By on August 14, 2019

It’s August 2019 and your author is pouring one out for little Blue Oval hatchbacks with mouths to match their trousers. Soon to depart from our shores (North American-market production has already ceased), the Focus and Fiesta represented bite-sized bits of fun that weren’t overly expensive and looked a bit derivative. Alas. At least we still have Honda, and it must be noted that Hyundai is stepping up its game in this segment.

For now, one can configure a 2019 Fiesta ST even if it is getting difficult to find them on dealer lots. Today’s post assumes the ST trim is a base car, insofar as we will be adding $0 in options to the sticker price.

We’ve played this game before ⁠— over two years ago, before Jim Hackett took the reins at Ford and decreed that all cars must be placed in the corporate dumpster. Back then, a no-frills Fiesta ST cost $21,140. Two years later, that price has risen by just $200 … and you can bet incentives are a lot higher these days. Any sane dealer will move one of these things post haste to make room on the floorplan for a high margin truck or SUV.

The hues of Orange Spice and White Platinum remain $595 options, so we’ll stick with the Magnetic shade shown here, especially since we chose Shadow Black last time. With 17-inch aluminium wheels, a zoomy spoiler jutting from the roof, and an angry slash down its flanks, this is not a bad looking car. It will avoid sneers given to racy new Civics by those who think they look too aggro and escape the guffaws directed at fast Golfs by people who deride them as too milquetoast. Ford designers walked a good line here.

Inside’s a similar story, with a Sync3 system replacing the button-laden base model infotainment that looks like Worf’s forehead. That tilt and telescope wheel is leather wrapped with red stitching and the cloth sport front buckets are adorned with the ST logo.

That’s a six-speed manual, of course ⁠— the only available transmission. It stirs the pot on a 197 horsepower 1.6-liter EcoBoost mill that also heaves out 202 lb-ft of torque. To say that’s a lot in a car weighing about the same as an amoeba is cruelly understating the situation. The Fiesta ST’s penchant for alert and happy handling is well known.

Options are few and you should leave them all on the table. Recaro seats and a moonroof cost $1,995 and $795 respectively, with the latter simply adding weight up top and the former forcing the huskier driver to contemplate their breakfast choices. Neither is a necessary burden to carry through one’s life.

The phrase “you’ll miss it when it’s gone” gets thrown around a lot. Here, it actually applies.

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selection.

The model above is shown in American dollars with American options and trim, absent of destination charges and available rebates. As always, your dealer may sell for less.

[Images: Ford]

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54 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2019 Ford Fiesta ST...”


  • avatar
    FerrariLaFerrariFace

    If you’re having trouble finding a 19 Fiesta ST as the author suggests, check out Ricart Ford in Columbus, OH. They have apparently been hoarding the little buggers, as there are 30 of them sitting on their lot right now.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    This would be a fun car with a manual.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Although they were fairly common shortly after their release, I haven’t seen one of these in a long time. Like the Focus ST before it, they seem to have the lifespans of possums. It could be where I live, although it would apply to the previous two cities I lived in during the past five years as well. The roads here eat rubber band tires like the ones on the Fiesta ST. People who buy twenty thousand dollar cars are probably more than inconvenienced by the constant need for tires and wheels.

    I have a hard time with any review of a Fiesta that doesn’t mention that everything you see with your eyes and touch with your hands is the cheapest, most decontented mess you’ll experience in a car meant for US consumption in the past thirty years. Acura doing away with AM radios is heinous. Ford binning mechanical door lock switches is an abomination. Most Fiestas I’ve seen are also missing their driver’s interior door pulls. 2012 Civics had a strange pattern to their dashboard covers. A really strange pattern. The Fiesta’s dashboard and controls are what the back of that dash cover probably looks like. The ST is a strong performer for the price, but you never wonder where the money was saved.

    • 0 avatar
      TheDutchGun

      I don’t find my focus ST to feel cheap on the inside, personally. Maybe there is a difference in materials between fiesta and focus.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        There is a big difference between the Focus interiors I’ve been in and the Fiesta interiors. Basically the difference between a car that emphasized its interior detailing compared to one that had me looking for the missing door lock switches so I could escape.

    • 0 avatar
      TheEndlessEnigma

      Your screed indicates to me you really don’t have a clue what you’re talking about. The build and material quality of the car is really very good including the soft-touch surfaces. I can only assume you once saw a base model Fiesta and have assumed all Fiesta’s are the same…which they are not (your comment about mechanical door lock switches reinforces this). The cars very reliable (with the manual transmission) and show every sign of being a long lasting vehicle (my 2016 ST has 65,000 routine maintenance miles). Where I am, Florida, when you see a Fiesta on the road it tends to be an ST as opposed to any other Fiesta trim.

      In short “ToddAtlasF1”, you’re wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      He’s trolling. I paid under 17 out the door all rebates included. The interior is fine for that price range. I say that even having skipped the recaros.

      The only thing that annoys me is the hard armrest pad and it feels too tall. I got a base console sans armrest that I’m going to fit. What you get for the price is phenomenal though.

      Some people prioritize other things than “my dash is soft”. Some people like driving. Todd likes Toyotas. Umm not sure the circles on that Venn diagram intersect.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I’m not trolling and I didn’t know the ST was priced against the Versa, which it competes with well. I’ve seen how poorly soft dashboards age compared to rigid ones, but the detailing and finish of the plastic in the Fiesta is not as nice as that I’ve seen in any other cars manufactured in the past couple of decades.

        I like Toyotas because I’ve run a shop and understand enough about vehicle design and development to know that some of their current models have the chance to endure decades of use and abuse that no other available new vehicles possess. I don’t even own one yet, but whatever helps you bend the world to your image of it.

        • 0 avatar
          TheEndlessEnigma

          You do understand Fiesta ST’s and Versa’s (whatever trim) ARE NOT cross shopped against each other. You do understand the ST is the hot-hatch version of the Fiesta econo-box? You seem to be conflating the ST with the SE model.

        • 0 avatar
          SPPPP

          I don’t think the Fiesta interior is bad. It’s not luxurious, but at least it’s not cheap fake luxury, which is worse than honest poverty. I think it might be nicer than a first-gen Focus?

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Why on earth would I want to drive the same car for decades, especially a Toyota. One of the things that motivated me to make decisions that eventually led me to making real money was my enjoyment of driving and being able to purchase the car I wanted…more than once a decade. I cross shopped the Fiesta with the 3 Series, the Giulia, the WRX-STI, and many other more expensive vehicles that have exquisite interiors.

          But this was a toy car and none could match the Fiesta on the whole smiles per dollar bit. Plus if I wad it up in a wall down at Barber I can walk away free and clear (post lease purchase will be cash). I am under no illusion that the Corolla would likely give me less headache long term from a reliability perspective, but I don’t hate myself. I enjoy driving my cars, not crowing about my dots in Consumer Reports and/or caressing my dash. I didn’t even plan on keeping it after 2 years, but it is just so good I have reconsidered.

          Life is too short to spend it behind the wheel of an appliance like a Toyota. If my Fiesta gets problematic, well I make this thing called money in a large enough quantity to repair it or buy a new car. Or maybe I’ll get a built motor for it. Who knows. Life is good. I don’t drive basic B!+c# mobiles. My next car will likely be something German with an LS under the hood. It won’t be on the same planet reliability wise as probably even a 20 year old Toyota. Know what, nobody, self included will care. We will all revel in the tire shredding awesomeness.

          I will not be on my death bed wishing I had driven more exciting cars. Have fun with your black dots, smugness, and Pumpkin Spice Lattes. Some of us enjoy driving.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      is acura making digital radio standard? if so, a lot of AM stations are simulcast as HD2, HD3, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      Count me as another who doesn’t think the FiST interior is cheap-looking. And before you say that I haven’t seen enough cars to know, I’m 58 and have been purchasing cars since I was 13.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    The ST is far from base. The Fiesta has got the Consumer Reports worst five list for reliability list at least once. This car doesn’t ace anything!

    • 0 avatar
      NG5

      To be fair, (and I love CR) this is probably due to the overwhelming proportion of their respondents who are buyers of the automatic dual clutch Fiesta, which featured a giant middle-finger as its transmission. The ST has a manual and a bigger motor used in the rest of the Ford range. I had no real issues with mine in the first 3 years and 36,000 miles, and a Ford mechanic I know as a friend said there really weren’t many problems with them. That said, I ended up in an older Miata and I am grateful that it had almost no technology in it to break down the line.

    • 0 avatar
      b534202

      Next they do a Ace of Base on an M4. Can’t option the competition package because you can only afford the base model!

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I paid 17 OTD for mine. That’s pretty basic and yes…plenty reliable if you don’t get the auto which, why would you.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      The Fiesta reliability dings in C/R can be traced to TWO issues 1) the DPS6 transmission, and 2) the early version of Sync. The Fiesta ST has NEVER been equipped with either.

  • avatar
    NG5

    I wouldn’t buy one of these new now, not because it wasn’t a great car for me, but because Ford North America seems to want to actively drive away the customer base this car appealed to.

    I’d take my money to Mazda for a 3 (for space, design, and the amazing interior) or CX3 (for fun, one of the only small hatchy vehicles near this size left, plus AWD). Or maybe Hyundai for a Veloster N, though the 3 door thing annoys me. I’d probably have better reliability and long term ownership prospects, but I have serious doubt that any newly made FWD car could ever be as fun to drive at full poke again. I now drive an absolutely perfect 5 speed NB Miata, and I still have to wonder if it is any more fun to drive, even after I slide the car through a U turn laughing like a child. The convertible experience is a huge plus for fun, but I’ll never have another 2 hour fun drive on backroads with a vehicle full of furniture. The rear hatch area should be padded so that your groceries don’t smash themselves to paste on the way home from every shopping run.

    To all the last buyers of these, congratulations. When people try to tell you the interior was bad in 2040, you’ll be laughing at good memories of driving it. I don’t regret a mile I spent in the car, and I wish I still had it. I wouldn’t buy it again new from Ford, but at the time I did they were still bringing the RS over. The hatchback future looked bright. Since Ford NA seems intent on moving on, I suppose I have to, too. But if you bought one then you will know what I mean. Enjoy it while you got it.

    • 0 avatar
      NG5

      Oh woops forgot to mention the thing to be narrowly relevant to the base trim discussion: This is exactly how I bought one (except black), though maybe I’d check out the Recaros next time. And I’d probably get a color other than black.

  • avatar
    TheEndlessEnigma

    There really aren’t that many options available in an ST. When I bought mine in 2016 I got it in Kona Blue, Sun Roof, Sony Synch 3 etc…. Really the only option available at the time were the Recaro seats.

    When it was all said and done, I got my FiST in March of 2016 for $19500 out the door (no trade in as my previous car-a Mustang was T-boned and totaled). Yes I went from a Mustang to a FiST!

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Recaros and moonroof is it I believe

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        Speaking of the sunroof, Sunroof Haters have become the enthusiast analog to Mayo Bullies (see https://thetakeout.com/drew-magary-hates-mayo-bullies-1832866128) or to American League fans who think the National League should have the DH. I’m not sure if Matthew Guy’s a sunroof hater or if he’s playing devil’s advocate in the spirit of Ace of Base. Anyway:

        – Don’t want *your* car equipped with a sunroof? Perfectly reasonable.

        – Don’t like that sunroofs often are part of a package that forces you to order a mix of options you do want with those you don’t? Again, perfectly reasonable. (I have to remind myself that bundled packages have helped keep prices down versus inflation while allowing for improved assembly quality.)

        – Think that *no one* should want a sunroof just because you don’t? Pretty unreasonably stance, in point of fact.

        Again, I realize in this case we’re talking about an Ace of Base ST and as such wouldn’t want a sunroof. And if you argue that extra weight is against the mission of the car, well fine. I’d argue that many owners are never going to track theirs and really don’t care that their car is incrementally slower and handles incrementally worse than some other guy’s example of the same model.

        – – –

        @ Art – Any updates on yours? I think the Fiesta ST is one of the more appealing buys of the past 20 years or so. I’m curious what it’s like to have one.

        • 0 avatar
          NG5

          People berating others about buying some “impure” option drive me nuts, and I am sunroof-avoidant due to headroom/maintenance(/ 0.05% hypothetical driving difference but I haven’t compared back to back) considerations.

          It would be fun if there was always a version of a car with the minimum possible bits required to make it work, but even then there would be a debate: does it need AC or power steering? Why not put the backup camera in a mirror screen and delete the infotainment? Why add a heavier engine? Porsche manages to sell such absences as features, perhaps another brand could make it work.

          If someone gives you guff about your sunroof, just ask if they’ve removed their unnecessary interior trim, extra seats, and A/C plumbing. If they have, did they leave airbags, backup camera, etc.? The argument never ends. I like being comfortable enough in a car to have fun and not instantly die in an accident – if I wanted pure fun, I’d ride a motorcycle. If you’re already driving a four-seat car, have the sunroof and AC if you want it. It’s not going to win any races because you skipped the options.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            *Thank you*, NG5. I don’t mind explanations about WHY someone doesn’t like a particular feature, but the blanket condemnation of certain options is off-putting.

            If my driving is mostly on surface streets, I love to have a sunroof. It it’s mostly highway, I’d rather save the $1,200.

            Automatic climate control is another option that sometimes comes in for borderline irrational criticism.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          @Featherston, I have zero regrets with it so far. Like I mentioned below I purchased some 16 inch Contour SVT rims for it to replace the 17’s at the first tire change. I like the look and the way the car behaves with them (a friend did the swap).

          Also installed the European ST200 stock intake. It has a hose and pulls cooler air, but it is still stock (Ford of Europe part). I did it and a higher flowing panel filter only to hear the turbo at work a little more.

          I would compare it to my Miatas. It is like driving them with the power you wish they had. I know the joke here is “Miata is always the answer”, but if the response to that is “I need a back seat”, then Fiesta ST should be the answer. The shifter is as good as my NA Miata and better than my Mazdaspeed NB. Other than the torque steer (it is there when you thrash on it), it really drives that good.

          I never fail to leave work and smile upon seeing it in the parking lot. I live up a windy “mountain”…(well at least its a mountain in Alabama) road. I feel like a rally hero every time I get to the top and any work stress is long gone.

          I have owned some great drivers cars (E30 BMW, multiple Miatas, Several of the front drive heroes to include a tired SE-R and some golden era Civic SI’s) and this is my favorite. The best way I can describe it is that it always feels like it wants you to push it harder, but it never gets you in over your head or leaves you wanting more.

          As has been mentioned in above rants, if you want Lexus interior quality, look elsewhere. But if you just want to smile every time you drive a car and for the car to make you feel like you have the skill Lewis Hamilton behind the wheel, grab one. They really are one of those special cars that don’t come along that often.

          Incidentally, my only option was the moonroof. I like them. When I get to a skill level that the weight of the roof is affecting my lap times it is likely time for me to move to a more powerful ride anyway. It’s a preference thing for sure as you mention.

          I skipped the Recaros. The headrest was at a terrible angle and unadjustable. You can flip it which makes it perfect with a helmet. I don’t often drive with a helmet though. The salesman suggested I bend them in a vice. As they were 2000 dollar seats I didn’t see this as an option. They do soften up…my friend got one around the same time and they became more comfortable. But I felt like they just needed to be slightly larger. If I buy it (which I will unless I wreck it or something before lease end) I may swap in the Focus ST Recaros and get the back covered to match. They are ever so slightly wider and supposedly work with the Fiesta’s stock airbags. Having said all that, I’ve tracked it with the stock seats and again, when my seats start limiting me I’m probably at a different level anyway. They are comfy for daily use and the Recaros would just be a looks thing mostly.

          Anyway, I cannot stress enough how much enjoyment I get out of driving this car and though I don’t have much in the way of miles, I have had no issue with it. The only issue that seemed to plague the earlier ST’s was failure of the HVAC blend door (I am active on several forums for the car). It is a not fun repair, but was supposedly fixed by the 2017 model I believe. 18+ all come with Sync 3 w/ Android Auto and Car Play also taking away another source of complaints. As most of the beefs with the Fiesta in general are powershift related, I really don’t have any worries. The engine bay is pretty accessible too for future issues.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            Great write-up! Thanks.

            If I were in the market, I’d snap one of these up. Several logistical/life situation things are keeping me out of one (one of which may be acquiring a nice car from a relative who’s having health problems).

            I almost hate to admit it, but a car that might suit me better than the Fiesta ST is the slushbox 500 Abarth. A hugely disproportionate % of my driving under 30 mph, crawling from stop sign to red light. I know a lot of people here prefer stick under any circumstances; I prefer an auto if I’m in miserable traffic. [Ducking the popcorn and beer cups being thrown at me.]

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Life’s too short not to have a sunroof.

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        Do they not do the ST1, ST2, ST3 thing that they did with the Focus?

        I had a Focus ST1 for awhile, and liked it. Then I realized the extra power was really lost on me since I don’t have any interesting areas to drive around.

      • 0 avatar
        Higheriq

        Recaros, sunroof, Nav, and dark-painted wheels are the only options.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Why was there never much love for the Focus ST?

    Personally if I hadn’t needed more room for luggage etc I’d have test driven a Focus ST (minus the Recaros – the seat backs are too thick for a car that size.)

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Why was there never much love for the Focus ST?”

      I think the existence of the GTI hurt the Focus ST. I personally like the extra visual sauce and grit that Ford gave the car but most hot hatch intenders seem to prefer refinement and flying under the radar.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        What’s funny is generally I still have to look for the center mounted dual exhausts to spot a Focus ST from a regular one.

        The Focus RS OTOH is as obnoxious as a WRX when it comes to wings, scoops etc.

        Although I did once see a Focus St being flat towed behind a motor home.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Agreed, GTI is more or less a default choice in this class, but worth noting: it’s also considerably quicker and FAR nicer inside than the Ford. The ST is still a pretty solid driver, though – I liked the handling.

      • 0 avatar
        TheDutchGun

        I think new, the pricing is comparable between a focus ST and GTI. Mid 30s here in Canada.

        Once it’s a year or 2 old, focus ST is a bargain compared to the GTI. I bought my 2017 in March of this year for a little over $24k with 22,000 km on it. That’s probably 10-12k less than brand new. I’m betting a comparable GTI would still be in the $30k range at those specs.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Yep, they were about the same money new, but setting all the performance stuff aside, a FoST still had all the Focus’ quality/cheapness issues, and a GTI feels like a $28,000 Audi. Same was true of the base Focus and Golf as well.

    • 0 avatar
      NG5

      My guess is the size and the RS on the same platform. If they’d have made only the wagon version, it wouldn’t even be compared unfavorably to the lighter Fiesta, the faster RS, or the nicer (but against a wagon, smaller) GTI. And the RS would have seemed even more exclusive. Though critical / enthusiast reception doesn’t mean sales, as the Fiesta vs Focus ST probably would show if broken out. Also I saw the wagon version in Germany on the street and it looks great.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I drove both when I got mine. The Focus ST is very good. It is more powerful and if you are into modding the stock Turbo can support more power. It just isn’t as much fun to drive. There isn’t anything wrong with it, it just isn’t quite as fun.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    The only serious beef I have with mine is that I leased it so I could hopefully get the new one. It isn’t coming so I’ll have to buy mine. There is really nothing like it out there.

    • 0 avatar
      TheEndlessEnigma

      Agreed, it’s a great hot-hatch.

    • 0 avatar
      NG5

      If I’d have kept mine another month, my girlfriend and I would be using it indefinitely as our do it all car. Unfortunately, her car suffered a catastrophic mechanical failure just after I sold the Fiesta. I think the Devil got word that alternating between it and a Miata would be too fun, and a plan was put into motion.

      Driving a Miata without air conditioning for our every required errand during the interceding summer month of car searching was fun, but I missed the Fiesta. The only reason I don’t miss it now is because where I live, driving is not generally necessary, and I bought the other car as a commitment to walk and bike more for my boring errands. For when those errands are required, I now can borrow her car. In other words, the only reason I moved on from it was simply because I wanted to drive less. I can’t think of higher praise for a car than “it made me drive too much”.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      The FiST I drove sure charmed the heck out of me – it isn’t terribly fast, but boy, does it think it is. Reminded me of a Jack Russell terrier.

      At the time, though, I was doing a daily work commute, plus about 100 miles of highway driving back and forth to my girlfriend’s place on weekends, and that’s the FiST’s weakest suit by far – it’s rather loud at speed, and the ride isn’t very comfortable. It’d have gotten tiresome with my 56-year-old backside.

      But, wow, what a fun car to drive! I’d recommend it wholeheartedly if you don’t have a lot of highway commuting to do.

      • 0 avatar
        NG5

        Yeah, I agree completely FreedMike. It has the power and handling to make highway driving effective, but the suspension and short wheelbase makes for some bone-jarring impacts. The pad on the left armrest was too thin, and my arm would hurt on long (3+) hour drives. Also, on the highway, the quick and fairly interactive steering is more to manage and less to enjoy.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          With respect to the ride quality, I have a nice set of Contour SVT 16 inch rims ready for powdercoat (can’t decide on the color) that when the OE tires are worn will be going on. They are OE wheels and have the correct offset and bolt pattern. I have ridden in one so setup and it honestly improves everything about the car, including the ride. Many of the guys I’ve seen on the track go down to 15’s. If I tracked it more I’d do the same as the tires are way more affordable, but I think 16’s are the right size with respect to appearance and performance for a mostly street driven car.

          • 0 avatar
            NG5

            Oh yeah, I had 15″ wheels for winter tires and I honestly looked forward to them going on. If I were keeping one forever, I think I would downsize summer ones too.

      • 0 avatar
        TheEndlessEnigma

        My FiST is my daily driver, 32 miles each way through I-4 and Tampa traffic. Yes the right is stiffer than, say, a Camary or Corolla….but then I’m driving a much more interesting car.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    I’ve mentioned before that I was a devoted Ford customer since my first car in 1980. I’ve had exceptional service from each car save for a 1988 1/2 Ford Escort GT that was a very very early production model that had pathetic assembly quality with a pinched harness and a bent strut that wore out tires and other suspension parts on the passenger side too quickly. Thanks for a dealer from whom I did not buy the car originally and with 60001 miles on the odometer with a 60k warranty, they noticed the service history and voluntarily repaired what was causing the issues and the gremlins never came back.

    My last Ford was fantastic – Honduh quality – exceptional gas mileage (45 mpgs per tank) – and went 178k miles before gremlins started a family and a cascade of impending repairs loomed overhead. I had not had a car payment in nearly 20 years and it was a big step to take on such an obligation.

    Ford could have had my business. But they abandoned me. I wanted a manual transmission, a small car (Focus sized), but I hated the new Fords with a passion (save for the C-Max). Terrible room utilization and bland and weird interior design. There was zero chance of me going to a CUV or SUV. A hybrid might have worked but they were too expensive.

    Being frugal, I chose to eschew a new car and cross shopped cars (even gagging at the thought of looking at Honduhs and Toyoduhs). After months of preparation in research, the car that kept me coming back to it was a 2016 Hyundai Elantra with 21k miles from CarMax. While I’ve thought CarMax to be expensive, since my car choice was a manual, it was $1k less than automatic versions and the car I chose had been a fleet car (not rental) from Massachusetts. Somehow it ended up in North Carolina and was eligible for a free transfer to Virginia where I live. This car looked even better than the pictures and after my own automotive (anal) detailing, it now looks brand new. I’ve had over 6k of trouble free miles and it gets 46 mpgs per tank (measured by miles traveled by gas pumped). The vehicle is quieter, more roomy, and even more stylish than the Focus I could have chosen.

    Ford lost me perhaps for good because this Hyundai is giving me great value for the money and I’m not ashamed to say I own a Hyundai. Because this brand lacks the Honduh and Toyoduh tax of their “perceived dependability”, I can get what they offer for substantially less.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      This could be me almost verbatim. I don’t want a Mustang. Other than the F150, which I will replace with another one every decade or so, they just don’t build anything else that interests me.

      Hyundai lost me because my wife’s 2017 Santa Fe has been no where near as good of an appliance as her old 2007 Tucson. Barring a Fit SI that is actually good, when I decide to replace the Fiesta ST it will likely be with a GTI or something like that if I still need the back seat. Otherwise I’m thinking Alfa 4C if they are still around. Otherwise maybe a Lotus Elise or even a 124 Abarth.


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