By on August 27, 2018

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe

Calling something “unremarkable” is usually a bad thing. No one likes being called unmemorable or bland. But when it comes to crossovers, which are primarily meant to haul lots of people and stuff, it’s a term that can easily be used in a complimentary manner. After all, few people are looking for crossovers that drive like tall sports cars, and no one wants something so bad that it’s remarkable.

Not to mention that only a few crossover buyers want or need significant off-road capability – and only a few crossovers really offer that, anyway (which hasn’t stopped brands, including Hyundai, from touting their crossovers’ “off road” ability. More on that later).

If you’re selling a crossover in 2018, all you really need to do is come up with something comfortable that isn’t terribly boring to drive. Something that has all the right safety and convenient features, has a price in line with the competition, and won’t require a stop at every gas pump.

Hyundai has most of that covered here.

(Full disclosure: Hyundai flew me to Park City, Utah and put me up in a hotel room that was uncomfortably close to my condo in size. The company also offered me sunglasses I didn’t take, fed me several great meals, and offered up good beer and wine. One meal included a whiskey tasting.­)

Naming conventions have changed – the Santa Fe now seats five. That was the domain of the old Santa Fe Sport. The long wheelbase, seven-seat model remains for one more model year, now called XL. It’s a carryover from the previous generation.

So the old five-seat Santa Fe Sport is now the Santa Fe, and the old seven-seat Santa Fe is now the Santa Fe XL, pending the arrival of an all-new, three-row, eight-passenger vehicle for 2020 that will have a new name. Still with me? Good.

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe

Hyundai touts the new Santa Fe’s styling as “more SUV-like,” stating that the new duds are a reaction to consumer perception that the previous generation was too minivan-like. I’m not sure it really screams “SUV,” but it is a looker. It doesn’t necessarily look more rugged, but it does look more muscular and sportier, with some details that remind me of the brand’s subcompact Kona (such as the thin upper headlamps).

I also like the grille, which is being seen across the lineup, and the thinned-out taillamps also look sleek. I am torn on what Hyundai has done with the rear turn-signal lamps – they’ve been moved to the lower rear fascia. On the one hand, I applaud the company for doing something different; on the other, I worry that they may be hard to see.

Inside, I like the storage shelf ahead of the shifter, and as always, I appreciate large knobs for radio volume and tuning, as well as HVAC. I continue to dislike the trend of infotainment screens that look like tack-ons atop the center stack. At least control buttons are easy to find and read and laid out in a logical fashion, although some of the plastics were harder than I’d like in a vehicle pushing $40K in price. I dug the available upscale headliner fabric, and count me as a fan of the quirky design of the in-door speakers that graced our Ultimate-spec vehicle, as well.

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe

I found the front seats plenty comfortable during our nearly 200-mile tour of the Park City area, and the rear seat offers up enough legroom that I was able to fit my long legs without too much trouble, even with the front seat pushed fairly far back. Cargo space behind the second-row seats falls short of the Edge or Kia Sorento, but at 35.9 cubic feet it’s still respectable.

Hyundai tossed us the keys of a fully loaded Ultimate trim with the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder, eight-speed automatic, and all-wheel drive. The 2.0T (235 horsepower, 260 lb-ft) proved to be merely adequate when it comes to passing punch, although Utah’s elevation likely sapped some power. The transmission was mostly unheard from, but it did occasionally offer up an oddly harsh shift. The Santa Fe struggled a bit on a twisty road that climbed the side of a mountain, as a bit of lag from the throttle didn’t help (again, elevation was a factor).

Ride and handling proved a better picture, at least on-road. The Santa Fe struck the right balance between soft and stiff for a comfortable experience. Hyundai finally dialed up steering that felt connected to something, and the “Sport” drive mode livened things up. The only downside with the steering was the lane-keep assist – it tended to tug at the wheel unnaturally, and it worked against me when I intentionally tried hugging the shoulder to apex a corner. Thankfully, a flick of a switch easily turns it off.

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe

Our drive did include some long stretches of gravel road, and there was some washboard action from the suspension – MacPherson strut with aluminum knuckle up front, multilink with aluminum carrier in the rear – especially under braking.

The Santa Fe also did its business quietly. Road, wind, and tire noise were kept to a minimum.

Drive modes include Comfort, Sport, Eco, and Smart – that last one analyzes how you drive and blends the other three together, picking the best one for the circumstances.

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe

Our drive finished with an off-road hill climb that was a bit more challenging than one would expect to subject a Santa Fe to (but still way too easy for, say, a Jeep). The crossover did just fine, though almost no Santa Fe buyer will subject their crossover to a trail even half as tough as this mostly easy one.

There’s another engine on offer – a 2.4-liter four-cylinder that makes 185 horsepower and 178 lb-ft of torque, also paired with an eight-speed automatic. Like with the 2.0T, it’s available with front- or all-wheel drive.

My time in the 2.4 was brief, but it felt louder and thrashier than the smooth 2.0T. It also felt especially gutless in Utah’s elevation. Flooring it at one point seemed to do nothing. If urgency matters to your driving at all, opt for the 2.0T.

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe

The 2019 Santa Fe starts at $25,500, and key standard features include Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, forward collision-avoidance assist, blind-spot collision-avoidance assist, rear cross-traffic collision-warning assist, lane-keep assist, driver-attention warning, pre-wiring for towing, smart cruise control, high-beam assist, LED accent lights and DRLs, chrome accent for the grille, and dual front and rear USB ports. One other key standard feature is “safe-exit assist” – which warns rear-seat passengers about approaching cars before they open the door, and can also prevent the passenger from opening the door.

The previous graph describes the SE trim. Pop up to SEL and you’re adding on things like a 7-inch TFT/LCD instrument cluster, selectable drive modes, remote keyless entry and push-button start, power driver seat, heated sideview mirrors, heated front seats, fog lamps, power windows, satellite radio, and Hyundai’s Blue Link connected car app. This trim will set you back $27,600 before D and D ($985 across the board).

Next trim up is SEL Plus. That adds rear-occupant warning (an alert that Blue Link sends to your phone if you leave a kid or pet behind. It works by sensing motion.), park distance warning, dual-zone climate control, 18-inch wheels, hands-free liftgate, roof rails, sliding second-row seats, leather wrapping for the steering wheel and shift knob, and premium audio system. This one stickers for $29,800.

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe

Pop up to $32,600 for the Limited, and you’re getting panoramic sunroof, LED interior lights, LED headlights and taillights, LED fog lamps, turn-signal markers in the side mirrors, leather seats, and power passenger seat, among other goodies. Spend the extra $1,600 for the 2.0T and you add a trailering package and 19-inch wheels.

Willing to drop $35,450 on an Ultimate? You add a surround-view camera, 8-inch touchscreen with nav, head-up display, wireless device charging, heated steering wheel, seat memory for the driver’s seat, lumbar support and cushion extension for the driver’s seat, cooled front seats, heated rear seats, 115-volt power outlet, and rain-sensing wipers. Spring another $1,650 for the 2.0T and you’ll add the trailering package and 19-inch wheels. There are other accessories available, such as carpeted floor mats.

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe

All-wheel drive is $1,700 across the board, and you can only get the turbo four on Limited and Ultimate models. Hyundai told us they’d guess that the SEL and SEL Plus will be the volume-selling trims.

Fuel economy is a sore subject – an all-wheel drive 2.0T checks in at 19 mpg city/24 mpg highway/21 combined. That’s not as good as the Ford Edge 2.0-liter turbo with AWD (20/27/23) or the Nissan Murano with V6 and all-wheel drive (21/28/24). With front-wheel drive, the 2.4-liter Santa Fe returns 22/29/25 and the 2.0T 20/25/22. The 2.4 with AWD is listed at 21/27/23.

Price-wise, the Santa Fe acquits itself well against the Murano, and can undercut the Edge, depending on options. It even lines up well against lower-trim Honda Pilots, although that crossover offers three-row seating.

Hyundai spent a lot of time in the press briefing trying to convince the assembled media that the Santa Fe is now more “SUV like” than “minivan like.” As stated before, that means Hyundai felt consumers labelled the previous-gen vehicle as too much like a minivan, with all the negative connotations that entails. Whatever – a sportier look and the ability to climb a rutted, rocky trail up a hill doesn’t change the fact that the Santa Fe is a crossover, just like its competition.

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe

Which is fine. Hyundai’s marketers do have a job to do, of course, and consumer perception matters. But consumers can also be silly. Who cares if a crossover appears “rugged” or like a lifted sporty hot hatch? With some exceptions aside (the Ford Edge ST, Jeeps, et cetera), most crossover buyers want something that gets people and cargo from point A to point B without being boring to drive, having a chintzy interior, costing too much, or sucking down fuel – like I said above.

The Santa Fe does most of those things well. It could use more power (although as noted, things may be better closer to sea level), its fuel economy isn’t above average, and you have to spend over $30K to get the best engine of the two. So it’s not perfect.

That said, pricing is par for the class, the ride and handling aspects are perfectly fine for most of the driving most of us do, the styling is eye-pleasing inside and out, and the cabin is perfectly comfortable. Safety and convenience tech is right in line with class expectations, if not exceeding them.

Instead of trying to sell us on the idea of the Santa Fe being an old-school SUV, Hyundai should instead push it as one of the better five-seat crossovers out there, at least for the mainstream buyer who gives not a whit about sportiness or ruggedness. It’s not remarkable in many ways, good or bad, but that’s fine. It does the assigned task well, and for many, that’s what matters most.

[Images © 2018 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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81 Comments on “2019 Hyundai Santa Fe First Drive – Remarkably Unremarkable...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Wouldn’t this compete more with the Escape as opposed to the Edge? It seems fine for what it is, but placed in the right category it’s a bit pricey

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    “Willing to drop $35,450 on an Ultimate?”

    Car and Driver just ran a review of this same car, and whined that the interior materials aren’t up to Audi levels on a car that finishes six thousand dollars before the Q5 starts. Even car journalists don’t seem to be able to shake the “I drove a beater Accent when I was in high school so everything Hyundai makes will suck forever” curse.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Turn signals in the rear bumper???? Don’t the designers realize that most of these vehicles are driven in traffic where your rear bumper is hidden by the hood of the car following you too closely?? It also puts the emergency flashers at ground level and decrease their distance visibility. This is a mistake, a big one.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    The never ending why.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    CUV reviews leave me numb, like reading a health insurance statement. or a technical document. There’s so little soul (unless it’s a Kia! – joke) that my eyes begin to glaze over.

  • avatar
    arach

    Seems like an oversight that the Santa Fe IS available with a third row?

    we’re actually quite excited about the third row option, which is only available with the diesel. I’d love your speculation as to WHY the third row is only available with the diesel.

    I can only imagine its because the diesel requires different axles which can support the weight.

    Anyway, My wife is really hoping to buy the three row santa fe (NOT THE SANTA FE XL) which is supposed to be out this year.

  • avatar
    redapple

    GAS

    Good catch. I didnt notice the rear turn signals.
    Not acceptable – agreed!

    I wouldnt buy. But they ll sell loads.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    First picture in the article, look in the space between the headlight and the A-pillar.

    There’s a pair of hard horizontal lines from the corner of the headlight that don’t line up with the horizontal line of the hood cut, which curves up and is intersected by another horizontal line for some reason between the pillar base and front fender, stacked with another horizontal line on the top of the hood. All within the space of about 5 inches.

    This din is but a small example of why I will never take hunday seriously.

    • 0 avatar
      turbo_awd

      Honestly, that doesn’t bother me much at all.. But then again, I’ve always been “go before show”, so I’m more focused on the engine / transmission of the cars I’m interested in, not so much styling cues. To each his own..

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “No one likes being called unmemorable or bland.” 90% of the industry are bland appliances.

    • 0 avatar
      IBx1

      No they’re not, they’re aDveNTurOUS cRoSSOveRs with GroUNd CLeaRanCe and AlL wHEel DriVE

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You’re right. But 85% of the stuff made back in the day was bland appliances.

      What I don’t get is the price on these things (or pickups, for that matter.)

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Exactly. Like a 4 cylinder automatic Sonata of 10 years ago is such a stunning driver’s car that handles like its on rails and sprints to 60 in 2.4 seconds and OMG the buyers of this desroy that proud heritage. Sheesh.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Even 30-40 years ago, the overwhelming majority of stuff that got sold was bland. And as a bonus, the overwhelming majority of all that bland stuff was also junk.

          I think there’s a tendency to over-romanticize how good the good old days were. After all, even the slowest, most ponderous, most generic current CUV could probably blow the doors off something people get nostalgic about, and run flawlessly for 8-10 years to boot.

          Far as I’m concerned, the golden age of cars is right freakin’ now…CUV craze and all.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            I would drive a Santa Fe for the rest of my life to keep from driving a 1989 Sonata.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I think your chances of finding a ’89 Sonata that hasn’t rusted into a family reunion with planet Earth are about as good as me getting a hot date with Jennifer Lawrence.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Build quality and durability killed them outside the rust belt. I drove one that style, it was truly a miserable crap box. I can’t see how they sold one.

            If you want to think very highly of a Chevy Corsica, drive it back to back with one of those roaches.

            Btw, the job I’m on is supposed to be through today. But, they also said that Friday, Saturday and Sunday LOL but each time they ask do I want to come in the next day, I say yes.

            I was planning to buy a 1996 Toyota Tercel with 109k on it, 2 door, grey bumpers, 4 speed stick, extremely clean and well kept for $1200. Of course it sold before I could. I’m working 12 hours a day and commuting 88 miles each way, so not a lot of time to go look at cars.

            My idea is to get a work car, something to take on these jobs and not worry about getting in it all filthy, leaving it in the contractor parking lot, piling miles on it, etc. The Tercel was more than perfect for the task. Oh well.

            Only thing else decent in my self-imposed price range within reasonable driving distance is a 2003 Focus ZX3 5 speed with 130k, same price. By 2003, the had the bugs worked out (like wheel bearings etc), the Zetec and the 5 speed are a reliable combo, and not a bad driver, either.

            I’m also thinking about picking up a 1982 Prelude. Always loved the first gen. Its to be a project car to drive when I’m at home (off these jobs). Of course its a stick and has a sunroof. They’re asking way too much ($1500) considering it hasn’t ran in 5 years since the previous owner could no longer drive and left it in the garage. I’m thinking if I can get it for like $800, that’s plenty of room to fix it up and not be in it too deep.

            Needless to say, expanding my fleet has been on my mind, as usual lol.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I don’t think there is anything *wrong* with building a mass market appliance-vehicle. That’s what some people are after.

    However, it’s $37K starting for an AWD 2.0T version and $28K for a base AWD. That seems like a lot of cheese for something so forgettable.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      This is Hyundai, so the blue-light pricing will commence soon.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Design-wise, the new Santa Fe is a lot less “forgettable” than other CUVs and the SL trim of the Murano (w/ AWD) starts at $40.1k.

      The Platinum trim starts at $43.8k.

      People need to keep up w/ the cost of vehicles these days, esp. the loaded versions w/ all the latest amenities and tech (and the Santa Fe has more than most other mainstream vehicles).

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        But Nissan doesn’t force you into the top trims to get the higher output engine.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          That’s b/c the Murano is only available w/ the V6.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            That’s my point. The Santa Fe should have the 2.0T as standard equipment the way the Murano does the 3.5L as its only engine.

            Instead you are stuck with 185 horsepower and 178 lb-ft of torque until you go over $35K.

            I understand this segment is not made up of speed demons, but I think comparison shoppers are going to be able to feel that difference.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Not much of a “point” when Nissan is the outlier (they like to think of the Murano as being more of a “luxury” vehicle, just as the Lexus ES is only available w/ a V6).

            The Edge, Sorento and Outback are available w/ 2 engine choices, and the upcoming Chevy Blazer and Honda Passport will likely do as well.

            And again, both engines in the SF will be replaced by a new 2.5L in both NA and turbo-form and then there’s also the diesel option.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            But the Edge’s base engine is rated 245/275 and the Sorento offers the 290hp V6 as low as the $31K LX trim.

            Then what’s a naturally-aspirated 2.5L going to make? 205hp?

            It sounds like the Santa Fe is going to remain one of the lower powered vehicles in its class.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Likely will see the V6 dropped from the Sorento for its next gen model as it no longer will be the “top dog” with the impending Telluride; Hyundai had the 3-row Santa Fe for those who wanted a V6.

            Esp. as the turbo-4 will increase in displacement to 2.5L and the V6 will increase in displacement to 3.5L.

            Not disagreeing that the current base engine is underpowered, but 200+ HP w/ the new 2.5L should be adequate for certain types of buyers.

  • avatar
    AK

    Yuck.

    Seems like it does absolutely nothing above average. What a great way to waste $30,000.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Santa Fe Turbo-4 gives you near V-6 power with sub-V-6 fuel economy, and the added bonus of less pleasant noise, more vibration, and lower reliability. How bad is it? 21 combined is the same rating as an F-150 4X4 with 2.7 V-6.

  • avatar
    RHD

    Time for nominations for the new SUV’s name. Let’s have a look at a map of New Mexico, since that’s what the Hyundai folks do.
    Since they thought Equus and K900 were such good ideas, “Gallup” should be on their list for consideration.
    Aztec has already been taken… Socorro rolls of the tongue very nicely. If it’s for your average middle-aged American woman, then Elephant Butte would be very appropriate.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    WTF THIS REVIEW IS TOO POSITIVE/TOO NEGATIVE! I HATE IT! I hate reviewers who drive the car in x situation. I hate reviewers who don’t even drive the car in x situation.

    What, are you a paid shill for Hyundai?
    What, are you still under the impression of a 1986 Excel?

    This is a terrible car because reasons.
    This is an amazing car because reasons.

    (Did I get them all?)

  • avatar
    chrishs2000

    Oh NHTSA. Brake fluid must be amber, hazard button has to be physical, but turn signals can be buried at the bottom of the bumper where no one can see them? Okay…

    • 0 avatar
      Jerome10

      Don’t forget that the bulb color on that blinker can be red and also can override the brake lamp. And I believe it is still based on area of the bulb and not brightness, so we don’t get nice bright, minimalist LED blinkers either.

      Also, headlights that are only allowed 1 dim and 1 bright setting, meaning all those fancy adaptable headlamp systems in Europe (they’re incredible) can’t be sold here.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    So, if I get one without nav, where do you put your Garmin?

    I know, use your phone, but so far the Garmin has been much better than Google or Mapquest on our android phones and it doesn’t such the battery dry and we can use the BT for music.

  • avatar
    cammark

    Every new design Hyundai puts out reaffirms my theory that their styling department literally just browse press photos of other vehicles from the past 5 years, cut-and-paste the elements they like onto their new platform, then 15 minutes of Photoshop blur tool later and their presenting the new design to top brass.

    Honda’s chrome uni-brow: check
    Jeep Cherokee headlights: check
    Lexus “spindle” grille: check (but paint the bumper to avoid patent…)
    Subaru Ascent sides: check (door panel shape, roof line and windows included)
    GMC grille mesh: check (but scale it up for more more-ness)

    If that’s not enough the rectangular exhaust tip (and matching cutout) I think are a handsome feature IF and ONLY IF dual outlets are present! It draws your attention (not in a good way) to the faux diffuser under the faux skid plate, stacked under the faux black bumper all to trick your eyes so you don’t realize it’s just a short mini-van with a higher rear load height.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      They really copied the just-hit-the-streets Subaru Ascent? Wow, Hyundai engineers are clearly the best in the world. It usually takes other automakers a couple of years at least to develop a fully redesigned product (take it from frozen design sketch to an actual car in production), these guys did it in a few months! Bravo Hyundai!

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      This thing may as well be a Ferrari 250 GT California compared to the Ascent. That thing looks like the fake car that is always on the cover of craptastic Pep Boys accessories.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        “Introducing the new Mediocrity! Now from Subaru. Because Love.”

        https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=%23&ved=2ahUKEwjTzOvB7Y3dAhVQOK0KHVMVAQMQwqsBMAB6BAgJEAU&usg=AOvVaw0VTJzWxrN8ZFOD4xbU2nov

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      1. Numerous automakers have done the “uni-brow” look and Hyundai has far better implemented the look on the Santa Fe than Honda has on any model.

      2. Sorry, but Citroen was doing the split headlight-thing before Jeep and other automakers have followed (Chevy, Skoda, etc.) as it’s better to have the headlights lower for better illumination of the road and less blinding of oncoming traffic.

      Plus, the look is far better implemented on the Santa Fe than the derpy looking Cherokee.

      3. The SF still has Hyundai hexagonal-shaped grille (just w/ some sculpturing on the side) – which other automakers followed.

      As for the “spindle grille” – Hyundai used that on the Nuvis concept before Lexus started using it, but thankfully never got beyond concept stage.

      4. The Ascent is about as bland and generic as CUVs come; only rivaled by the Pilot. Says something when the Highlander is a less bland-looking CUV.

      5. Uhh, automakers have been using “mesh”/chainlink grille treatments since like forever.

      Going back to #4, putting aside that designs are frozen about 3 years (if not earlier) before a model heads to production, Subaru started production of the Ascent in Indiana May of this year.

      The Santa Fe had been on sale in Korea since February.

      Also, the greenhouse of the Ascent looks more like the old 3-row Santa Fe (now the XL) than the new 2-row.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        So Hyundai went forward in time to steal the Subaru design? Damn, even better than I thought! Holy shishties. Gotta give it to them crafty Koreans. They’ll stop at nothing, not even the known laws of space and time, to steal generic design cues that could pass for darn near any CUV.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Hyundai designers did a good job w/ the new Santa Fe inside and out (can’t say the same for the Elantra’s facelift).

      Basically 2 issues.

      Needs more power (esp. the base engine) and better fuel efficiency – which should be addressed when the 2.4L and 2.0T are replaced by the Theta III 2.5L and 2.5T.

      Another is kinda nitpicky, but for doing a pretty good job w/ the interior in most spots (a lot of soft-touch areas), seems like an oversight to have that hard plastic strip on the interior door panel (not sure if its just on the lower trims) when there’s soft touch on both sides of the strip.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Park City is an ambitious setting for a remarkably unremarkable badge. You won’t get any traction or attention in that place driving around in a gray Hyundai.

    I thought turbochargers compensated for most of the power loss at elevation. Maybe this engine just isn’t enough for a porky crossover.

    This would be a hard sell for me given the engine options and their fuel economy ratings. $34K for the cheapest 2.0T. Just get a Pilot EX for the same price, give up some baubles, and have an overachieving drivetrain.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I’ll be honest, I kinda just skimmed the article.

    That’s a good summary of my level of interest in cars like this.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Worth noting:

    Hyundai did say in their initial press release that a diesel version of this car is forthcoming, and that it (and it alone) will get a third row.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Yeah I read that too and found it hard to believe. Diesel only for the 3-row? Even when so many people act like they have to have a 3rd row whether they need it or not?

  • avatar
    robc123

    Rented this did 2400km in it (majority of my SUV experience is in a Alfa and Macan GTS)- it’s not bad- seats are comfortable, interior is good, functional.

    The engine/trans/suspension are the weak spots- for huge hills and passing power, angry bees come out and for all the noise, not much happens- but its a NA 4 cylinder- what do you expect. Handling, pretty bad as well- angela’s forest for example. But a A-B people mover? yes if you can get a killer lease on this.

    Looks wise I don’t think its that bad. If it was my money and wanted a cheap SUV- I would shop the Mazda CX-5 to compare.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    I drove this on Saturday and I find it much better than it’s competition in every respect except for power. I’d like closer to 300hp. For $39k you are getting a great deal of content, heated and cooled seats, 360 degree camera, loads of safety system including a motion sensor for the back seat that will alert you if you have left a child or animal in the car (I still find that mind boggling but I’m glad manufacturers are starting to add the feature) heated rear seats, wireless charging, full color HUD, Carplay and AA, huge sun roof and so forth.

    I had an 03 Murano and this is about the same size. While I’d like the Edge ST for the power that is going to be mid-upper 40s and will still be on a dated platform with a poor interior.

    I’m interested in Hyundai’s replacement for the 3 row Santa Fe or if Hyundai comes out with a Santa Fe N.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Doubt we’ll a Santa Fe-N; something that size/heavy goes against what the N-division is gunning for.

      When it comes to N-variants of Hyundai CUVs, likely will be limited to the Kona and Tucson.

  • avatar
    V16

    The upcoming Cadillac XT4 has an unexpected rival.
    Who would have guessed a Hyundai?
    At $35,000, the Ultimate edition is a strong contender.

  • avatar
    Lefty54

    You have to really work to make a front end that ugly. And the back end is even worse.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    to nitpick, the frontal double chin makes the Santa Fe look like it has coke bloat. Should’ve kept a more chiseled look.

    though in red the double chin looks more subtle than in gray

  • avatar
    300zx_guy

    >> and count me as a fan of the quirky design of the in-door speakers that graced our Ultimate-spec vehicle

    just a bit of friendly constructive criticism (which also applies to many posts on many sites)… If you call out a particular piece of styling in the article, how about including a picture? Its not like this is a magazine and you can only fit a certain number of pictures.

    Otherwise, a pretty thorough review.


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  • thegamper: Pure speculation on my part, but I would think as more luxury automakers get EV’s to market with...
  • Rocket: I don’t see it. For one, it’s a lot of money to spend. But more important, Toyota is all about...

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