By on August 12, 2019

Image: Lincoln

Got your eye on Lincoln’s upcoming Aviator? You’ll be pleased to learn the brand’s premium midsize crossover will enter your driveway with more bragging rights than previously thought. Specifically, more power for the same price.

As Lincoln doles out a small fleet of 2020 Aviators to a cabal of shrimp-loving auto scribes, the provided spec sheet held a surprise. The model’s certified power figures are not the same figures listed during the Aviator’s 2018 LA Auto Show reveal.

First noticed by CarBuzz, the confirmed power numbers amount to 400 horsepower (unchanged from earlier) for the base twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter V6, plus 415 lb-ft of torque. That’s up from 400 lb-ft.

Greater things await those who shell out near-Navigator sums of cash for the plug-in hybrid variant, positioned by Lincoln as something of an exclusive hot rod that just happens to be green. While the automaker previously claimed hybrid buyers could expect 450 hp and 600 lb-ft of torque — healthy numbers by anyone’s measure — the actual output is even better.

Image: Ford

In plug-in guise, the Aviator is good for 494 hp and 630 lb-ft, widening the already significant power gap between it and its Cadillac XT6 rival. Surely there’s a hotter “V” variant of Caddy’s new midsize CUV in the works? (Perhaps a better question would be, “Would a V variant of the XT6 turn anyone on?”)

Boasting a rear-drive layout at the bottom end (unless you’re a Canadian buyer), the Aviator starts below the XT6 in terms of price, quickly rising as buyers add all-wheel drive and loftier trims to the standard 3.0-liter/10-speed auto drivetrain. Going green and gutsy adds a lone electric motor to the mix. It’s worth mentioning that the sportier and hybrid variants of the Aviator’s Explorer platform mate do not match the Lincoln in terms of power. The Explorer hybrid is not a plug-in, either.

Ford was careful not to overlap the two models too closely.

While we now know exactly how much power these Aviators make, fuel economy for the plug-in variant remains a mystery. Presently, the EPA only lists rear-drive and AWD versions of the standard Aviator, with MPGs amounting to 18 city/26 highway/21 combined for the rear-driver. Adding all-wheel grip lowers things just a bit to 17/24/20.

Aviators begin landing at dealers later this summer.

[Images: Lincoln Motor Company]

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41 Comments on “A Pleasant Surprise Awaits Lincoln Aviator Fans...”


  • avatar
    Jerome10

    My call: They’re gonna sell a ton of these.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Why is GM half-a$$ing things so much?

    • 0 avatar
      NoID

      I don’t know, but after watching their climb back to relevance and aspirational status, I’m heartily disappointed to see them phoning it in on their SUVs.

      I mean, as an employee of a competing brand I’m ecstatic to see their design team running up their long distance phone bill and cranking out sub-par product. As a believer in American excellence and proponent of our continued domination of the globe, I’m disappointed that they seem to be (re)ceding ground back to the established premium/luxury players. There’s a case to be made that the future of luxury has room for FWD-based platforms, but that’s no excuse for sub-par entries.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        GM just wants profit and thinks they can sleep walk there way there.

        GM is being extremely cynical about this segment. You’ll buy it because it’s a CUV – everyone wants a CUV, who cares if its any good?

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Half-a**ed? Depends on how you look at it, I think. As a stylish, high-performance, the XT6 is a bust. But as a people/stuff hauler, it’s going to be very, very good – far better than the Explorer/Aviator. That’s not irrelevant to buyers in this class (which included me, not so long ago).

        Half-a**ed as the XT6 is, I actually predict it’ll outsell the Aviator. I think the market for a practical, boring CUV is bigger than the one for a hot, smaller one.

        Anyone want to lay odds with me?

        • 0 avatar
          Jerome10

          I actually suspect you might be right.

          The difference to me, however, is as a “luxury” brand, Cadillac will throw down incentives or talk about sales figures.

          Lincoln will sell them on merit, and the car actually fits with what a “luxury” car should be. Big power on engines not available in the common-man version, true presence on the road, beautiful, stylish interiors with real substance etc.

          So yeah, you’re probably right Cadillac will sell more, and each one that sells drags the brand down with it.

          Lincoln I feel will be going in the opposite direction with the Aviator. Brand image will go up substantially, higher ATP etc.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I’m not only referring to the XT6.

          All of GM’s recent product announcements (aside the C8) have a weird devotion to austerity (in everything but price for now). It is a company-wide issue. I feel like they are going down the Nissan path and they’ll end up with similar results.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          The XT6 likely will outsell the Aviator, but w/ higher discounts and a lower ATP.

          As for Cadillac, Mark Reuss and the beancounters have been winning the battle, but think things will change for the next-gen models based on the VSS-R platform (if not at least partially-based on the likes of Lincoln and Genesis forcing their hand to up their game).

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    I went to the Canadian Lincoln website to see more pictures of that beautiful green paint, but it’s not offered here even on the highest trim. Why?

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Sorry, FoMoCo/Lincoln* Fanbois; it’s ugly all around’ 360 degrees, and from top to bottom, and it undoubtedly has a too high MSRP (at least initially, before production is cranked up to 11), and Lincoln Dealers, geniuses at moving product and inventory control/s will not be able to put appropriate amounts of $ on the hood until Hackett and Fartley sign off on oodles of incentive cash.

    This a new entrant into the already overcrowded (beyond seating capacity) premium SUV/CUV market, AND THE DESIGN ALREADY LOOKS OLD EVEN AGAINST THE FAR LESS EXPENSIVE HYUNDAI PALISADE (that is made of premium stuff, inside and out, assembled precisely, and literally is 2/3rds the price of this).

    But what do I know?

    IT’S NOT LIKE ANY OF MY PAST PREDICTIONS HAVE COME TRUE.

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      @DW: No FoMoCo fanboi here, but to my discerning eye, the Lincoln looks great.

      Why are you yelling?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      But which Palisade has 400hp? The H/K crossovers are nice but you’re still getting a minivan-tier engine.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        not to mention that here in Texas, AWD is never needed, especially for these larger, more expensive cars.
        I want my two wheels driving me forward to be the rear.

        And, the last time I checked, the scribes were all wrong about the price comparisons between the Koreans and the Explorer.
        I was able to get they on the Ford build sites easily as cheep, or cheaper than the Korean builds.

        And the real world MPGs given by everybody testing and reviewing them has them well below the stated. I believe Matt Moran had his ave 17 MPG after the entire week.
        PLEASE! 17!

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      “IT’S NOT LIKE ANY OF MY PAST PREDICTIONS HAVE COME TRUE.”

      Even a broken clock is right twice a day

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        DW

        I usually agree with you. RE Lincoln- I cannot.
        Sharp looking. Good interiors. Engines that are NOT weezy turbo 4 bangers that will explode piles of crap like GM.

        I hope they sell tons.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The Hyundai Palisade is not a pretty vehicle. The Aviator is and w/o trying to hard to look flashy like Lexus and the Lexus grille inspired Palisade.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        The Palisade’s grille is the inverse of the Lexus grille and is something that Hyundai has been using for years (they also did the “spindle grille” on a concept before Lexus started using it).

        Think DW is off-base here.

        While that argument may work in some sense w/ the XT6 (compared to the top trims of the Palisade and Telluride), the Aviator is on a different level when it comes to design and interior quality.

        What should be an interesting battle is that btwn the Aviator and the upcoming Genesis GV80 – for those seeking a luxurious RWD-based CUV and don’t want to pay MB or BMW $$ to get it nicely equipped.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I have to yell sometimes in Cadillac and Lincoln threads because both those brands median customer age is approximately 68 years old.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    I will pick an Aviator over any Cadillac offering.

  • avatar
    redapple

    michael…

    agreed !!!

  • avatar
    Hummer

    As much as I hate the thought of a crossover with a tiny whiny engine, I would pick this over the FWD Cadillac that shouldn’t have made it past the idea stage, everyday of the week.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Sooo…A Tiny whiny engine that has more horsepower than the Lamborghini Countach that graced my walls back in the day. 400 base RWD hp. Man we live in a golden era.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Time moves on, horsepower expectations only have one way to go. That Lambo achieved its horsepower figures much more gracefully than this tiny engine can. The V6 is a perfectly acceptable base engine, but there’s nothing luxurious about a turbo and Ford should sell to customers that want larger engines. I give them credit on the drivetrain layout but a turbo engine will never be aspirational or desirable as a similarly powered naturally aspirated engine.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Time does march on. Turbos have gained mainstream acceptance as truck motors and are apparently desirable based on the sales of Ford’s models vs. the competition.

          And I bet that Lambo required a bit more maintenance than the Ford.

          Still, even with modern HP expectations, 400 base and nearly 500 optional is massive for a people mover like this. Plus Fords turbos are small, spool stupid fast, and make gobs of bottom end. They are probably closer to old school big blocks than any of the small block V8’s. Yes, I’ve driven tons of both.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “They are probably closer to old school big blocks than any of the small block V8’s.”

            I would say this is correct.
            Unfortunately they tend to run out of breath like an old school big-block too. Probably not a big deal on the Aviator, although I do wish they’d have done the full-whack Bullitt-tune Coyote V8 for the exST.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            It’s not that turbos have gained acceptance or appeal, it’s that other options are being hardfisted out of availability while only the easier to game (on CAFE) are being offered. You can compare a turbo engine to a big block all you like but we both know that a turbo is incapable of maintaining the longevity of a big block, measuring only by output while ignoring how that output is created doesn’t really tell the full story. I would much rather take the big block and know it would last longer doing the same thing at a much more leisured pace. Using a turbo to compensate for lack of displacement is poor engineering at best, the people getting stuck with these small engines are typical the ones least able to afford the disaster they become out of warranty.

            Making an assumption that a Ford requires less maintenance is a bold statement based on my experiences. Cheaper to do those unplanned maintenance visits? Sure. Certainly no less frequent however.

            Regardless, at the end of the day a turbo anything is not luxury, it’s no different than the badges on the Dodge 600 article exclaiming it has Front Wheel Drive. It’s all marketing hype to sell sh1t ideas for more than they are worth in order for the manufacturer to cash in on cheaper to build cars to people that buy cars based on the latest fads.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “It’s not that turbos have gained acceptance or appeal, it’s that other options are being hardfisted out of availability while only the easier to game (on CAFE) are being offered.”

            Bull. If what you say is true, F150 sales should have cratered when they shifted to turbos. Yet the F series is comfortably the best selling truck on the market with the most popular engine choices being the ecoboost models in the half tons by a long shot.

            If people wanted the V8’s so bad and Ford wasn’t providing them, they’d roll down to their Ram or Chevy dealer. If truck buyers fit the stereotype perpetuated on here, (Only want V8’s, dont care about gas mileage), the Tundra would be a wild hit.

            There is no conspiracy to make you buy a turbocharged truck. 4 of the 6 makers of them dont even sell a fullsized truck with a gasoline turbo engine and GM’s lone offering is hardly a volume offering. Ford buyers like the ecoboost motors…And a ton of buyers buy them. But it is no problem to get a NA v8 if you want one. Heck you can still get an NA 6, though it will probably be a low spec model.

            They are selling because a ton of people like them, not because a bunch of people met in a boardroom in Dearborn and said “You know what…lets only build turbo sixes just to make that Hummer guy mad”

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            And yes, I am going to go out on a limb and say that my F150 has to go to the shop less frequently than an 80’s exotic. If I had the worst powershift car out there and it required engine out replacement every 30,000 miles it would still be better than many 80’s exotics. Not that that makes it good, but again, to imply that modern turbocharged truck motors are as maintenance intensive as an 80’s exotic makes me wonder if you are on meth.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            @aija I agree. The stock ecoboost turbos are tiny so they spool quick, but yes, if you want much on the top end you typically need a bigger one. Not a bad compromise on trucks though.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Fact is that the Ecoboost F150s sell well because people want them. They had to cut back hours at the plant that makes the 5.0 since the number of buyers choosing it continues to drop off. When Ford introduced the first 3.5 they were totally shocked by the take rate being near twice what they had expected. So the 2.7 was added which boosted the EcoBoosts share considerably.

    • 0 avatar
      Michael S6

      400 HP and 415 lb/ft of torque is not a tiny whiny engine. Most turbo engines put the power down at low rpm which is great for around town acceleration.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Hopefully this version of the Explorer will have better quality than the Ford version. already being recalled lol.

    And Lincoln, please hire competent designers. This looks awful.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      My friend makes 750 dollars an hour working from home just a few hours a week. Click below to find out more!

      Were I one of those bots that posted that stuff all of the time I would still contribute more to this place than your rantings.

  • avatar
    la834

    Lincoln needs to do something about their dealerships if they want to be a major player again in the luxury field. At least around my parts (near a major city), Lincolns are sold from the corner of a 45-year-old Ford dealership, fluorescent troffers, linoleum tiles and all. Nothing like the elegant bespoke surroundings at the Lexus dealership with their espresso machine and guest lounges. At least the cars, er, CUVs, are finally good enough.

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