By on May 21, 2019

Buy/Drive/Burn returns this week with three American sports cars in their most basic, purest form. The Big Three are represented here, and they don’t get any cheaper than this. No options or fripperies are allowed, and one must receive the Buy.

Start your (small) engines — it’s sports car time.

Ford Mustang

Ford’s perennially present Mustang entered its sixth generation for the 2015 model year. It’s assembled at the Flat Rock plant, which is in Michigan, and south of Detroit. Engines are of four or eight cylinders in The Current Year, as the Cyclone V6 bowed out in 2017. Our basic money means we select the cheaper fastback body style, with an EcoBoost-y 2.3-liter inline-four. Power resides at 310 horses and 350 lb-ft of torque. The six-speed manual sends power to the rear wheels. A good selection of no-charge colors are available at the base price of $26,490.

Dodge ChallengerThough Challenger’s lineage started in 1970, in 2019 it’s still in its third generation. The new Challenger is the same car underneath as the one offered in 2008, though FCA has made thoughtful and extensive updates in the years since. Assembled in Brampton, which is east of Downtown Canada, it’s built alongside the Chrysler 300 and Dodge Charger. Even the most basic Challenger SXT comes with the nice 3.6-liter Pentastar V6, where 305 horsepower and 268 lb-ft of torque travel to the rear via the eight-speed automatic. FCA gives you some fun colors for free in the $27,340 base price.

Chevrolet CamaroThough it took a break after 2002, the Camaro returned as a new model in 2010 and entered its sixth generation in 2016. The Camaro is assembled in Lansing, a suburb of Flint. It shares a factory with luxurious rear-drive Cadillac products, and is the only Chevrolet built there. Spending the fewest dollars as possible on Camaro nets a 1LS trim Coupe. Under hood is a 2.0-liter inline-four that’s turbocharged to 275 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque. A manual transmission resides under the driver’s right hand, shifting through six speeds. Eight colors are available for the base $25,495 asking price, but only the red one avoids looking boring.

Three American sports cars on a budget; which receives a Buy?

[Images: Ford, GM, FCA]

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86 Comments on “Buy/Drive/Burn: 2019 American Sports Cars, Ace of Base Edition...”


  • avatar
    RangerM

    Buy the Mustang.

    Burn the others, since I wouldn’t really want to drive either of them.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike-NB2

      I came here to say exactly this.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryan

        Agreed. After driving the Chevrolet and Dodge, I couldn’t get out of either of them quick enough. Dark drab interiors with next to nothing for a greenhouse. I couldn’t imagine commuting in one of these blind spot a plenty pigs. The new Mustang is “nice”, it does not appeal all that much to me but if I had to choose between the three – Mustang. And only the Mustang.

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    This is a pretty tough one, as all three of these cars are a blast to drive and look really cool. The Dodge’s downfall is that it’s a barge compared to the true pony cars and that there’s no manual for the V6, so burn it.
    That being said, I’ll buy the Chevy because have you seen the prices for old Camaros at Mecum? Which means that… I reluctantly…have to admit…that the current Mustang is pretty much the apex of pony car development (I just threw up in my mouth a little bit).

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Buy the Mustang – best hp/performance for the dollar

    Drive the Challenger – well least it looks cool even though the 3.6 (which is nice) doesn’t have enough power for the weight of the car.

    Burn the Camaro – this could change with the V6; but the greenhouse and visibility? Meh.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Burn, burn, burn. If the Mustang still offered the V6 as its base engine with a stick, I’d drive one instead of burning it. None of these are sports cars. The Corvette is. Unfortunately, the current one stinking up dealers’ lots across the country is the worst styling abomination in the model’s history. Apparently Chevrolet thought their market was ten year old boys who played with Transformers instead of boomers who can’t pick up their Harleys when they tip over. Assuming the base model has a V8 and a stick, I would drive the only stripper American sports car on the market for a weekend somewhere that nobody knows me.

    • 0 avatar
      CaddyDaddy

      “Apparently Chevrolet thought their market was ten year old boys who played with Transformers instead of boomers who can’t pick up their Harleys when they tip over.”

      +1

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Is it the Transformers styling that’s driven away the Boomers, or that they don’t want to drive a four-wheeled foxhole? Because the 5th gen, which looked pretty much the same, outsold the Mustang for a few years.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    Buy and drive the Challenger, burn the other two. Can’t see out of the Camaro and don’t care for the Mustang. Too bad the Challenger at this level didn’t come with a manual like the other two. But given the take rate of manuals these days, I see why they don’t offer it. That 3.6/8-speed combo seems to work well in just about anything they put it in.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Buy = Mustang

    Drive = Challenger, because it reminds me of old-timey Chryslers

    Kill it with fire = Camaro, because claustrophobia

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Burn the Challenger, it’s too big and heavy for sporting driving.

    Drive the Camaro, especially on the track. It’s lots of fun.

    Buy the Mustang, it’s more livable than is the Camaro, and still acquits itself nicely on the racetrack.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Buy the Challenger because it is a V6 and automatic.
    Drive the Mustang. I’d tune it to an inch of its life.
    Burn the Camaro for being crampy. Although at least it still offers the high-output 2.0T instead of the new 230hp wheezemaster.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Buy: Challenger
    Drive: Camaro
    Burn: Mustang

    Why?
    The Mustang is very nearly uncontrollable, at least when you look at all the insanity that occurs with them at Cars & Coffee events. You don’t see the other two crashing all the time.
    The Camaro is still fun to drive and can surprise you with its performance but it still seems more controlled under your hands when pushed.
    The Challenger, meanwhile, holds reasonably well to its classic appearance. There’s literally no chance of the Challenger being mistaken for anything else.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      How much time do you have behind the wheel of a late model Mustang?

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @FF : Don’t intend to put any time, ever, behind the wheel of a Mustang. Or have you forgotten that I’ve had nothing but bad luck with Fords?

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          Sorry, I’m not here often enough to remember everyone’s preferences.

          The reason I asked is that I rented an Ecoboost Mustang last year and took it to a track day. I quit racing 20 years ago, and the only track experience I’ve had since was 12 laps of Atlanta Motorsports Park with Xtreme Xperience, spread over two years. I put myself in the intermediate group, and off I went in a car I had barely driven. The Mustang never put a wheel wrong, by the third session I was getting comfortable enough to where I was starting to push it, and got a little wiggle on a turn exit. That was Mustang telling me to back down a little, that I wasn’t quite on the right spot on the track for that much throttle, and that my skills weren’t quite up to the task yet. No big slide, no overly dramatic wheel spin, and no loss of control.

          Any powerful car will spin its wheels with the traction control off. If you are not practiced with doing that sort of thing you will hit something. If Mustang drivers do stupid stuff at Cars and Coffee events it’s on them, not their cars.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Ok, my apologies.

            However, while I agree with what you say about its power and performance, a car needs to hold up to daily driving requirements unless it is a purpose-built track-day car, and my experience with Fords of all models along with first-hand discussions with many Mustang owners in our acquaintance, the one thing Fords don’t have going for them is reliability and durability–especially lately. Ford’s trucks are better than their cars in this area but even there, it seems to me that Ford trucks purchased new get traded off much sooner than their GM or RAM equivalents. Even Toyota trucks, while not popular in the showroom (except maybe the Tacoma) seem to last forever when put up next to Ford’s. And yes, I’ve owned two Ford trucks myself.

            But the question is the Mustang and even there, most owners I know complain of poor build quality and mechanical issues within the first year of ownership. Worse, they too, though Ford fans for the way they perform, tend not to keep their Mustangs more than two or three years. Why? Well, going back to my own lifetime experience (not just the two pickups) I have to say their durability leaves much to be desired and I never again will buy a new Ford and definitely won’t buy a used one.

            The only way I’ll drive a Ford is if it’s given to me or it’s the only choice available at a rental office. I’d rather drive a Kia and the last one of those I drove just ‘felt’ weird due to what ‘felt’ like drive-by-wire vs mechanical linkages in the steering.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      I drive a 2014 Mustang and even with the V6, the rear end (with traction control off) could take an inexperienced driver by surprise. It happens very quickly, even when the gas peddle isn’t all the way down. I imagine the V8 is even more of a handful.

      That’s what I’m imagining happens during those viral videos.

      Driver: I’m going to take Traction Control off so I can do a big burnout and impress this crowd.

      ::rear end slides out, panics and over-corrects::

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @Vulpine – For anyone else’s comments, you demand concrete, scientific evidence. But stating the Mustang is “very near uncontrollable” based on random videos on youtube is goofy. Likely everyone there turns on their camera for a Mustang blasting off.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Assuming roughly equal tires, there is nothing any more or less controllable about a Mustang on the street than any other powerful RWD car, of which I’ve owned and driven many.

        The reason there are more disaster videos of Mustangs leaving car shows than anything else is that they are common and affordable, especially used, which allows them into the hands of younger, less experienced, and more impulsive drivers. There is no easier or cheaper way to get your hands on 400 hp, except maybe a Hemi Ram.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @jack4x: “Assuming roughly equal tires, there is nothing any more or less controllable about a Mustang on the street than any other powerful RWD car, of which I’ve owned and driven many.”

          If you ask me, the BRZ/Toyota 86 is far more fun than the Mustang for slip-slidin’ along. For that matter, so is the Fiat 124.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            That is a defensible point of view, but in no way shape or form would most people consider those cars powerful.

          • 0 avatar
            FormerFF

            I’d like to have a car that is trackworthy, but it’s a couple of years away. If were going to do that today, I’d go with a BRZ. The way the market is going, I don’t see that changing unless Mazda makes an MX-5 coupe.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @jack4x: If it can spin the wheels, it’s powerful enough. You don’t have to run 100+mph to have fun; some of the most enjoyable roads can be deadly at 45mph. There is such a thing as too MUCH power.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I took his comment as a joke. Would it have been better if he’d said he’d burn the Mustang because the people who drive them are embarrassments to the hobby and threats to the public?

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Buy- Challenger because it is the easiest to live with on a daily basis
    Drive- The Camaro because it is the most fun to drive on the track and through the twisty roads
    Burn- the Mustang because of it’s Chinese transmission and clunky rattle trap structure after the miles build up and the noisy unrefined tractor like 2.3

  • avatar
    Dan

    Love the Challenger even with a V6.

    Burn the other two, hate four cylinders and the Camaro’s ergonomics are so bad that even a V12 wouldn’t make it work.

  • avatar
    A Scientist

    It hurts my heart to answer these this way, but here goes:

    Buy: Mustang. Best bang for the buck here; more powerful and better handling than the other two. And from what I’ve seen, heard, and read, they seem to be better built overall. I never would have thought this would be my buy answer because….

    Drive: Camaro. Had a ’68 as a teenager: 327, 3-speed in the floor, so this is my youth. I love the retro styling here, although I’d rather have the earlier models.

    Burn: Challenger. Ugh…this one hurts the most. My dad had a ’70 R/T 440 six-pack. Sublime green with black vinyl top. That car was known all over town growing up. Powerful, fast, mean, beautiful. God I LOVED that car, and wish we still had it in the family. But these new ones, they just don’t do it for me. They’re porky compared to the other two, slower, and handle like a boat. The interior looks like it belongs in a 20-year old Avenger or something. Build quality is typical FCA.

    My heart might break here, but I listened to my brain for once :)

  • avatar
    whynot

    Buy the Challenger. Easiest to live with- who cares that it is most boat like we are talking about base powered no options pony cars here.

    Burn/drive the other two. It really doesn’t matter what you do with them.

  • avatar
    cbrworm

    I would drive the Challenger, just because it is a decent car to live with every day. I don’t particularly like the monster two door class, but it is a good cruiser with a fairly well-sorted chassis for normal to somewhat spirited driving – especially for its size – and it is the only one that really makes me feel like it is an evolution of the cars I grew up with.

    The other two are a toss up. I don’t like the interiors of either. On the track, I would prefer to be in the Camaro, but my suitcase doesn’t fit through the trunk opening. I guess that means:

    Buy the Mustang
    Burn the Camaro

    but only by the tiniest of margins.

  • avatar
    John R

    Buy – Mustang
    Drive – Camaro, because I can’t burn it in addition to…
    Burn – Chally. Anything less than a V8 in that car isn’t worth it.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Buy Mustang

    Drive Camaro – preferably on empty 2 – lane roads where you only have to look forward.

    Burn Challenger – the 6 is too low on torque for that porker and with the other’s at least you get a manual transmission with your small engine.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Buy and drive the Challenger and burn the other 2. The retro styling of the Challenger, better visibility, roomy trunk and back seat, and it is more livable than the other 2 on a daily basis. I like manual transmissions but I would rather have the Challenger. My only concern about the Challenger is FCA build quality but the Challenger has been on the market long enough to have worked out most of the bugs.

  • avatar
    Matt Foley

    The Mustang has a great engine and a pretty good chassis, the Camaro has a great chassis and a pretty good engine, and the Challenger has a proper V6 and is the only one that is useful as an actual car. Sorry – nothing gets burned. There’s not a turd in this bunch.

    How about the 1989 version of this: 3.1 V6 Camaro, 2.3 Lima 4-cyl Mustang, and 2.5 (stroker 2.2) Daytona. NOW you’ve got some turds to burn.

    • 0 avatar

      We did cover Malaise Sports Cars of 1982 previously, these same three cars.

      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2018/08/buy-drive-burn-american-malaise-sports-cars-of-1982/

      • 0 avatar
        Matt Foley

        And I even commented on it, too. That’s funny.

        Remember the “personal luxury” coupes everybody had in the late 70’s/early 80’s? Seems like the V6 Challenger is the optimized version of those. There is nothing my dad’s ’79 Cutlass Supreme or ’83 Thunderbird could do that a V6 Challenger can’t do better.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          You’re tempting me, Matt. I had a ’73 and ’75 Cutlass (one used, one new) and loved the ’75 (the ’73 had been treated harshly and was a dog on the road–worse yet, had bias-ply tires and not radials when I got it.) The ’75 even had the swivel bucket seat meant to help you get in and out, before parking spots got so narrow you could hardly open the door. I could almost go for the Challenger now if I hadn’t just bought a Colorado (and need its carrying ability.)

  • avatar
    chaparral

    Burn the heavy, slow, wallowing Challenger. Archaic is just archaic.

    Drive the super-precise Camaro and enjoy the GM vehicle dynamics work.

    Buy the easy-to-live-with Mustang.

  • avatar
    roverv8i

    Man, this is not an easy one. I don’t disagree with most of the choices of others. I think it really depends on your primary focus.

    Cruising with friends or having to ride the kids regularly – Buy the Challenger, Drive the Mustang, Burn the Camaro.

    Fun car on a budget for track or back roads, Buy the Camaro, Drive the Mustang, Burn the Challenger.

    Everyday fun and only really need space for +1, Buy the Mustang, Drive the Camaro, Burn the Challenger.

    If this were my only car I would have to go with the Challenger as it fits my current needs the best.

    Don’t think the rules say you can’t change out the wheels after you get it so lots off possibilities in the looks department with the Challenger. If I was going with one of the others same comment plus some suspension upgrades.

    What I really think would be interesting to know is what percentage of actual buyers buy on the historical preference for a certain brand/model vs. current need/want. The old among us have a lot of build up bias from our experiences making it hard to understand what the younger generation thinks about these cars.

  • avatar
    micko4472

    I drove a Challenger as a rental, about 300 miles in one day. I thought
    it was a great car, all things considered. I have’t driven the other 2.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Buy and drive the Mustang

    Burn the Camaro because it’s hideous

    Burn the Challenger because it’s automatic garbage

    Also, the Mustang’s cheaper fastback bodystyle? Cheaper than what? This isn’t 1992, you can’t get a notchback.

  • avatar
    saturnotaku

    Buy the Mustang. It’s an American icon and should have good resale value when I’m done with it. Drive the Challenger because it’s comfortable and surprisingly practical. I’d be happy to take it on a cross-country trip. Burn the Camaro. I’ve never been a fan of any version of this car from 2010 onward.

  • avatar

    Buy the challenger (only ones my kids can fit in the back seat)
    Drive Camaro, rentals I have had were more fun to toss then the Mustang.
    Burn Mustang, really not a bad car just whats left.

    To those picking on the Challenger for being underpowered while it’s a half second slower to 60 then the other 2 it still does 0-60 in 6 secs. Seems it has just the right amount of power when you need to pass some one on a 2 lane.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    None of these are sports cars. They are all too large, too heavy in high-power trim, and not powerful enough in lighter trim.

    That said:
    Buy/Drive the Camaro/Stang. Buy whichever one ends up having the nicer seating position and cheapest consumables (pads, rotors, tires, etc) and drive the other.

    Burn the Challenger. Burn it with the fire of a 1,000 suns.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    Buy: Mustang. Recently drove one and came away impressed with how Ford has managed to keep it modern. Not a huge fan of Fords, though, but hell, if they are going to discontinue almost all of their cars, at least they are keeping this one alive!
    Drive: Challenger. It’s looking and feeling old and it’s still more of a cruiser than a bruiser in base trim. However, when I think of “Drive,” I think of something that might be a rental for a long trip, and the Challenger might be the most comfortable for that. But I don’t think there would be tears shed when it came time to turn in the keys.
    Burn: Camaro. WTF was GM thinking? Agree with a lot of the comments here – this is a muscle car, not a Transformer. It looks childish, the interior is borderline wretched, and part of driving a car is being able to see out of the car, and the styling seems to have neglected that. If Chevy is going to continue down this path with Camaro styling, might as well dig a huge hole and bury it now. I already see too many Camaros with rental car stickers on the rear window – I wonder if that’s the path taken with the Camaro.

  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    REALLY hate today’s choices..but here goes…

    Buy the Challenger – Because it’s the only car I would comfortably fit in.

    Drive the Mustang – Because it offers the best performance once I squoze into it.

    Burn the Camaro – While I think it has the best exterior styling, its ingress/egress is approaching Lotus Elise status and I would never be able to see out of it

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    At first I thought this was a toughie, but after some thought not really……

    “Buy” the Camaro, it has the finest chassis and I’m just a GM guy in general.

    “Drive” the Chally, because I have 3 kids who are not getting any smaller and that car has a borderline decent backseat.

    “Burn” the Mustang, it’s a Ford. (although in all fairness I’ve owned a few, all GT models, even bought a couple new so you other GM guys might wanna burn ME lol)

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      I’m a Fordaphobe and I would take the Mustang, for looks alone, over the awful Camaro, even if it’s a great car, it’s inside one of the ugliest bodies ever made by GM or anyone else. That back end, wow, is that bad. But I would never want to buy a base Challenger or Mustang anyway. My Challenger is pretty pimped out, and no V6 for me, I chose the logical 6.4 and the godlike 8 speed.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    This is an easy one. Buy the Mustang, drive the Challenger and burn the Camaro.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    Buy mustang.

    No use whatsoever for the other 2, especially in base trim.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Has anyone shouted “THEY’RE PONY CARS, NOT SPORTS CARS” yet? Or “A MIATA IS A SPORTS CAR, THESE DUMB DETROIT 2-DOOR SEDANS AREN’T?” If not, I’ll have to find my string-back driving gloves, goggles, driving moccasins, tweed cap, and cherry wire-wheel MGB so I can look the part, and then do the deed.

    Buy the Mustang because it’s almost pretty and someone might want to buy it from me later. Build quality isn’t great, driving experience isn’t great, practicality isn’t great, but it looks good.

    Drive the Challenger because it’s a perfectly satisfactory actual car to drive: good hip point, quiet operation, comfy seat, giant trunk, passable base stereo, acceptable build quality, pleasant ride, excellent highway MPG for the HP — everything that matters the 90% of the time you’re just puttering along, without ruining the fun of the other 10%. Plus it has a lot of cylinders, so there’s that. The interior materials are from Wal-Mart, the city MPG rivals a city bus, and between the Dukes of Hazzard and Heather Heyer the car practically announces “I’m on my way to a Klan rally!” but aside from that it’s a solid companion.

    Burn the Camaro because it looks like a video game car inside and out. It’s supposed to be retro styling, but the whole point of the original Camaro was that it was a more serviceable “car” for day to day use than the Mustang: better sightlines, more comfortable hip point, and so on — and this Camaro is the opposite of that with its gun-slit windows etc.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      Not to get all political but you state “between the Dukes of Hazzard and Heather Heyer the car practically announces “I’m on my way to a Klan rally!”
      After the tragedy in Charlottesville there was a discussion over at Jalopnik and the Root about the type of vehicle involved. “Isn’t the Challenger popular with White Nationalists?”, “Nope, its cool I know a few sisters who drive them”. “Oh, ok that settles that”.
      Nothing like a fine German-American muscle/pony car that was rescued by an Italian motorcar company to bridge our differences.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      What does a Challenger have to do with The Dukes of Hazard? BTW, the creep who killed Heather told me he liked my car about 4 weeks before he threw away his life.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    I don’t really want a 4-cylinder or an automatic in this type of car, but if I have to . . .

    Buy the Mustang. Looks good. Seems alright from the reviews.

    Drive the Challenger. I like the looks of these as well. Probably a better highway cruiser than the Mustang so I’ll use it for that.

    Burn the Camaro. I don’t find it aesthetically pleasing and visibility is important to me.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I like the looks of the Challenger much better than the Mustang and Camaro. Challenger is old school muscle car but it is just modern enough to still be relevant. I always liked the looks of the Challenger from the very first one, the 70 1/2. Agree the Camaro is more video game and a turbo 4 in a Mustang might have plenty of power but it just doesn’t fit the category. None of these cars are sports cars they are more pony. I could see day to day the Challenger would be an easier car to live with and on a trip it would be more comfortable.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    Buy and Drive:

    Challenger: Roomy interior, good ride quality…a comfy long distance traveler
    Mustang: Best value in the category and row-your-own gearbox

    Burn:

    Camaro: I will never pull back my heartfelt 1999 commitment to NEVER, EVER subject myself to another inferior GM product and dealer experience. My lease experience with a 1997 Astro van for my business was beyond horrendous. Sorry GM, you burned me with fire, and I will, forever, ignore you, and/or laugh at your self-inflicted problems! Eff you and your cave-like Mustang wanna-be pony car!

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Buy:Mustang- Good value for the dollar particularly compared to the BRZ/86. Great handling though the Ecoboost can be a bit noisy like a vacuum.

    Drive:Challenger- I’ve rented both the base and RT Hemi versions and found it to be a roomy, family friendly nice highway cruiser that eats up the road.

    Burn: Camaro-The Transformers styling and trapped in a tank ergonomics are just unappealing.

    Suggestion: They should offer hatch or shooting brake versions of these for us non SUV folks. In their day the F-body and Fox body hatchs were fairly practical.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Buy the Challenger because it’s easiest to live with for more than 2 passengers. Drive the Mustang because it’s a hell of a lot of car and history for the money. Burn the Camaro because I no longer have the limber abilities to get in to it.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Dave M.–I hear you on the limber abilities I got in a new Camaro at the auto show and nearly needed help to get out of it. Not for me.

  • avatar
    ptschett

    Buy – Challenger. I’ve been of the opinion for over a decade that the V6 Challenger is the [current year] closest equivalent for my 1996 Ford Thunderbird LX V8. The Pentastar/ZF8 powertrain is entirely fine in a Ram 1500, it’d be quite good in a car massing roughly 1000 lbs less than that Ram. [In my opinion the 5.7 Hemi/ZF8 combo as found in my 2015 R/T is more than enough for street use.]
    Drive – Mustang, I guess? My dad’s brother has a 2.3EB/auto he likes.
    Burn – …Camaro, reluctantly. (Can I try out the drive/burn cars for a few weeks?)

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Drive – Mustang, I guess? My dad’s brother has a 2.3EB/auto he likes.

      My local Ford dealer has a left over 2017 (yeah you read that right) Ecoboost Mustang INCLUDING Performance Package. Now why would this model be glued to the parking lot?

      My guess is that some idiot ordered the automatic (old 6 speed auto) – this is one vehicle where I think the manual would have actually helped chances at a sale.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      I hadn’t considered that the Challenger, at least in basic form, is more of a personal luxury coupe than a sporty car. I had a 95 Cougar with the 4.6 at one point and from my experience in the 300/ Chargers I’ve had as rentals, the feel is about the same.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Buy the Challenger because it’s the only one I feel I could live with on a daily basis. There’s plenty of room for the detritus of life. Also, I find that I tend to prefer boulevard bruisers. The 3.6 is dreamy and the ZF is nice, having been behind both of those items in a current gen 300.

    Drive…the Camaro. I haven’t had experience with one of these other than in a showroom and an auto show, so I’d be morbidly curious.

    I guess burn the Mustang, though it pains me because I’ve always liked the looks. I’ve test driven the 2.3 and I’ve driven my friend’s 2017 GT. My curiosity has been sated. About 12 years ago when I was learning to drive a manual I drove my other friend’s 98 Mustang GT. That was a hoot.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Burn the Camaro- I’ve never cared for any Camaro/Firebird. Yes, I know they are/were performance bargains. But the whole car felt like a bargain too. Today’s rolling bunker style, even with the refreshed looks, does nothing for me.

    Drive the Challenger. If something were to happen to my VW tomorrow and I couldn’t find an Alfa Guilia I wanted, I’d probably shop the Charger/300. I’ve always found them to be decent cars to drive, if just a tad too big. I’m not really a Challenger fan, but in the context of B/D/B here, the big Chrysler would be a drive. It’s outward visibility isn’t much better than the Camaro, but the whole package is a bit better.

    Buy the Mustang- To compliment the 89 GT Convertible in my garage. I’ve always felt the Mustang was the best all around “sporty coupe” throughout the years and the current car is no exception. The only thing that would keep a Mustang out of my driveway is the two-door aspect, I just would rather have a four door car, especially with two growing sons. But out of the 3 here, the Mustang speaks to me the most, in any guise.


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  • gearhead77: I hadn’t considered that the Challenger, at least in basic form, is more of a personal luxury coupe...
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