By on December 9, 2019

2019 Silverado Work Truck features a “CHEVROLET” graphic across the grille and tailgate, blacked-out trim and 17-inch steel wheels for maximum durability. The interior features durable vinyl or cloth seats and 7-inch color touch screen.

If you’re like the dinosaurs who rumble around this here site, seeing a showroom-fresh regular cab pickup in daily life is a moment to be savored, as it’s a rare one. Barring work crews and contractors, most of which still prefer an extended-cab configuration for indoor tool storage, the once-dominant regular cab is a rare breed. A regular cab/short bed setup is even rarer.

In Chevrolet’s new-for-2019 Silverado 1500 line, regular cabs can be found at the bottom of the ladder, configured in a manner in which the automaker feels it can get the best return on investment. Low-trimmed work trucks for working stiffs, with no option for a short bed. However, the door isn’t shut on something a little more individualized.

As reported by Muscle Cars and Trucks (via The Drive), the automaker hasn’t completely scrapped the idea of a regular cab/short bed offering with additional niceties in tow.

Hugh Milne, the model’s marketing director, claims Chevy offered the Silverado Work Truck as a regular cab with long box for obvious reasons, which doesn’t mean the future won’t hold a less bare-bones one-row model.

“There were some decisions made to only do a regular cab long box Silverado… it’s only a work truck,” he remarked. “We had customers that were disappointed that we didn’t do a reg cab short box, and we’re seeing whether or not (offering one) makes sense. We’re always evaluating opportunities, but a lot of that is based on greenhouse gas and how that is formulated… good players, bad players, footprints… we’re always trying to balance the portfolio.”

Past decades has seen each of the Detroit Three offer regular cab/short box sport trucks with uplevel engines and go-fast exterior trappings, or at least in trims well above “base.” Dodge’s Ram SRT-10 comes to mind immediately, though it’s hardly alone in the field. (Just the pinnacle.)

Since the heady days of the previous century, pickups have become the new family car, meaning automakers place a far greater emphasis on the extended and crew cab models that make up the vast majority of their volume. The current round of belt-tightening in the industry has also spawned fewer build configurations, at least when it comes to passenger cars, though the popularity and meaty profit margins of certain leading truck models could convince executives to look the other way and throw this niche community a bone. That’s assuming there’s a bare minimum of demand that can be met.

And that’s question GM needs to answer before any Chevy regular cab grows more exciting than your average public works vehicle. A two- or three-seater with sporting, lone-occupant pretensions would demand a decent price to go with its side of (relative) impracticality, though pickup price ceilings already know no bounds, with no apparent downside to the automaker.

For 2020, the Silverado 1500 WT regular cab starts at $29,895 — a package that gets your rear-wheel traction, a 4.3-liter V6, and a six-speed automatic. Swapping the six for a 5.3-liter V8 brings the bill to $31,290.

[Image: General Motors]

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40 Comments on “Short Bed a Long Shot but Still a Possibility, Chevy Says of Silverado Regular Cab...”


  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    How hard up is GM? I typed Ram 1500 4wd into Bing in an effort to find the trim package of a new truck I saw, and the sponsored result at the top of the page was the official Chevrolet Silverado website. Desperation is a stinky cologne!

  • avatar
    dal20402

    There was a rumor that the Ford Tremor would be a regular cab with a 5 1/2-foot bed, but when produced it turned out to be an ordinary RCSB. That would have been an amusing wheelie machine with a bit more boost.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I can’t believe they want 30k for a Base truck. What was it 3-4 years ago Ram was selling $18k V8 1500’s like pancakes.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      You’re comparing MSRP to out-the-door price. I’m seeing base Silverados for $23-24k at local dealers.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        The discounts help substantially but why tack on $7,500 you don’t intend to charge. That doesn’t help get people into the dealer.

      • 0 avatar
        Mnemic

        Huh? MSRP is typically a few grand more than what the dealer paid for it. Nobody is getting $30,000 trucks for $18,000 unless the manufacturer is writing the dealer a $12,000 check for the difference (or close to it).

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Not really true with pickup trucks (and often GM and Ford cars). You can absolutely find a $30k MSRP truck for $24k or a $60k MSRP truck for $50k. The MSRP on my Bolt was $44k and the dealer was quite happy to sell it to me for $35.5k. I think pricing this way is a psychological trick; buyers feel jazzed about getting a “discount” even if they are actually paying the correct price for the vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            I’ve seen buyers with poor credit pay full MSRP (over $60K GMC), just to make the deal happen. For typical cars, dealers require a cosigner (or recommend Nissan) for high risk buyers.

            It’s a system that works, and if someone has to be the first on their block to own a brand new generation, gotcha! And it’s not really considered gouging.

    • 0 avatar
      GoNavy99

      MSRP is the starting point that puts the buyer’s negotiating ability to the test and builds in a certain profit for the dealers at the expense of the meek.

      Don’t want to negotiate? Here’s the stated price – enjoy. Want to negotiate? There’s lots of room.

      • 0 avatar
        Robotdawn

        Or for certain car makes, it’s the actual sale price. As a long time GM owner who views MSRP exactly as you do GoNavy, when they won’t negotiate (Honda/Subaru) I get pissed and walk.

        To me, only fools pay MSRP. It’s all in my head I know!

      • 0 avatar
        Robotdawn

        Or for certain car makes, it’s the actual sale price. As a long time GM owner who views MSRP exactly as you do GoNavy, when they won’t negotiate (Honda/Subaru) I get pissed and walk.

        To me, no one rational pays MSRP. It’s all in my head I know!

        (Weird moderation filter wordpress has).

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I think it would have been worthwhile for this post to note that both the RAM 1500 Classic and Ford F-150 are currently available in RCSB configuration, whereas the new-style RAM 1500 does not.

  • avatar
    Menar Fromarz

    Ive seen a ford SCSB and it looked ridiculous. All stumpy and tall on 18-20 inch rims. Actually looked like a toy.

    • 0 avatar
      Mnemic

      And good luck selling it used

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I don’t think they look bad at all. They definitely stand out in a sea of crew cabs though. There is a Home Depot near one of my offices that being in an industrial area does most of its buinsess with the trades, not DIY’ers. So the Milwaukee rep is there M-F and of course he drives his company vehicle. Which of course is a Milwaukee Red F-150 and is the RCSB version. I had to do a serious double take the first time I saw it because it is such an uncommon configuration. I do however remember a time when that was common and the first F-150 SuperCrews looked odd. Now the crew cab is far and away the most common 1/2 ton on the road and the regular cabs, no matter the bed length, look strange.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Build a regular cab, short bed, 2.7T and see how fast someone builds a tuner drift-truck out of it.

    The original W/T from the GMT400 generation became the ride of choice for men over 40 in my little rural community when I was in my late teens. They stacked the 4×2, small V8, automatic models deep and sold em cheap. Almost all long beds BTW.

    • 0 avatar
      56BelAire

      Back in the day, a Regular cab, long bed, 4×2 was the very definition of a pickup truck. I’ve had mine for 10 years now V-6, 5-speed, cloth bench seat. It’s a truck…yeah, not a self-esteem tool.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      You can get this exact truck so long as you don’t mind a Blue oval on the grill instead of a bowtie. You can even get the 5.0 if that’s your fancy.

      I want one with The Raptor/Limited 3.5, Bucket Seats and Lightning badges personally.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    In the lede photo, the black nose does a good job of hiding the hideousness of the design. As such, I believe all trims should come with the black plastic.

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    Let me just say this – I’ve owned a lot of trucks and SUV’s, but I have only purchased TWO brand new, and they were both decently equipped fullsize regular cab shortbeds (a GMC and sadly, a Ford).

  • avatar
    CannonShot

    Is there some safety reason these new trucks need to have such a high beltline? They are so weirdly proportioned. I love the idea of a regular cab with a short box, but with the high beltline they are going to look strange. The grill itself is pretty massive, but look at the distance from the bottom of the front air dam to the bottom of the grill. My neighborhood is home to many regular cab pickups from the 90s and early 2000s — some with a long beds, some with short. They look great. My daily driver is a 1995 F150 — regular cab, long box. I don’t see many people buying a new truck with a regular cab short box, but it would be nice to have the option.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    If I were buying a regular cab full size I would want the long bed for hauling things and I would buy the stripped model.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    I think the Silverado has a bigger problem than a regular cab short box and that would be Ram.

    Eyes on the prize, Mary. Eyes on the prize…

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Mary and her peers need to go before there is nothing left of GM.

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    Why do they sell the single-cab/long-bed configuration but not the single-cab/short bed? My guess is that the popular and profitable four-door cab with the short bed shares components, like that length of frame, with the single-cab/long-bed; the short bed would share nothing. That, and its ostensible lower price (and lower profits).

  • avatar
    redgolf

    I sold my 03 Silverado 2 years ago, bought it new in 03, base v6 auto with the chrome package, beautiful truck, got many compliments with it,paid $18 k plus change, it had 187 k miles on it having only to replace the fuel pump and 2 alternators, first person to look at it bought it with cash in hand, I wish I never sold it but having 4 vehicles and being retired something had to go!

  • avatar
    How_Embarrassing_4You

    Yeesh, and everyone thought the new trucks were ugly? Well, you can get your short attention spans ready, because the new Suburban and Tahoe are here….and boy, did they get hit with every ugly stick imaginable. Grills so gigantic and ugly, Lexus is jealous. Better dig up some more petty dirt on Ford real fast TTAC, this is gonna be a doozy.

  • avatar

    What about the Silverado’s cheap interior and the overall superiority of the RAM truck line?

    Barra has brought shame and dishonor to GM.

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