By on September 14, 2018


Having already introduced a subscription service for its vehicles, Porsche decided to continue experimenting with alternatives to traditional car ownership. The luxury brand plans to launch two pilot programs on both U.S. coasts (condolences to America’s Heartland) aimed at encouraging drivers to get behind the wheel of a Porsche for brief periods of time.

The first, overseen by Porsche Cars North America, will test exclusively within the Atlanta area, near Porsche’s North American headquarters. Called Porsche Drive, the pilot program launched a few days ago and offers hourly to weekly rentals of new Porsche cars and SUVs. Meanwhile, a second joint venture with peer-to-peer car rental company Turo will service San Francisco and Los Angeles starting next month. That endeavor focuses on the sharing of already purchased (new and vintage) Porsche vehicles by owners inclined to share them.

Turo has roughly 300,000 car listings on its site and operates in almost 60 countries. It seems the company’s broad reach intrigued the German brand, which is a popular rental option on the company’s website.

“The collaboration with Porsche is a fantastic opportunity to reach a large number of enthusiasts via our marketplace,” said Andre Haddad, CEO of Turo. “I have always been a Porsche fan myself, and I enjoy the feeling of handing over the keys to my own 911 to another Porsche connoisseur for a short time.”

Haddad lists his car for $200 a day, making him eligible for a program that selects enthusiastic Porsche owners for special training at Porsche’s Experience Center in Los Angeles. On October 8th, Turo will create a page on its website listing all the specially selected “Porsche Hosts” in one place.

The Atlanta deal is a little different. Porsche Drive, which started in Europe, allows Atlanta-area customers to take out a new model for a few hours or a full week. Pricing is dependent on the vehicle’s value and time. For example, a four-hour rental of a 718 will set you back $269. But you can snag a 911 at just under $3,000 for a full week.

Drive’s European pricing, which should be indicative of the American pilot program, bundles the 718 and Macan together. The Cayenne is slightly more expensive with the Panamera another tier higher. The 911 will be the most expensive model available, at roughly $100 more than the cheapest options over a four-hour stretch — which is the minimum timeframe Porsche allows in the United States.

It’s a pretty crummy contract if you’re looking to own a Porsche, though it’s not a bad deal if you just want to enhance your social media presence with a fancy car you can’t actually afford. Four hours is more than enough time to take some photos of yourself with the car and record videos of yourself overtaking on the highway. It’s sure to make your friends jealous, at least until they figure out what happened. But it also might be a good way to make some pocket change while introducing new customers to what is has to offer. Two days with a Porsche 911 or 718 Boxster is more than enough time to become enamored with it.

[Images: Porsche]

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13 Comments on “Porsche to Strangers: Borrow Our Cars...”


  • avatar
    jmo2

    I wish every company did that. It’s hard to get a good sense of a car on a brief test drive. I’d gladly pay to be able to take one for a week when I’m trying to decide between two cars.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I don’t see the reason for the snark. People showed off their cars long before social media. Does the author think people bought Countaches to remain conspicuous?

    Anyway I like this plan. I’d love to get to really drive and experience a Porsche, but I have zero interest in actually owning one over a long period of time. These plans, especially coupled with their “driving experiences” (my word, a 911 at Road Atlanta? Sign me up ASAP!) seems to distill everything great from everything awful about the Porsche experience. I’d wager the cost per mile for this is not far off from actual ownership. Hopefully they expand this program across the country.

  • avatar
    ACCvsBig10

    Wouldnt it be cheaper just to sign up for the porche passport for $3500 you get the car for a whole month than just a week.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    As a 911 owner, I think these people are nuts. I barely let my wife drive mine, let alone some stranger on Turo, :) If you need the money that badly that you have to rent out your Porsche, you probably can’t afford to own a Porsche. Or if this is a business where the Porsche is purchased for the sole purpose of renting it out on Turo, it’s bordering on fraud, IMO, since a future buyer of your used Porsche won’t know it was essentially a rental.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      You’ve got a point, although all buyers down the line don’t know if they bought a rental either (unless the state titles it as rental and I don’t know if that happens anywhere).

      • 0 avatar
        I_like_stuff

        Well at least Carfax will tell you (most of the time at least) if it’s a fleet. But as far as Carfax is concerned, a Turo owner is just a regular private owner, even if the car is rented out 20 times a month.

    • 0 avatar
      jh26036

      Easy fix, don’t buy used cars.

      If you can’t afford a new one, then you should get a thorough inspection. Buying used cars will always have risk. Is it fraud to fix your crashed car outside of insurance and you don’t see it on Carfax?

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      You drive a 911, not a 250 GTO lol. It’s just a car.

      • 0 avatar
        philipwitak

        re: “You drive a 911, not a 250 GTO lol. It’s just a car.”

        i just stopped by my local porsche dealer [san diego] a couple of days ago. new 911s start at just over $91k, but prices go up rather quickly from there. dealership had one “classic project gold” model with a tag of $286k. also had a couple of 911 R coupés that listed somewhere north of $330k [each], plus a handful of 911 gt3s even more expensive and a 911 gt2 @ $350k.

        i seriously doubt that anyone fortunate enough to purchase one of those referenced in my paragraph above would be renting it out on turo. but to make a blanket statement like yours is more than a little misleading.

        if you have not had the pleasure, i suggest you visit your local dealer and take one – any one of them, even the least expensive – for ride, and see for yourself.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    I’d love to rent a 1984 944 for a few hours just to remind myself of how wet and slow it was.

  • avatar
    James2

    Anyone have a 928 they wouldn’t mind tossing the keys to me? I promise not to play “U-boat commander”.

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