By on July 29, 2019

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray - Image: Chevrolet

In accordance with all that is true in the U.S. sports car market, General Motors is about to sell 2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8 Stingrays by the truckload before settling in to a few years of significantly less volume.

Even casual industry observers understand that trend. Between the hype, the early adoption fervor, and the performance leaps generally represented by a new species of sportus caricus, shoppers tend to turn en masse to the newest, flashiest, boldest two-door. That pattern is amplified by vehicles with legendary status.

Fortunately, the legends aren’t as inherently prone to suffering from dramatic, post-hype declines in demand (See: FR-S, Scion.) History tells us General Motors’ 66-year-old sports car will surge some 40 percent in 2020 and then continue rising in 2021 before dipping somewhat in 2022.

The Corvette average buyer age is a whole ‘nuther story.

One thing is certain: when it comes to publicizing expectations, GM doesn’t want to play ball. “We’re not discussing sales or production projections for the 2020 Corvette Stingray at this time,” Chevrolet spokesperson Kevin Kelly told TTAC last week. Kelly’s at this time phrase gave us cause for hope, so we asked again two minutes later, to no avail.

1997 Chevrolet Corvette - Image: Chevrolet

Looking back at the three most recent launches of new Corvettes therefore becomes a primary means of discovering what might happen with the C8.

During the first year of the C5, for example, sales rose 28 percent compared to the final year for the C4 before rising a further 29 percent in 1999.

2006 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 - Image: Chevrolet

The C6’s launch didn’t incite quite as much passion. To be fair, the C6 didn’t possess the same level of all-newness that the C5 (or the C8, for that matter) made so obvious. The ’04 launch spiked volume, but in its first full year of 2005, sales actually declined before rising modestly in 2006. (In fact, that ’06 total of 36,518 U.S. Corvette sales is the highest since the C4’s early 80s heyday.)

Venture only as far back as the C7’s launch and the demand deluge that came with the arrival of a new ‘Vette was easy to spot. U.S. sales in 2014 doubled 2013’s output before dipping in 2015.

With history in mind, can Chevrolet instantly return the Corvette to that annual 35,000/units that seems so otherworldly for a high-dollar sports car? Here are three key factors working against the C8.

  • The C7’s decline has been more precipitous than the decline of its predecessors. Sales dropped in 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018; falling 46 percent during that period. (2019 sales are down again.)
  • Though arguably more of a performance bargain than ever before, the C8’s sub-$60K sticker is still higher than ever before.
  • The typical Corvette buyer is aging out of the sports car market. The car’s average buyer is 61 years old; 60 percent of buyers are over 55. You can’t blame the expense of the car for that fact — the average Porsche 911 buyer is nearly a decade younger.

2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 - Image: Chevrolet

Yet it’s worth our while to strip away history and numbers. After all, GM threw decades of history into the dustbin just by creating the C8: a mid-engined car with a predictably-Xeroxed mid-engined silhouette and no manual transmission. The Corvette C8’s potential in a shrinking sports car market may well have no relation to the launch of any Corvette replacement in history. Here are three key factors working in the C8’s favor.

  • The C8 is likely to shift the performance paradigm in an altogether different manner. Think of the Nissan GT-R in 2008.
  • While clearly not shaped like a Corvette in the traditional sense, the new Corvette’s name recognition and vast dealer network work wonders when compared with, say, oh I don’t know, the rather more costly Alfa Romeo 4C Spider.
  • GM is ready to build Corvettes. The Bowling Green, Kentucky, workforce has grown by 400 to 1,300 people. GM has also invested $900 million in Bowling Green since 2011. This isn’t one of those situations where an automaker is caught off guard by early demand for a previously unknown sports car.

There’s also the possibility that the gradual decline in interest for the existing Corvette has less to do with the shrinking sports car market and more to do with the ascendant buzz around the potential of a forthcoming mid-engined Corvette. In other words, the C7’s low U.S. sales totals could bode well for the C8. Don’t forget, too, that the new car’s potential for global demand (including right-hand drive) could limit U.S. capacity.

As a result, it’s entirely possible that GM will sell 30,000 Corvettes in the U.S. in 2020; not quite double the monthly output the C7 is currently producing. Given the conditions of the market and the age of the typical Corvette buyer, however, the Corvette’s rate of decline over the next half-decade is likely to be even sharper with the C8 than it was with the C7.

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Driving.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars and Instagram.

[Images: General Motors]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

61 Comments on “How Many Chevrolet Corvette C8 Stingrays is General Motors Going to Sell? A Lot, At First...”


  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    The pent-up demand and hype will spike this year’s (and next year’s) sales. If GM was smart, and that is debatable more than a few times, they would cap production around 20-30,000 worldwide to keep the interest high and the desire of what can’t be had there. Case in point, as I’m currently discovering and going through some internal debate whether it is worth it or not, several area Honda dealers are still tacking on $7-10K markups on Civic Type-Rs!!! Two and half years after introduction!

    Chevy has it priced just right – get them in the door for 60K, upsell a few nice packages that bump it to $70K, add dealer markup around another $10K so now we’re at least at $80K and live like that for a few years. When that pent-up demand starts to wane, then introduce the Z06, GS, and ZR-1 models.

    Don’t flood the streets the first year – something like this should be special to see on the streets.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      There was a wise quote about sports cars that went something like, ‘you can sell a million of any sports car, but you have to sell them all the first day.’ The last thing you want is tight supply up front. For one thing, it is the only time you’re going to sell a car to the people who want attention. For another thing, the dealers will rip off the early customers so badly that demand will wilt and there will be no justification for keeping the car in production. See Ford Focus RS, Boss 302, and Honda Civic Type R soon enough.

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        I’m of the belief that you don’t want to flood the streets the first year of something special like this (or any sports car) – a mid-engine $60K Corvette with this kind of performance counts as special. Economists with more degrees than I probably have a formula drawn out that can dictate how much of a “special” automobile can sell to keep it rare, profitable, and keep the buying public interested and willing to buy. If you strangle supply too much at first, and there are so few for sale, people might move on. However, there are still tens of thousands of the cash-waving public that have been waiting years for this and if they have to wait a year or two longer for their number to come up, I’m betting they will do so.

        In a way, it’s like the Porsche 911. Something so powerful and iconic should be a rare sight, and yet with the exception of the ultra-high performance ones, Porsche doesn’t seem to put a cap on production and it becomes a kind of “yawn, another 911” scene on the streets. I don’t want to see that happen with the C8.

        And the Focus RS is all but done, not sure about the future of the Boss 301, and the 2020 CTR images are being leaked and it appears to a: finally have a less boy-racer body, and b: a future.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          There are at least three of the latest 911 GT2 RSs flatulating around my neighborhood. Where people buy exotic cars, they’re only special the day they come out. When you move down the status order, it is even more compulsory to milk the novelty market. Do you think we’d have Mustangs today if they didn’t sell 650,000 in the 1965 model year?

          • 0 avatar
            theflyersfan

            You make a couple of interesting points there.

            That’s why I chuckle when someone brags that they just bought a used Ferrari or Lamborghini…but they are the third owner and just bought themselves ungodly high repair and insurance bills and not a status symbol except to maybe a couple of their friends not in the know.

            It has to be where you live – in my slice of flyover country, except during election season when we turn into ground zero in the rings of Hell, I have seen so few higher performance 911s that it really registers on my radar when I actually see one that isn’t outside a Porsche dealer. But according to my brother outside of DC, they are thick on the ground.

            And that shoots their exclusiveness to almost zero.

            And my counterpoint to your Mustang point – Ford didn’t set out to make the Mustang exotic. As I recall, and there are some Mustang historians on this site that can correct me if I’m wrong, Ford used nothing but off-the-shelf parts and engines in a new body to make an inexpensive runabout for a new class of buyer and hit gold. It was Ford’s intention to flood the market if they sold because they could be made on the cheap, and sold inexpensively. I don’t see a comparison with the Corvette with this. Almost everything with this Corvette is new from the engine, layout, design, interior, and even how it will drive with the hunk of engine behind you. It appears they are swinging for the fences with this one and in my mind, should make it something to strive for, trade up for, and not settle for, especially if you see a similar one at the same street corner.

            In a way, in my eyes and mind, it would be like driving a Lotus. You don’t see many Lotuses (Loti?) because their production capacity is low, their dealer network is sparse, and I think their quality reputation puts the fear of God in anyone wanting to consider buying one. But they are not $200,000 cars. They fall in the price range of this Corvette. They are also mid-engine, highly styled sports cars. And it is rare, and could be a bust out the camera phone moment when seeing one. That’s what I believe the new Corvette should be – a Viper-like, Lotus-like, bust out the phone moment and not something you see every day. It keeps them special, could help their value in the future, and keeps the public wanting more.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I don’t think there’s any business case for making a car with all those unique components to develop in small numbers for $60K. They need something close to the Corvette numbers of 2000-2009 for it to make any sense at all.

            The Mustang could be produced in giant numbers because it was a restyled Falcon, but it still shows what can be accomplished if you can deliver lots of cars up front. It was a pretty Falcon with a 2+2 interior instead of six seats. People wanted to be seen in it, and they wanted to be seen in it while it was fresh. Ford didn’t keep restyling it just because they were dolts.

            Developing a new sports car today involves far more than making a coupe body for an econobox. Developing new mechanical components and certifying crash structures today costs more than the entire Mustang program. Can GM really afford to do that for a halo car?

            The Viper piggy-backed off the Ram V10, which was a stretched LA 360 V8. I believe the transmission was developed for the ZR1 Corvette. Chrysler also owned Lamborghini and used them to do the development on the cheap. Adjusted for inflation, the simple Viper still cost more than $60K when it was new, and I don’t know that it made money.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    I think it will be an unqualified success.

    Sure $60k is more in nominal dollars than ever before. But for comparison:

    2008 Corvette $46k, 2020 Corvette $60k (30% increase)
    2008 GT500 $45k, 2020 GT500 $75k (67%)
    2008 GT-R $70k, 2020 GTR $115k (64%)
    2008 911 $73k, 2020 911 $113k (55%)

    $60,000 is well under $1,000 on a 72 month note. Lots of people are going to be able to swing that.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Jack I could not agree more except for one thing. I think a lot of the C8 buyers are going to be folks who can and will pay cash and surprisingly Chevy stores may find themselves with a trade-ins they are not accustomed to; M3, M2, AMG, Porsche etc.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      2020 Porsche 911 Carrera starts at $91,100. $113K gets you a Carrera S. (25% increase over 2008)

      2019 Corvette brand new on Cars.com this very moment $45K. (33% increase in a day would make even payday loan places giddy)

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        $113k is indeed the Carrera S, I misread it.

        However, the base 992 Carrera was unveiled yesterday for $98,750. So that is a 35% increase from 2008. I’m still surprised it’s that low considering Porsche’s reputation.

        As for the $45K C7, you’ll be able to buy a new C8 under $50K a few years from now too. Such is the life cycle of most American sports cars.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Pathetic automatic garbage.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      Automatic shifting has won the battle.
      From the race tracks to the 18 wheelers to the military to the mundane streets and highways.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Out of curiosity, do you feel the same way about Ferrari and Lamborghini? Honest question with no snark intended.

      From a super car stand point, it seems that most if not all have gone away from the MT, so are they all pathetic? Even the not so super cars, BMW M series and AMG Benz are primarily auto’s as well.

      If speed is what you want, an auto is the way to go. A computer can shift way faster than any human can. Rocky Mountain Race Week even had a separate category for MT’s as most every street/strip car these days is an auto.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        They’re no longer aspirational. Do you remember how Porsche insisted on putting automatics in the GT3 for a bit? When they relented and put a manual in the car and called it the 911R, they created an instant classic. The all-automatic lineups are being driven by regulators, the middle east and China. Only the most malleable Americans and Europeans are buying in.

        If you look at how the EPA emissions test(which is used for CAFE too) is run on cars with manuals, you will see why forced-skip-shift was invented and why automatics get better mileage than manuals only on the test dyno. Automatics can be gamed to upshift early and use large throttle openings with minimal fuel when they sense they’re being tested, resulting in much better numbers than manuals that are shifted at road speeds dictated by the test instead of load or need. Then all you need to do is convince gullible people that they want automatics in their sporty cars.

      • 0 avatar
        IBx1

        87 Morgan, I feel doubly so about those brands. I could hardly care less if posers that hardly know how to drive want to show off how much their car costs, but for the company to not offer the option of a manual at all for those of us who actually love cars and love driving is sacrilege. It doesn’t matter if a computer can shift faster; the issue is that the computer is shifting at all.

    • 0 avatar
      MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

      “Pathetic automatic garbage”

      …..pathetic caveman getting smoked by modern automatics in his prehistoric stick shift that he just thinks is great “cuz stick” (and yeah, I own several sticks, but I also own automatics in versions where they are quicker).

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        To be clear I am not knocking the MT, I specifically sough out and bought a C6 with the MT, because it is way more fun to drive, others may think and feel otherwise. I am certain that manually shifting an Auto C6 would yield a faster E.T, if that is what one is after. I am holding out hope that GM has a MT in the works for later offerings; think about the line that would form for those cars….

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Yeah opting for the manual also got you the faster sports cars, historically, but that wasn’t the only reason. Not by a long shot. I shouldn’t have to explain those things if you’re an enthusiast.

        • 0 avatar
          MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

          The way it used to be is different than how it is now (with many cars, not all). Of course a true manual provides maximum involvement, but some of the newer paddle shifters are just fine. As long as they respond quickly, as I’m betting the DCT will. And every time I choose to drive a stick and then get stuck in a couple miles of dead stop traffic, I am hating life, so it’s nice to remove that variable.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            If you look forward to little involvement, wide open stretches and whatnot, vs heavy stop-n-go, you might not be a fan of 3-pedal manuals.

            In such situations, it’s time to wake up, and or put the phone or other toys away, but truly I’d rather be stuck (in that situation only) in 3-pedal ’97 4-cylinder Altima, than any paddle/automatic supercar.

            I’ll wait for the 3-pedal fully manual C8, thank you very much.

      • 0 avatar
        Ol Shel

        What, do you race for pinks? How often does an automatic Lambo just happen to line up at the light next to a manual one, with two drivers stupid enough to go all-out on the street? Basically never. They’re both losers, btw.

        I would choose a ‘slower’ manual EVERY TIME, because I love driving. I really don’t care about knowing that I could win a pointless theoretical drag race against some bonehead.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “if posers that hardly know how to drive want to show off how much their car costs”
      “Automatic shifting has won the battle.”
      “convince gullible people that they want automatics in their sporty cars.”
      “those of us who actually love cars and love driving is sacrilege.”
      “pathetic caveman getting smoked by modern automatics”
      “I shouldn’t have to explain those things if you’re an enthusiast.”

      Why does everyone on the internet need to be a jacka$$ when it comes to what transmission other people want to spend their money on?

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        It’s totally fine, either way, except the excuses are weak.

      • 0 avatar
        IBx1

        ajla, quote my full statement; not offering the option of a manual is sacrilege.

        Also, the posers who don’t know how to drive is in reference to people who buy an automatic ferrari simply for the fact that other people know how much it costs.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    I have a soft spot for the C6 era, personally.

    I know it was 1997, but those wheels on the base C5 were awful.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I took my 57′ to a benefit car show yesterday and had a chance to speak with a couple of the typical boomer C7 owners and they were mostly depressed about the C8. These guys had really nice C7’s with very tasteful paint mods etc and their cars will make for a spectacular buy for someone who wants a great no-mileage driver.

    As typical of aged Corvette owners they were convinced their car would cross the Barrett block for all the dough some day, but no more. A new 19′ C7 is absolute lot poison and unless you can get 20k or better off sticker it is not worth buying and the value of C5, C6, & C7 models dropped 10% or more I believe. The C8 is going to drop the average age of Corvette buyers substantially, I think GM finally realized their core constituency bought the C7, the last time buyer program so to speak.

    Long story short…for the considerable future if you are looking for a fun car, a pre-owned C6 or C7 will be bargains!

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Especially if you can tolerate an automatic.

      I think the manual C6 and especially C7 will hold some value as “the last of their kind”. Nothing like what the old guys are hoping for, but it wouldn’t surprise me if someday a manual car is worth double an equivalent auto.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        I had not thought about that aspect all that much to be honest, you have a valid point. If memory serves the first run Challenger in 08′ came in SRT form with orange paint and auto only though in limited #s. I will be shocked if the 21′ or 22′ Vette does not show up with a MT, only to stir up a frenzy again. Maybe the folks at the RenCen put more thought into this than we think…

      • 0 avatar
        MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

        More than double with stick VS auto Miatas (NA and NB at least).

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        The rarer the manual cars become, the more they will sell for when you let them go. My friend hunted high and low for a stick 330i convertible a number of years – not an easy find. He paid more because there were simply a lot less of them sold new. The Corvette will be no different. Sure, a dealer on a trade-in will low ball you saying that they “can’t get rid of it” but in reality, those who want a stick will seek them out and pay the price. Especially in the convertibles as they have a much higher auto take rate than the coupe.

        GM’s sales curve on this should start out hotter than the C7, which itself in the first year sold what, 38K units or thereabouts? If the model does attract a younger buyer that will be the key to doing even better. Traditional ‘Vette buyers are on borrowed time. So are 911 owners, though they have another generation to go. The key for Chevy will be how well this is received. It has to be good right out of the box – no multiple recalls, no shoddy workmanship concerns, and it must perform. And even then, no snot-brand-only buyer will even consider it which is fine. I see too many 911s (and ‘Vettes for that matter) driven like a grandma while she balances an ice cream cone in one hand.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    GM made a substantial gamble with perhaps the most comprehensive revision ever of this iconic car. They went to M-R drive configuration because they wanted more performance and had reached the limit of what F-R could deliver. In the process, they’ve delivered a car that will be objectively better than any Corvette before it, but will it actually deliver what Corvette buyers want?

    The current Camaro is the best Camaro ever and is a sales low point for the nameplate. Ditto for the Mustang.

    There’s rattle from the Corvette faithful about betrayal in the form of new drive-configuration and lack of manual transmission. Will the new car attract enough new buyers away from other sports car brands to back fill those lost through betrayal and old age/death? They made a bold move with the car that sense from a performance evolutionary standpoint, but is this what Corvette buyers really wanted? Did they listen to their faithful? No one buys more Corvettes than Corvette buyers and they’re an awful sentimental bunch. Time will tell.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      There seems to be this belief that there are a whole bunch of buyers who fall into one of two imaginary categories:

      1. People who are driving sedans or CUVs who would buy a sports car if there was one that accelerated faster than the current offerings in their payment range.

      2. People who are driving Porsche or AMG sports cars who want to be perceived as bargain shoppers.

      Thirty-thousand of these phantom buyers are going to take up the slack for the current Corvette buyers who liked them as they were.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I think GM specifically decided to move away from the current Corvette faithful as, literally, they are a group that is dying off.

      GM needs needs new cadre of Corvette loyalists and they need to be younger and folks who up till now have not ever set foot in a Chevrolet showroom. The point of a Halo car is bring in these buyers, get them to buy a vette’ and then 6 months later or more when they are in for their first oil change get them to drive a Tahoe or Suburban with that glorious 6.2 liter mill and see if said individual wants to trade in their X5 for something bigger.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Conquesting from high end import makes traditionally hasn’t gone well for GM. Perhaps the value proposition is good enough here to sway some, but I’m not sure that many customers prepared to drop fix figures on an exotic make will gravitate towards the C8 because it’s cheaper.

        Old guys have money, and are proven to buy Corvettes. Pissing them off could prove foolish. But then again, maybe they’ll get over it.

    • 0 avatar
      bts

      “but will it actually deliver what Corvette buyers want?”

      Even though a small number of vocal Corvette owners are complaining about this car, it still appeals to many of the traits I’d say that “Corvette owners” are looking for. Those owners are likely old, set in their ways, don’t like big changes. That’s a decently priced sports car with a big engine than can effortlessly embarrass cars priced several times more.

      This car will sell better, steal sales away from other brands, and the Camaro will likely get a boost from those who absolutely refuse to realize this car is better.

  • avatar
    theBrandler

    I will say this, as a millennial car enthusiast, THIS Corvette appeals to me far more than any previously. Can I buy one now? No :( I can’t, yet. I hope to be able to before I’m 40, Lord willing.

    And seriously, this is the car I’m willing to take years to plan on buying. Considering it’s performance per dollar value, nothing, not the Civic Type R, Supra, GTR, NSX, or 911 has my attention like the C8 Corvette does.

    Time will tell, I hope it does as well in the reviews as it’s paper specs says it should. If it doesn’t fall flat on it’s face, I hope to own one in the coming years.

  • avatar
    redgolf

    When I worked at the Corvette plant back in 84 I was 35 years old, I went out in the lot and saw the sticker on one, $27,500, I thought by the time I’m 50 I’m gonna own one of these, well, I’m 70 now and do not own one, no longer want one. We were hired in 84 because they put on a second shift to cover the demand of the new model, 18 months later the second shift was cut and I found myself with most “new hires” building Camaros in Norwood Ohio! At least they will be building right hand drives, that should keep them busy for several years.

  • avatar
    JMII

    This C7 owner is only 48 so the age is moving downwards… slowly. I wouldn’t touch a previous ‘Vette due to the craptastic GM interior. So for me it wasn’t an age thing however being older does help with the cash flow – it was more of a quality problem. The C7’s interior was finally on par with higher end sports cars which got many people’s attention.

    GM is doing their best to break the “old guy” mold. This was seen when the C7 ditched the round tail lights and internet went nuts. Getting rid of the front engine and manual gear box for the C8 is another clear indicator then want a younger owner to experience a Corvette. The problem is its still just a Chevy which means putting up with the same dealer who is servicing Sonics all day long.

    The buzz around the C8 is incredible so I expect over MSRP due to the pent up demand and the rush to have the first MR ‘Vette ever. As seen with the C7 as the model years move on engine upgrades are pretty much guaranteed. We know the LT1 can crank out over 750 HP in the ZR1 so I expect a 900 HP LT2 C8s. Not to mention what if GM puts an AWD hybrid system into this car?

    Before they announced the price pretty much everyone was thinking the C8 was a six figure car, but at only $60K it is going to turn the so called “super-car” world upside down. The Corvette has always represented amazing value in the performance to dollars category but GM is rewriting the rule book here. At this price point sales will be very strong. However it is still a limited niche sports car. I guess the question that remains is what numbers is GM expecting and gearing up for.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      I also am well below the average age owner and I agree – the junkyness of the prior models precluded me from ever wanting to own one. But the C7 changed all that and I wanted a car that handled exceptionally well. C7 filled the bill. If money was less of a concern I would have bought a 911. But I keep cars far longer than most and the staggering cost of German repair bills kept me from plunking down $82K on a used 911. But I did do a lot of research on the topic to make sure I didn’t make a mistake. Glad I made the choice I did. An now, five years in I have my first repair – infotainment crapped out.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        “An now, five years in I have my first repair – infotainment crapped out.”

        IIRC, this is a car you don’t put enough miles on to have a hope of GM replacing the defective fuel tank under the duration of the supplemental warranty. How many miles did the infotainment system last? It’s interesting hearing these stories from the context of long-term Honda and Acura ownership. One car had a bad passenger door lock solenoid after ten years. Another had a bad driver’s sun visor after twelve years. Had I driven the car more, it would have been replaced under warranty, but at least it was just a sun visor. Another car is now seven years old without a fault. Was there something particularly cutting edge about the Corvette’s radio that made it’s short life understandable? Are expectations just that much lower for GM?

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          I never had any dreams of killer reliability when I bought it – its a first model year GM product. So I bought a factory extended warranty with no deductible. And this is the first time I will be using it. Not complaining about the reliability either; I could be crying in my beer like my co-worker whose X3 needs a battery and an alternator for $2K. Can fix a quite a bit of beancounting for $2K.

          …Was there something particularly cutting edge about the Corvette’s radio that made it’s short life understandable?…

          Actually, yes. Not exactly cutting edge perhaps, but the hidden compartment behind the radio is accessed by a retracting screen. A number of MY ’14 models had a cable tie that was a bit too tight and caused undue strain on the cable when the screen was raised/lowered…which you might do if you needed to put your Kel-Tec in there…

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            What’s the world coming to when a man hides his pistol in his stereo? You could create an awfully happy stereo thief.

            Your story did remind me that the 2004 Acura TSX needed wiring to the trunk lid sorted in 2015 while I was a few thousand miles away. IIRC, it was the wiring for the back up lights.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Does anyone steal stereos anymore? Awful lot of work for something that will inevitably break when the heavy handed thief tries to remove it, once removed he has to go down to the friendly GM dealer to have the radio reprogrammed for his cars VIN.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            A couple of years ago there was a news story about how intentionally easy GM made stealing Escalades. Thieves were driving them a few blocks away and then stripping out the infotainment/nav units that had a street price of several hundred dollars while creating many thousands of dollars in repair parts business for GM. There are still youtube videos on how to reset GM’s premium THEFT-LOCK receivers.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      And I guess my concern is how many corners were cut to get to that price point?

  • avatar
    Hummer

    The disco era styling on this will surely attract the boomers but it’s played out, I’m sure as is everyone else that sales will explode, but if it were my money I wouldn’t think twice about a C7 with a 7 speed, that’s an easy choice.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    I wish people would stop referring to the C8 transmission as simply an automatic, evoking as it does some old GM Hydramatic with its high slip torque converter and leisurely, slurred shifts.

    First, even the C7’s trans, which is a conventional auto, cracks off quick, sharp shifts. It also has flappy paddles for when you want to row your own. The C8 uses a dual clutch gearbox, which conceptually and practically lies someplace between traditional manuals and autos.

    And anyway, the last Corvette I got a chance to drive, a C5 Z06, had a manual trans that sucked. Better a good auto than a crappy manual.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      For all intents and purposes the C8 has an automatic, it requires no inputs from the drivers to change the gear, thereby it’s an automatically controlled transmission. If there’s not a third pedal, then it’s an automatic.

      Also, even a crappy manual is always in the correct gear, outside of setting speed records an automatic in a sports car makes no sense, in a muscle car maybe, in a sports car meant to go through the twisted? Why?

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      It can shift gears without me doing anything, therefore it’s an automatic, regardless of how quickly it shifts or how many clutches it has.

      As for the T-56 sucking, I think you’ll find that opinion is not widely shared.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    One thing I’d like to know more about is the new C8’s engine compartment layout.

    One of the problems of a mid-engined north-south layout is that all the accessories — alternator, water pump, A/C compressor, etc. — and their drives end up squashed between the front of the engine and the bulkhead behind the driver. This may lead to either having to drop the engine to replace them, or at the very least a difficult access procedure from under the car.

    • 0 avatar
      bts

      I was reading an article about the new 6.2 L Corvette engine, https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a28426967/chevy-corvette-c8-lt2-engine/

      “Lee also confirmed that the C8 doesn’t require any routine engine-out services—often an expensive bugaboo with mid-engined cars—and that the spark plugs and other ignition components, along with the accessory belts that are tucked up next to the passenger compartment at the front of the engine, can be accessed with the engine in place. However, swapping out, say, the oil pump will require dropping the engine.”

  • avatar
    JoeBrick

    Chevy says that first year production run is “nearly sold out”, without saying what that number is. Speculation is that 30,000 will be produced in model year 2020.
    https://www.autoblog.com/2019/07/28/2020-chevy-corvette-nearly-sold-out/

  • avatar
    cprescott

    Once those fools who bought the $60k entry Corvette find out that their orders are pushed behind the most expensively optioned ones, Chevrolet will have a problem. And even if the cheapo models get built, GM dealers will slather on a Market Adjustment of at least $10k. This is how this company does business. You might find pockets of dealers who won’t jack the price on this car to high heaven, but most will. And I’m assuming that the most expensive WON’T get market value adjustments. They likely will.

    In 18 months, dealers will beg, borrow, and steal people to buy this hideous thing.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      The “LT1” base Vette was/is produced in high numbers…and was so even in the first quarter of C7 production. As for dealers, I ordered mine in April 2014 for sticker. Sure there were Stealerships flying the “its just capitalism” flag and banging buyers for $5K over list, but smart capitalists could find plenty of dealers willing to sell at sticker. So if the C8 fails it will not be for any of the reasons you stated.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        It might take some doing to find a good dealer when allotments are tied to recent C7 stock orders and so many dealers are carrying fleets of C7s that now need to be fire-sailed. Those are the ones that are going to receive C8s, and they’re going to need to gouge C8 buyers to make up for 25% discounts on the C7s they bought to get the C8s.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      As Golden said, this is not Honda, GM, as much as they have changed, do react to the market by producing plenty of the lower priced models, I doubt the expensive version of the Vette will even be available during the first 12 months. I’ll bet 90% of production will be <$80k.

      As crappy as GM can be, especially now, even they aren’t stupid enough to push the lower priced model purchasers behind the higher priced models, that’s how you lose goodwill and customers faster than any poorly running jalopy. For every dealer that wants to play games you have 2 more that want to sell on MSRP and make profit on numbers.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Have they ever resorted to channel stuffing an obsolete model by making stocking it a requirement for receiving allotments of a future model before?

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Just means more C7s to choose from used in a couple years, I wouldn’t touch a C8 but a used C7 would be the perfect commuter car. Besides every car maker stuffs channels before model change overs to prevent drops in sales, see F150 change over.

          I literally can’t think of a better commuter car on the market, it’s the obvious and easy choice and I’ve only just recently realized it.

          • 0 avatar
            87 Morgan

            Hummer, I commute daily in my C6, snow days excepted.

            I have not driven a C7, but have never had a real owner of one do anything but rave about it. As I have stated, C7’s are going to be a bargain really soon.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            It’s such an obvious easy answer to the daily drive to work, it’s light and nimble, great on fuel, cheap to insure, huge aftermarket, parts are cheaper than most parts on a Honda, just put some long lasting all seasons (possibly a symmetrical tire/wheel setup).

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    The day after it was release my three in town dealers said it was sold out for model year 2029 and 2021!


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • iNeon: Therapy helps.
  • SuperCarEnthusiast: The day after it was release my three in town dealers said it was sold out for model year 2029...
  • Hogey74: I bought a ford fiesta new in 08 based on the excellent reviews. It drove that well but had quality issues...
  • Mike Beranek: With 3 cylinders you get a powerstroke every 240 degrees of crankshaft rotation. That’s going to...
  • A Scientist: 2 things: “Life” and “Money”, which for the purposes of this question might as...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States