in the US any longer and it when it was offered it started at $75K compared to a ’21 330e that starts at $45K.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          I bought my 2018 CT6E brand new, untitled with 575 miles on the clock last month. It was half off MSRP but this was a unicorn at this price. There are half dozen 2018 CT6E for sale that are brand new with close to $25K off MSRP.

  • avatar
    2manycars

    Oh, please. Wipe down the nozzle or wear gloves. There is no circumstance I can imagine that would make me want to have a plug-in hybrid or electric car in my garage.

    I don’t care what millenials, enviro-weenies, or governments want and will be sticking with internal combustion. It may go away at some point but not likely in my lifetime.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      PHEVs are still internal combustion.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “I don’t care what millenials, enviro-weenies,”

      Sorry most of us own them because we LOVE the way they drive.

      I own 3 V8 powered boats that will burn through a gallon of gas faster than you can say “Small Block Chevy”……….LOL

    • 0 avatar
      warrant242

      As an expendable, er “essential” worker, thinking of all the things I touch every day…

      …I have to say the bar for article content is getting pretty low.

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        Agreed. Think about all the workers in your local grocery stores, and there have been no significant outbreaks among them anywhere in the country. In my area, you can feel the tension as people and our economy are ready to let loose. There is still reason for care and precaution, and perhaps stay-at-home orders in places like NYC where everyone is crammed in and using public transportation, but out here it’s time to let this thing loose.

        The models (which all assumed significant social distancing precautions) were far overblown. Score one for the “evil” U.S. healthcare system. Time to get back to work.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          Not to be harsh, Saul, but…Are we nationally renowned epidemiologists stating the consensus of our profession? If not, then maybe we should all just sit down, zip it on this subject, and stay out of the way while the professionals do their work.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          @saultigh: the original laissez-faire approach of the POTUS and some Republican governors to the pandemic, has resulted in the following crucial statistic. Despite comprising less than 4.5% of the world’s population the USA accounts for more than 20% of COVID cases.

          • 0 avatar
            bullnuke

            “Despite comprising less than 4.5% of the world’s population the USA accounts for more than 20% of COVID cases.” Might be better to say, “more than 20% of ACCURATELY REPORTED/DISCLOSED COVID cases.”.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @bullnuke – even jurisdictions that are aggressively testing haven’t captured all of the cases. The USA hasn’t been capturing all deaths in their data. I don’t believe any data out of China. I bet that their death rates are double what was reported.

          • 0 avatar
            forward_look

            And how many are constituents of Cuomo and De Blasio? Ahem.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @forward: It is the federal government that has access to international contacts and information, funds the CDC and is responsible for disseminating this information to the states.

            The White House fumbled the ball badly. Giving out erroneous information and downplaying the pandemic until it was too late.

            It seems that the POTUS and his supporters are trying frantically to ‘pass the buck’.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Oh Saul, I had to laugh the other day when I overheard these three epidemiologists arguing over who knew the most about cars. The first epidemiologist said that HE knew more, because he read Motor Trend magazine. The second epidemiologist said that HE knew more about cars, because he watched that car show with the snotty English guy. The third epidemiologist leaped to his feet and said you’re both wrong, because HE knew the very most about cars, because he lurked at TTAC

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          “Agreed. Think about all the workers in your local grocery stores, and there have been no significant outbreaks among them anywhere in the country.”

          You were saying?

          http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2020/04/11/coronavirus-grocery-store-workers-kroger-meijer-reported-dead/2976800001/

          Try again?

          “Time to get back to work.”

          you first.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @warrant242 – “thinking of all the things I touch every day”

        Despite all of the articles floating around the internet about SARS-CoV-2 surviving on surfaces for 5-7 days, it actually is a surface threat for an average of 2 hours.

        @SaulTigh – “Score one for the “evil” U.S. healthcare system.”

        Many hospitals in that US health care system are laying off doctors, nurses and other allied staff because elective surgeries are way down. The USA “for profit” system only excels at high “throughput”, low risk medical procedures. It doesn’t rate very well for chronic care and as we have seen, pandemic response.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “I don’t care what millenials, enviro-weenies, or governments want and will be sticking with internal combustion. It may go away at some point but not likely in my lifetime.”

      yes, yes, we know. We know you can’t deal with the fact that you’re such an insignificant nobody that the only thing you can do in order to feel the slightest bit important is to brag about how much oil you intend to burn.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      At least with PHEV and plugging in at home a tank of gas could last close to 1,000 miles before the gas may go stale and your handling gas at the pump will be far and few.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        “It seems that the POTUS and his supporters are trying frantically to ‘pass the buck’.”

        Funny thing that ~ you’d think the “!LI’BRAL MEDIA”! would be all over this if it’s true….

        Remember how trump yelled so much about ‘being responsible’ until he was elected then suddenly everything is someone else’s fault .

        The one thing alt righties can’t stand is the plain truth .

        It makes it difficult to be a true Conservative .

        The fear filled, cowardly mouth breathers have _nothing_ to fear because the dnc couldn’t dump piss out of a boot with the instructions printed on the heel much less win an important election .

        FOUR MORE YEARS ! .

        DONALD TRUMP IN 2020 ! .

        -Nate
        (BTW: plenty of grocery store workers are infected, that’s why they’re all hiring like mad, easier to hide from the facts and live in abject fear I guess)

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I bought a 2017 Volt in early October 19′, it is truly an amazing car. I could get 40-47 miles on electric, keeping in mind I don’t drive for economy. The gas engine would kick in seamlessly and would get 50 mpg on the gas assist. The Volt is a great car and for **some** it makes a lot of financial sense; for me it did not.
    I sold the car 12/28/19 on CL for what I was in it, which is a small miracle.

    The downside of any electric drivetrain car: Insurance companies hate them. My insurance doubled again when my 16 YO was put on the policy; suddenly I was paying 2k a year for 250/500 coverage on a car that I paid 20k for. That math does not work.

    Our electric bill went up $50 about $50 a month as we did not have any option to plug in the car at work place. The final issue is back seat was too small for my teenage boys to sit comfortably so we ended up driving the Suburban more when we went out as a family, when prior to that we would take the Lacrosse which had a spacious back seat.

    My verdict is if you drive greater than 12k miles a year and/or you do not mind not carrying comp/collision insurance than a Volt works. It really is a great car to drive; quiet, comfortable, and very fast.
    In the end, we figured out with the kid now driving himself to practice and work we could go have one less rig. I can drive my vette’ and when the weather is no good commandeer the kids 4×4 01′ Frontier and he can get to school the old fashioned way.

    • 0 avatar
      watersketch

      Morgan – you bring up a great point about insurance costs. As a parent of 2 teen drivers I have seen my insurance costs more than double to about $400/month.

      Will soon be looking at strategies like change cars, cut insurance limits, drop collision, comprehensive, whatever it takes. The kids have done the math and figures they could Uber everywhere they want to go for nearly the same cost.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        I was appalled at the increase. My Lacrosse was $350 every 6 months, the Volt went to $500..then 1k every 6 with the kid. What frustrated me is that we clearly have a car for the teen to drive on the policy; 2001 Nissan Fronter 5 MT with liability coverage only. I shopped every company and shockingly found Allstate to have the best deal. Geico and Travelers were close to 7k per year!

        I can’t even imagine what my costs would be if I had a Tesla…So, for me, selling the Volt and DD’ing the vette & Suburban (wife) actually saves us $$ even factoring in the gas though for now the gas is a nonfactor. I have not dropped the coverages on the Burb’ or Vette; both have decent values even though they are old..that will most likely be the next step in 1 year when junior #2 gets licensed.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I’d say insurance companies hate the Volt, we replaced my wife’s C-Max with a C-Max Energi, yes insurance did go up a couple of dollars since the Energi is top trim with all the options and the other one was a base model with no options, both are 2013.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Our 2018 CT6E was new and half off with 575 miles. I would have considered a ELR or Volt but with the dogs frequently in the back seat they wouldn’t be able to lay down and stretch out. The 40+ miles on battery is more than enough for our weekend shopping plus I can plug in at work to lower vostsk.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Now that the weather has warmed up in Minnesota, I can’t remember the last time the ICE in the Volt has run but pretty sure it has been well over a month. Pretty good considering this car get driven every day. In that same time the ‘Hoe has only been started to move it out of the garage or driveway when necessary.

    Even delayed picking up my new v-nose enclosed snowmobile trailer today as that would require putting gas in the ‘Hoe as it is a 150 mile round trip to pick it up. Luckily w/COVID the dealer has no problem letting it sit on his lot for 2 more weeks.

  • avatar
    ScarecrowRepair

    What about those companies which fill tanks at work? Do they make house calls? I never used any of them, don’t remember their names. Seems like nowadays would be a great time for expansion to homes. They’d have to charge more, I reckon.

    • 0 avatar
      forward_look

      Be sure to call your insurance company and explain how much gasoline you’re storing.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      They would probably charge you more than the tank of gas for the trip, but I’d bet they would do it because their sales have likely fallen dramatically. They really need to show up and either fill a couple of tanks on big equipment or have 10-12 regular vehicles to top off for their business model to work.

      • 0 avatar
        PandaBear

        They will be hurt like the mom and pop gas station owners, and may likely need to get a loan or VC funding to tough it out.

        Layoff for sure, I feel for those drivers.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    Kia Niro would suit me well except I don’t have a place to plug it, so I might consider a regular hybrid someday.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    I can’t wait for Steph to regale us with tales about his fear of touching doorknobs.

    Watching millennials shamelessly freak out in public seems to be what the internet is all about nowadays.

  • avatar
    retrocrank

    Wear cotton gloves (what Eric Jones called “Swedish Driving Gloves,” from the hardware store), wet them with denatured alcohol diluted 2:1 with water from a small spray bottle in the car, and pump the gas. Take off the gloves, put them in the door pocket, and drive home. Probably should be wearing a mask, put it on before the gloves, and take it off after removing the still-damp gloves. Wash hands with soap and water. Same principle applies for going to the grocery or any other place where potentially contagious humans have touched stuff.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      I go to the store in a positive pressure Level 4 suit and have my wife pay out the hose from the compressor in the truck of my car. Needless to say, I’m not a fan of automatic doors.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    Not a huge selection PHEVs out there to pick from.
    Alex on Autos has a video discussion of the Prius Prime, and how it is in fact the most efficient car out there save for one ( I think) Tesla model. His thorough discussion does apply to the PHEV genre in general. The conclusion is that at the fleet level, the best use of battery resources is in PHEVs, rather than in EV’s with giant batteries that exist for their reserve range. He makes the case that using gas and and a gas motor as the reserve to extended range of a vehicle is more efficient. Search out his video if anyone is interested.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    No fear and looting at the gas pump for me. I have loose leather gloves that I can put on and take off without touching the exterior surfaces. I do the fuel pump push buttons with my index finger wrapped in a double layer of windshield paper towel, and being deft with the credit card I can insert and withdraw it without contacting the pump surfaces. Would love it if the pump would do Apple Pay.

  • avatar
    JMII

    My brother drives a hybrid Porsche Cayenne. With the gas/electric combo its gets 70 MPG. Acceleration is impressive with or without the electric boost. Vehicle purchase price and maintenance costs aside it checks all the boxes: SUV? Yes! High quality interior? Yes! Cool brand? Yes!

    As for gas pumps I have hand sanitizer in all my vehicles now. I’ll clean up after I fill up. I’m hitching up my boat trailer tomorrow and my V8 truck will be dragging it 200 miles round trip this weekend.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Of course, my Ioniq EV requires no pump stops, but if I had to choose a PHEV I’d look at the Ioniq version first. I really like the car.

    For a straight hybrid, I’d consider either the Niro or the Ioniq, or RAV4.

    • 0 avatar
      EGSE

      @SCE – ” I’d look at the Ioniq version first. I really like the car.”

      You piqued my curiosity so I checked out the Ioniq PHEV on the Hyundai website. It looks impressive and the MSRP is reasonable for what it offers. What trim level did you opt for, and what would you do different if you had to do it over again if you don’t mind my asking? Seat comfort and position (especially height above the floor) is of special interest; I’m a lanky 6′ 1″ and the seats in my ’07 Civic are lacking on both counts. Any other observations are also welcome.

      My sister is car shopping and the SE trim is within her price window. I’ll suggest she consider it; a PHEV would be ideal for her use case and mine as well. I’ll tag along with her when we can go to a dealer. Maryland is a CARB state so they’re sold here. Thanks in advance…..

  • avatar
    Add Lightness

    Prius Prime.
    I have many other wheeled devices to entertain myself with velocity and just need a transportation appliance. A zillion non-plugin versions used as taxis is a pretty good testimonial to it’s durability.

    Hypermiling and searching out charging stations has become my new fullfilling automotive adventure as the golden age of motoring is long gone in North America.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Proposed QOTD: When is, was or will be the peak golden age of motoring – and why?

      Suggestion – it wasn’t pre-seatbelts/collapsible steering column/safety glass (unless you want to go *way* back to Model T days). It wasn’t 55mph (’73-’86?). It is likely not circa 2035 shapeless autonomous pod tech.

      Vehicle capability has been on a general upward trend for 40 years, while infrastructure has been on a general downward trend for at least 40. Those probably intersect at some point, but I’m jumping ahead.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        It was way back before the Model T got cheap, when cars were a plaything for a select rich few.

        The paradox of cars is that they are only time-saving devices if few people have one. If everyone has one, land use changes to accommodate them, everything gets farther apart, and they no longer save anyone time.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        It is now. Even mundane appliances are as fast as the supercars peoe had on their walls back in the 80s.

        Style wise? early to mid 90s but overall? Now

        • 0 avatar
          EGSE

          @Art Vandelay

          A lot of the V6 mid-size sedans are as quick as the 308 I used to have. And you don’t have to fiddle with them near as much to keep them going. We’re not at “peak styling” but I’d say we’re doing quite well now.

          (G0d Almighty does this commenting format ***SUCK***!!!)

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Pretty much at peak now, everyone has their own feelings wants and likes .

            I like my oldies, I’m lucky that I live in the Desert where running a 36 year old car (my newest one) isn’t the chore it was when I lived in the snow belt and our 10 year old 1950’s vehicles were all badly rusted out….

            In my 30’s I began to plan for my eventual old age so although I have little actual $ I’m doing O.K. and can afford gasoline and new tires etc…

            In the 1970’s I had no $ and fished old tires from the trade ins, I still had lots of fun and enjoyed the older vehicles every where but modern times are better in most ways (says the creaky old geezer, now GET OFFA MY LAWN !).

            -Nate

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    I picked up a PHEV for the wife Jan 2019. It is a 2013 C-Max Energi. I knew the PHEV Escape, Corsair and potentially the Bronco II along with the now named Mach-e and wanted to see how the wife would do with plugging in. It has went well, I’ve been the one that forgot to plug it in, I think she has only done it 2 or 3 times in the 15 months we’ve owned it. Of course if desired it will text or email you that it is at a known charging spot and wants to be plugged in.

    The wife definitely likes visiting the gas pump less frequently and it does save money. The math worked out that running it on electricity at 12.5 kwh was about 1/2 the cost of running it on ~$3/gallon gas.

    So yeah it is likely that a Corsair, Escape, or Bronco PHEV will be in our future.

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    I forgot whether it is a pandemic doctor or CDC warned that gas pump is actually one of the place where coronavirus can pass around, so if you are just cruising for fun, you do increase your chance of contracting something for nothing.

    Just stay home and don’t drive if you are not getting groceries or going to work. Anything you can do will help make this better sooner.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      snopes.com/fact-check/covid19-gas-pump-handles/

      Unless you are aware otherwise there doesn’t seem to be any official concerns related to transmission from fuel pumps beyond that they are something outside. So risk isn’t zero but it doesn’t seem to be a unique hot spot either.

      Beyond that it is the refueling that is the risky activity, not the driving itself. Unless you live in a place where extra travel is specifically restricted an EV owner or someone with excess fuel range driving around recreationally doesn’t appear worse than going for a bicycle ride.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    I simply grab a windshield wiping paper towel from the dispenser next to the gas pump and use it as a makeshift glove between me and the pump handle, keypad, etc. Then into the trash it goes.

    Add a quick just-in-case hand cleanse with a disinfecting wet wipe in the car. Done.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    It happened that I had filled up the Highlander Hybrid right before the lockdown started. I don’t drive much, especially now, and it still has a bit over half a tank.

    I’d just skip it and drive the Bolt, which charges at home, except that we’re trying to minimize trips so when I do go out I tend to bring home a mountain of stuff.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    I’m curious to see how Toyota’s redesign on the Mirai works. I’m open to trying a hydrogen hybrid.

  • avatar
    Spike_in_Brisbane

    Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV. It seems to give the driver the most control over the PHEV system. I like to be able to choose electric or gas, choose to save the battery capacity for later or top it up now while driving. Pure electric range is OK at about 40km. A very clever car.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Oh, crap ~

    I mostly drive my Diesels and everyone knows DieselHeads are all filthy mouth breathers…. =8-) .

    Luckily most filling stations have some sort of towels these days , I should prolly begin using them on the pomp nozzle instead of waiting until finished to wipe my hands with them….

    The other day I was filling up and noticed the young guy ahead of me freaking out and using 10 towels on the handle…

    I just wish the rain would quit so I could ride my Moto .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    pragmatic

    No self service in NJ, so I’m good. That said last time I got gas in the Vette was going to donate blood in mid-March. Jag was last filled in February as was the pick-up. If I keep driving like this I shouldn’t need any gas until May.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    I filled up for $1.35 today. That was pretty sweet, and I took nothing other than my normal precautions, which is to say I’ve carried a bottle of hand sanitizer in my car for years and use it after every fill up anyway.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    None of them. I don’t drive enough to care. Gas, even at “normal” prices (nevermind the current $1.49/gal) doesn’t cost enough for me to care. None of the hybrids are entertaining enough for me to care.

    The cars I drive most (Fiata, GTI, BMW wagon) easily get 30-35mpg, and even my 16mpg Land Rover Disco doesn’t get driven enough for it to matter. There is no point in spending a LOT of money to save a little money, but math is hard, I guess. My next vehicle purchase will probably be an ace of base stickshift Gladiator, just of the heck of it (assuming I can find one sufficiently discounted).

    So at this point, the only reason I am buying a car is for the fun of it, because at the rate I am putting miles on my three daily drivers could very well last me the rest of my driving life.

    The author should really chill out and go for a nice drive. I’ve been taking my Fiata out for evening spins every couple of days and enjoying the lack of traffic. Just wish there were more entertaining roads around here – in that respect I wish I was up at my place in Maine. Fabulous driving roads all around me up there. SW FL, not so much. But still a nice drive to the Gulf is a pleasant way to socially isolate. And for darned sure pumping gas worries me far less than getting groceries (which barely worries me at all). This weekend if the weather is nice I might take a round-trip to Sebring for the heck of it – then I can say I have been there.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    @SaulTigh, Not true. In Ontario there have been a number of grocery store workers diagnosed and at least one has passed away.

    As testing in the USA is behind most other 1st world nations there may be a number who have the virus or possibly even passed away who have not been identified.

    Meant as a reply to the earlier comment regarding grocery store workers, but this site is getting technically less user friendly everyday.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    There are lots of terrific PHEV choices. For a CUV, the Mitsubishi Outlander doesn’t have much of an EV range but it ‘does’ have one ace-in-the-hole: DCFC capability. No other PHEV has that (yet). Now, if the upcoming RAV4 PHEV includes DCFC, it would easily trump the Mitsu.

    For max hauling capacity, though, it’s the Pacifica Hybrid. You can stuff a lot of humans/cargo in one of those without burning any gas for ~34 miles.

    If a sedan will do, the Honda Clarity has an EV range of 47 miles. And if you don’t mind buying used, a second generation Volt, although smaller than the Clarity, has the same range and, unlike the Clarity, is a hatchback. Just make sure to get the top-tier version with the 7.2kWh charger. Charge times of lesser Volts aren’t so great.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      The OEM consensus seems to be that a) Level 2 charge time doesn’t matter on a PHEV and b) DCFC on a PHEV is unnecessary.

      Annoying as it is to me, as a Volt owner with a 3.3 kW Level 2 onboard charger, they’re probably right. The batteries on these things aren’t huge: you charge it overnight from your regular garage outlet and you’re full by morning. If you run out of juice, that’s what the ICE is for. DCFC makes no financial sense on the Mitsu; you spend 15 minutes and several gallons worth of gas to get less than a gallon worth of range.

      My next car will be all-electric. Unless my income takes a dump, of course, in which case my next car will be “getting my ass out of bed an hour earlier and riding my damn bicycle to work.” Probably be a lot better for my health and hey, that’s still one less exhaust pipe on the road. If you don’t count the emissions from my ill-advised cheese intake, anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        Hey now HotPotato ~ let’s not go crazy, O.K. ? .

        Life with out cheese would be like, well, like _death_ .

        We have some here who actually enjoy riding their bicycles to work around Los Angeles, to me it’s a death wish , think : you’d be sharing the crowded road with _ME_ .

        -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        rudiger

        The catch on charge times not mattering is whether or not an EV owner has the ability to charge at home and overnight. Without that capacity, charge times are, indeed, a significant factor.

        In fact, I see more than a few Teslas (usually Model 3’s) regularly camped-out at free public Level 2 chargers for >six hours. I just don’t get how someone can pay Tesla money and not have figured out how to keep the damn thing charged without seeming to have to rely on free public chargers. I can only surmise that they hadn’t done their research before buying to figure out how far and expensive it would actually be to regularly use the Supercharger network to keep their hotrod luxury EV going, and it’s irritating that everyone else with EVs that have much shorter charge times have to suffer for it.

        • 0 avatar
          -Nate

          *THIS* .

          I know a few ‘free’ (means _I_ pay not you) charging stations and they’re almost always full up, the young folks inside (never anyone over 30) reading, napping, smoking and so on…

          I even know of one recently added by the City Of Los Angeles in South Central, L.A., needless to say there’s never been a Tesla within five miles of it =8-) .

          REALLY good fried chicken and clams right across the boulevard tho’ .

          -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            rudiger

            There are different types of ‘free’ charging stations. Yeah, the most common ones are at places with public funding like public parks, local government agencies, etc.

            But there are also those where a business has installed one in a ‘value-added’ situation where they’re hoping on the more well-heeled to stop and patronize their business. The business, not taxes, pay for those.

            Either way, I’m surprised to find any free stations not monopolized by Teslas. The problem isn’t a Tesla using a free station; rather, the problem is there are Tesla owners who take advantage of using a free station by using it for extended periods. The more progressive locations will try and avoid this by posting a time-limit with an appropriate penalty (i.e., ticket and/or towed). In fact, the really enlightened free charge station owner can set up the station in such a way that limits the time to charge and will assess someone who goes over that time with a ‘parking’ fee.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Yes, the ‘free’ charging station I was thinking of is always full of Teslas and nothing else .

            I got a post card in the mail yesterday saying the largest free charging station in the U.S.A. just opened, up on the roof of some building, I dropped that card into the shredder with all my junk, old bills etc. .

            -Nate

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    @SaulTigh: Another grocery store shut down due to COVID. A store in Vaughan Ontario (Northwest suburb of Toronto) closed after 8 more of its workers test positive. This despite the store being closed and sanitized a couple of weeks prior.

    So much for your assumption/prediction.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      that’s what happens when we let people believe that reality is just a matter of opinion. if he doesn’t believe any grocery store workers caught it, then no grocery store worker has caught it.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • mcs: “The people working on this problem don’t even know what they don’t know. You can’t work on a problem if...
  • Art Vandelay: A beam axle can be made to handle (See the Fiesta ST), however in the price range this is likely to go...
  • Art Vandelay: hope in one hand and take a dump in the other and see which one gets full first.
  • AnalogMan: “Can a turbo revive the Mazda 3?” Sure. But only if they offer it with a 6 speed manual. It...
  • Art Vandelay: A 1994 Taurus was an attractive car and still is. The 1992 Crown Victoria IS the best looking of the...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber