By on July 23, 2018

Image: GM

We told you the other day how Ford’s Mustang reigns supreme in the domestic pony car crowd, at least in terms of volume, with Dodge’s Challenger serving as a delightfully archaic and stable-selling runner-up. That leaves Chevrolet to figure out how best to get buyers excited about its own entry.

Depending on trim, there’s a stable of new Camaro faces (fascias, to be exact) arriving for 2019, but order guides show that would-be customers stand to save money, too. Especially if they can live without a V6.

According to guides seen by CarsDirect, getting behind the wheel of a base 2019 Camaro LS requires 905 fewer bucks than last year, with the trim stickering at $25,995 after destination. However, there’s no longer an option ($1,495) of moving up to the 3.6-liter V6 from the standard turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder. If six cylinders is a must, you’ll need to move up to an LT.

Should you want to sap as much excitement from the driving experience as possible, the eight-speed automatic now becomes an option (again, $1,495) on the LS four-banger. It’s a late availability item, so don’t go looking for it at launch.

Image: GM

The price of upgrading your 1LT Camaro to V6 power hasn’t changed, but the model’s entry price has. For 2019, the 1LT drops $1,200 to $26,495 after destination. Digging a little deeper for that $1,495 option swaps the 275 hp, 295 lb-ft four for a potentially more satisfying six making 335 hp and 284 lb-ft. This option exists on the $28,495 2LT trim, which drops three grand from last year.

New for the coming model year is a 3LT trim that brings the V6 on board as standard kit. It’s basically just the 2LT with the upgrade engine, though you’ll have the option of adding a Convenience and Lighting Package (which vanishes from the 2LT options list). For the privilege of this content, GM asks $31,995. Certain interior color packages (Adrenaline Red, Ceramic White) also disappear from the 2LT.

It’s worth noting that 1LT four-cylinder buyers can add Chevy’s 1LE Track Performance Package to their rides for an additional $4,500.

And that’s where the pricing changes stop, as SS and ZL1 Camaros carry over their Monroneys for 2019. A 1SS coupe continues to retail for $37,995, while the 650 hp ZL1 stickers for $68,495. You’ll find the ZL1’s 10-speed automatic in the SS now, with line lock and launch control standard for those who like relaxing their left foot.

Will larger, more aggressive grilles and knocked-down pricing on volume models put some wind in the Camaro’s sails sales? Time will tell, but, as CarsDirect points out, there’s no shortage of existing incentives waiting for buyers of the outgoing model.

[Image: General Motors]

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42 Comments on “Sweetening the Pony Pot: Price, Content Tweaks Coming to 2019 Chevrolet Camaro...”


  • avatar
    Maxb49

    Live without a V6? I can’t live without a V8 on my ponycar!

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    The 4 cylinder has more torque than the six? Whichever motor you get just don’t order a large milkshake at the drive-thru, you’ll have to open the door to get it into the car.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      >SUB

      Correct. Those windows are so short its nuts.

      It s like driving from inside a bunker. MAJOR FAIL CARRIED OVER IN THE NEW DESIGN. FAIL !!!

      BEST PERFORMANCE CARS?

      #1- Challenger
      #2- Mustang
      #3- Hum—- Stinger?

      #? Camaro in my opinion.

      • 0 avatar
        Maxb49

        “Whichever motor you get just don’t order a large milkshake at the drive-thru, you’ll have to open the door to get it into the car.”

        “Correct. Those windows are so short its nuts.”

        “Today’s greenhouses on cars remind me that for all of its faults at least in my old Celebrity I could see all four corners of the car easily from the drivers seat. Made it not all that difficult to learn parallel parking.”

        All three of you are correct. Ford and the other automakers don’t get it – this is part of the reason people are turning away from sedans. These lousy greenhouse designs aren’t just ugly, they also aren’t practical.

      • 0 avatar
        Drew8MR

        In HS I had a ’70 with a 440/727 and my buddy had a ’70 ‘cuda with a built to the hilt 340. The new ones look like your HS dream girl after 4 kids and 5 years behind the counter at Baskin Robins.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      The 4 cylinder has more torque than the six?

      Yeah and that torque curve is generally pretty flat. Some manufacturers have started to advertise XYZ lb ft 1,800-4,000 rpm or something like that.

      In midsize and smaller family vehicles a turbo 4 isn’t really a drive-ability problem.

      Today’s greenhouses on cars remind me that for all of its faults at least in my old Celebrity I could see all four corners of the car easily from the drivers seat. Made it not all that difficult to learn parallel parking.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I want to know who okayed the refreshed model’s styling, especially the front fascia. The 2016-2018 looked great, even if it was a nightmare to see out of. But this…this is a definite downgrade.

    • 0 avatar
      tonyola

      Neither version of the 2019 Camaro looks wonderful, but the black front bumper bar looks better than the smiley body-colored one.

      • 0 avatar
        DeCode Er

        They say looks are in the eye of the beholder, but i have to agree with Kyree. The 2019 front end look like hot garbage acrosss the board. Thank god the ZL1 was spared this refresh.

        The 2016-18 is definately the looker of the 6th gen.

  • avatar
    EX35

    With base (non z51) C7 corvettes selling for as low as mid 40s, Im thinking this is the better deal if you want a sports car. The back seat really isn’t usable in the Camaro anyway.

  • avatar
    ernest

    Looking at that Camaro nose, I have to ask… what as it we all said about the Camry’s front end? Yeah…

  • avatar
    FWD Donuts

    GM can do whatever it wants with pricing / content combinations — but there’s no way my butt’s ever getting in that stupid looking car.

  • avatar
    Carroll Prescott

    How could GM bring this generation of Shamaro to life when it is even uglier and more cramped and horrific on the inside than the prior Shamaro (which was the lowbar of all those things at the time it was introduced?).

  • avatar
    Hummer

    4 cylinder option doesn’t even make sense, but the bigger story is that they want nearly $40k for a tiny car that’s impossible to see out of with a V8. Get that price closer to $30k and they will have no problem meeting sales numbers. Then again the Alpha platform has been a disaster on everything it’s been used on. Bring back the Zeta.

    • 0 avatar
      DeCode Er

      You had me till you jumped of the cliff with the alpha comment. That said, in a way you are right. Its NOT the cjassis thats hurting the sales. Its the pricing. Unfortinately GM either put out alot of cajs for this excellent chassis, or they are snorting their own funk over it’s apperent greatness and feel they can charge 20-30% more for it. Either way the ATS and Camaro are suffering for it.

      As you said the compromises i design are easily overlooked when the price is inline with what is expected. But the Camafo is priced outside of its target demographic. They are trying to force the affordable performance crowd into turbo 4s and v6s when the core marktet for the car is the v8 ss.

  • avatar
    Krivka

    Probably the best chassis GM has ever put together bolted to great engines and transmissions, wasted on a Hot Wheels inspired body and an interior out of a 1972 Gremlin. I mean WTF really? GM, this isn’t rocket science, people who want these cars are not BUYING THEM. I think it is way past time to retire this attempt at retro and find a way to make a car that actual people might actually enjoy driving daily and can track on weekends. I very seldom see a new Camaro on the road but I am also not seeing Porsche Boxsters or Caymans. but I do see MANY Challengers and Mercedes C class coupes. Even the Mustangs are losing the panache they had with the hot wings and beer set. Time to up your game and build a real car and lose the perceived rivalry with Ford. Build a better Camaro or get out of the market.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Retro-inspired styling doesn’t seem to be holding the Mustang or Challenger back.

      • 0 avatar
        DeCode Er

        Agreed. The Camaro is the least retro of the three. The problem is the price. A mustang or challenger can be had in the twenties. Heck a nice v8 is available in the low to mid 30s. But GM for some reason feels price of entry for the v8 or any model with decent options should be near or above 40grand.

        They say GM is making a higher profit on each car sold. I hope so, because they sure arent selling alot of them.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          The Mustang’s retro cues are subtle, blend in, and don’t offend like the Camaro’s pronounced quarter panel and door skin character-lines you can see from 3/4s of a mile, almost set your damn drink on, and consistent since 2010.

          With the Camaro’s new tail lights, finally something not retro, but it’s as if they don’t know what else to do with them.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          The Camaro smacks of a rehashed 67-69 car. Of the three the Mustang is now the least retro of the three (unless modern “me too” coupe styling has become retro?)

  • avatar
    Kenn

    I would love it if both Ford and GM would take a cue from the Dodge Challenger and offer more upright designs, with larger, more easily accessible interiors and trunks, but with lighter and smaller bodies. I think there’s room for RWD, “2+2” pony cars, but these newest versions aren’t really retro at all, considering their bloated exterior sizes and porkiness. I would be at the local dealer in a heartbeat for something similar in design to a brand new 1969 Camaro. The impossible dream?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Safety, refinement and features customers demand all add weight. Adding lightness costs money. Ford is able to do it profitably on the F-Series (aluminum body) because they sell at or over 800,000 a year, and its a very profitable vehicle. Pony car sales will never be a drop of water in that lake, so using (expensive) light weight materials would significantly add to the cost of the car, to the point where it isn’t worth selling (producing) or buying.

      You can’t simply take a 1969 design and build it exactly the same way today. Cars are required to pass safety tests and there is no way in hell that you’re going to get a 1960s design to pass. Not only that, but most consumers would be turned off by the lack of features and refinement.

      If you want a like-new 1960s muscle/pony car, head to Barret Jackson. Don’t forget to bring a suitcase full of money.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        If you’ve never driven a muscle car out of the late ’60s era, you’re in for a surprise. They don’t exactly inspire you to drive them fast. Unless you have a deathwish.

        But if you insist the “modern take”, the V8 F-150 is the best solution to true Muscle Cars. And just like in the ’60s era, you can actually get the V8 F-150 with steel wheels, vinyl seats and crank windows, but also performance (towing) axle ratios, limited-slip or locking.

        Try that with the Camaro, Mustang, etc. But just tell them you want the F-150 to haul goats and stuff.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s easy to do, BMW did it with the 2-series. All it takes is money. Since it’s not gonna happen at GM, Ford, etc, late ’80s pony cars is what you want, or up to early ’00s.

      Many modern amenities, or no driver’s “nannies” at all, not even ABS if you prefer. Lightweight, fuel injection, overdrive, rack-n-pinion, fixable AC, all kinds of aftermarket suspension tuning. But most of all, they’re cheap thrills.

      Not only can you actually work on them, tweak the timing, underdrive pulleys, chip, etc, you can even upgrade the factory seats without the dash lighting up and it going into limp mode.

      The main problem with V8 pony cars of the era was the lack of performance axle ratios. 3.73s or 4.10 is all it take to wake them up, and without a penalty at the smog station.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        If your talking 80’s pony cars the F-bodies were the better driver’s car even if they were much heavier than the Mustang and while I love those old fox cars they weren’t much better than the muscle cars they replaced. Outside of the SVO Mustang and first SVT Cobras (1993) they had drum brakes until 1994 and the rear suspension is best left in the dumpster replaced with either a good parallel four link or torque arm setup. Then there is the matter of safety which the fox chassis definitely lacks. Those cars are beer cans at best and where you would walk away from an accident in an S-197 or newer Mustang your going to the hospital in a fox or sn95/new edge car and where your going to the hospital in a 2005+ Mustang your going to the morgue in a 1979 to 2004 Mustang.

        If I were in the market for an older Mustang I’d look at the S-197 cars especially the 2011 and later versions with the 5.0 coyote. Easy to work on much better chassis not too heavy and safety factor is higher. Granted they are larger than a fox but the positives blow the negatives away.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    Not too long ago there was an article on here with a picture of the NASCAR Camaro and a production Camaro. The NASCAR version was actually the better looking car with it’s proportions and upright greenhouse.

    • 0 avatar
      DeCode Er

      Yeah no, the NASCAR Camaro looks like garbage. I dont know why they used the camaro in the first place. Apparently the overall shape of the race car sucks on the track as well. Because it hasnt been winnimg and the drivers complain of a obvious aerodynamic disadvantage.

  • avatar

    Let me know when they offer visibility as an option.

  • avatar
    TwoBelugas

    I drove some earlier Zeta platform Camaros as rentals and honestly I liked the way it drove but was not comfortable changing lanes or backing up in parking lots in those things. The backing up part could be partially addressed by backup cameras but being able to see what’s in your blindspot when changing lanes? Nah, no with this puppy.

    Sad to see they have not done anything to address that.

  • avatar
    scott25

    A V6 manual is near the top of my list for my next car next year, since I’ll get an employee discount, but I don’t know if I can live with the ridiculous styling and tanklike driving experience.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    What’s the point of a V6 in a car like this anyway, except as a base ‘secretary’ version? The V8 is the obvious choice if you want an old school heavy hitting ballbreaker where the skys the limit if you want to build a hotrod. Turbo 4’s are the other side of that coin, people have been tuning them for decades now. A little monkeying around with the boost and its a fast way to more performance. No one does anything with V6 engines, outside of a few rare examples. Pony/muscle cars are destined to become hotrods. And in that respect, V6s are the loser engine.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      Meh – I just bought a low-mileage 2014 6-cyl Mustang with a manual and the engine has plenty of power for me. I do miss that bottom V8 torque but the car is no slouch. Lower insurance and gas costs are a bonus.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    The Camaro’s sales fall intrigues me. It’s wasn’t very long ago where it was handily beating the Mustang with well over 100k a year sales. By all rights the new generation is a better performance car, and what they did to it is essentially what Ford did with it’s revamp of the Mustang which rekindled interest in that car. Meanwhile the Challenger has retained the same shape and size and has sales remained steady.

    There are many simplistic explanations like “too small”, “poor visibility” which were also largely true of the last gen, but don’t sufficiently explain the complete turn away in interest. Perhaps it became too focused a performance car and alienated the secretary demographic that buys on looks but demands practicality.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      It also costs $1,000-$3,000 more in pretty much all trims than the Mustang. $38K for a V8 with no options would have me looking elsewhere before I even tried to figure out what the real price would be. Ford was knocking plenty of cash off the Mustang when I bought one, Chevy dealers seemed to think they had something special on their hands at the time (the Camaro was still pretty new then).

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Probably equal parts “engine in a box” as Camaro guys used to say about the 4th gen and the now tired look of an imitation 1969 Camaro.

      Granted the Challenger seems immune to that but it is less pony car and more large personal luxury coupe/muscle car and its cheap to get into and finance (people here have certainly joked about how far FCA is willing to go to get people into a Challanger even if they were better suited to the buy here/pay here lot).

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    If GM insists on the retro, base it off the IROQ-Z

    Pony Car buyers have been letting GM know (loudly) it’s time to ditch the cartoonish Camaro and go with a “clean slate” design. for at least 5 years.

    Some subtle retro “cues” would be fine, but like the PT Cruiser and Beetle proved, you can only take the theme so far, regardless of initial smash success.

    Vanilla Ice was a smash success, but how many ways could he remix “Ice Ice Baby”?

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