By on January 29, 2019

This May sees Toyota mark the 20th anniversary of the start of Tundra production. When that happy date arrives, there’s be two full generations of full-size truck memories to look back on. Yes, the Tundra is old, with the current generation bowing for the 2007 model year. A significant refresh came in 2014, with minor tweaks occuring ever since.

While testing a loaded 2018 crew cab variant a while back, this writer couldn’t help noticing the Tundra’s advancing age, despite the addition of new creature comforts and tech. The rig I piloted also weighed nearly 900 pounds more than a comparable Ford F-150.

Well, there’s good news for that uniquely loyal crop of Toyota truck owners. A new Tundra is on the way, but it won’t entirely break from the past. You’ll certainly recognize the cab.

Spy photos of a partially disguised 2020 Tundra are making the internet rounds (see the AutoGuide bundle here), revealing a pickup that’s only partially revamped from the long-running current generation. It seems Toyota has a Ram HD-like heavy refresh in mind, with the truck remaining on its current platform, though likely in a modified form. Looking around the segment, there’s no lack of pressure to shave every last possible ounce of weight from this vehicle.

In the linked photos, the cab remains the same, too, with outward styling updates relegated to the grille, front fenders, rear flanks, and tailgate. Sadly, the current-gen’s faceful of chrome (arguably, the model’s most appealing outward feature) appears destined from the dustbin, replaced by a heavy horizontal bar. Inside, expect a more contemporary layout.

Much has been made of the low-hanging fringes concealing the new Tundra’s rear underbelly, but speculation about an independent rear suspension seems far reaching. An available air suspension isn’t out of the question, however. As for power, there’s little to go on; Toyota will be under the gun to eke out more mileage from whatever’s under the hood, as my parched Tundra guzzled gas to the tune of 13 mpg during a tepid week-long test. Expect the transmission (currently a six-speed) to gain several additional cogs.

Despite not posing a real threat to the likes of Ford, GM, and Ram, Toyota Tundra sales remained remarkably consistent over the past number of years — a testament to Toyota’s brand loyalty. Even with new or almost-new full-size trucks on offer from the Detroit Three, Toyota only sold 11 fewer Tundras in December when compared to the previous year. 2018’s sales tally shows the truck up 1.6 percent over 2017.

It’s little wonder why Toyota took its time getting around to a new Tundra.

[Images: Toyota]

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69 Comments on “You Won’t Have a Hard Time Spotting the 2020 Toyota Tundra – From the Side, Anyway...”


  • avatar
    salmonmigration

    Toyota trucks might not be comfortable, contemporary, or fuel efficient, but down here on the gulf coast you see as many Tacomas and Tundras as you do F-150s. And my buddy who owns a tow company says he just doesn’t get any business from Toyota pickups.

    I’ve got my popcorn out waiting to see how godawful the bigass “Entune” touchscreen will be.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Gulf Coast resident (50m north), and no. GM trucks, followed closely by Ford, with Ram in a distant third. Tundras barely register on the radar (literally 1 in 20+ full size, recently built trucks, much less older trucks), and a Tacoma isnt nearly as common as even the rarest domestic fullsize variant.

      The one trend I’ve noticed, even after a 4 hour trip yesterday, is that the newest body style Chevrolet truck is rare. I saw all of one, and I drove by 3 GM dealers. Old style trucks are out front on display, even used GMCs at a Chevy-exclusive dealer were more prominent than the all-new Silverado.

      GM dropped the ball, Ram hit it out of the park, and Tundra? What’s a Tundra?

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        As a former Gulf coast resident I agree. Tundras/Tacoma’s weren’t exactly rare (that would be the Titan), but they weren’t nearly as prevalent as the domestic full sizers. Suggesting they are as common as F-150s suggests to me that the poster is just so use to seeing F-150s that they are tuning many that they sees out. Or he lives very close to a very popular Toyota dealers that loves to deal.

        Tacomas were by far the most common midsize truck though, but the full-sizers still significantly out numbered them.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Honda sold 22K Ridgelines in 2018.

      Nissan sold 38K Titans in 2018.

      Toyota sold 87K Tundras in 2018.

      GMC sold 152K Sierras in 2018.

      Ram sold 375K Ram Pickups in 2018.

      GM sold 424K Silverados in 2018.

      Ford sold 679K F-150s in 2018.

      Numbers don’t lie.

      https://seekingalpha.com/article/4222180-gm-toyota-grow-midsize-pickup-truck-sales-25-percent-2018

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Numbers don’t lie, but liars leave the Tacoma’s numbers out of their lists. Suddenly Toyota’s pickup total isn’t that far off of Fiat’s, and regional preferences explain the rest.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          245,659 Tacoma’s plus 87,000 Tundra = 332,659. Speaking of leaving out numbers, the Ram in all it’s varients (hd included…i mean it’s closer to a Ram 1500 then a Taco is to a Tundra) sold well over half a million. What was that about liars and numbers?

      • 0 avatar
        Oberkanone

        Honda sold 30,592 in 2018.

        Liars lie. Your numbers lie APaGttH.

        A note on the Ridgeline. Honda is constrained on production at HMA.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          So he left off 8,000 Ridgelines. Thats not even a rounding error. FWIW, since Todd was so intent on counting all the truck sales from Toyota, (but nobody else), Ford sold over 900,000 trucks last year (F150 through F450)

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Also wasn’t RAM production constrained with the new model changeover?

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Colorado / Canyon production are also production constrained.

            When you combine Sierra, Silverado, Colorado and Canyon numbers, you get almost 750K – which is more than 2:1 to Tundra/Taco.

            Meh – facts.

  • avatar

    Curious on the rear suspension I’m guessing either coils or air like the ram. Toyota tends to not go to crazy on things like IRS when it might alienate customers. The biggest knock on the Tundra (well besides being old and early ones having frame issues) is the Fuel economy and ride, seems a new rear suspension and power train would fix that.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Coils on lower trim and air ride for top trims.

      That would be the likely guess.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      They might as well compromise capability for ride comfort, the Tundra represents everything the haters of domestic fullsize trucks loathe: pavement pounder, hauls nothing but air, horrible mileage and inferior driving dynamics.

      Ironically, even the worst of the domestic nameplates leave all of those “concerns” (b¡tching) in the rearview heated mirror.

      You can use all the nice words you want about Tundra sales, how they’re “consistent” and “improved xx.xxx% since—-“, but it all boils down to those who wouldnt DARE to buy a domestic vehicle no matter how much better it is and/or cheaper it is, and those who literally did 0 research and test drove nothing else.

      • 0 avatar
        formula m

        you are full of it broke down Taurus

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          @formula m — which part?

          …pavement pounder…

          Don’t see many Tundras being used by trades in the construction capital of the country (until 6 months ago) of Puget Sound. It is Ford, Ford, Ford, and more Ford, and some GM.

          …hauls nothing but air…

          Like most pickup trucks, which have become the Crown Victoria and Chevy Caprice of the 21st century for the average American family.

          …horrible mileage…

          The Tundra does get inferior mileage compared to the competition. The 5.7 is a great engine but it is thirsty. Other V8 offerings in particular like the GM 6.2 V8 are highly praised. Even Jack owns one.

          …and inferior driving dynamics…

          Subjective, and I haven’t driven the most current Tundra with the 6-speed auto, but the “reviewers” say that compared to the competition – this is true.

          …You can use all the nice words you want about Tundra sales, how they’re “consistent” and “improved xx.xxx% since—-“…

          Toyota sold 87K Tundra in 2018, which is up 2% from 2017. The Sierra outsold the Tundra 2:1, the Ram outsold the Tundra 4:1, the Silverado outsold the Tundra almost 5:1, and the F-150 outsold the Tundra 7:1.

          Toyota only achieved it’s goal of 200K Tundras a year (set over a decade ago) once, and it was a “close enough.” They’ve walked that number back long ago. The Tundra is a “B” player in this market, and always will be.

          https://seekingalpha.com/article/4222180-gm-toyota-grow-midsize-pickup-truck-sales-25-percent-2018

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      They might as well compromise capability for ride comfort, the Tundra represents everything the haters of domestic fullsize trucks loathe: pavement pounder, hauls nothing but air, horrible mileage and inferior driving dynamics.

      Ironically, even the worst of the domestic nameplates leave all of those “concerns” (b¡tching) in the rearview heated mirror.

      You can use all the nice words you want about Tundra sales, how they’re “consistent” and “improved xx.xxx% since —-“, but it all boils down to those who wouldnt DARE to buy a domestic vehicle no matter how much better it is and/or cheaper it is, and those who literally did 0 research and test drove nothing else.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Eh, the only reason I don’t cross-shop the Tundra when I think about replacing my SuperDuty is that they *don’t make it* with a long-bed in a high trim level [SR5 and below only], and that is the segment I want.

        (I’m much more likely to go with an F150, for that matter, but I WOULD look at the Toyota if they made one to even compare.)

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      When I was truck shopping a couple of years ago, the biggest knock on the Tundra was the number of doors (too many). Fuel economy was much less an issue, and ride “quality” is subjective.

  • avatar
    MBella

    What’s strange is that Toyota doesn’t have to put more cash on the hood of these. They seem to be content with sales as they are. It’s an interesting strategy.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      In the SW I do actually see them advertised on AutoTrader for less than MSRP (especially lower trims like the SR5) but more like $5K off instead of the $10K off that everyone else seems to advertise for theirs.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        That’s what I mean. Every full size truck is discounted heavily from MSRP. It’s just strange to me that a truck that was mistimed at introduction is still selling with smaller rebates. It was released right as gas prices were going up, and full size truck buyers actually cared about fuel economy for the first time. Toyota was going for power. Logic goes out the window with Toyota trucks though. My buddy just sold his Tacoma that he was leasing because he wasn’t using it and didn’t want the payments. Dealer gave him a few grand. It’s been sold for just over $1000 less than his truck was new.

        • 0 avatar
          whynot

          Volume is still good and steady without heavy discounts, so no need to cut into your profits. Toyota knows that at this point the Tundra is really too old (and thus behind on tech, fuel economy etc) to really make a dent in the domestics’ market share, so with volume remaining steady why bother offering a lot of cash on the hood.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      It’s almost like Toyota realizes that the Tundra really isn’t competitive enough.

    • 0 avatar
      Prado

      I’m guessing Toyota is more than happy to use the capacity on building more Tacomas. The profit on the Taco has to be substantial, considering what they go for.

  • avatar
    Peter Gazis

    Amazing how the biggest auto conglomerate in the universe can’t build
    •new platforms for its trucks
    •long range electric vehicles
    •a sports car on its own
    •a state of the art infotainment system
    •a new U.S. assembly plant without Mazda.
    •regularly updated peoducts

    Maybe Toyota should sell off all its side businesses and focus on building vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      All your bias are belong to ’80s.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      Can’t or doesn’t need to? They seem to be selling vehicles just fine. Would I like them to do the things above? Yes. They’re just thinking the extra cost won’t be worth the spend.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        @MBella and @Peter

        I think the truth lies between your two points of view.

        I do believe there is some won’t and some can’t.

        New platform for their trucks: Let’s take away the Tundra which compared to the other players is a low volume vehicle. The Tacoma is the top dog in the class and is still behind in a number of areas. The Taco sells on reputation. That’s great – for a while – but evidence shows it eventually catches up and the competition is getting a lot stronger. Points to both of you.

        Long-range electric vehicles: Toyoda made the decision over a decade ago to not pursue electrification over hydrogen fuel cells, and that is where the R&D dollars went. You basically don’t even hear about hydrogen fuel cells from — anyone — anymore outside of military development. Point to Peter – Toyota has dropped the ball here.

        A sports car on its own: This is 100% won’t. Toyota doesn’t want to dedicate the R&D dollars that they will never recover, so they partner with others. The Subaru partnership was a dud, that’s a different issue. There seems to be a strong backlash on the BMW partnership – that is yet to be determined. This is 100% bean counter driven. Point to MBella.

        A state of the art infotainment system: is ETune really THAT bad? Jaguar and Volvo systems are a hot mess. Cadillac finally got Cue together – sort of. Screen size and offerings are behind. On the other hand, Toyota certainly has the brains, the money, and the resources to do it right. This is a puzzle for me. This is similar to Apple and the Windows client for iTunes. It is a feckin’ disaster. Apple clearly has the resources to start over from scratch and make something – usable. No point to either of you.

        A new U.S. assembly plant without Mazda: Or Subaru, or GM, or… Toyota has done partnerships in manufacturing for decades and shared assembly lines. It is a good hedge to market conditions and the variations in manufacturing capacity. Point to MBella

        Regular updates to products: There are a number of Toyota products that are long overdue for updates. Sienna, Land Cruiser, Sequoia, Tacoma (it needs more), Tundra, the 86 (dead car walking). Yes they’ve had incremental upgrades but the fundamentals haven’t changed. Heck both the Tundra and Taco were soldiering on with 5-speed automatics. The Yaris is a great example of phoning it in, and in a class of car that Toyota historically knew how to build, and in a class of car that sells well in their other markets. They definitely update their core much more often, Prius, RAV-4, Highlander, Corolla, Camry, RX-350, ES-350. No point to either.

        The truth is between.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          “Heck both the Tundra and Taco were soldiering on with 5-speed automatics.”

          FWIW Tundra’s had a 6spd auto since 2007.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yup, the 2007 Tundra redesign put the pick’m up industry on its head with its all-aluminum 32-valve DOHC 5.7L V8, its huge floating caliper 4-wheel Discs, and its enormous 10.5″ Ring Gear.

            A couple years later and all the other me-too pickups followed suit and had those brakes and six-speed auto as well.

            Well done, Toyota!

            I was very happy with both my Tundras AND the 2016 Sequoia we had for a little over three years.

            They never let us down. And they continue to live on with someone else driving them.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            You know, you’d have a point except that was 11 years ago and they’ve done bupkiss since. Do Tundras’s even have boxed frames?

            In 2007 The Tundra was competetive (not class leading, but certainly competetive). Now it is an embarrassment. The world has moved on.

            The Tundra was an all out effort to crack the Full-sized nut by Toyota. When it failed they decided to invest minimally and recoup what they could. Not dumb, but so many better options.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Art, Toyota is slow to upgrade or make changes. We see this over and over again with all their vehicles, especially the Tacoma after Ranger, Dakota and the GM-twins were discontinued.

            But for Tacoma and Tundra buyers this appears to be OK with them. It was OK with me in 2011 and 2016.

            IMO, both the Tundra and the Titan were brought to market to take sales away from Ford, GM, and RAM. And from that marketing angle, they both succeeded. They are taking sales away from them.

            There’s no doubt in my mind that IF I ever buy another half-ton truck, it will be another Tundra (as long as they have that 5.7L V8).

            If Toyota is forced to downsize to a smaller engine or otherwise cheapen the Tundra, I’ll be forced to step up to an F250 4dr 4×4 with electric side steps.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The 2007 Tundra’s cutting edge advancements meant little then, and even less now. At least to typical pickup buyers, fleets or anyone used to spec’ing out a truck to their exact needs/wants, with nearly infinite combos, instead of the 3 or 4 ways Toyota is willing to sell you a fullsize pickup, if you just gotta have one, for whatever reason.

            Take it or leave it, and don’t expect much discounts/incentives either. Toyota has to know exactly how to build/market a truly competitive 1/2 ton pickup, it’s not Rocket Science but that would take a huge investment with no guarantees.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            DenverMike, the point is, they continue to sell.

            And there are no plans for Toyota to discontinue or scrap the Tundra in the foreseeable future.

            People who buy a Tundra do not want to buy a Ford, GM or RAM.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            People now kind of hand-wave how much motor the Tundra had back in the day. To 60 and in the 1/4 mile it was about 2 seconds faster than a GM 5.3 or Ford 5.4, a second faster than the GM 6.0 or Hemi and half second faster than a Titan. It didn’t really get beat until GM starting offering the mighty L9H 6.2L in the half-tons, and like today those were thin on the ground.

            I get that truck buyers aren’t drag racers, but the Tundra was the first “normal” truck that I ever noticed how fast it could be.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            HighDesertCat, I fully agree, there has to be an alternative to Big 3 pickups. By the same, Toyota realizes it doesn’t have to be a great or amazing truck, constantly updated, endless packages/options, or the latest tech, since it’ll sell regardless.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            DenverMike, every Tundra owner I know just gushes over that 5.7L V8. They’re certainly not buying the Tundra for the interiors, or the ride and handling.

            There was a time when only Ferrari came with an all-aluminum 32-valve DOHC engine, and Toyota succeeded in putting one in, of all things, a pickup truck!

            Only goes to show that “if you build it, they will come.” And they came. I did too.

            Especially true when Toyota taps that hidden demographic, the demographic of people who had already owned the rest, but now want only the best.

            Right now Toyota has a real winner in their new RAV4 AWD. And their new Camry.

            Corolla ain’t doing too bad either in spite of that damn CVT.

            So why not their new Tacoma?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            HighDesertCat, A pickup can have the world’s most amazing engine, but for most pickup buyers, the engine is but a smaller consideration to the total package.

            One of the reasons I bought an F-150 SC STX was it’s as if ordered just for me with fog lights, 17″ alloys, siding rear window, dark tint, 3.55 gears, 4wd, and a few others. And it was just sitting on a Ford lot with lots of money on the hood!

            The 4.6 V8 and 4-speed auto were and are, less than amazing, but they had and have a long and strong history in many FMC cars and trucks. If I ever need a used replacement, they’re absolutely everywhere, like the ancient GM 350/350 setup. By no means exotic, but they get the job done.

            Everyone’s looking for different things in a new vehicles, and for many, the best infotainment wins every time. Of course that’s the last thing I care about.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            DenverMike, yup, that’s what makes the world go ’round and ’round.

            That’s what I love about America! Choice!

            Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

            And Happiness is……choice.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “People who buy a Tundra do not want to buy a Ford, GM or RAM.”

            Then how is it taking sales from them? Didn’t the F Series enjoy a record year?

            “There was a time when only Ferrari came with an all-aluminum 32-valve DOHC engine, and Toyota succeeded in putting one in, of all things, a pickup truck!”

            Would be impressive again IF they had done something more in the past 11 years. And does that make the F150 a true “supercar” I mean there was a time an aluminum bodied 400hp twin turbo was truly exotic stuff. Now it can be had in the world’s best selling vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “Do Tundras’s even have boxed frames?”

            Do SuperDutys?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Art, my guess is that a Tundra is not a good fit for your wants and needs.

            Fortunately for Toyota, ye olde Tundra and Tacoma just keep right on selling to people who know a good thing when they see one.

            And yes, every one they sell is one less sale for Ford, GM or RAM.

            Some of us still remember the days before Tundra and Titan existed. Those were the days my friend, the days of no choice.

            If you like your Ford, GM or RAM, you get to keep your Ford, GM or RAM. But if you want to buy a new truck today, you have a choice.

            Choice! What a concept.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “The 2007 Tundra’s cutting edge advancements meant little then, and even less now. ”

            You have to be truly willfully ignorant to think that.

            As mediocre as the specs look now compared to some of the latest domestics, in 2007 the Tundra was the most thorough and comprehensive curb-stomping of the competition in any class as I’ve seen, based on specs. Vastly stronger powertrain, best towing outside of a diesel, biggest beefiest brakes, transfer case and transmission, competitive (at the time) fuel economy. As Ajla notes the 381hp 5.7L iForce absolutely obliterated the competition at the time, and the fact that it remains relevant in terms of power 12 years later is pretty impressive if you ask me.

          • 0 avatar

            Have to mostly agree with GTEM. I wouldn’t say a curb stomp but in 2007 the Tundra was at least highly competitive maybe even leading. The thing is it’s flaws at it’s intro in 2007 still exist along with new ones thanks to age. It had a somewhat poor ride out of the box since Toyota didn’t want a whole bunch of different payload variations. Chevy and Dodge kind of ignored halfton payload to some extent and Ford decided to have a special package for it. The reason for that was ride on the higher payload packages was bad and most buyers didn’t need it (or ignored it) . So guys hauling air in a Tundra had a worse ride then the comps (except maybe the payload uprated 150) Dodge went with coils and airsprings in 09 to help keep reasonable payload and ride Chevy and Ford keep tweaking their rear leafs and option packages. When released in 2007 a GM 5.3 had it all over then Tundra on fuel economy but the Toyota was right inline with Dodge and Ford, and we have seen both of those make great strides in the decade since which now means the Tundra is left behind. And now also has to deal with advancing age in the interior compared to the comps.
            Other then the thing being really ugly the 2nd gen Tundra is really a pretty decent halfton for actually hauling stuff. A doublecab with a 5.7 can haul 1650 lbs and tow just under 10,000 and can easily be found on a dealer lot. But it will not be as efficient or as comfortable as the domestic options. My inlaws have an 09 I have borrowed a few times and once trailerd a decent size travel trailer across half the east coast with. It really does truck stuff well (including hauling a small 5th wheel at the moment)but even my in laws are now tempted by a 3/4 domestic with more options and payload.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Yes Gtem, Super Duty’s have boxed frames and have since the 2017 redesign.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        GM was selling vehicles “just fine” in the mid 70s as well. They are the default choice for the boomers much as Buicks and Oldsmobiles were for there parents. Keep “resting on those laurels” and they’ll be right up there with those marques in 20 years.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    I hope that “single horizontal bar” grille means it gets rid of all that ridiculous-looking, big-rig copying SIZE. By no means does that grille need to be so tall and blocky. Not only could that hood lose that excess 3″ in height but the added slope would help improve its CoD (Coefficient of Drag) and improve its highway economy. Losing about 4″ to 6″ of cab height would also help, while also removing some excess weight.

    There are many ways this truck could lose weight without losing what has made it so trustworthy.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Even losing a lot of weight does little for fuel economy. Pickups aren’t like cars. Then there’s Tundras.

      There’s way too much turbulence over, under, bed, behind, for any improvements in front aerodynamics to make a bit of difference in fuel economy, no matter how dramatic the aero changes. And that’s before any boxy cargo or trailers.

      Chopping 4+ inches of headroom would be crazy. Then they’d have to drop the seats by as much, plus loss of visibility.

      Tundra “work” options are kept to a minimum, so all come with near 4-to-1 axle ratios standard, 4.30 Tow Package. You could put a nose cone off a Learjet on the front of the thing and it wouldn’t make a dent in fuel use.

      There’s a good reason Toyota doesn’t want to sell too many Tundras.

  • avatar
    86er

    They must be milking maximum profits out of this thing, because a casual observer would think they’re barely trying.

    I agree with other posters: the Tundra was embiggened in 2007 because Toyota couldn’t be taken seriously in the U.S. market without one, and it provides Toyota diehards with an option.

    Otherwise the indifference wafting from corporate is palpable.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      In ’07 when it came out, the 2nd gen Tundra really laid the smackdown on the half ton field in a big way, and sales reflected that. Then a year later the recession hit and a shiny big truck that gets 13-15mpg wasn’t exactly the right product to be selling. By the time the economic recovery was in full swing, domestics had upgraded to the next generation of powertrains and tech and Toyota was happy to let the Tundra stagnate, mind you it remained competitive in real world comparisons (IMO) through until 2014/2015ish when the latest revisions of the Ecoboost+aluminum and gen 3 Ecotec GM motors came on line.

  • avatar
    jatz

    All new pickups are dumpsters with a cupola, even Ram.

    We who imprinted upon ’60s and ’70s pickups know this is meant to ease us onward.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I know I’m in the minority but I miss the size of the first generation Tundra / T100. Just right for my wants/needs and living in the city.

    My ol’ T100 was a rust bucket by the time I got it, but I sure loved that thing.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Here in the desert where the T100s aren’t rusting away I see them every once in a while in a parking lot.

      I still think a T100 with a current Toyota V8 would be a killer app for most who use trucks as trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      crtfour

      I have a ’97 T100 which I bought rather unexpectedly in 1999 and it’s been such a great vehicle that I can’t seem to let it go. It’s a southern truck as well so no rust. It’s slow, it’s not fancy, and it can’t tow very much, but I still don’t tire of driving it. And it’s nearly as tight as when I got it in 1999.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        “And it’s nearly as tight as when I got it in 1999.”

        Something old Toyotas do exceptionally well, my ’96 4Runner is the same way. The same can’t be said for my wife’s ’12 Camry, although it in turn is better than my ’16 T&C.

  • avatar

    My only comment is they’re not trying very hard, just like they haven’t been since about 2010 when this was due for more updating.

    And that blue color is not good for press photos. Looks old and washed out.

  • avatar
    ryanwm80

    Perhaps Toyota should “pull a Supra” and partner up with another company to have a truck that’s competitive against the domestic companies. This way they could have a truck with a twin turbo V6, 10 speed transmission, and an aluminum body. Except that VW has partnered with Ford. Well they could still have a truck with cylinder deactivation, active air suspension and active grill shutters.

  • avatar
    ryanwm80

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe the first truck to have an aluminum DOHC V8 with 32 valves was the Lincoln Blackwood.

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  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber