By on October 11, 2019

bmw

For years now, we’ve watched as the average car/crossover grille has expanded faster than that aunt you got divorced in her 20s and never settled down (the same can be said for a man; don’t send us letters.)

Now, as vehicle grilles — once declared nearly extinct in the Taurus/Sable/Intrepid/Crown Vic era ⁠— reach their zenith, the mind turns to an obvious question: What comes next? You’ve watched on these pages as Toyota and Lexus attempted to swallow galaxies with their gaping front openings. Now, BMW is eager to swallow what’s left.

Like tailfins in the late ’50s and cab-forward/androgynous-fascia’d automobiles from the late ’80s and early ’90s, styling trends come and go. Right now we’re in the golden years of the Big Grille, and frankly, having lived though the smooth-front era, I’m okay with it. However, all trends eventually pass by the wayside. What’s next?

With only so many external flourishes to be had, the list of options is limited. Tailfins aren’t coming back; certainly not on crossovers (though the Lexus UX tried its best). Coupe-ified SUVs is a thing we’re knee-deep in right now. Faux fender vents are stayin’ alive like John Travolta, helped along by the gaudy Nissan Armada and Infiniti QX80. And big grilles, well, those are just the flavour of the decade. Increasing electrification will put an end to those eventually. Maybe.

Predicting trends is difficult stuff, but it can prove lucrative to those whose crystal ball is firing on all cylinders. Once the giant, world-inhaling grilles tone themselves down, what design feature do you see taking center stage?

[Image: BMW]

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82 Comments on “QOTD: What Comes Next?...”


  • avatar

    the classic Buick Waterfall Grille never goes out of style.

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    I predict we will get more “Apocalypse Chic”. Design studios will hire The Humongous and Wez. The new style will be to attach your enemies to the front of your vehicle, leaning forward.

  • avatar
    Thomas Kreutzer

    I think there has to be a blow back to all the weird sheet metal design we are seeing these days. There are too many body lines running every which way. You just know that when TTAC commenters are talking about how “clean” the Chevy Beretta looks in the picture you posted the other day that people are already longing for the day that every car on the road didn’t look like it was folded by an origami master.

    I think we are headed back to clean, straight-line design with just enough aerodynamics to cut through the wind and nothing else.

    It will be the American blow back against the ugliness of design that the Chinese market seems to demand.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Hopefully the Silverado and certain Infiniti models are the height of these designs and it goes back to normal from here on. The 4 door coupe needs to die as well, bring back the 4 door convertible in its place.

      • 0 avatar
        Thomas Kreutzer

        Or the pillarless hardtop.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          That’s would be nice as well.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          I doubt a pillarless hardtop roof can withstand the roof-bashers they use for rollover testing. The crash safety standards have eliminated designs of yore forever. Too many people complained about all the deaths.

          It’s a shame to lose all that great styling. But then again, I remember an old-timer arguing, “In the ’50s kids didn’t even have seat belts. If you were in an accident, you just died, and didn’t complain.”

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Don’t all of the convertibles made now have auto engaging pillars that launch once the car starts flipping?

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      I can’t resist mentioning the C8 Corvette. The front and sides are fairly restrained. The rear is an incredibly complex hodgepodge.

      • 0 avatar
        SuperCarEnthusiast

        The rear is taken from the Camaro’s rear end so the Camaro owners will have something to identify when they are going to upgrade to a new sport car!

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    Look to Chrysler products from the mid-1960s for the cleanest designs since WWII. That includes bodies and grills. Straight lines and beautiful proportions that really don’t look that dated. I still don’t like Audi’s grills and this new BMW design can’t be called anything but cartoonish. Like most trucks these days.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Once most vehicles go hybrid, electric or whatever becomes the new mainstream technology, and MPG targets become moot, we may see a resurgence of automotive design. Without the need to reduce drag and weight to meet MPG/CAFE requirements, designers may again come to the forefront.

    • 0 avatar
      statikboy

      But until we get there, I predict the continued shrinkage of windows.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        We’ll all be driving updated versions of the 1951 bathtub Mercury, but with cameras and multiple screens showing us what’s outside.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @Lorenzo: You just reminded me of E.E.”Doc” Smith’s Lensman series of books (science fiction) and the Rigelian vehicles which were little more than heavily armored tanks with no windows or other viewing methods. Of course, the Rigelians were telepathic so they had a “sense of perception” to see outside their vehicles and they bluntly didn’t care if they bumped into other vehicles… no damage simply because they were so heavily armored. By description, they come across much like that “bathtub Mercury” you mention.

    • 0 avatar

      I don’t see how aerodynamic shape ala Taurus and weight are not important for electric cars. It is not like laws of physics do not apply to EVs.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Those batteries are heavy too. BTW, as the California blackout has shown, electric car owners couldn’t reharge their cars, and the owners of solar panels forgot to install batteries to store electricity. They connected to the grid, and when the grid went down, the solar panels became useless. Now, electric car owners are buying gasoline generators to recharge their cars in a blackout.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          My grandson in Fallbrook has been running the 15KW Generac I gave him a long time ago whenever there has been a brownout or blackout, and feeding the neighbors on each side of him e-power.

          That damn thing is sooooooo loud you can hear it running blocks away, drawing lookie-loos toward all that noise.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          ” BTW, as the California blackout has shown, electric car owners couldn’t reharge their cars, ”

          It also showed how gas cars couldn’t refuel because the pumps were electric.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            SOME gas stations have installed PORTABLE gasoline-fueled 7500-watt AC generators, sometimes more than one, in order to maintain security, provide service, and/or stave off public discontent. No power for the freezer or coolers though.

            But those stations tend to be in the better neighborhoods.

            I don’t know about the Watts District in LA.

            I do know that China town and Korea town use lots of standby-generators, because I was there during brownouts and blackouts.

            We went to a Chinese restaurant in China town as a group of 16, and it was business as usual one summer when everything else there was enjoying rolling blackouts.

        • 0 avatar

          It is ironic that California – the world capital of electric car – is not capable in providing uninterrupted supply of electricity to its screwed denizens.

          California joins in its misery other one-party progressive states like Venezuela and Cuba. It looks like US as a whole is also moving in the same direction.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            A friend who works for a California state agency showed me an email he got that read:
            “Power from the uninterruptible power source will be interrupted from 2AM to 4AM Saturday for maintenance.”

          • 0 avatar
            ttacgreg

            This is an article about oversized grilles, and commentary leads to derogatory ideological political snark. Off topic much?

          • 0 avatar
            sayahh

            @ttacgreg: agreed but replying to insidelookingout

            Could deregulation be partly to blame? Also, energy grid needs updating, but there’s little financial incentive for PG&E to do it.

            Who killed the electric car? documentary showed that the EVs were good but GM never wanted them and California regulators allegedly had financial interests in hydrogen fuel cell and it would be dumb to back electric vehicles when it would make their fuel cell stocks lose value.
            Also, capital of electric cars? Norway might be closer percentage-wise. Plus, not every county is blue. Venezuela is screwed BECAUSE they were so dependent on oil that after other countries banded to push oil prices lower to kill their economy, Venezuela had no money left because all their eggs were in a single basket. Ditto with Texas, but at least Texas has a booming solar and wind industry. It’s called progress for a reason. The only reason it’s not working is because people and politicians are obstructing progress against their own best long-term interest.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @ILO: Certainly aerodynamics will make a difference but with an EV achieving an average of 4x the equivalent fuel economy over an ICEV the aerodynamics won’t be as critical and we can get back to real style for cars instead of these generic eggs on wheels that are currently the single best-selling TYPE of vehicle in the world (pickups only have about 30% of the global market, CUVs over 40% with the remaining 30% scattered between sedans, sports coupes and more exotic types.)

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          The trouble is that even if electric motors are four times as efficient at converting energy into work, batteries have about 1% of the energy density of gasoline. Teslas carry 800 lbs of batteries to store the same amount of energy that’s in three gallons of gasoline. They might use that energy efficiently, but there is no surplus energy to squander on pushing a car that doesn’t look like a suppository along at highways speeds.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “batteries have about 1% of the energy density of gasoline.”

            What??? Gasoline is 12,200 Wh/kg and the latest batteries from CATL and Tesla are about 300 Wh/kg.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I stand corrected. Batteries that can store energy 2.5% as efficiently as gasoline are imminent. Clearly, the days of cars that have lower drag in reverse than forward will return!

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @ToddAtlasF1: I think your ratios are a bit off. The AVERAGE car can only go about 80-90 miles on three gallons of gasoline. The AVERAGE BEV goes over 250 miles on an 800# battery. The issue is that only 25% of gasoline’s energy is actually used by those cars while the BEV is able to use more than 90% of the energy fed into the battery.

            Oh, and the BEV doesn’t have to “look like a suppository” to do so.

          • 0 avatar

            “I stand corrected. Batteries that can store energy 2.5% as efficiently as gasoline”

            It is actually 2.459%.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            @Vulpine,

            As you pointed out earlier, electric motors are about four times as efficient at converting energy into work. That is why the energy of three gallons of gas in an EV yield a range about three times as far as a real car can go on three gallons of gas. The problem is that storing more than three gallons worth of energy in an EV carries high costs both economic and mass related. At the end of the day, drag is more important to an EV operating at highway speeds than it is to an ICE vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Again only partially true, Todd. Do a little research on the cars of the ’30s, ’40s, ’50s and ’60s and their true economy and aerodynamics.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I’m quite familiar with the traits and performance of popular cars throughout their history. I also remember Chrysler’s original research that revealed that conventional cars of the early ’30s had less drag in reverse. Also no engine cooling. I don’t know what that has to do with the reality that EVs don’t have the luxury of carrying around however much energy they need, nor taking on more as quickly as might be needed.

            Suppose your pickup usually gets 20 mpg on the highway. The trip to your lake house is 200 miles. When you’re just driving there in your truck, you use 10 gallons of gas. When you’re bringing your boat to the lake for the season, you get 10 mpg and use 20 gallons of gas. Fortunately, your only additional expense is pumping 10 more gallons of gas into your trucks 25 gallon tank. Now suppose you have an EV pickup. Being bigger than a car, let’s say it was 1,200 lbs of batteries delivering the energy of 4 gallons of gas that it uses at an effective rate of 60 mpg empty and 30 mpg towing your boat. How much bigger of a deal is it that you increased the drag experienced by your EV pickup than it was for your gasoline one? The increased load on the EV pickup means that it can’t do the job efficiently, and considering the recharge time now added about 120 miles into your 200 mile trip, it also can’t do it conveniently. EVs can’t afford to use more energy than necessary because they’re always already marginal.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @ToddAtlas: Ever hear of a show called Mythbusters? They actually ran an experiment based on that myth about “more aerodynamic in reverse”, using one of the most aerodynamic cars they could find; a Porsche. Now, granted it wasn’t a 1930s Porsche but it was one of the 911-style models and what they did was literally lift the body and reverse it on the chassis, with as little modification as possible.

            Using many conventional aerodynamic experiments, concluding with that real-world example, they demonstrated that aerodynamic efficiency in reverse was just that–a myth. It was resoundingly debunked and demonstrated roughly 10%-15% worse than the as-designed layout, because the sharp drop of the windshield from the roofline created an eddy in the airflow, causing more drag than when the windshield faces the wind. I think the older Audi TT might have been one of the FEW cars that would be equal forward or backwards.

            And as far as electrical performance with aerodynamics, while I do agree that wind drag is an issue, it is not a 4:1 ratio between BEVs and ICEVs when it comes to drag effects on economy. The ratio appears to be almost 1:1 when comparing like for like. This even includes towing.

            Simply put, your math doesn’t work.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I never saw the Mythbusters use a Porsche to test a fact about Chrysler wind tunnel research performed on sedans in early 1930. Is their research ability really that bad, or have they completely lost their integrity?

            What part of my math are you still failing to follow? Without any references to bogus pop culture tv, construct an equation showing where my model deviates from reality.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @TodAtlas: They Mythbusters episode is readily viewable on streaming; you only need to look it up. I remind you that the Mythbusters do the research not only at full scale but also in model form, using very visible scientific methods to demonstrate the WHY something works or doesn’t work. They proved definitively that pickup trucks get better fuel economy with the tailgate up vs down in one such episode.

            Just because somebody makes science fun doesn’t mean it’s bogus. Models don’t always live up to reality.

            As for the 1930s Chrysler research, aerodynamics has come a long way in 80 years, making that 80-some-year-old data obsolete.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Todd Atlas: BTW… Here’s a couple of videos for you.

            https://jalopnik.com/mythbusters-bust-reverse-porsche-myth-5707182

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3aqHbD-O9E

            https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/g475/15-favorite-mythbusters-car-myths/

            I admit to a bit of surprise on the “mesh” results but they absolutely proved than when it comes to tailgate up or down on an open bed, up is measurably better than down. As far as the mesh goes, however, my state has banned the sale of bed fences, bed extenders and yes, meshes, due to the fact that they allow the contents of the bed to blow up and over those barriers and out into the roads (potentially causing damage to other vehicles with flying debris.)

            All things considered, a tonneau cover is as efficient as the tailgate up and protects the load better when traveling at highway speeds when that load doesn’t rise over the height of that cover. I will also note that I have a tri-fold tonneau on my own truck and have exceeded its rated fuel economy on trips of 100 miles and more.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “When you’re bringing your boat to the lake for the season”

            Just rent a truck twice a year. Problem solved.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            It’s probably a coincidence that two EV proponents don’t get the point. Sure, rent a real truck. Rent a real car to cover highway miles at speed too, since drag increases exponentially with speed and EVs are always running on empty. The new Porsche EV Taycan has a drag coefficient of .22 and suppositories should be as featureless and blob-like. Another coincidence.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            It seems, ToddAtlas, that YOU are the one that doesn’t get the point.

            “Rent a real car to cover highway miles at speed too, since drag increases exponentially with speed and EVs are always running on empty.”
            — You’re right that drag does increase exponentially with speed. The Tesla Model S has a 0.21CoD, lower even than the Porsche’s and the LOWEST of all cars on the consumer market not specifically designed for speed. The Model S is NOT featureless nor blob-like any more than the Taycan. But unlike city cars, the Tesla is not, “always running on empty.” It is capable of over 300 miles at highway speeds on a full charge, the Model S specifically carrying a 375-mile range in one configuration–the same as most similar ICE models. And it does so using about ⅓ of the total energy both used and wasted by those ICEVs.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “batteries have about 1% of the energy density of gasoline.”

            Again, wrong numbers. I haven’t seen may EVs that look like suppositories, then again, that’s a subject you’re obviously more familiar with than I am.

            By the way, 800 lbs of 300 Wh/kg CATL (and probably Tesla) cells will get you 490 miles in a 4.5 mile per kWh EV. 500 Wh/kg is probably within a year or two. Plenty of labs with batteries greater than 1kW/kg, although none of those are in mass production yet as far as I know.

        • 0 avatar
          ttacgreg

          Here in the land of pickups and SUV’s, “generic bricks on wheels” is an equally appropriate term.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    How is it that cars like the Porsche 911, Boxster, Tesla Model 3, Corvette, etc. can get away without having high hoods and blunt noses designed to protect pedestrians?

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Miata anyone?

      I would bring more attention to the fact that modern front ends are “grounded to the ground” where as the hood height in the past looked better because the front bumper had a good distance of space between the ground and the bottom of the bumper.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        There was a federal law placing bumpers between 14″ and 18″ above the ground. The idea was to have bumpers that matched up in a crash, but the front end dive in emergency braking, with the raised rear end, pretty much made the law useless. I don’t know if it’s still in effect.

    • 0 avatar
      Andre Robinson

      Pedestrian safety is said to come from having empty space between the top of the engine and the hood. This pushes the hood higher. The 911 is rear engine, so that is very easy. I think the same can be said of cars with electric engines (I think the engines are smaller, and the transmissions are more simple, or non-existent, so that makes packaging easier.) C7 Corvette, I think it helps that the engine is shoved rearward of the front axel. This is why rear wheel drive cars often have nicer proportions than FWD. Is the Boxster rear engine-ed?

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I also don’t get why Genesis is putting large clear plates high center on their grills. It distracts from the rest of the car and you can rest assured in 7-8 years that plate is going to be yellowed scratched up and generally look very poor.

    • 0 avatar
      gasser

      That is the radar sensor for the AEB and cruise control. Other manufacturers put theirs in a large pod behind the rear view mirror.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Interesting, it has a purpose then.

        I wonder how sensitive it is to being out of place, such as in a post wreck rebuild.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Yep, this is stuff people don’t think about when they buy expensive cars – it adds THOUSANDS to the cost of a fender-bender, making it more likely for the car to get totaled out (which leads to the owner being upside down).

          If you’re buying a modern car with a lot of this kind of stuff, I think a GAAP policy makes sense. But since so many cars are leased, and leases generally come with automatic GAAP coverage, people probably don’t give what happens when they rear-end someone much thought.

          • 0 avatar
            pinkslip

            Man, FreedMike, you went way off topic on this one. And managed to say very little. GAP (Guaranteed Asset Protection- not sure what the extra A was for), is useless to anyone who put enough money down on a loan that they are not upside down following the depreciation curve. And, as you pointed out, is often included in a captive lease structure.

            A majority of luxury cars are leased, but not economy brands.

            And, the technology you’re pointing out is expensive to repair on the front of the car is designed to avoid (or mitigate the damage of) that car rear ending others.

            Airbags are also expensive, so a car without airbags would be cheaper to repair than one with airbags.

          • 0 avatar
            Rick T.

            “And managed to say very little. GAP (Guaranteed Asset Protection- not sure what the extra A was for…”

            Disagree with the first part, just as people really don’t think about how much the replacement tires are going to be for those delicious 19″ rims.

            As to the second part, I’m guessing Mike might be an accountant.

    • 0 avatar
      sayahh

      You think that looks bad/odd, imagine having to put front license plates on the BMW pic from this article.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Whatever appeals to the Chinese market will determine the design of all future vehicles in the US since China is the largest car market in the World. Also whatever is the cheapest to make but with the highest profit margin.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The Chinese market will determine design only in China. We didn’t get Kei cars from Japan because they wouldn’t sell. Even the subcompacts don’t sell well in the US anymore, and the Civic/Corolla, formerly subcompacts, are up to compact size, about 15 feet long.

      The Chinese penchant for rear seat legroom requires longer wheelbases and midsize cars that aren’t selling well here. The American market is big enough to have its own standards, independent of Chinese preferences. American-made cars don’t sell there, and Chinese-made cars don’t sell here.

  • avatar
    lstanley

    The more urban planners and nanny state self proclaimed logicians gain influence across vehicle manufactures, the more pedestrian oriented and outward focused safety devices will be demanded.

    So I see more rounded and physically softer front ends.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    When I first saw the tail lights of the 2002 Nissan Altima I thought oh boy fins are gonna come back… Those afterburner tail lights I thought were gonna start a new trend. However nobody copied Nissans success and Nissan went on to abandon them after the 2007 redesign.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Grills seem to be following the dinosaurs – getting bigger and bigger before disappearing altogether.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, it’s not the first time that anyone designing a car mysteriously lost all sense of taste or restraint. To wit (and check the grille size on *this* baby):

    http://topclassiccarsforsale.com/uploads/photoalbum/1975-lincoln-continental-town-car-1.jpg

    It’s all cyclical, you know – design in the ’70s was unbearably baroque, became more restrained in the ’80s, and then went “function first” in the ’90s, only to morph back into gaudiness today.

    So what comes next? I’d predict more minimalism, but only after people get sick of the current design ethos. It’s a fashion business, folks.

  • avatar
    cicero1

    All I want is a freaking shark with a freaking laser on its head so i can take care of dumba$% drivers. /s/ A. Powers

  • avatar
    SSJeep

    BMW grilles have gone from being somewhat stylish to looking like an oversized nut sack hanging from the front of the vehicle. And based on current designs, its likely to get worse before it gets better.

    Lexus tried the spindle grille, which ended up looking like a gaping Predator maw.

    Automakers are using design to try and differentiate themselves. Im not sure that it is working given that we live in an era of utilitarian blobs and oversize SUVs that generally look the same.

    What I find really interesting is that modern vehicles really dont need a grille at all. Why not try some new designs where there isnt a grille at all (similar to Tesla) or where there is just a small opening for air exchange and exterior lighting?

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    “Predicting trends is difficult stuff, but it can prove lucrative to those whose crystal ball is firing on all cylinders. Once the giant, world-inhaling grilles tone themselves down, what design feature do you see taking center stage?”

    — You’re right; predicting trends is difficult at best. Much better if you’re able to create a trend instead.

    What I would like to see is a return to the obvious (even if only cosmetically) bumpers and sensibly-sized grilles (again, even if only cosmetic skins.) A throwback to the look of the ’50s and ’60s, even on a more modern body, can work if done right. Stickers are easy to apply (and remove) and the car can be made to look like any brand you choose. Just look at Nascar for an obvious example.

  • avatar
    MeJ

    This has nothing to do with the QOTD but driving home yesterday I saw a Hyundai Palisade and was very impressed with what a great looking SUV it was. Anyone else think these are great looking vehicles?
    Ok, I’m done.
    Back to the QOTD.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I predict the average truck will resemble a semi in 20 years. Bout the only sure thing going as far as future design trends.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    I can see BMW enlarging it grill design but this is ridiculous! Did they hire the Lexus grill design guy? Totally outrageous!

    I time we will love it!

  • avatar
    TimK

    No one ever complains about the Alfa Romeo grill — it resembles a vagina.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    So did the Edsel’s.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      According to engineers, the original grille on the Edsel was much smaller and was fairly attractive. It just didn’t admit enough air to the radiator to keep the V8 from overheating. Some kind of mesh on each side might have helped, but they just made it bigger and bigger instead.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Sadly I don’t think we have hit peak wheel yet. With nothing but trucks and SUVs selling 22″ wheels will become the norm. Also apparently due to pickup height there is still opportunity to design several new generations of tailgate steps / ladders. I think the new round will be some kind of powered lift system, like an escalator so you can load mulch into the bed.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I could see sticker instead of regular emblems. Stickers are cheaper and manufacturers could charge more for a special or limited edition with the only difference being the sticker. I don’t see tail fins and more chrome coming back even if it is plastic because it would add to the manufacturing costs.

    I predict that the large crew cab pickups will suffer the same fate as the large land yacht cars of the past. We will still have crew cab pickups but they will get smaller with less hood length and much lighter (smaller turbo engines will mean not as much room will be required under the hood). Eventually trucks will have to meet more stringent fuel efficiency standards and more money will be spent on lighter materials such as carbon fiber. Manufacturers will always look for inexpensive ways to make a more premium trim and charge more for them.

  • avatar

    Fins will come back but will be functional this time. Cars will use them to land vertically like SpaceX Starship.

  • avatar

    But in immediate future car designs will be inspired by iPhone, iPad and other Apple gadgets.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    My prediction: a return to full-width grilles from headlight to headlight. That’s actually a return to the late 1930s, but more like the mid-1960s Chrysler full size sedans that were mentioned. I can see a one-piece plastic shield over a huge slotted opening, even on electric cars – the batteries have to be cooled too. Any front end damage, and the grille, being part of the front clip, will be replaced as part of the entire unit. After a few years, a fender-bender will total the car, so people will drive cars with smashed front clips featuring makeshift repairs of the headlights and turn signals. At least until the electronics go haywire. Then perfectly usable drivetrains will be junked.

  • avatar
    monkeydelmagico

    I’ll go with you Lorenzo. Predicting peak ugly grill by 2021. Lexus/Toyota is ahead of the trend with GM in hot pursuit. Just when BMW was beginning to erase the stain of the Bangle they find a prodigy. Bravo.

    Any 30’s grills would be better than what is occurring now


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