By on January 9, 2019

You hear it time and time again on the internet. “There are no bad cars today.” It’s proclaimed by those who lived through the Malaise Era and have personally experienced the build quality and reliability of an new Renault Le Car or Chevy Monza. And while things are most definitely better than they were, nothing’s perfect. Bring out your critical fingertips.

Today we’re going to talk about trucks, and the one which sticks out in your mind as a bit lesser than its competitors; the company which builds it could be doing a better job, you feel. Perhaps it’s down on quality, or lacking in technology, or its manufacturer hasn’t updated it as much as it should. How dare they do any of these things, here in the non-malaise year of 2019! Below is a list of the trucks available to North America this year, because you all shouldn’t go Googling around unsupervised.

Chevrolet Colorado
Chevrolet Silverado
Ford F-150
Ford Ranger
GMC Canyon
GMC Sierra
Honda Ridgeline
Nissan Frontier
Nissan Titan
RAM 1500
Toyota Tacoma
Toyota Tundra

Now, this list shows bias of the alphabetical persuasion, so watch out. Apparently the pictured Hummer H3T is no longer available. In the interest of keeping the list concise, heavy-duty variants are not broken out separately. It’s a short list which makes up a substantial part of the profits for some of these manufacturers (or virtually all of them, in the case of RAM). Truck sales matter! But we’re looking for a loser today in this, the Game of Trucks.

Which one is least deserving of the consumer’s precious dollars when pitched against its competitors?

[Image: General Motors]

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112 Comments on “QOTD: Which Entrant Is Losing at the Game of Trucks?...”


  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Pretty easy choice: Toyota Tundra.

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      The Tundra. The model “T” of full size trucks!

    • 0 avatar
      Hank

      I liked the Tundra a family member loaned me a few years ago, with one huge exception: fuel efficiency. How Toyota of all companies can’t even present to match the domestics I just don’t understand. 11 city/16 highway was typical, while the Silverado I bought instead got 18.6 city, and 22.5 highway (my real world averages over 80,000 miles of ownership…even pulling a full utility box trailer I could beat the Tundra’s 11 city.

      You would think Toyota could double that blindfolded with both hands tied behind their backs, but nope.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        When it comes to a lot of things, Toyota is resting on its laurels.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        I could not agree more on the MPG of the Tundra, it is an absolute disgrace.

        Toyota does so much right but completely screws their customers who will buy the tundra because of the badge. My neighbor has a 15′ or 14′ Tundra, he readily admits that his average is 12. I get 15.8 (typical average using miles/gallons pumped) out of my Suburban with an old tech 4L60E 4 speed trans and the displacement on demand turned off on the 5.3.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I agree that the Tundra is the worst. I rode in my boss’s 2017-ish Tundra Limited a few weeks ago. I was not impressed.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    30k for a FWD Honda Ridgeline…..I continue to be amazed at what sells these days…

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      There are people asking $12,000 for ten-year-old Ford Rangers with a straight face. Pricing on trucks is Looney Tunes.

      The good news is that if you don’t want a truck or a CUV, pricing is Looney Tunes good.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      I both agree and disagree. While it isn’t really a truck, per se, it is probably what most suburbanites actually need. It could carry my kids, furniture, electronic devices, and do it all efficiently and reliably. If I had the money for only one vehicle (of a non-sporting variety) that had to do all tasks, and be driven by both of us, this would be a great bet. If you need a truck in the way that F-150 commercials portray, though, then you need a real truck.

      Your price point is a good one. I keep looking at Frontiers, as they kind of are the last of the (relatively) compact breed of real, honest-to-goodness pickup. But the price? WHY?

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      Ridgeline sells, but to a Honda-faithful niche. 2500 a month.
      But given its common parts with the SUV/minivan platforms, likely a profitable product for Honda.

    • 0 avatar
      Hank

      And styling matching the soccer mom Pilot does it no favors. At least the first gen looked like a Yeti with wheels. The new one makes an ’84 El Camino look like a Raptor.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      I didn’t realize they were so cheap. Wow.

      I might be seriously tempted if Honda makes an actual midsize Ridgeline, based on CR-V, instead of Pilot. Oh, and put a real transmission into it, with 1:20 total. Pilot gets the ZF, but Ridgeline does not.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      BTW, this reminds me a TV episode where they took 2 or 3 conventional trucks and Ridgeline to Death Valley. After just driving the road for a few miles, all the rugged midsizers blew their shocks. Even Tacoma did. Ridgeline continued just fine. So who’s rugged now?

    • 0 avatar
      Pleease

      But who buys a Ridgeline with FWD?

      My old 2007 AWD is a terrific vehicle for my uses, and that’s actually a lot.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Are all comments being moderated now? Just asking.

  • avatar
    salmonmigration

    Jeep Gladiator. Like a Jeep but not good at being a Jeep, and like a Tacoma but more expensive and it’ll break a lot.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    The easy answer is the Frontier, but I think the new Silverado is a real misstep from GM on the product line that they can least afford to get wrong.

    -Ugly styling, especially so on the HD.
    -Interior immediately and noticeably outclassed by the new Ram.
    -Uninspiring 4 cylinder.
    -Still limited trim/configuration availability of the 6.2L (after 5 model years!)

    Where is the compelling reason to buy this over a Ford or Ram?

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      Jack

      top marks

    • 0 avatar
      1500cc

      Definitely the Silverado. I would be willing to bet that it drops down to third place in sales (Ram takes over second) in a year or two. That’s a lot of coin not going to GM.

    • 0 avatar
      Hank

      I really liked my ’15 Silverado, but wanted to move up from 2wd to 4wd. I ended up opting for an F150 when the ’19 appeared. Can’t stand the new look. Very pleased with the F150.

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

      Just today I returned a Frontier 4×4 SV Crew Cab to Enterprise, and over my five-day rental I grew to really appreciate its refreshingly no-frills approach to, well, being a compact pickup.

      The cabin was basic but comfortable (Apple Carplay was the only feature I missed) and the V6 made more than adequate power, although it was quite thirsty. The Frontier also seemed to be screwed together well and still tight as a drum at 21K rental miles.

      Sales figures indicate there’s still a market for such a vehicle, even if it’s largely to rental fleets and the credit-challenged. Now, the Titan? That’s a truck with no recognizable place in the market, as – again – its sales numbers demonstrate.

      • 0 avatar
        R Henry

        “the V6 made more than adequate power, although it was quite thirsty.”

        Hereiin lies my unwillingness to give up my sedan. I have owned V6 trucks, and even 4-cylinder Taco. Getting more than 23 mpg was practically impossible in those trucks. And the ride…can you say “Bouncy?”

        I am a suburban homeowner who could use a truck for household projects fairly regularly, yet I decided to put a hitch on my sedan and get one of those folding 4 x 8 foot utility trailers from the big imported tool place–less than $500 on the road. A great compromise as long as you have a place to put the trailer the 98% of the time you don’t need it.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      My neighbour traded his almost-new Silverado for a new one a couple of weeks ago. Said he got a great deal. BTW, it’s not a straight-up GM family – his wife drives an Avalon.

  • avatar
    ajla

    There is no scenario where I would purchase a Ridgeline.

    • 0 avatar
      formula m

      Have a ’14 Ram 1500 Hemi. The days that I actually require over 5000 lbs towing capacity are about 5-7 days per year. Also days I need a reliable vehicle because the Ram is in the shop with air suspension problems are 5-7 days per year. (usually the coldest days are when it fails)

      Biased because I work for Honda but I think I will benefit from having Ridgeline as my DD because I could actually drive it every day and not use 17.5L/100km = 13.4 MPG of fuel.

      Ridgeline I have observed 10.5L/100km = 22.4 MPG combined city/hwy

      i-VTM4 AWD system can send up to 70% to the rear axle and send 100% of the power left or right to the wheel with traction. (Not using ABS)

      • 0 avatar
        Pete Zaitcev

        If you work for Honda, could you ask them put a real transaxle into Ridgeline? The total ratio is 1 to 14.28 (3.36 in 1st by 4.25 final drive). My BMW has better! Seriously, guys, that’s just pathetic for an all-wheel-drive vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @Pete: But yet the Ridgeline beat all but the Tacoma in a mid-size off-road test by PUTC early last year (or was it late ’17?) Its off-road chops–or rather, soft-road chops–are better than any of the other mid-sizers, especially on the hill climb (the only one other than the Taco to top the hill) and fast start in sand, where it pulled through faster than all the others (even the Taco, IIRC.) No, it’s not a trail buggy like the Tacoma or other off-road-specific configurations but it did prove itself superior where an ordinary driver might get in trouble. I’ve got to give the Ridgeline credit for showing strength in the others’ playground.

      • 0 avatar
        Pleease

        I have an old Ridgeline that I love (’07, 147k) and until yesterday had a Grand Cherokee Overland with the hemi and air suspension (traded it), and indeed in 2018 I paid 2K or so to have the compressor, etc., replaced. Also had that replaced under warranty. Loved driving it – super plush inside, etc. – but had run it up to 133k and know something even more major would bust soon. It was in the shop for weeks on end while they tried to figure out the air suspension problem last year.

    • 0 avatar
      Pleease

      I have a 2007 Ridgeline I bought in 2011. Now has 147k miles and has been an absolute warrior, in suburban + lake cabin terms. Have hauled about everything imaginable in it, including up & back the 3 mile super-hilly, often-rutted gravel road at the lake while pulling my subcompact tractor. Wish I knew how many loads of topsoil, gravel, bricks, etc., it’s carried.

      It’s obviously not for everybody, but between the passenger space, the ride & handling, the locking trunk, and especially the durability, it’s a really useful machine. Not the equal of standard pickups in towing and other truck-use areas, sure, but far ahead in some.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’m not going to call it a “looser” but I’m amazed that the Tundra and it’s sister Sequoia continue to sell given how out of date they are. I know they’re reliable as an anvil (and twice as fast) but good Lord, Toyota!

    Give us a 8 or 10 speed auto, give the V8s your DI+port injection system, and (according to every review I’ve read or listened to in the past few years) give the Sequoia a decent steering rack!

    • 0 avatar
      teddyc73

      Look at sales of the Grand Caravan and Journey. Apparently older designs can sell just fine.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Would that make you buy one? Because I’ve directed my company to buy one, and it was precisely because the V8 was port injected and the transmission will last half a million miles. Why does every truck need to be built for marketing puppets? If you want a truck that will cost a fortune in engine work and need a transmission by 125K miles, there are plenty of choices for you.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        The Land Cruiser & LX570 both use an 8-speed transmission and variants of the UR engine family have offered D4-S for 13 years.

        This isn’t a durability thing, it is Toyota being cheap.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        DI and PORT has proven to provide most of the benefits of each, Toyota was one of the pioneers of combining them, seems like a no brainer.

        Forgive me for wanting some slightly competitive fuel economy in a truck and not bottom of the barrel.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        FWIW: Friends of ours are diehard Sequoia fans. They have had two since i have had my 1 Suburban.

        They got the new Sequoia because the old one ate the trans…just sayin’.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      Personally- an old design on a truck doesn’t bother me much, but the value then has to be there. Tundra is still charging what everyone else is charging based just on being a Toyota. I just don’t think they’re lasting enough longer to pull that one off anymore. The Frontier I can appreciate- it’s an old design but it’s functional and it’s cheap. Sounds perfect for a lot of applications.

      Also, I’ll add that Toyota trying to say that they leave the rear frame on the Tacoma unboxed on purpose as a ‘feature’ so the frame flexes and gives it a better ramp index seems pretty questionable.

      • 0 avatar
        Flipper35

        I know several people that bought a Tundra because “Toyota” only to vow to never buy another. One actually bought a Jeep in between an old model Colorado and a new model Colorado. The others have split between the full size from the domestics.

  • avatar

    The new Silverado is a BIG fail in my book. Awful styling combined with sub-par interior design and materials.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    I would say the Tacoma and frontier but they seem to sell regardless of how long they’ve been basically the same.

  • avatar

    Only one comes with the HEMI….so Ram it is.
    OR maybe the new Jeep truck not listed.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    These are actually all pretty good trucks, but if I had to choose it would be the Nissans for no other reason then being a bit long in the tooth

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    And yet, the fact that the Frontier has been left pretty much alone since its last update is its strongest point for many – including me. The fact that one can buy a base version for $18K makes it even better.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    As a non truck guy the only one I would buy would be a ridgeline, but I do not get why anyone would buy a Nissan Titan unless you worked for Nissan,

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    I’m going to state there is no “least deserving” truck, though I acknowledge that in the used car(truck) market, some are grossly overpriced. I will also admit to a personal dislike of Ford products through a lifetime of bad experiences with the brand. But that’s beside the point.

    Each of these truck models has a value to the person buying them. Not all truck owners need or want the biggest thing on the road. Not all of them need or want the smallest. Not all of them need the most powerful; the heaviest capacity/towing capability. Not all of them need or want a secured lockable space in the bed (yet it’s amazing how many add a lockbox of one sort or another onto the bed rails after the fact.) But for all of those that DON’T want these things, there will be some few who do and praise the model that has what they want, despite so many others not wanting it.

    So to me there are no real losers here; they’re all winners to a greater or lesser extent.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Yeah. If you live and breath trucks, a Frontier is not going to be your thing. If you need something cheap and practical, it’s just about perfect. Context matters.

      • 0 avatar
        Yankee

        “Context matters.” Well put. You and Vulpine make an important nuanced case here. I knew this thread would bring out the fanboys of one brand or another thumping their chest with brand loyalty as if the companies themselves sent them. Of course, the first at bat is always JohnTaurus, who has to bring a negative comment on EVERY post on this site (despite championing a boring midsize rental car with spotty build quality which should disqualify his judgement up front). Kudos also to ToddAtlasF1 who pointed out that some people are more interested in buying a proven reliable truck then being beta testers in the field for the latest gizmos. Of course, trucks these days run the gamut of lifestyle use, with many of them never seeing any type of load in the bed and no driving outside the highways and mall parking lots. I’ve probably worked on everything in my over 30 years as a mechanic, which is why I can’t understand for the life of me why the F150 is the best selling. I know my experience is anecdotal, and therefore limited to my own geographic region, but Toyota owners seem to hold on to their trucks a lot longer with a lot fewer problems in the course of ownership. If you have to have to try and impress your neighbors by owning the newest changed model, by all means head on down to your Ford or Chevy dealer. Just know that your neighbor with the Tundra will not be impressed knowing the steep depreciation on your new ride means in 5 years his old truck will be worth more than 5-year-old one. Of course, he’s too polite to point this out to you.

        • 0 avatar
          dont.fit.in.cars

          I’m at 175k miles on my 2015 2500HD WT and my only consideration is reliability, which the bow tie has, at full payload and tow, delivered in spades.

  • avatar
    Fred

    What about Mahindra? 10 years ago it was pick-up truck, now it’s that jeep thing. Not bad ideas, but maybe poor marketing.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Mahindra’s pickup truck is still in limbo; they felt abused by the dealership franchise that was sponsoring their import while the “Jeep thing” is not a road-legal car and therefore does not qualify.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        Dealers filed a lawsuit accusing Mahindra of fraud, misrepresentation and conspiracy. That whole thing was a mess. Almost 350 dealers put up cash for exclusive distribution rights and Mahindra never delivered. I don’t who is most at fault, but Mahindra hasn’t brought a truck here in the nine years since the agreement with Global Ventures expired.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I think General Motors definitely fumbled on the styling for its new Silverado and Sierra trucks, including the HD range.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      Kyree
      Your comments are usually spot on. But, I ll disagree with you this one time.
      Silverado – Fugly agreed.
      Sierra- nice looking

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        New Sierra has been selling decently in the local area but I also think part of it is the guys who are trading their “old” Denalis for new Denalis. We’re at the point now where those guys are like the the Cadillac customers in the 1950s through the 70s who bought a new Deville every time the new generation got released.

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        I would have to put the Sierra at, “Not as ugly as the Silverado”, but still ugly. Kind of like a friend’s wife and her sister. My friend’s wife is the less ugly of the two.

  • avatar
    cbrworm

    The obvious outliers are the Tundra, Titan, and Ridgeline. But anyone that I know who has one of them loves it and would buy another. Except for that one guy with a Titan, but he complains about everything.

    I don’t think there are any real losers in that list.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I’m going with Titan. I mean, it’s probably a decent truck, but Nissan can’t get anyone to buy. I see more F-150s in a day than I see Titans in a year.

  • avatar
    jfk-usaf

    Might as well go through all of them:
    – Chevrolet Colorado – nope… First generation was absolute junk. No interest in v2
    – Chevrolet Silverado – No faith in its longevity. they brag about steel being better but theirs is so thin.
    – Ford F-150 – I’m in. Looks great and it’s reputation says it is great
    – Ford Ranger – Can’t wait to see/ drive it
    – GMC Canyon – A better looking Colorado so No
    – GMC Sierra – A better looking Silverado so maybe… but probably No
    – Honda Ridgeline – A minivan with a truck bed. Innovative design that is so utterly boring. The fact that these sell tells me how under appreciated this market is by the industry
    – Nissan Frontier – Waaaay overdue for an update. Come on guys, at least up your powertrain game – Suzuki’s version looked better
    – Nissan Titan – No compelling reason to buy. Not rumored to be that rugged and not all that attractive
    – RAM 1500 – It’s an FCA vehicle so its made of spray cheese and watermelon rinds… unless the new one isn’t and only time will reveal that
    – Toyota Tacoma – Ugly older design with a poor seating position. Should be a clear winner but somehow isn’t.
    – Toyota Tundra – Another older design. Another case of should be a clear winner but isn’t.

    Least desirable you ask?… Its hard to say because most of them suck for different equally important issues. … With a gun to my head. Ridgeline because its so pulse-less.

    and the Hummer was just hateful. A crappy Chevy truck with a Transformers costume on

  • avatar
    SC5door

    Nissan:

    Hired Fred Diaz from FCA’s Ram Truck division to lead Nissan North America and still managed to create an interior that is garbage on the Titan. Fails to set the standard for pickup truck design. Although kudos for the amber rear turn signals.

    GM:

    Knew good and well that FCA wasn’t playing with interior design and still managed to launch the Sierra and Silverado with garbage looking interiors. Fails to set any standard in design. Still waiting for a Colorado/Canyon update!

  • avatar
    kkop

    Going by my own experience and research:

    Ram 1500: loved it, until at 130,000 miles I faced a $5000 engine repair bill (failed lifter(s) that ate the camshaft) – will probably not buy again, even though I own two more Hemi-powered vehicles that run great at almost same mileage

    Nissan Titan (previous version) – took me to 187,000 miles before I traded it with just a few issues that were fixed under warranty. However, drove the new one at introduction and was disappointed at how little had been improved – will probably not buy

    The Silverado – I understand it (and other GM vehicles that have the V-8) suffer from failed lifters as well – enough so a cottage industry of DOD-delete companies has sprung up – no thanks

    That leaves me to consider F-150 and Tundra. Tundra is long in the tooth but reliable. F-150 looks too ‘Tonka’ to me, but I could get over that. Not sure about its reliability.

    So, who needs to improve? All of the above, except maybe Ford?
    Ram – needs to improve reliability
    Silverado – idem
    Tundra – needs to be refreshed
    Titan – needs to be more than an afterthought at Nissan

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      The Hemi and 5.3 both had issues with their multi-displacement system. Was your lifter related to that? That’s been worked through as far as I can tell.

      F-150, seems like it had some teething issues on the 3.5 but those have been worked through.

      Engine wise, I wouldn’t be afraid of any of the big 3 at this time. I don’t know about the new Chevy that has multiple, multi-displacement layouts since just going from 4-8 has been an issue in the past.

      • 0 avatar
        kkop

        Chrysler claims it only affected 2011 models I believe. However, my experience with a 2014 (and lengthy forum threads containing all 4th gen model years) say otherwise. The required parts (lifters and camshaft) are on almost constant backorder, so read into that what you will…

    • 0 avatar
      dont.fit.in.cars

      6.0 L96 in the 2500. Doesn’t have the wizardry of the 6.2 nor the mileage but a solid performer.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        I had the 6.0 in my 2004 Sierra HD. A true truck engine that you couldn’t kill even if you wanted to. When I got rid of it at 13 years old w/170k miles it was still as solid & tight as the day I drove it off the lot w/40 miles on it.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        I had the 6.0 in my 2004 Sierra HD. A true truck engine that you couldn’t kill even if you wanted to. When I got rid of it at 13 years old w/170k miles it was still as solid & tight as the day I drove it off the lot w/40 miles on it.

        • 0 avatar
          Erikstrawn

          I had a coworker who was a fan of the 6.0 trucks. Both had transmission failure about a month apart, and I’ve heard similar from other GM owners. A robust engine means nothing if the transmission is made of glass, and anecdotally, GM’s transmissions are crap right now.

  • avatar
    SwiftLegend

    Answer: The one that just went all in and spent millions on a universally loathed looking truck. But don’t worry, real men like JD power awards!

  • avatar
    AVT

    For me I think the Titan is probably the worst. A lot of money, time, and effort went into that project for the new one and no one’s buying them. So far their reliability has not impressed but more than anything the ride quality isn’t competitive. I think at some point in the future you’ll be able to grab one at fire sale prices. I do think the new gm twins could have done more interior wise but I understand why. Gm likes to rotate between mechanical changes then interior changes instead of all at once. The new diesel and turbo 4 are impressive but until the next scheduled refresh which rumor has is due in late 2021 or early 2022 is really needed if they want the big buck customers who are also looking at the ram limiteds and f150 platinum. I do like the new rams but without the e tuorques the milage is pretty bad and my bigger concern is seeing long term reliability with those units and the hybrid setup. FCA’s rep for reliable new tech is not exactly inspiring. The tundras only purpose is to last longer than any of the other trucks, so if your buying it for that reason cool, if not, I really don’t know why you would buy it. Unless you actually do some minor off roaring as stock, it’s the only one left without a stupidly low air dam. The f150s are a really good all around competitor but man the number of recalls those thing get hit with compared to the others does somewhat irk me. Also, they are usually the rich man’s option. Many point out that yes, they have more features than anyone else so it should cost more but dang, that’s a big difference in money for a limited vs a Denali or even the new rams. My concern is honestly is the truck market does cool down even a little, I think ford would feel it harder than any other. But that’s not the point here today. I am looking forward to seeing the new refreshed mid sizers as I think chevy will put that turbo four into them and the Ranger already sounds like a decently competitive product right now. I do hope toyota does redo the tundra at some point because it seems to me they’re the ones missing out the most. A competitive tundra should be a license to print money. As much as toyota and Nissan need to redo their midsizers, the associated cost to do so just makes it counter productive. Ford figured that out with the Ranger last time. Trying to refresh or redesign them to much makes them either unprofitable or to close in cost to a full size, plus a lot of these buyers are diy people, so the familiarity of the same product makes it an easy sell.

  • avatar
    AVT

    One thing that does interest me though is when gm redoes the full size SUV’s soon and they move to an independent rear suspension, theirs been talk about bringing an avalanche esque equivalent back to market as a GMC only unit but with a independent rear suspension and a lower towing capacity. Still leaving the Sierra and silverado with the solid rear axle which is fine. To me, that seems like a no brainer as most of the development cost would be associated with the new platform anyways and all your really doing is just removing the back part and sides on the roof of a Denali Yukon XL. Given that the market is hot for trucks right now (the opposite of when the first avalanche hit than the market cooling by the time the redesign came) I think it could actually fill a similar niche market similar to the way Nissan wanted to with the Titan but I think gm could actually do it profitably.

  • avatar
    AVT

    Oh I forgot about the ridgeline. That ones easy. You either get one or you don’t. I really don’t think of it as a truck but that’s kinda the point. You know right away if it’s for you or not. Theirs no cross shopping with that one really. And given how it shares platforms with other Hondas, it just an easy way for them to make a few extra bucks and not shudder a plant instead if the market cooled off more.

    • 0 avatar
      jfk-usaf

      I like the trunk in the bed concept and they get a lot of the small details right (esp Gen 1) but I just can’t stop yawning when I look at it. I feel like I’d just lose hope, maybe drag my feet a little when I walk and seriously consider mass transit if that was my daily ride.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      That would be my take as well. I think its an interesting idea and fills a niche but its not a truck. I wonder what Ridgeline buyers actually cross shop against… CUVs? For example people that were already looking at a Pilot?

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Those who have a Ridgeline absolutely love it; it offers the lightweight utility of a large CUV with the open bed of a pickup truck, so those big, dirty items they carry, like engine blocks, locomotive parts, etc, don’t mess up their interiors. The in-bed trunk offers effectively no-cost, lockable, outside storage for tools, cargo management and other clutter so the back seat area can be kept clean for passengers.

        In talking with several, they simply wouldn’t choose what they consider a “lesser” truck that doesn’t have what the Ridgeline offers, even though those “lesser” trucks have more cargo capacity and towing ability by weight.

        • 0 avatar
          jh26036

          As a G1 Ridgeline owner, I can’t imagine owning any other truck. Just a smart package for people like me that need it for light duty hauling and dump runs but still can act as a civilized family hauler. If I could buy a brand new G1 today, I would. I don’t really like the G2’s look.

          • 0 avatar
            Pleease

            Same. My 2007 has a lot of miles and ain’t pretty, but not sure I’d want the new one – too Piloty looking. Also the bed’s shallower a little longer, which would be nice.

    • 0 avatar
      white ridgeliner

      I have 2014 Ridgeline that I bought new shortly after i retired and moved to the lake. I had several DIY projects and needed a truck. I have had several trucks before – a full-size Dodge and a full-size Chevy back in the 80’s and then a Ford Ranger. I cross-shopped nearly all the trucks in the list above and didn’t consider a CUV or an SUV. I wanted four doors, reliability, driving comfort, reasonable fuel mileage. I didn’t need to tow a lot.
      What I liked about the Ridgeline was the size. The full-size crew-cab trucks were just too big. The Tacoma was uncomfortable for me and the Frontier was too basic. I never got around to looking at the Canyon/Colorado.
      Last time I was in the Honda dealership I test-drove the new Ridgeline and was disappointed. Styling was bland and interior not to my liking. When I’m ready to trade I’ll probably start by looking at the new Ranger first.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    I’ve never owned a truck, and now from sedan-height I can’t see a darn thing surrounded by them. Most that I see are used for city commuting, yet they are usually high-end models with the big engine, big wheels and tires etc. My question is this: Given the phenomenal capabilities of these trucks, when used lightly, do they never break, last forever???

  • avatar
    carguy67

    “Today we’re going to talk about trucks”

    For a second I thought I was in a Chevy commercial.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    No real criticism of any of the trucks. True the Frontier is outdated but it is a proven truck at a very competitive price–for many it is all they need. Frontier still manages to hold on to number 3 in midsize sales. Titan is far from having stellar sales but it is a good truck. Not that crazy about the new styled Silverado but it will still sell. Most truck owners are fiercely loyal to their own individual brands but most of today’s trucks are good.

  • avatar
    Zane Wylder

    Don’t get the appeal of the Ridgeline, last gen was “… WTH is it supposed to be?!” And the current is an Odyssey with a bed

    Nissan, they need to update the Frontier, give us the ones they got in other countries (seen a newer one in Aruba back in ’17)

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Titan would be my first choice, but honestly I think the Tundra is probably the worst new truck out there. At least Titan has seen some changes from the first gen trucks, Tundra is largely unchanged since it was introduced. Considering how much Ford, GM and FCA throw at their trucks in only a few years time, Toyota is way behind the curve. I understand the Tacoma’s appeal, I don’t get why you’d buy a Tundra. I say this as a Toyota owner.

    Not a fan of the second gen Ridgelines looks, but Honda must have sold enough to justify its existence. Honda is probably the most conservative company on taking chances, I think that speaks volumes about the Ridgeline.

    Yes, it’s an Odyssey with a bed. That’s all most of us need. A van that’s occasionally a truck (that you can hose out). The wife likes her minivans, she won’t entertain a Ridgeline though. And yes, I know you can put dirty and bulky stuff in a minivan, but cleaning it out is a pain.

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