By on July 19, 2018

Image: Tim Healey/TTAC

What’s something that’s really, really old, yet continues to attract a steady flow of buyers year after year? You could say the Colt 1911 and its knock-offs, and you’d be right — in fact, an old American pistol that packs a punch and never really saw the need to improve in a major way seems like an apt comparison to what we’re actually talking about.

When it first appeared on sales charts in May of 2008, the Dodge Challenger was pure throwback. A cherry to place on top of the brash, retro sundae Chrysler had constructed out of its 300 and Charger sedans. In case you missed it, last month was the 10-year anniversary of the reborn Challenger’s first full month of American sales; the TTAC crew deferred its celebrations until July 4th.

Taking a look at the sales performance of its domestic, um, challengers, it seems like the two-door Dodge might outlive us all. Will the last American passenger car on the market ride into the sunset with a supercharged roar and two smoking rear tires?

You’d be forgiven for thinking that. In terms of volume, the Challenger takes second place in the pony car battle with 37,367 units sold over the first half of 2018. But while the first-place Ford Mustang’s 42,428 YTD sales modestly trounces its FCA rival, trajectory counts for something.

Mustang GT Performance Pack Level 2

Mustang volume fell 4.9 percent, year to date, despite June providing the Blue Oval with a 19.6 percent year-over-year uptick for the month. The Challenger, on the other hand, saw sales rise 3.3 percent, year over year. Over 2018’s first half, Challenger volume rose 4.1 percent.

It’s worth noting that Mustang sales are far more fickle than that of the Challenger’s. To look at the last 15 years in Mustang sales is to look at twin peaks. From 166,530 units sold in 2006 to just 66,623 three years later, Mustang sales rebounded to 122,349 in 2015, only to fall again, to less than 82,000 in 2017.

The Mustang’s a yo-yo. That’s what you get when you actually redesign your model once in a while.

Anyway, if Fiat Chrysler keeps this up, it just might find itself surpassing last year’s tally, which wasn’t far off 2015’s high water mark. That year, after seven years of steadily rising volume, Americans took home 66,365 of the LX-platform coupes. The following year saw 64,478 Challengers leave the dealer lot. And 2017? FCA unloaded 64,537 of ’em. That’s amazingly consistent volume for a heavy, two-door passenger car that isn’t exactly the freshest thing around.

Of course, it’s one only a few vehicles where you’ll need all five fingers on one hand to count the engine options, with no electric assistance in sight. Only the addition, years back, of a 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 base engine and eight-speed automatic in the lineup gave any nod towards environmental stewardship. And yet the Challenger, a decade on, manages to buck two trends: our simultaneous, self-defeating thirst for both SUVs and ultra-green driving (the latter of which is mainly just an OEM rivalry spurred by rosy predictions and fear of government).

For the coming model year, the Challenger Hellcat gains an additional 10 ponies (to 717 hp), while the semi-Demon Reyere variant leaves the gate with 797 hp on tap. It’s amazing seeing the amount of mileage FCA gets out of adding power to an ancient model.

But you’re forgetting something, you say. What about the Chevrolet Camaro?

Image: GM

Can’t forget that, though many buyers already have. The Camaro’s first-half volume stands at 25,380 vehicles, which represents a 30.6 percent drop from the same period last year. We can only average GM’s quarterly sales reports over three months, but it returns a figure of 4,529 — meaning June likely saw a year-over-year sales dip. Sadly for Chevy, the sixth-generation lookalike Camaro, even with the addition of the 650 hp ZL1, hasn’t set sales on fire.

Its introduction led to a steady decline for the model which, to its credit, still posted sales volume of over 67,000 vehicles in 2017.

For 2019, the model undergoes a trim-dependent styling refresh (Turbo 1LE seen above) and makes four-cylinder power available on more variants, possibly luring in buyers interested in extra features and flash, but no additional dash. To beat the Challenger in full-year 2018 sales, those new faces will need to prove very popular.

[Images: © 2018 Tim Healey/TACC, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

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71 Comments on “Pony Car Check-up: If Only Our Lives Were As Stable As the Dodge Challenger’s Sales...”


  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I imagine the Camaro’s sales will nosedive when people see what it looks like for 2019.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Well if we could get a Camaro based on the Generation 2 styling instead of these endless rifts on the 1st gen car…

      You can even do a take on the split bumper models. Cars don’t really have bumpers anymore anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Agreed, that Camaro is u-g-l-y. Makes the Supra look downright pleasant.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      The Alpha platform, it goes without saying, had been an unmitigated disaster.
      GM should have done an extensive rework of the Zeta platform and gave us a better car.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      I think you’re going to be proven correct. I don’t understand what GM/Chevy is thinking with the………styling they are going with. The Camaro is a great car in a hideous body, and IMHO, it has been since it’s reintroduction. And it’s useless as far as doing anything else but carrying two people. No trunk space, useless back seat (My friend’s dogs don’t even like it in his car, lots of sighing and figeting), and it’s just ugly.

  • avatar
    agent534

    Challenger isn’t a pony car, it is more like a personal luxury coupe closer to a 70’s monte carlo. It is far too big to be considered a pony car. Muscle car for sure tho.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      At least it has a useable back seat (compared to its competition.)

      If I wasn’t going to be wrestling with a rear facing child seat again very soon, I would have the Challenger on my short list of vehicles to test drive. (For some reason a two door version of the LX platform is more appealing to me than a 4 door version.)

      • 0 avatar
        BobinPgh

        Wrestling with a car seat? Boy that sounds like loads of fun. See what you miss by having the kids again? Besides, don’t you see enough kids all day?

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        And that’s the “secret” to the Challenger’s continued sales success, despite continuing on an old, heavy platform.

        More so than the cartoonish looks, what has really hurt Camaro sales is the switch to the Alpha platform (the “gift” that keeps on giving) which basically rendered the rear seats unusable.

        The reason why CUVs have surpassed sedans in desirability is due to the increase in utility the body-style offers.

        Along those lines, sedans/coupes that offer LESS utility (compromised interior room) than the competition lose out.

        When it comes to driving dynamics/handling, the Challenger is a boat compared to Camaro, but even for pony cars, the majority of buyers place a greater premium on passenger room/utility.

        Things likely won’t improve for the Camaro until it moves over to the Alpha 2 platform – which underpins the larger CT5 sedan (compared to the ATS) and presumably CT5 coupe.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    FCA needs to put the 5.7L back in the AWD models. The sales figures indicate otherwise though. I’ll have to get a Pentastar or move to Arizona when my AWD R/T is finally toast.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Was there ever a HEMI AWD Challenger?

      I’d say it couldn’t be done, but they have no problem putting that combo in the other LX cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        No, I have an AWD Charger R/T. They stopped the 5.7L in AWD models when they switched to the 8 speed transmission. This is the first model year for the AWD Chally.

        • 0 avatar
          whynot

          IIRC there are packaging issues with fitting the 5.7L, 8 speed transmission, and AWD equipment all in. Hence why AWD went V6 only on the Charger when the new transmission was introduced and why the Challenger never got it (AWD introduced after or with new transmission).

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Oh, you’re right. Jaguar / Land Rover had a similar issue when they decided to start offering AWD. It didn’t fit in the V8-equipped (previous-gen) XF and current XJ. That’s why the AWD was V6-only.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      FCA needs to put the 5.7L back in the AWD models.

      Can’t. Not enough room for the 5.7L and the god-like 8-speed.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Don’t worry, just ignore those recall notices and soon the insurance company will buy you another one. Might be hard to get that image of charred Charger out of your head, though. Along with the image of a Taurus SHO whoopin’ dat azz.

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        Well John, maybe Ford can show Chrysler how a reliable full size RWD sedan should be done.

        The Taurus is so good, Ford is killing it to make it a limited edition collectible, lol. Also good luck getting parts for that SHO when it’s 5 years old. My local Ford dealer couldn’t find a bunch of my Ford’s parts like when my steering wheel wiring harness burnt up, when it was 6 years old.

    • 0 avatar
      cardave5150

      A good friend of mine, who lives in Arizona, went to get a new 300 a couple years ago. All they had at the SEVERAL dealers he visited were AWD models. He ended up buying one, insisting he needed it for the couple times a year he drives up to Sedona and finds sleet on the roads. Seems ridiculous to me.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    ” It’s amazing seeing the amount of mileage FCA gets out of adding power to an ancient model.”

    Very disingenuous statement.

    • 0 avatar
      pdog_phatpat

      A very true statement. I guess you could go with if it aint broke etc etc etc. Maybe thats the story you and all the rest are going with. The thing is ancient. FCA is scared to do anything with this platform…based on their success with other hits such as the Dart and 200.
      FCA-JUNK JUNK JUNK

  • avatar
    ajla

    Guys…

    I’m buying this.

    caranddriver.com/news/miss-out-on-a-demon-the-2019-dodge-challenger-rt-scat-pack-1320-is-your-consolation-prize

  • avatar
    gmichaelj

    I think the key here is consistent product image. This car looked good when introduced and FCA didn’t get insecure about needing to update the look.

    Perhaps they couldn’t afford to. Nevertheless, they stayed the course and established a now well-known image (icon).

    If you desired the Challenger when these first came out, and you now have the means 10 years later to buy one, then your dream car awaits.

    I saw a 05 to 09 Mustang on the highway the other day and began wondering when I buy my next car if I’ll get a new Mustang or a modified Retro one.

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    Wow only took five tries to get the log in to register…

    Recall when this car first came out? Numerous TTAC posters said the sales will be short lived, only aging boomers want them, the market will quickly saturate…well, that was about as wrong as when Car and Driver called the Quad 4 a “jewel of an engine”. I see Challengers all the time. And most seem to be kept in great condition, even the early ones. BTW, these types of cars aren’t necessarily gas guzzlers. I understand that the environmental angle was thrown in with great hopes to stimulate clicks, but RWD cars with big engines are very good on gas if you are on the highway and keep the speeds steady. My C7 can easily return over 30 MPG on the highway. Yes, it is lighter and far more modern, but still, upper 20s out of a Challenger is not the thing of unicorns.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I was in Chicago this week for a meeting at home office, yeah. One our newest additions to our team, a millennial was driving a new 17′ or perhaps 18′ Scat pack 392 auto. It was a beast of a car, looks great and sounds mean. He advised that he traded his r/t for this one. To your point, it is not just boomers who buy the challenger. It appeals across the bandwidth young/old, male/female and race/color which for me is one of the reasons the car is still just as awesome today as it was 10 years ago.

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        When I got my ’18 Scatpack a few weeks ago, I got a flood of thumb ups, “Wow, I love your car!”, and one old guy who said, “I wish I could get one!”, as he stepped out of a new Yukon Denali. Apparently his wife won’t let him. The main reasons the Challenger sells is it has a decent trunk, a decent back seat, and it LOOKS GREAT. That’s capped as a hint to GM and Ford. I’ve never been a Mustang styling fan, but when it looks better than a Camaro, well, as a 3 time F-Body owner, that just saddens me.

  • avatar
    Chi-One

    I’m on my second Challenger and I’m an “aging Boomer.” I have a ’16 R/T manual. I love it and so does my 3yr old grandson as he makes vroom vroom noises from the back seat when I take off from a light.

  • avatar
    Chi-One

    Also wanted to add, prior to the Challengers, I had a ’13 Camaro convertible. Beautiful car, Dusk edition, metallic blue, blue top, beautiful Mojave leather interior, every option available. With the top up the only view was thru the windshield. Unfortunately, Dusk editions come with 21″ wheels and the tires are 35s rear and 40s front. Handled like a go kart, but rode like a truck. We drove it 1100 miles from Houston where we bought it to Chicago. Just a punishing ride. It hurt to unload it, but it was better as a piece of art than a car. Riding in the Challenger, it feels like a Cadillac.

  • avatar
    Carroll Prescott

    The Shamaro is a horrible product to experience on the inside. It could be the worst interior ever conceived which is something to say since the prior version was the lowbar for that measure at the time. I’m not sure what GM was thinking when they conceived the Shamaro. They spent all the time being too cute by half on the outside and let the chimps design the interior (that explains why you can’t see out of it).

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      It is extremely frustrating that GM won’t do a Monte Carlo or (more likely) Chevelle revival with a larger RWD car.

      You can argue that “it won’t sell” during CUV mania, but according to this article the Challenger is still doing okay, and I bet a more livable (but still fast) muscle car entry would move off the lot better than the current Camaro.

      Hell, just kill the Camaro altogether and replace it with a larger 2-door. GM already offers a world-class track car with the Corvette, they don’t need a second one.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        GM doesn’t have a suitable larger RWD platform that would still be cost effective to badge as and charge Chevy money for (that also won’t just decimate Camaro sales or be decimated by the Camaro). That is down side when things are designed with Cadillac in mind.

        The Charger and Challenger works because their platform is ancient by automotive standards.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Up until this year they had the Zeta (just as old as the LX) available to use for something more than an Australian imported nosejob. They also have the larger floorpan of the Alpha CTS or they could even design something off the ATS-L.

          I don’t think it matters if it “decimates” the Camaro because it looks like the Camaro is on its way to the graveyard anyway.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            A large GM RWD Coupe would have to compete with the Challenger on price point and it will be slaughtered. Like their other stuff or not, FCA’s Brampton plant has it down when it comes to making affordable large cars.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            They’re also pretty down in reliability rankings. How can you build the same car for a decade and still not have “the bugs worked out”?

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            the reliability of the LX variatns is no worse than their Ford counterparts, well at least in cases where Ford has something to compared to them.

          • 0 avatar
            nrd515

            If GM does kill the Camaro, the only people to blame for it are the “designers” and the management that approved the horror show that it is.

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            @ ajla – no way GM is going to ever let Ford get the upper hand in the performance department. Part of the Camaro’s raison d’etre is to offer a more performance oriented version of the Mustang.

            Keeping Zeta would have put the S550 Mustang at the forefront of that race by a good margin. Camaro would have still been able to put on a good show (much like the Boss did until GM dropped the Z/28) but once Ford started producing its variants (Shelby, PP L2 and so on) it would have been game over and not in keeping with the Camaro’s original intent.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    10 years in and its STILL pound for pound the best investment as far as ‘cars’ go. Ive had my ’09 R/T 6spd for 2 years now and absolutely love it. Its got all the fun, thrills and ego stroke you could possibly want all the while the dirty secret is that as a daily driver and my only car its surprisingly practical and easy on gas. The build quality and comfort level are excellent. By any yardstick you use to measure them, the LXs are just damn good cars.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    Challengers are fun GT cars that aren’t trying to be canyon carving sports cars. It’s big, it’s comfy, fast, doesn’t cost an arm and a leg, and you can still get it with a manual transmission.

    The LX platform has been a printing press for years. There is no good reason to ruin a good thing.

  • avatar
    OzCop

    I want one…Scat Pack with 6 speed…make mine yellow…

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Retro flop! 2 years!

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2008/05/dodge-challenger-the-retro-flop-has-landed/

    • 0 avatar
      Sub-600

      Good find. Frank Williams comparing the Challenger to the retro Thunderbird and giving it two years. Epic fail.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I guess its true: nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the buying public.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        So very true. Look at how well the gas guzzling EgoBust engines sell. The uninformed buying public will buy anything.

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          EcoBoosts: Ford engineered the direct injection so well, they had to add port injection to it after “isolated” cases of carbon fouling on low mile Fords with the ‘Boost.

          I hope these articles keep coming because John Taurus clearly enjoys reading about the LX/LY cars’ success.

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            @ TwoBelugas – hybrid injection isn’t just a Ford band-aid. Lexus had it well before Ford introduced hybrid injection.

            GM seems to have a handle on it but that could very well be an advantage due to its OHV architecture and constrained cam phasing.

            Hybrid injection also neatly addresses a problem all DI engines have and that is particulate emissions which will require after-treatment like diesels do now plus you get the best of both worlds when it comes to the dyno sheet. Direct Injection pumps up the low and mid-range numbers (more aggressive ignition timing due to better knock resistance) and when you hand it off to port injection which is upstream of the valve it cools the incoming air/fuel mix and provides a denser charge in the cylinder at a time when high air speed and turbulence mitigate or negate the advantages of DI in any event.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex Rodriguez

      Funny to read that article again. Hey that Alex Rodriguez guy was pretty smart! While his prediction of 50K units by 2009 didn’t quite turn out, he was right in the fact that 50K units was attainable, and the Challenger has done 50K+ every year since 2012.

      You’re welcome.

  • avatar
    smokingclutch

    I bought mine brand new as a leftover 2010 in March 2011 – it was my 30th birthday present to myself. I wanted a Hemi Orange R/T Classic 6-speed, and this was the only way to get one as in 2011 they went to a copper color instead.

    (No I didn’t pay extra for that setup – I got ~$8500 off sticker).

    It turned out to be the car I’ve owned the longest – over 7 years, with just under 70,000 miles on it at this point. I’m so happy with it, that I’d definitely buy another; this point a Hellcat Widebody just to go totally gonzo, though I’m almost as motivated by the updated electronics and the ventilated seats than really needing a new car. It’s needed very little in the time I’ve owned it:

    – New front brake rotors, and new pads all around
    – It’s on its third set of tires
    – It had an issue with the clutch not disengaging all the way – fixed under warranty
    – It had the front seal on the hood tear – fixed under warranty

    It really was the combination of its size and practicality combined with its personality. It’s really closer to the old Chevelle SS, Olds 442, and other midsize muscle cars, rather than a pony car – this makes it a unique proposition on the market.

    People can’t believe it’s pushing 9 years since it was manufactured, but I do get it clay barred and detailed once a year (did it twice a year when I lived back east, now I live in Orange County, CA), but most of all it’s surprising how well the interior held up. The leather isn’t the most supple, but it’s held up well with zero cracks. No rattles inside unless I REALLY crank the stereo – I think some dynamat would fix that.

    It’s the only new car I’ve ever bought – I put my money where my mouth is, unlike the cheapskates around here who seem to think companies are in the business of making cars for the second or third owner.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    The Camaro is in bad need of a redesign. It is a coffin and a joke.

    The Mustang is not as pretty as last generation but drives well enough. Problem is the V8s have become expensive. In some ways, it has become a sports car. A little too low.

    The Challenger is big. A personal luxury coupe. And in street racing, going in a straight line, the 392 and Hellcat are tough to beat, short of a Corvette. There is a four wheel version. There are cheap versions that look like expensive ones. The powertrains are proven. The automatics are flawless. And they are very roomy. What is not to like. And there is no turbo four thank GOD for that

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Who are some of you – few in # but incessantly knocking the LX platform – going to believe, facts or your lying/disingenuous eyes/minds?

    Face it, those of you whom are Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors (GM) and Ford (unreliable, increasingly ugly, AND increasingly ridiculously priced) fans, FCA is brilliant because:

    1) The sales of the Challenger don’t include the Charger (same car basically) or 300 (ditto, but with more exterior/interior changes – bones on these are all pretty much the same). Don’t change the chassis because it’s rigid and stout like a tank from day one – why change that which is not only not broken, but so good that it allows for an excellent balance between ride and handling.

    So, the Challenger, alone beats the Craparo and does respectfully against the Mustang (one of 2 passenger vehicles not a CUV or Truck that Ford will still make.

    Add in Charger and 300 sales, and the LX is a juggernaut against rivals, in general, and for 10 years running.

    2) These are excellent vehicles with an excellent chassis, excellent power options (whether V6 or especially V8 – STOUT acceleration), excellent transmissions, excellent durability, excellent comfort in the sense of true room for 5 people fore and aft, and all of their things, excellent ride quality (go ahead and get your brains/kidneys beat into oblivion by the Craparo instead), and many other advantages over the Rustang and Despairo (go check out that shameful interior full of PROC plastics).

    3) FCA allows far more customization with these than competitors.

    4) People who actually buy these and their LX-stablemates actually love them.

    6) The Challenger and Charger sound bada$$, accelerate like rockets, while being actually large inside, and easy as daily drivers with actually comfortable GT-like cruisers, and the 300 is a more refined, better riding, more comfortable, higher quality sedan at 1/3 to 1/2 the price than garbage POS Cadillac rolling dumpster fires with their turbo 4s and their bizarre and overly complicated chassis (CT6 – that manages to have the worse ride quality ever of any “luxury sedan” and is ridiculously overpriced) or too small chassis (ATS/CTS) or just sh*t quality in general.

    Suck it, haters

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Anyone that knocks the LX platform are people who like the Camaro or (god forbid) the Mustang and are jealous at how well the LX cars do and how they eat the lunch of the Camaro and Mustang.

      The Camaro and Mustang combined do not have the attitude or soul of the Charger/Challenger. Plus Ford and GM cannot figure out how to make their flimsy platforms handle 860HP. All from an “ancient” platform.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        “Plus Ford and GM cannot figure out how to make their flimsy platforms handle 860HP. All from an “ancient” platform.”

        Do you actually believe that?

        If that was the case the Hellkitty would be sucking up ZL1’s and GT350’s all day long on the road course. It doesn’t and even the 435 horsepower GT had no problem walking away from the Hellcat on something other than a straight line.

        Ford has also made no secret that they are gunning for the Demon with the GT500. It might not get 860 crank horsepower since they probably want some semblance of road capability and don’t have to contend with moving so much weight and air out of the way.

        I’ll give the Challenger plenty of attitude but as long as the other V8 coupes keep thier V8’s they’ll have plenty of soul. The LS and Coyote (and its Voodoo variant) are fine engines making the right noises.

        Camaro’s problems aside if I were to fault the Mustang and the Camaro it would be that they are just getting too expensive. Hellcat and Demon aside the Challenger’s top offerings are coming in much cheaper.

        At this point Challenger is just retreading Ford foxbody territory and leveraging a chassis that is dirt cheap to produce allowing them to make it endlessly customizable.

        As I stated in another post Camaro doesnt have that luxury by dint of thier self appointment as the king of pony car performance. GM can’t afford to let the Camaro live on an old chassis since it would just take an updated Mustang or Challenger to take the crown and Ford with its global Mustang ambitions can’t afford to let its car go stale either as they lay claim to the “worlds best selling sports car”. They can no longer appeal to an amercian only audience since it does have to compete with similar offerings mostly from German rivals abroad – something the Camaro and Challenger don’t have to.

    • 0 avatar
      rjg

      Yep. The LX proves that cars didn’t have to die. People just want roomy, good looking cars with the smoothness and acceleration that comes from large displacement NA power plants. In addition to Cadillac, I’d add BMW and Audi to the list of carmakers whose products just aren’t as compelling as the good ol’ LX trio.

  • avatar
    incautious

    it’s easy to explain.The Challenger is the easiest for day to day driving. Plus a huge trunk and the most rear passenger room. plus great road manners.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I used one as a daily family car when both my kids reached forward facing car seat age. At the time my wife worked across the highway from my office, so each day all four of us would commute in the jazz blue R/T super track pack with red interior. It was great.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    If only Dodge would offer a factory Challenger convertible, they could Hoover up all the money they didn’t get with Hellcats and demons.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    My brother in law is a big Chevy man but the Challenger is on his short list and the Camaro isn’t even in consideration.

  • avatar
    pb35

    Let me preface this by saying I’m a Mopar guy. I had a ‘12
    Charger R/T and a ‘15 SRT 392 Charger. My current SS is going to be out of service for a while due to a carelessly piloted FedEx truck so after a few days of hell in a Malibu that drove like a wet sponge, I exchanged it for a Durango GT.

    I liked it, I was happy to have Uconnect again and it was good to be in familiar surroundings. Until I received a notification from Budget that there is an outstanding recall on my rental and it needed to be immediately returned/exchanged for another vehicle. You can’t even RENT these things! Geez.

  • avatar
    skloon

    I think the sales success has a lot to do with FCA loan standards- if you have a pulse you qualify

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      The people who own the Challenger/Charger/300 seem to love them. I’m on my second Challenger, a friend is on his 3rd one R/T SRT SRT, Another friend will soon my trading his 2010 Mustang GT for a new Scatpack. Other friends own 300’s and Chargers, but if it wasn’t for kids/grandkids, would much rather have a Challenger. And we all have good or great credit. When it came to thinking about what new car I would get, it was down to two choices, a Charger or another Challenger, and while I like the Charger, it’s seriously looks challenged when it’s compared to the Challenger.

  • avatar
    Sikeh Beryuf

    The Roar of the Dodge Challenger’s Engine contributes greatly to its stable sales. I know the sound of the engine may sound unimportant, however, this sound tells prospective buyers a different story. When the hear the sound, it feels like the Dodge is most powerful car on the street and there is nothing better than the Dodge.
    And when they finally set eyes on the ride, they design is impressive and imposing, giving them one choice.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      I’ve had a Challenger since 2010, and almost every day, I get comments, all positive about it. Old guys want one, middle aged guys and quite a few women want one. My friend’s grandkids want one, but they will surely be gone when they are able to drive in 7-9 years.

      And the sound of the 6.4 is fantastic.

  • avatar
    ceipower

    The Camaro went from bland front end styling , to a confused and frankly ugly look. Like it or not , the Challenger even with it’s tiny year to year updates , still. Looks good , has more interior room and far better outward visibility. As for the Mustang , hey. , it seems to be in far better control of its heritage than Camaro.


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