By on September 5, 2018

When the current-generation Fusion appeared for 2013, its Aston Martin styling was a cold glass of water in the face of milquetoast midsized family sedans. Part of Alan Mulally’s “One Ford” plan, the stylish car added zest to a bland segment.

Now, with recently minted CEO Jim Hackett having decreed the Mustang to be Ford’s only car worth keeping, the Fusion has been left to weather crushing competition from competitors that have undergone significant renewals – twice, in some cases.

In creating the Fusion, the Head of Advanced Design for Ford of Europe was commissioned as lead designer. Based in Detroit, under the guise of Exterior Chief Designer for Ford/Lincoln, his team received support from Ford of Europe studios in Germany and the UK. It is highly unlikely this would fly in today’s climate under the ministrations of Hackett.

Nowhere is the shift in thinking more evident than on the 11th floor of Ford HQ. According to a story in the Wall Street Journal, a plaque dedicated to Mr. Mulally’s One Ford plan was removed from the executive’s main conference room several months after the new CEO’s arrival. This was done to clear the wall for use as a workspace to map out a new strategy. Hackett apparently said he didn’t feel the language “fit what we were trying to get across.” The plaque has been re-appointed in a common area on the same floor, a Ford spox explained. Hmm.

For now, the Fusion lives on. How much longer is up for debate. The base model for 2019 is, as in past years, simply called the S. Powered by the company’s 2.5-liter Duratec inline-four that’s been around in some form or another seemingly since the last millennium, drivers will find 175 horsepower and an equal amount of torque. A six-speed automatic is the only transmission option.

Ford includes its Co-Pilot360 suite of safety features on the $22,840 base model Fusion. This packages lane keeping, pre-collision assist, blind-spot monitoring, and a rear-view camera. Adding to the safety net is the MyKey tech which allows parents to annoy teenage drivers by putting restrictions on speed and even radio volume. My parents simply had to rely on reports from nosy neighbors.

Outside, el cheapo 16-inch steel wheels with silver-painted plastic covers wear 215/60R16 tires. Natty LED taillamps adorn the rear. Color-keyed door handles and side-view mirrors won’t bely your thrifty ways. Fog lights don’t appear until the Titanium trim, four rungs up the ladder. The hue shown here is tasty Velocity Blue, a $0 option. I still believe this is a good looking car.

Buttons for the manual climate control reside on the dashboard, along with a couple of power points for accessories. The steering wheel tilts and telescopes while housing switches for the cruise and redundant audio controls. It’s pretty standard fare but a solid feature list. Sync3 is optional. My main gripe? The interior is only available in beige Medium Light Stone, a shade good for deflecting heat in hot climates but offensive to this author’s jaundiced eye.

Like so many other Blue Oval sedans before it, Lincoln LS and fourth-gen Taurus to name just two, it appears the company is content to let a once-great car wither on the vine until it is put out to pasture. Sure, all hands are hot for SUVs, but surely there remains a place at the table for the American sedan – even base models.

Right?

[Images: Ford Motor Company]

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selection.

The model above is shown in American dollars with American options and trim, absent of destination charges and available rebates. As always, your dealer may sell for less.

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88 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2019 Ford Fusion S...”


  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    I look forward to renting this from Budget in the next few months.

  • avatar
    tallguy130

    But steel wheels! There is cheap and then there is getting a megaphone and yelling to everyone how cheep you are. It really shouldn’t bother me as much as it does and I know it’s vanity but….yuck…steel wheels…

    • 0 avatar
      cognoscenti

      This is deliberate, not just a cost-cutting measure. How else are they going to get you to spring for the next trim level up? All the dealer needs to do is stock one of these base models and stack the incentives for their advertising. Even the premium brands deliberately put ugly alloy wheels on lower models – it’s their version of the steelie.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Give me a hubcap. If you get curb rash just replace the damn hubcap.

        I’d personally love painted steelies with trim rings and baby moons to make a comeback.

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          I didn’t love the exact execution, but points to Chevy for doing a steelie with trim ring in the form of the 5th-gen Camaro’s “Heritage” wheel.

          Also, some of our loved ones, alas, are not great parallel parkers. I really like the practicality of steelies with wheel covers or steelies with hubcaps and trim rings.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I think our current craze for slab sided CUVs (especially the massive 3 row versions) would look pretty good with steelies, trim rings, and either center caps or dog dish hubcaps.

            Better than spindly alloys anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      hpycamper

      Nothing wrong with steel wheels. Gigantic alloy wheels … yuck.

      • 0 avatar
        WallMeerkat

        Ford pioneered plastic wheel trims with the 1982 Sierra (aka Merkur XR4Ti, the sports model), the previous Cortina had mostly used steel wheels.

        The only models I can think of that sell and suit steel wheels are base model European MINI hatchbacks (MINI one) and base model Dacia Duster CUVs.

        It used to be a sign of an undercover policecar too, a look which suited some midsize sedans…

  • avatar
    Tomifobia

    Aside from the too-tight driver’s footwell, and the awful flat buttons on the center stack, sure.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    An extra grand gets you a base Camry. I’d spend the extra grand.

    • 0 avatar
      forward_look

      You don”t like to drive.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      REnted a new Camry in DTW couple months back. I fired it up and thought, ‘holy crap, is something wrong with the engine?’ NVH was NOT good.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        @ redapple – I assume it was a newish one with the dual-injected 2.5? In my experience, Lexus’ dual-injected engines are pretty noisy (just noisy, not rough), but Lexus does a fantastic job of underhood sound insulation. I was curious to see what the end result would be when dual-injection trickled down to Toyota applications . . . .

    • 0 avatar
      tonyola

      Wouldn’t you rather have a base Accord for the same price? I would.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        of course

        The Accord is the undisputed class leader – because it’s a class above

        People get Fusions because they’re cheap – but over the long haul the Accord the economically sound choice plus you’re getting the better car

        • 0 avatar

          If Accord is so good why they cannot sell it in Europe?

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            non-sequitur

            but here, C&D rates the Accord the best, Fusion near the bottom

            The Best and Others to Consider
            https://www.caranddriver.com/ford/fusion

            better question, if the Fusion is so good and so cheap why aren’t consumers rather than rental lots embracing it?

            further, why did Ford refuse to really update it and why did it announce it would be dropped?

          • 0 avatar

            Because Ford never updates existing models. It is the tradition started with Model T. It is more efficient to wait another 20 years and reinvent the car.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Based on what? Outdated misconceptions of reliability, refinement and economy? It can’t possibly be resale value, or you wouldn’t have chosen the fleet-heavy Camry and went for the Accord instead.

      As others have alluded to, the Fusion has a far more rewarding driving experience. Toyota can stick all the “bold” grilles it wants on the Camry, but until they improve the actual driving dynamics, its just lipstick on a pig.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        I thought the new Camry felt more athletic than the Fusion in all guises I drove, with the exception of the Fusion Sport and its 2.7-liter twin-turbo V6.

        That said, the Fusion just looks and feels more premium, even into its seventh year on the market.

        And the base 2.5-liter is a dog. The only one that drives worse is the Fusion Energi, with its 2.0-liter N/A I4 and electric motor. Of course, no one else is making a plug-in hybrid family sedan. The 1.5 and 2.0 are decent, although they lack mid-range power. Still, I would at least upgrade to the 1.5.

        Also, to be fair, the Fusion is just as fleet-heavy as the Camry (although the Malibu and Altima seem to rule the roost in that regard).

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Kyree, what did you think of the Camry’s new 2.5 + 8spd? Dual injection + NA + 200hp + 39mpg looks great on paper, but I see a lot of complaints about the refinement and driveability of that powertrain.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          The Koreans also make plug-in hybrid family sedans. Sonata or Optima, your choice. I’d still take the Ford, though it’s an enduring mystery why the Fusion Energi feels doggy when the C-Max Energi and regular Fusion Hybrid don’t. Ford needs to make the enhanced-performance cop version of the Fusion Energi powertrain the standard version.

          There’s also the Honda Clarity PHEV, aka “almost a real Volt.”

      • 0 avatar
        a5ehren

        If you care about driving dynamics, you’re getting a Mazda 6 anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          That’s what the journalists and that slavuta guy insist. In reality, the Accord drives just as nicely, but has better engines, transmissions, interior space, resale, dealer coverage, etc. etc.

          Mazda mainstreamers are for contrarians. Complete sidebar, seems CX-5 drivers are among the most aggressive on the road down here, which is quaint given the weak engines they are equipped with.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Based on what? Based on his preference with his money. WTF do you care?

        But since you do,

        “until they improve the actual driving dynamics”

        They did, speaking of outdated misconceptions. Don’t look at the fuel economy figure, either. I’d avoid comparing the hybrids and the 2.0T vs. V6 as well.

        https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2018-toyota-camry-se-25l-test-review

        https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2018-toyota-camry-xle-hybrid-test-review

        In your quest for mid-80s Fords, what was the last year and trim of Camry you’ve driven? When was the last time you shopped for a new family sedan for your kids, with the intent of using it as a functional family vehicle with minimal extra cost and hassle? Examine that and you may understand, even if you don’t fully agree, why someone would pick a Camry instead of being p*ssed off by that choice.

      • 0 avatar
        jimmyy

        JohnTaurus, I just drove my 12 Camry Hybrid to a Ford dealer in Costa Mesa, Ca, where I picked up a friend who was getting some bump work on his Kia. The sales force was almost chasing me in the lot … they wanted my Camry for the used car lot. Wanted to know what kind of money I wanted for it. Sorry, keeping it. Resale is no problem.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        LOL.

        The 2013 Accord was better than this Fusion and the new Accord is a class above. Every single professional review confirms that.

        There’s a reason the Fusion is a rental car. It’s just not competitive and not worth updating.

        • 0 avatar
          rocketrodeo

          We shopped the Fusion against the Accord, and we’ve had four previous Accords. We got the Fusion. It helped that it was available in colors, with options, along with a six-speed manual–and it was by far the better driving car. Ride, handling, and road noise especially. The worst thing about Ford is the way they decontent the later iterations of what is initially a great car.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      The Ford 2.5L is bulletproof (and not a dog as someone stated). The Fusion drives better. The Fusion has a more refined interior. The Fusion isn’t fugly. The Fusion has cash on the hood, while you’re paying full price for the Camry.

      People can certainly have their preferences, but the Fusion S deserves the “Ace of the Base” award.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        I do like the Fusion, but the new platform underpinning the Camry has apparently improved the car substantially and I don’t think the advantages you cite are there anymore. Despite this, you’re not paying full price on the Camry. Not in this age of sedan-o-phobia. I have to disagree on the old 2.5 not being a dog. It felt a bit weak compared to the Toyota, Honda, and Nissan 2.4s and 2.5s of six years ago. It’s hopelessly outclassed now in both acceleration and fuel economy. Which is fine, it’s just what happens at the end of a design life.

        • 0 avatar
          brn

          We’re not too far off. Yes, it’s nearing the end of it’s design life. Vehicles in that stage often have all the kinks worked out and are also price leaders.

          As to to the power of the 2.5, it’s not up to some of the more modern 2.5’s. However, it does manage to move the car reasonably. By no means am I saying i’ts powerful, just not a dog.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    You say it comes in only beige, but you show a black/dark interior.

    I own the car that aced the ace of base for midsize cars. ’14 Accord with the 6speed manual. Long list of standard features, and I’ve never said I wish it had…, but wow, at this price it has really nice alloy wheels, back up camera, automatic dual heat and air etc.

    • 0 avatar
      S197GT

      i think he meant, more specifically, the seats only come in the “medium light stone” color.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      14 accord.
      One of the best looking cars of the decade.

      Almost pulled the trigger on a 14 Sport.

    • 0 avatar
      rocketrodeo

      We shopped the Accord too, with the primary requirement that it have a six-speed manual. There was a long list of “I wish it had”s. Leather, tech options, a light-color interior, COLORS. We found all of that in the Fusion. Granted, the Fusion is no longer on the list because no more manuals, but the Accord hasn’t improved in this area either, except that now you can get it in non-grayscale.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Any problems or regrets with your Fusion during ownership? I’m curious about how these hold up after the usual 5yr/60K.

        • 0 avatar
          rocketrodeo

          We had one issue with the turbo wastegate actuator solenoid, replaced under warranty. The initial symptom was an overpressure situation that blew off the charge pipe between the throttle body and the intercooler. The stock suspension, when new, was IMO the best of the class, but the rear shocks were shot at 60K. We are doing a mild suspension upgrade with Koni struts and shocks and Steeda antiroll bars, but will be retaining stock rate/height springs.
          I’d note the character of this car is very different with the manual versus the automatic, and 180hp is adequate. Tunes are available since this is basically the FiST engine.

          Other than that, it has been really, really, good — and that’s with a first-year car. It is a fully optioned SE, and none of the toys have stopped working or even hiccuped. It even has the self-parking system, which is something I have never seen available on a manual transmission car. Forward and rear parking sensors, blind spot sensors, forward camera for lane departure warning and headlamp dimming, and what is usually a complaint area, the MyFordTouch, all flawless. The three upgrades to the SYNC system were painless; downloaded them online, and each one made the infotainment system faster and added functionality.

          There have been a few recalls, most recently for the clutch pressure plate assembly. This was a pretty minor recall, affecting about 2000 out of the million and a half second generation Fusions built — but it was for every six speed manual Fusion, giving an idea how rare our car is. Ford installed a brand new clutch free of charge at 82K miles and gave us a nice loaner in the meantime.

          Honestly, we’d get another, it’s been that good. I don’t know what we’ll end up with now that it’s no longer an option. But it was no longer an option after 2014 when they discontinued the manual.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            Thanks. Frankly sounds like an excellent car worth hanging onto, particularly in that unicorn loaded manual transmission example you have.

            It really is a shame that a car like this isn’t profitable enough to continue offering.

            Regarding replacements, have you tried a current Accord 1.5T with the manual? Seems like the closest analogue right now.

  • avatar
    threeer

    I genuinely miss my old first gen Fusion…WITH manual trans and sunroof, it made for a great DD. I do like the new Fusion, but higher trim levels do it far more justice than the base trim.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    That 2.5 is pretty weak-kneed and pokey even by base engine standards.

    The powertrains in this car were always a weak point to me.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I think there are some great powertrains in the Fusion lineup.

      But this base 2.5 is not one of them.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        The 2.7T certainly, but the Sport is an odd duck. In the meat of the segment, I just don’t see what the 1.5T and 2.0T provide relative to competitors. The 2.0 impressed me around town and I wondered how this thing was clocking longish 7 second runs to 60 in magazines. Then you take it down the first onramp and see the power just sag by 40mph and never recover whereas the big V6s keep pulling strongly.

        I still like it, but the Fusion is something I’d buy despite the engines rather than because of them.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          I really don’t see anything wrong with the 2.0T although I was reading a review somewhere and a reviewer lumped all the current mainstream 2.0T engines together as “characterless” and doubted he could “tell the difference between them.”

          YMMV. It looks like I’ll get to try out my Father-in-laws 2.0T Terrain on a roughly 300 mile trip and I’m looking forward to it. Car companies seem to think that 2.0T is the cure to life’s ills and I have yet to log significant seat time with one.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            IIRC it was Bob Lutz who recently said “it’s basically come down to everyone finding that 500cc per cylinder is the ‘sweet spot.\'”

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            Not that it’s bad, just that the V6 Camry and Accord it competed against were notably stronger above 30mph. Out on the freeway it’s no contest, the Ford just doesn’t feel like it has the “big” engine in it.

            All 2.0Ts may be characterless, but some are stronger performers. The Malibu and new Accord are far quicker.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            My guess is that the 2.0T is sized to avoid displacement taxes that kick in on Chinese-market vehicles.

            It’s been an argument of mine that if you’re going to kill V6s, at least make the baseline engine to which aforementioned gerbil-wheel is attached at least 2.3 liters or so, but again, there’s the ChiCom displacement tax, and the certification cost of the additional powerplant for the American (and other) markets.

  • avatar
    detlump

    Always thought those small windows near the mirror were a bad idea – easy to smash to gain entry – and they don’t even open!

    I like the steel wheels but would prefer wheel covers secured by the lug nuts so you don’t lose them hitting a pot hole. Steel wheels are cheap to replace and nigh-on-unstealable. I do recall a rash of Fusion aluminum wheel thefts when this model first came out.

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      They are not any easier to smash to gain entry than any other window in the car…

      • 0 avatar
        eManual

        The cost of the small glass and the ease of replacement make it easier to steal the whole car. You might even be able to find a slightly bigger piece of glass and cut it to fit. And plugging the hole (without glass) would also not draw attention to the car to any non-automotive person.

        • 0 avatar
          whynot

          “The cost of the small glass and ease of replacement” Lol you think the people breaking into the car care about that?

          Most people breaking into a a standard run of the mill car like a Fusion are doing so either:

          1) Just to get into something inside (they are long gone by the time damage gets notice and don’t care)

          2) Are on the run (Don’t care about final condition of car, have no long term intention of using the car)

          3) Taking it to a chop shop. The car will be there before any suspicious people reports the vehicle they see just because of a broken window.

          Number 1 is by far the most common reason people break into cars. That is why many owners of soft top convertibles or Wranglers often time leave their doors unlocked especially in sketchy areas. Very few people are breaking into cars to steal them, especially for long term personal use, and especially if it is a garden variety vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            deanst

            I don’t understand the logic, but when my Jetta was broken into, they smashed the small window on the rear door.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I’ve had a couple of cars with those forward sail windows (2015 Golf SportWagen, 2016 Cruze), and they made the cabin feel less claustrophobic, as well as providing superior visibility around the A-pillar. Plus, it just looks upscale to me.

      The only thing is that due to the position of the glass on the Golf SportWagen, my tint shop was unable to tint it.

  • avatar
    SixspeedSi

    I guess this is an okay Ace of Base, but meh, it’s just a Fusion with a couple more safety bits. I think the new Accord is still a superior Ace.

    I doubt you’ll even see “S” trims stocked at dealers besides in their fleet department. The base “SE” trim seems way more popular and I’m sure the incentives puts it right back at this price range.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      Used to be you’d see the ‘S’ trim regularly, but not anymore. It’s too bad.

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        The S + Appearance Package is pretty sharp. The only discernible difference from the driver’s perspective is the fairly basic driver information screen. Other than that I only notice the lack of an HVAC vent in the back seat and no armrest back there. My only real gripe with the refresh is the goofy taillights.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    Much preferred the prior gen. The front end of these just feels flimsy.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Update the Center stack -is that the industry’s smallest screen? – and buy some drive trains from Honda, and this would be decent. It’s still a better looking car than some competitors.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      It might be the smallest, but I like it.

      My Ford sedan has a big infotainment system. My newer Escape has a teeny one. I prefer the teeny one. It does everything I need (sync with phone, backup camera, voice commands, dial 911 if in an accident, display music info, etc). If I buy another Ford, I won’t upgrade to the fancy infotainment system. It just gets in the way.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Ford should be thoroughly embarrassed that this car gets mileage of 21/32 while a Camry with a 2.5L engine and more horsepower gets 29/41. It’s things like this that make some auto manufacturers seem like they really don’t give a damn about their customers.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      You realize you’re foaming at the mouth over a trim level practically nobody buys, right?

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        If you have stats on the take rate for s and se models, I’d be interested in seeing it. I still think that selling cars with embarrassing low levels of technology has an impact on the value of the brand. I doubt I’m unique in that regard.

        • 0 avatar
          hpycamper

          Some of us prefer low levels of technology. I would be happier without infotainment. Just give me a space for a radio.

          • 0 avatar
            deanst

            I’d probably prefer no screen to that sorry little thing. The vast expanse of cheap black plastic on the Center stack is some designers embarrassment somewhere.

            I checked the epa stats, and this Ford has the “honour” of having the worst fuel economy among all non-turbo, automatic 4 cylinder cars. Congratulations Ford!!!!

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I don’t know, steel wheels with plastic covers might be an automatic disqualification.

    Otherwise I really like the Fusion.

    Particularly in hybrid form.

  • avatar
    ColoradoFX4

    Interesting that for MY19 Ford went back to steel wheels on the S after making alloys standard for MY18. The steelies are a bit small and dopey looking, but they can be useful: I bought a second-hand set for my 2014 Fusion to use with my winter tires, since the narrower tire size provides a bit more traction in snow, and I don’t mind if the plastic wheel covers get dinged up from sand dropped by plows.

  • avatar
    James2

    Why is the grille in the bumper asymmetrically placed?

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      (I believe) the asymmetrical block-off plate on the lower grille is there because it’s where the radar is on units equipped with adaptive cruise. It’s on some other FoMoCo cars, too, like the Edge and MKX.

      I like when they’re able to hide the radar inside the front logo, generally with cars that have large, central-logos (Mercedes-Benz models with the sport grille, Volkswagen, Hyundai, Acura, some Hondas, Cadillac, etc).

      But if you think the Fusion’s implementation is offensive, look at a Bentley Mulsanne or previous-gen (pre-2019) Bentley Continental GT with adaptive cruise.

      https://bit.ly/2Q6oiaX

      • 0 avatar
        WallMeerkat

        The Hyundai one looks awful, on the Ioniq, as it is literally a plastic plate with the grille and badge printed onto it.

        Mercedes seems to be replacing their old slatted grilles with ones with big badges to hide the radar.

        Looks better than the one in the Skoda Superb which was just a black box in the middle of the grille, like a hitler moustache on a car.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I’ve had some seat time in a 2013 Fusion SE and a 2017 Fusion S and I feel like they’ve gotten noisier as the generation ages. I’m possibly overly sensitive, or don’t remember the 2013 clearly since it was my roommate’s car and I didn’t drive it often. Possibly the older SE model had a bit more sound deadening kit added.

    *Both vehicles had the 2.5. It seems like even the Escape with a similar drivetrain was quieter.
    Also, that mileage is pretty middling at best. The 2003 Accord I had had identical ratings and my memory of it was that it was a quieter vehicle all around. Then again it’s been years since I drove it.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    I haven’t driven the current Camry or Accord, but I spent about an hour in a 2.0T Titanium Fusion. Compared to prior gen Camrys and Accords it’s vastly better….at least as far as handling, and steering weight/feel are concerned. Older Camry wheels are full of Novocaine, and the ’14 Accord I drove had that kind of gooey steering feel that just screams FWD family sedan designed for people that don’t care about driving.

    The problem is acceleration, or lack thereof. I’m not sure if it’s an issue with the gearing of the 6-speed or what, but the car feels like it has about 50hp less than advertised. Around town yes is fine, but as was already said, getting on the highway is like waiting for VTEC that never comes.

    Comfort, refinement, and materials are par for the class, but nothing exceptional. You get nowhere near the level of lux feel of the current TOTL Mazda6, buy an MKZ if you want that. That’s what I did. That being said, Sync3 makes Mazda’s infotainment system look like a joke.

  • avatar
    pdog_phatpat

    So many new entries today to comment on. OH LOOK, A FORD ARTICLE! RABBLE RABBLE RABBLE RABBLE RABBLE….

  • avatar

    Ford – what a disgrace!

  • avatar
    WallMeerkat

    Ford Europe assisted as this was the replacement for the Mondeo (which in 1st gen form was brought to the US as the Contour).

    That’s why the side profile looks very similar to the previous gen Mondeo.

    I have to say, I was sitting at lights earlier opposite a euro Mondeo (this Fusion) that had those Audi style moving indicator LEDs, it looked high spec (Vignale?), really looked nice.

    Sadly it looks like when the Fusion goes the Mondeo will follow, even Europeans are falling for the CUV fashion.

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    I had a 2016 Fusion SE loaner last week. It said EcoBoost on the back but under the hood had no displacement on a decal like every single other car I have ever seen. Had to be the 1.5L though, because it was a total dog. There was also a very odd “bulge” below the accelerator that only let you push a very small amount on the gas – like barely push it. To really gas it you had to lift up your foot and like, jab at it with your toes – craziest design I ever saw, and made me darn certain I could never DD one. And that bizcard-size backup cam! Why even bother with such a worthless joke of a tiny screen! I got back in my Charger R/T and the backup cam is like being front row at a drive in. Come on Ford…….


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