Don't Expect a $35,000 Tesla Model 3 in China or Australia

Matt Posky
by Matt Posky
dont expect a 35 000 tesla model 3 in china or australia

Months after promising a $35,000 base Model 3 in the United States, Tesla appears to have only just recently begun offering the “Standard Range” variant to the public. The vehicle comes with locked features and a 10-percent reduction in maximum range. However, most of the models milling around on public roads appear to be Standard Range Plus variants waiting on an over-the-air update to convert them into a normal SR.

Meanwhile, Tesla is looking at the Chinese market and calculating what the Model 3 will be worth there. It’s even asking Asian customers to hazard a guess as to what its base MSRP will be, claiming it has a big announcement scheduled for May 31st.

Bloomberg, which has already taken a stab at Tesla’s guessing game, cites inside sources who claim Tesla is currently considering pricing the vehicle between 300,000 yuan ($43,400) and 350,00 yuan ($50,600) before incentives. However, at least one source claims the official Chinese MSRP has yet to be finalized, and was unable to confirm if the end-of-month announcement is even related to the matter.

Considering that Chinese production of the Model 3 is still months away, Friday’s announcement has a decent chance of being about something else. Still, Tesla’s effort to encourage future customers to estimate the vehicle’s price means the company is actively thinking about it.

Certification documents from nearby Australia suggest Tesla will bring the pricier Performance and Long Range variants of the Model 3 for its initial launch, and the same could be true for China — meaning the global rollout would mimic what we’ve seen in the United States. Lower-margin variants probably won’t be a priority until worldwide demand for the well-equipped Model 3 peters out.

[Image: Aleksei Potov/Shutterstock]

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  • Wooootles Wooootles on May 28, 2019

    "Don’t Expect a $35,000 Tesla Model 3" FTFY.

  • Drew8MR Drew8MR on May 28, 2019

    LOL, I'm pretty sure Accords and Camrys are $50K in Australia at least, so yeah,probably not. My wife is from Canberra,and while I love the country, holy crap is it ridiculously expensive. I won't even go anymore when she visits,because we'll drop $$$$$$ even with free lodging.

    • See 2 previous
    • LDRcycles LDRcycles on May 31, 2019

      @Drew8MR I believe the last change in imported vehicle tariffs was about 15 years ago. There's still a 5% tariff today, despite local manufacturing ending in late 2017.

  • FreedMike I was lucky enough to grow up in a household with the two best German luxury sedans of the time - a manual '81 733i, and a '75 Mercedes 450SE. The BMW was a joy on back roads, and the Benz was a superb highway car. Good times. And both were dramatically better than the junkheap American luxury cars Dad had before.
  • Wjtinfwb A Celebrity Diesel... that is a unicorn. Those early A-bodies were much maligned and I'm sure the diesel didn't help that, but they developed into very decent and reliable transportation. Hopefully this oil-burner Chevy can do the same, it's worth keeping.
  • Wjtinfwb After S-classes crested the 40k mark in the early '80s, my dad moved from M-B to a BMW 733i Automatic. Anthracite gray over red leather, it was a spectacular driving car and insanely comfortable and reassuring on long interstate hauls. My mom, not really a car person, used the BMW to shuttle her elderly Mom back home to Pennsylvania from Miami. Mom and grandma both gushed with praise for the big BMW, stating she could have driven straight through the car was so comfortable and confidence inspiring. A truly great car that improved through the E38 generation, at which point the drugs apparently took hold of BMW styling and engineering and they went completely off the rails. The newest 7 series is a 100k abomination.
  • Vatchy If you want to talk about global warming, you might start here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darvaza_gas_crater
  • 28-Cars-Later $55,218 for a new GR Corolla: https://www.reddit.com/r/COROLLA/comments/zcw10i/toyota_needs_to_know_the_demand_is_there_but_this/"But if OTD prices get beyond 50k there are better options"That's what people were arguing in that thread.
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