By on January 6, 2020

2014 Mitsubishi Mirage in Colorado junkyard, LH front view - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsAfter better than 1,800 Junkyard Finds, Junkyard Treasures, and Junkyard Gems since I started doing this stuff in 2007, the oldest discarded vehicle I’ve shot is a 1941 Plymouth Special Deluxe sedan in Denver (that’s not counting a lot of older junked cars I’ve shot with ancient film cameras, of course).

Before today, the newest junkyard car I’ve documented was this 2012 Fiat 500, but now I’ve got a car that might still have had That New Car Smell if it hadn’t been cruelly abused every day of its short life.

2014 Mitsubishi Mirage in Colorado junkyard, fender tape repair - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsI see plenty of affordable and/or rental-spec cars in the one-to-five-year-old range in these car graveyards, of course, but nearly all of them have been in instant-total-depreciation crashes or fires (with the exception of the Chrysler 200, which seems to be so unwanted that it gets scrapped rather than put its owners through the hassle of a brake-pad change). This car was in a crash, sure, but just a fender-bender that shoved around some sheet metal and plastic. The owner found a replacement fender from a burned car, applied some tape to the mangled plastic bits, and the young Mitsu went back on the road for a while.

2014 Mitsubishi Mirage in Colorado junkyard, hood - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsWhen you know you’re a car’s final owner, you can do stuff like this to it. Might as well go all-out with a full-on Groovalicious Purple Princess of Peace treatment, I say.

2014 Mitsubishi Mirage in Colorado junkyard, interior - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsI don’t know how it’s possible to trash a car interior made with harshly cheap (but tough) modern materials so badly in just five years that it needs Pep Boys seat covers to hide the damage, but such is the case with this car.

2014 Mitsubishi Mirage in Colorado junkyard, instrument cluster - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsSoon after the launch of the current-generation of Mirage in North America for the 2014 model year, it became fashionable for automotive journalists to issue sneeringly scathing negative reviews of this cheap little transportation appliance. Unless you’re stupid, they implied, you’ll get a Versa or Sonic or — wiser still — spend the extra money on a Fit or Yaris. As Jason Torchinsky explains so well, part of the reason for the onslaught of negative American press for the Mirage was the fact that we’re all starved for really bad cars these days (say, as bad as the wretched Subaru Justy or hateful first-gen Hyundai Excel) and we all want to have fun thumbing through the thesaurus for suitably cutting negative words. Mitsubishi makes a great target for this because they don’t have many vehicles available here, and so getting frowns from their PR staffers or even de-invited to their not-so-upscale press events doesn’t matter a whole lot.

2014 Mitsubishi Mirage in Colorado junkyard, hood badge - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsHowever, the Mirage came with (and maybe still does come with) a great warranty for the price, which was low, low, low, and Mitsubishi dealers were eager to negotiate with customers who might have received the brush-off from other purveyors of new cars. I drove the 2014 Mirage and found it to be a perfectly competent point-A-to-point-B machine, capable of driving up Grapevine Hill at 80 mph with the air conditioning on. Air conditioning! Imagine having air conditioning (or even power windows) in a Ford Festiva! We have become spoiled in the last couple of decades.

2014 Mitsubishi Mirage in Colorado junkyard, RH rear view - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsSure, the Versa has nicer interior plastic and the Fit is way more fun to drive, but let’s say you’re 23 years old and The Man will fire you from your entry-level job — to which you just barely cling by the most fragile of fingernails — if you’re late to work even once, and you endure a hope-I-die-soon 70-minute suburb-to-suburb freeway commute on the cruel stop-and-go highways of Atlanta or Los Angeles or Houston. You don’t give a rat’s ass about the tactile pleasures of the goddamn dashboard plastic or the barely-detectable roughness of a three-cylinder engine. You want a cheap car that runs every day and that will be covered by a heavy-duty warranty — for years — when something breaks, and you don’t want to get jerked around by a dealership yelling at you about your lack of a credit history.

Such a purchase wouldn’t have made sense for me, of course, because I’ve spent my entire driving life keeping terrible old hoopties running for next to nothing, but I understand the appeal of the Mirage (which, as you can see in this side-by-side comparison with a 1996 Eclipse, isn’t even all that small) for ordinary people who just want to get to their jobs. In fact, I liked the Mirage so much that I went back in 2017 and reviewed the GT. Yeah, I have a soft spot for Mitsubishis, ever since I yearned for a new Starion when in high school.

2014 Mitsubishi Mirage in Colorado junkyard, automatic gearshift - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsAll that said, the Mirage depreciates hard, and so many of them meet this fate when they get damaged in a way that would be non-fatal for, say, a Kia Rio. Even the value-hemorrhaging Fiat 500 remains a few years behind the Mirage, in terms of the examples I see during my junkyard travels. Neither car reaches the disposability levels of the Chrysler 200 (itself based on a Mitsubishi platform), of course, but then nothing does.


Rainbow your life!


That Indonesian-market ad was all about the wonderful dreamworld you’ll enter when driving a Mirage. In the United States, the TV commercials emphasized one thing: CHEAPNESS.


This Japanese-market ad may cause permanent eye damage, with its pungent colors and searing contrasts. Why didn’t we get that electric-green paint here?


The Mirage may be a Japanese design, but assembly takes place in Thailand. Thais can buy a sedan version (known as the Attrage) now, and it looks action-packed!


In Mexico, the Mirage sedan gets badged as the Attitude. LA GUERRA COMIENZA.


The German Mirage goes by the Space Star name, and it’s like a muscular gymnast.


The Netherlands. Truly a world car.

If you like these Junkyard Finds, you’ll find links to 1,800+ more at the Junkyard Home of the Murilee Martin Lifestyle Brand™.

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52 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 2014 Mitsubishi Mirage...”


  • avatar

    We did that electric green here.

    All lamentations aside, its a cheap car for cheap car people and as the thrid “worst” car sold in the US in the past decade (1st? smart. 2nd? 500L), its bad only because its cheap.

    It’s slow. Its unattractive. But it gets the job done. I’ve been buying these 15-16MY with middling miles in the 50s/60s for $3500-4500 and selling them for $5995-6995. How can you really go wrong when its still under warranty?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “which, as you can see in this side-by-side comparison with a 1996 Eclipse”

    That is a fine DSM product but I believe its the Eagle Vision (yes, being pedantic).

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    “Sure, the Versa has nicer interior plastic and the Fit is way more fun to drive, but let’s say you’re 23 years old and The Man will fire you from your entry-level job — to which you just barely cling by the most fragile of fingernails — if you’re late to work even once… You don’t give a rat’s ass about the tactile pleasures of the goddamn dashboard plastic or the barely-detectable roughness of a three-cylinder engine. You want a cheap car that runs every day and that will be covered by a heavy-duty warranty — for years — when something breaks”

    This, this, this. There are a lot of people living paycheck to paycheck for whom a single missed day of work means instant dismissal and a probable slide into an inescapable debt spiral. They do not buy new cars because they are uppity; they do it because they don’t have the luxury of absorbing cash flow dips and spikes.

    This seems like a good place to mention Jack Baruth’s excellent “You Gotta Be Rich To Own A Cheap Car” TTAC piece again, too.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I was thinking the same thing…I really liked the ‘tactile pleasures of the goddam dashboard plastic’. Great wordsmithing there Murilee.

    • 0 avatar
      Lokki

      “You gotta be rich to own a cheap car”.

      I used to work with a guy who would go on and on and on about Sam Walton who drove an old pickup truck. I finally had enough of it and told him exactly that: You gotta be rich to own a cheap car. If Sam Walton got a cigarette burn in the upholstery of his truck he could just replace the seat. If the truck wouldn’t start one cold morning he could just take a different car. However a poor guy needs reliability AND predictability of what his expenses are going to be every month.

      The true evil of the Ford Focus transmission fiasco is not that transmissions failed per se, but the breach of trust by Ford in putting unproven technology in an entry level car and refusing to take care of the problems Suddenly driving a Focus became like swimming in waters with a hungry Great White Shark in them. You become hyper alert, always wondering, “Is today the day?”

      “ More than 1.9 million unhappy customers who purchased or leased a Ford Focus or Fiesta say the company lied to unload cars with faulty transmissions on unsuspecting buyers and then blamed the drivers for problems they experienced.”

      https://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/ford/2019/05/09/ford-focus-fiesta-transmission-lawsuit/1119773001/

      That’s 1.9 million people who will never let anyone in their immediate circle buy another Ford for the rest of their lives.

      The Mirage on the other hand, may have lousy everything but it’s reliable lousy everything with a real warranty. That’s something a poor guy can live with.

      • 0 avatar
        cprescott

        Amen. I owned FOMOCO products ever since I learned to drive. I fixed a 1964 Ford Falcon so that it would get me through college. Ever since then it has been a Ford or a Lincoln in my parking space until last January when my 178k, 22 year old Escort was starting to have a cascade of issues. I really would have bought a Ford again – something with a manual transmission and that was inexpensive – but Ford left me – they orphaned their way out of my market and they made buying a manual transmission Focus/Fiesta a bad buying decision with escalating depreciation on even used car purchases even with manual transmissions. I ended up going with a nice 21k mile 2016 Hyundai Elantra and it has now been with me for a year. 45 mpgs constantly per tank of fuel and the car looks and smells new. I’m sold. I’m a former Ford customer and my loyalty is a significant concept to me. I won’t switch just to switch, but I will buy repeatedly if I have good luck with a brand.

      • 0 avatar
        Darkdowgow

        I could not say it better. For the record I have talked 4 people out of a ford purchase since my focus. 2 of which were f150s. A fake warranty is no warranty

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “they do it because they don’t have the luxury of absorbing cash flow dips and spikes.”

      Such is the tyranny of poverty.

      • 0 avatar
        PeriSoft

        “Such is the tyranny of poverty.”

        Yep. The one thing a lot of better-off people don’t realize about being poor is how expensive it is. This has a knock-on effect on policymaking, because people say, “Oh, if I made less money I could do this and this” – and yeah, *you* could, but an actual, real-life poor person can’t, because they don’t have the same credit rating, infrastructure, support system, reputation, and so on.

        There are a dozen little things too – my wife recently went to the hospital to support a new acquaintance who got sick and couldn’t find childcare. It turns out that this family was pretty desperately poor, and in the event some of the family members who showed up later on actually got booted out of the hospital. This was a real shock to me: I’ve been there a ton of times, sometimes not really during visiting hours, but it’s never an issue. Nobody has ever tried to stop me. But when you’re truly desperate, when you’re on the lowest social strata, people notice. You’re treated differently.

        People who are better off never even notice. We walk in like we own the place and are never questioned. But imagine this family dealing with this kind of treatment, multiplied times the hundreds of times every year it happens – everywhere. Every hospital, store, school – you can’t just walk in to a place, head held high, and get a better job. I can. I could. But they can’t.

        That’s something that hadn’t occurred to me before that experience, but it shows how being poor – not just “don’t have money right now” but *poor* – isn’t just a financial state. It’s a stench that follows you everywhere and never lets go, and makes it all the harder for you to drag your way out no matter how enterprising and hardworking you are.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I once heard “poor people will always be poor people” and I agree its not just a financial condition but a state of being.

          I suppose I was “rich” for six or seven years as I had three paid off cars, made rent no problem, and life was flexible enough that I had time when I needed it. Now I’m poor with real estate and a car payment.

          • 0 avatar
            dividebytube

            My grandparents were poor – no running water, beater cars that my grandpa got for $100, and a sink that emptied straight into the backyard.

            their 8 kids? I’ve got a multi-millionaire uncle, a dad who is pretty well off… and the rest, as far as I know, have exceeded their parent’s income. But that was a different era.

            Me? I make less than my dad did when he retired 20 years ago at the age of 55.

        • 0 avatar
          mzr

          This is why people who just say anything along the lines of “just work harder”, “get a better paying job” or the ancient nugget of “bootstraps!” really don’t know what they’re talking about.

          It is also generational. It follows you, and your children.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree. The people who say such things are completely ignorant of reality and apparently have never seen an economic chart since 1990.

            Now this doesn’t excuse atypical Millennial behavior IMO but when one does the math the reality becomes clear: August 15th, 1971.

            https://www.forbes.com/sites/briandomitrovic/2011/08/14/august-15-1971-a-date-which-has-lived-in-infamy/#675b05b4581a

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            “August 15th, 1971.”

            The predictions from that 2011 article have all been proven wrong – 9% unemployment is the new normal, etc. I’m not sure why you posted it.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I would counter though that people who let a car deteriorate to this state (exterior damage excluded…stuff happens and you have to get on the road sometimes) have such an attitude towards money as evidenced by a complete disregard for something that is a massive purchase that they are unlikely to escape living paycheck to paycheck regardless of their income level.

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          I know of an individual who was told by the parts store that a new battery for her vehicle would cost “six hundred dollars.” (After learning better, she had one installed for a little over a hundred.)

          Not sure how you fix this?

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      This seems like a good place to mention Jack Baruth’s excellent “You Gotta Be Rich To Own A Cheap Car” TTAC piece again, too.

      Quite possibly the best piece ever to grace the pages of TTAC

  • avatar
    Jeff Weimer

    The “cheap but reliable/warrantied” new vehicle is absolutely viable. I, like you, kept at used cars well past when I should have. After determining my B5 A4 just wasn’t reliable enough to keep running 650 miles per *week*, I traded it in on a 2012 Cruze Eco. Best car-buying decision I have ever made. I cut my weekly fuel cost by 50%, nearly enough by itself to cover the note; plus no unexpected or even the expected $3K in regular maintenance I was staring at in the upcoming year (clutch and timing belt). Bonus: I never had to take that car into the shop anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      My wife, bless her heart, decided to save some cash by buying a used 2008 Infiniti M35x. Minus a leaking brake caliper, it’s been a reliable car so far. But the mileage is terrible. 15-18mpg mixed driving. Which, even with our limited miles, results in a $200/mo or more in gas.

      Trying to find a more efficient car for her – but one with enough room to handle a 6’7″ teenage son (!!), myself, and a 55 pound dog. I was thinking VW Jetta 1.4T with the 8-speed auto but… VW. Plus she does a fair amount of highway driving and I’m not sure how noisy the interior of the VW is at those speeds.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Does she like driving her Infiniti? Picking up a new car payment to save $100 a month on gas is…think about it.

        • 0 avatar
          dividebytube

          Yeah the math doesn’t work out… except her job pays for mileage… so she could break even.

          And yes she loves the Infiniti even though it is fairly bland compared to her last vehicle, a yellow Mini Cooper S.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            $200 for gas + $100 for maintenance and repair over 1,150 miles at $0.55 per mile would net her $332.50 for depreciation and insurance.

            There’s a promo lease for the base Jetta right now. If you qualify, your first 32,500 miles will cost $0.332 each plus the cost of gas and maintenance. That’s the cheapest way to Jetta, and you’re still probably looking at another $25 a month in service plus $100 in gas for a total of $506.48 a month out of your $632.50 in mileage payments. You’re much better off in the Inifini, unless you really want to drive an economy car instead.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I couldn’t help being interested in this car if they called it the Space Star here. Man, those Germans have a word for everything!

    That said, my friend likes his Mirage. Gets him out of his home in the city to his job in the suburbs every day, reliably and cheaply. That’s all he wanted from the car, and he prefers to spend his money elsewhere.

  • avatar
    pathfinderdoorhandle

    I liked the Starion too, in my mind at the time the most lust-worthy Japanese car since the 240Z and the BRE Datsun 510. Saw this one at the Roar Before The 24 at Daytona on Friday: https://twitter.com/bimmerfan739

  • avatar
    TMA1

    Also, I’m glad to see a Mitsubishi being rebranded as a Dodge, at least somewhere in the world. Not sure how they got away with the TIE Fighters in that commercial though.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    You had me at 80MPH over the Grapevine with the AC on…..

    I know most here endlessly love bagging on base model strippers but there really *IS* a need for them .

    Plus of course my twisted farmer’s cheap ass mind says “! good idea !” even though I still drive old beaters….

    It’s nice to see some understanding and approval of this basic transportation bubble .

    Re : poor ~ it really is a state of mind , I’m broke but certainly not poor although those few who see my little slice of country backwoods living in the city might disagree .

    Little $ is spent on things I don’t perceive value in .

    OTOH, I live in a house with fruit trees and a back yard, not a condo nor apartment .

    Changing how you look at life is the most important step up the ladder of success .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    PentastarPride

    “(with the exception of the Chrysler 200, which seems to be so unwanted that it gets scrapped rather than put its owners through the hassle of a brake-pad change)”

    Sad… I own a 2013 Chrysler 200 and I go above and beyond in servicing and taking care of it. I love that car. It’s washed and waxed every two weeks, clayed every other month. Carpet vacuumed, leather seats cleaned and conditioned every two weeks. Windows Rain-X’ed. Every fluid gets changed at least once a year, at minimum — I still do an oil and filter change every 3k +/- 100 miles (using only Castrol Edge 5w-20 and a Wix or Bosch filter), even though I could go as high as 5k or more. I flush and fill my coolant with distilled water. I rotate my tires every 5k, get an alignment check every year. The first time I took it to the dealer for a drain/refill and filter change of the transmission at 32k — right after I purchased it — the service advisor was actually telling me that I didn’t need to do this but I insisted and forked over the $170 or so with nary a blink of an eye. I’ve done that procedure four times now that I’m at 160k. According to my local CJDR dealer, most people never do it at all.

    Suffice it to say, if my 200 needs a brake-pad change, I do it before I even need to.

    I’m OCD with my other vehicles as well. My wife tells me “hands off” her car for since it’s no use in being OCD with going above and beyond the service intervals as she doesn’t keep vehicles as long as I do and gets rid of just after the warranty is up.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I’m really surprised because he specified the Mitsubishi 200. They seem like sound enough cars. I could totally see people scrapping the Alfa-Romeo 200 because the brake pads are the fifteenth expense and inconvenience incurred in a year. I saw those with major problems starting in 2016.

      • 0 avatar
        PentastarPride

        It would surprise me even more that people would scrap a UF 200 (2015-17), for the simple reason that I figure many would still be in warranty. I wasn’t aware about the brake issues on the second-generation 200, but even still, that should be no reason to scrap a newer car (or even a “newish” car). I wonder if there’s a recall or at least some kind of stopgap in place to alleviate the problem. I do know that there was an issue with the 9-speed ZF 9HP for a short while, but was fixed with a firmware upgrade.

        I do think the JS (first gen) 200 is more reliable of the two, though I do think the second-gen shouldn’t be too bad over the long term. My 200 has the 2.4 GEMA engine and a 62TE trans. I think of the GEMA as the modern reincarnation of the 225 Slant Six — not the fastest, and that’s okay, but it’s a simple engine that will last longer than you want it to, lol. The 3.6 Pentastar is a sturdy engine too. As for the 62TE, I knew that the days of the Ultradrive having issues were pretty much over but was skeptical at first about FCA’s idea of putting a FWD minivan/midsize trans into a heavy-duty commercial van, but apparently they’ve held up very well in the ProMaster vans — I figure if these hold up in the ProMaster for 100k-300k without much fuss, then it should last me indefinitely in my little car.

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      I always wonder how many vehicles became absolute trash because the owners forego repairs thinking they know better than those who wrote the manual and designed the car.

      To put another way, how many people are penny-wise pound-foolish?

      • 0 avatar
        PentastarPride

        I wonder about the people who send a newer, seemingly undamaged car to a junkyard. Do they look at the maintenance or repair estimate, decide to junk the vehicle they have and turn around and go out and buy a new one? After all is said and done, I don’t think they’d be financially ahead in buying another car vs. biting the bullet and doing the maintenance or repair, especially if they maintain their ways of doing things with the next car, and the car after that, ad infinitum. In fact, I think it would be quite the opposite. At minimum, the monthly payment clock resets to zero — and they have 48 to 84 months to go — whereas they’ve made at least several payments worth on the car they’re deciding to scrap.

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          There’s always more to these situations than it appears. But unless Crabspirits shows up, we’ll never know!

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Up here in Canada/TheRustBelt often a vehicle still looks OK ‘on top’ but is beyond reasonable repair underneath.

          Salt, potholes, freeze/thaw cycles, driving a ‘cold’ vehicle in sub-zero temperatures all stress a vehicle. The tin worm being the worst of all longevity problems for vehicles.

          Looks like I may be in the market, 1 year and 25,000kms prior to ‘my plan’ due to the steering rack in my daily driver showing signs of requiring replacement. A job that may be too expensive on a vehicle with a trade in value of about $1,500.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Arthur, before making the call, check rack and pinion prices (new and remanufactured) on rockauto.com – may be less than you expect.

            Trade-in for my daily driver is ridiculously low, but I choose to focus on what my *replacement cost* would be when looking at decisions like this. (Another way to view it would be Cost of the Repair divided by 12 months = Maybe not a bad number for transportation for another year.)

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Looking at the state of this thing, I figure an engine failure die to the factory oil breaking down around 40k and a denied warranty claim when the tech stood a screwdriver up in the sludge in the pan.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    This hateful little crapbox is right where is deserves to be. I’m going to guess that it ended up at its just reward due to a failed JATCO CVT, a horrifically bad transmission if there ever was one. As for Versas, they’re not much better, as they also used JATCO CVTs. Stick with cars that use real automatic transmissions, like the Rio.

    And as for the fender, I don’t think it came off of a burned donor. It looks to me like an unpainted, aftermarket CAPA (insurance company-friendly) fender, a so-called “like kind and quality” part (yeah, right).

  • avatar
    Cobrajet25

    I bought a 2015 Mirage new in late 2014. Mine is red, top-spec, and a 5-speed. It was a hair over $14k, and has every option except navigation and, of course, the CVT.

    The car now has just over 135,000 miles on it, and all it has needed is consumables and a clutch cable. These cars are RELENTLESSLY reliable. I know of one that has nearly 300k, and it is still on it’s original clutch. The engine has never been apart. Even the CVT versions are very reliable. Problems with the CVT trans in this car are few and far between. I personally know five people with Mirages, and nobody has any problems with them.

    The car has gotten over 40 mpg on nearly every tank, and it has been hands-down the most reliable car I have ever owned. It has hot heat and and cold AC. It has great headlights. It has a great turning radius. It is reasonably comfortable. It has features that would have been unheard of in an economy car ten years ago.

    If I had to critique it, I would note that it is relatively noisy, the interior plastics are easily scratched, the suspension is crashy and under-dampened, and it eats stock brake pads. That said, I do not regret buying it for a minute. Were it to meet the same fate as the subject of this post I would be down at the Mitsubishi dealership the next day buying a brand new one.

  • avatar
    inuvik

    I have owned a 2015 Mirage since new and it has been ultra reliable and efficient. No, it’s not a sports sedan and doesn’t try to be. Gets me where I want to go with no fuss. Simple, reliable, efficient. I’d buy another one in a heartbeat.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Pardon my ignorant question but :

    ? Do they still sell these ? .

    My ex wife came by to have me look over her living trust papers and mentioned her old thing has close to 200,000 miles on it and she’d like some tiny little fuel sipper to commute in…..

    If they still sell these Mirage things she might be the perfect customer as she cares not a whit other than ? will it go & is it reliable ? .

    TIA,

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Cobrajet25

      Absolutely, you can still buy a new one. The hardest part would be finding a Mitsubishi dealership near you.

      The ’14-’20 cars are mostly the same, though Mitsubishi has improved things like the brakes, suspension, steering, etc over the last few years. The ’19 models are almost identical to the ’20s, so a good deal on a leftover shouldn’t be too hard to find.

      These cars are perfect for people who don’t really care about cars. They are inexpensive, extremely reliable, and get great mileage.

      My ex-girlfriend loves hers!

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        THANK YOU VERY MUCH ! .

        I’ll go look and let her know what I find .

        EDIT : oh, wait ~ it says “CVT” she was unable to learn to use a clutch, is this one more transmission made of balsa wood ? .

        -Nate

        • 0 avatar
          Cobrajet25

          No, the CVTs in these cars are pretty good. Very few problems with them, just have them serviced every 60k. They are connected to a two-speed automatic gearbox, so they don’t quite feel like a typical CVT. You may be able to feel this gearbox upshift and downshift at low speeds, but it is not a defect.

          These cars come with a 5 year, 60k bumper-to-bumper warranty, and a 10 year, 100k powertrain warranty. If anything happens with the CVT between now and 2030, it is Mitsubishi’s problem anyway.

          I have 136k on my Mirage, and the only thing I used the warranty for was corroded lug nuts…on one wheel. Weird.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Appreciated ! .

            She’s talking about getting a tiny econobox, this might be the perfect fit, she’s only 5″2″ .

            We buried her father so she’s still unsettled right nw but thanked me for the info and said she’ll let me know when / if she decides to look at a new car .

            -Nate

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