By on June 8, 2018

2018 Nissan Kicks

The subcompact crossover class may possibly offer more varieties of flavor than most. Not in terms of available models, but in types of mission for each model.

You have rugged off-roaders (Jeep Renegade), quirky runabouts (Toyota CH-R, Kia Soul), jack-of-all-trades (Honda HR-V, Hyundai Kona), urban scooters (Chevy Trax/Buick Encore, Ford EcoSport), tall wagons (Subaru Crosstrek), and now the Nissan Kicks.

Nissan employees will quickly correct you if you assert the Kicks is a replacement for the company’s previous entry in this segment, the Juke, which is no longer on sale in North America (but remains available in other markets across the globe). They’ll tell you the Juke was/is aimed at a different customer than the Kicks.

That may or may not be true, but if it is, it also evades at least two other truths about the Juke – it was too weird and too pricey for our market.

Enter the Kicks. Although it still has plenty of quirky details and styling, the overall look and feel is much more conventional. And the price tag is much, much lower than not just the Juke, but some of the key competitors.

Full disclosure: Nissan flew me out to San Diego, put me up in a nice hotel, fed me three excellent meals plus snacks and drinks, and let us see a small portion of its local design offices, including a demo on how virtual reality is used in car design. They offered a piece of artwork that was signed by the artist, which I forgot to take (and I’m fine with that), and gave us journalists a Bluetooth speaker that I will likely never unbox, a beach towel, a luggage tag, and a USB cable (which truth be told, could be the only thing that may influence a journalist. We always need cables). 

Editor’s Note: Sorry for using press shots, but a poorly timed camera malfunction rendered my photos unusable. 

On paper, the Kicks’ specs look underwhelming. Built on the same platform the underpins the unloved Versa econobox, the Kicks has a 1.6-liter, four-cylinder engine that makes 125 horsepower and 115 lb-ft of torque. That’s not a lot.

2018 Nissan Kicks

Those numbers sound better when you see the curb weight – 2,672 pounds, tops. That’s light by today’s standards.

Of course, keeping weight and costs down means some tradeoffs. Most significantly for snow-belt buyers – there’s no available all-wheel drive. Not to mention that the Kicks actually has drum brakes on the rear. Rare for a new car, as you know.

Nissan loves its continuously variable automatic transmissions, so of course the only transmission in the Kicks is a CVT. This one has a “sport” mode button attached to it, but there’s no reason to bother with it – I noticed very little difference in terms of throttle response, steering feel, or transmission behavior whether “sport” mode was engaged or not.

2018 Nissan Kicks

Steering feel is the largest letdown here. No one expects the Kicks to be sporty, but there’s just no real sense of engagement from the speed-sensitive electric power steering. My drive partner also noticed a disconcerting habit – initial turn-in was often too aggressive and required a mid-turn dial-back. Probably the result of the steering being so damn light.

No one expects the Kicks to be fast, either, but thanks to the light curb weight, it’s reasonably swift in traffic. You don’t get dropped back into your seat when you slam on the gas, and the engine makes a lot of ugly noise, but you will be able to merge without sweating.

The strongest dynamic elements are the ride and the sound dampening. The ride is smooth with just a touch of stiffness, while outside noises stay there, provided you haven’t matted the throttle. It’s shockingly quiet for a car of this price point.

So yeah, it’s not fun to drive from an enthusiast’s perspective, but the commuter won’t care. He or she will happily accept a little boredom in order to keep their bank account a little fuller.

This is where the Kicks shines – it’s not only not a bank-breaker, but save for AWD and a few other features (such as factory nav), Nissan hasn’t been stingy with the content.

2018 Nissan Kicks

Let’s start with the base S model. For $17,990 plus D and D ($975 across the board), you get automatic emergency braking, keyless entry and starting, Bluetooth, three USB ports, rearview monitor, cruise control, automatic headlights, 7-inch touchscreen, Nissan’s “zero gravity” seats, and power windows/locks. Not a long list of standard content, but enough to avoid the penalty box label.

Nissan believes the SV trim will be the most popular, and that comes with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, a driver-assist display, satellite radio, blind-spot warning, rear cross-traffic alert, remote start, 17-inch wheels, and automatic climate control, among other things. That’s all for $19,690.

The “loaded” SR adds features such as fog lamps, LED headlights, different seat fabric, leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, a roof-mounted rear spoiler, around-view monitor, and a module that controls some of the drive dynamics such as ride. An available Premium package adds key features such as heated seats, premium audio, and a security system. The SR is $20,290 and the Premium package costs a grand more. Various accessories are available, as well.

2018 Nissan Kicks

My SR tester ran $22,630 thanks to D and D and floor mats ($215), plus $150 for two-tone paint.

Value pricing sometimes comes with cheap quality, but while the interior offers a lot of hard plastics, there isn’t the usual sheen that’s seen with really poor plastics. Perhaps the biggest flaws of the interior involve a center screen that doesn’t quite line up with the HVAC controls and a steering wheel that looked off-center. Otherwise, the controls and gauges were simple and easy to use/read.

Legroom and headroom were plentiful, and ease of ingress/egress was good. The rear seat was a little tight for my long-legged frame but most adults will fit fine. The 25.3 cubic foot cargo area offers plenty of space for gear, and it’s a larger space than what’s offered seats-up in CH-R, Soul, EcoSport, or Kona.

2018 Nissan Kicks

Exterior design, while being far more conventional than the Juke, is still on the wilder side. There’s five ways to get a two-tone look, and Nissan is giving customers the chance to further customize their rides via a “Color Studio” and available accessories, such as color wheel inserts. Whether this strikes you as another example of a corporation desperately attempting to court Millennials or a cool way to personalize a car is up to you.

Accessories aside, I found the look to be generally pleasing to the eye, although the weird angle of the hatchback and the blacked-out C-pillar look too fussy. From up front, the Kicks looks to have a sporty stance that gives the impression of performance – which, as noted above, is just an impression. I also noticed a misaligned panel gap on the pre-production car I drove.

The two-tone look mostly works, although some combos are better than others.

For the fuel-conscious, the EPA rates the Kicks at 31 mpg city/36 mpg highway and 33 mpg combined. I did notice a relatively low range in the trip computer (Nissan’s spec sheet doesn’t list the range yet), which could be due to the driving styles of myself, my drive partner, and whoever drove before us. The tank capacity is 10.8 gallons.

2018 Nissan Kicks

Nissan has come up with a subcompact people-mover that looks quirky in a good way, is priced right, and has a fair amount of content for that price. That’s a recipe for a lot of sales.

Yes, all-wheel drive is noticeably absent, but I am not convinced you need AWD even in the snow belt. The other key omission – factory nav – is made unnecessary if you get CarPlay or Android Auto.

If you need to be coddled, or want something fun to drive, shop elsewhere. The Kicks knows what it’s about – value pricing without sacrificing too much content. That makes it an ideal choice for the value shopper who gives not a whit about how it handles.

Cheap doesn’t have to punish. While Nissan would be well served to apply that mantra elsewhere (Sentra, I’m looking in your direction), that’s the case with the Kicks.

Value buyers, your ride is here.

[Images © 2018 AutoGuide/Craig Cole and Nissan North America]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

62 Comments on “2018 Nissan Kicks First Drive – Commuting With Value...”


  • avatar
    markmeup

    cue Elaine Benes… your little car has arrived.

  • avatar
    monkeydelmagico

    With the help of Nissans aggressive financing tactics these things will fly off the lots. Well played.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “will fly off the lots”

      Maybe, but the lack of AWD in a CUV is going to be a deal breaker for many and over 72-84 month financing it isn’t much more to upsell to a Rogue Sport AWD.

      It’ll outsell the Versa, but I bet it stays well under the volume of the Rogue twins.

      • 0 avatar
        blackEldo

        Toyota has no problem moving C-HR’s which are also AWD-less–although I’ll bet most buyers don’t know that or simply don’t care. Ignorance is bliss for many commuter-car buyers.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      If this vehicle

      1) Rides softly/smoothly over rough/broken road surfaces (small wheels and lots of sidewall, along with softly sprung suspension/shocks/struts will help)

      2) Is as quiet as the review claims (none of its direct competitors are remotely quiet – particularly on rough, concrete pavement and at high speeds such as 78mph+)

      3) Is reasonably reliable

      4) Can be had for around $17,000 to $19,000 OTD real transaction prices, depending on trim level

      It will sell like crazy.

      The biggest complaints with tin vq like the Honda thing and Toyota thing and Mazda CX-3 and Chevy thing and EcoSh!t and other such things are 1) rough ride, 2) very noisy/lots of NVH.

      This has a decent interior, also, for the price point, and the horsepower is fine for a car this light (I am astounded Nissan got this to halfway between 2500 lbs and 3000 lbs, given modern safety regs and the equipment it has).

      Nissan may have a hit and huge volume seller on its hand for the ever increasingly squeezed working class of America, now growing rapidly in numbers and as a % of total population, and living on $30,000 or $23,000 per year ($15 or less per hour and/or gig workers doing 2-4 gigs).

      • 0 avatar
        Tim Healey

        Yeah I am curious if it’s as quiet on Midwestern roads as it was on Cali’s smooth streets. Hope one hits the fleets soon.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          This was a good review and you hit some broader, industry-wide themes on the increasingly important issues of vehicle inflation/pricing in an important segment of the vehicle market (subcompact CUV), too.

  • avatar
    deanst

    This is the ultimate Nissan – decent exterior looks for the class, interior that verges on attractive, with loads of content for the money. That off -center touch screen would drive me crazy, but this would make a great first car for many, many people.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      After watching video on this, I can predict that [unfortunately] this lamemobil will sell. You know why? Because new buyer is in town. They care less what is moving it. For them is more important how iPhone functions.

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        Auto manufacturers don’t care about improving performance anymore, it’s all about consumer electronics for brain-dead Americans. They can forget driving and text “I stubbed my toe this morning, then I ate a Pop-Tart, now I’m going out for a triple mocha zombie latte”…as if anyone on Earth effing cares. Why do some people hold their phone as if it were a slice of pizza they were about to bite into? If you’re going to talk and drive at least hold your phone like a phone. I notice a lot of Millennial beta male types doing this.

  • avatar
    gtem

    “Not to mention that the Kicks actually has drum brakes on the rear.”

    Newsflash: the people buying these won’t give a hoot, and certainly won’t appreciate the difference in performance. What they might appreciate (if they are a long term owner) is not having to replace rusty rear rotors and frozen up calipers. For something this light, this low power, with this little sporting pretensions, rear drums are just what the doctor ordered.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      GTEM
      Agree.
      Nothing wrong with drums on non high performance cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Of my many four wheel disc brake cars Ive yet to experience these rusty rear discs you always bring up, these all being old Midwestern salt cars at that.

      Drum brakes are nothing more than old tech used to save costs.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        My biggest problem with drums is how ugly they look with our modern open spoke wheels. If I can’t see them I don’t care.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          I personally dont care for modern wheels myself, they’re overdone. Gimme some sturdy steelies and hubcaps any day over todays rims.

          At Tim:
          I’m fairly certain that Honda uses drums on Civics/Fits, meanwhile the non-Mazda Yaris and Mitsubishi Mirage use them too. Its just sorta rare on CUVs from what I’ve seen.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Well I’ve had to preemptively replace rear rotors from rust rather than wear on the following vehicles in my relatively short driving career:

        ’98 Mazda MPV
        ’00 Maxima
        ’96 ES300
        ’03 Pilot

        And I just did my friend’s ’09 Mazda3 where both front and rear rotors were replaced due to rust rather than critical wear.
        My wife’s 2012 Camry needed the rear caliper pad seating surfaces wire wheeled/scraped after the pads started to drag slightly from corrosion causing them to not travel freely, it’s a very common issue in the salt belt on quite new vehicles.

        Cars I haven’t had to mess with the rear brakes on due to premature corrosion:
        ’90 Civic, ’94 and ’97 Ranger, and my ’96 4Runner, all with rear drums. The 4Runner was the only one that needed any sort of messing with the brakes at all after an axle seal blew out and contaminated everything with oil.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          Its pretty clear that we’ve both had very different experiences with brake work, but if you’re curious, my sampling is a handful of Volvos (RWD and FWD) and a Panther.

          On the other hand the only drum brakes we’ve had to work on were in vintage air-cooled VWs, and a Scion xB (rust and a crappy mechanic made the bolts tight, but the brakes werent rusty themselves).

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      I know most people won’t care, but it’s so rare these days as to be remarkable.

      • 0 avatar
        CKNSLS Sierra SLT

        Not really Tim-

        One needs to look no further than the Silverado as a vehicle with drum brakes. I believe they were standard from ’07 through at least 2012.

        Word has it that GM was tired of warranty work (and a recall I believe) on rear disks on those trucks.

        Let’s not forget they move at least 50,000 units a month-Silverado/Sierra combined. I have a fully load 2012 GMC SLT Sierra-with drum brakes in the rear.

  • avatar
    gtem

    I have to say, I still really don’t get this whole class of automobile, but I think Nissan has a “goldilocks” car here that seems well balanced in terms of what it does well relative to the class, with aggressive pricing (and Nissan’s historic easy financing) to boot. At least in photos the interior looks very presentable, the exterior isn’t particularly ugly, and the two tone paint is a cheap and easy way for the manufacturer to make their car stand out and seem funky/cool. Good cargo room (for the class), performance/economy metrics seem up to par, and sounds like good NVH control.

    • 0 avatar
      Lee Wilcox

      When your knees go GTEM you will appreciate this car.. I am The stereo typical buyer. I am on my second cube and this may replace it. Can’t get the wife in my forerunner because of the aforesaid knees. I enjoy reading the arrogance that pops up here with relation to Nissan. We buy them because we get what we want.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        The folks that bought my ’03 Pilot were a retired couple that were using a Trailblazer for some light towing, the wife was having trouble climbing into it. Not that a Trailblazer is a very jacked up SUV (I’ve always thought they were real belly-draggers), but their feedback has been that the Pilot has been a big improvement in entry and exit for her. I removed the side steps from my 4Runner so it’s quite an exercise to sit down in it with that high floor. My grandfather in law rode in it once and I felt bad that he had to struggle with it to sit climb up.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Agree it has everything it needs to sell. Can’t help but feel not offering AWD is a mistake. Even if offered on highest trim only, bet the take rate would be high. Wondering if this platform AWD is even possible.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve Biro

      Not having AWD hasn’t hurt the Kia Soul. And look at the sales figures for vehicles such as Honda’s HR-V. A whole lot of them are leaving the lot with FWD. I have friends with an HR-V and they’re far more concerned with purchase price and fuel economy than they are AWD. I see just as many aging boomers in this new Nissan as first-time new-car buyers.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    You have rugged off-roaders (Jeep Renegade),

    Woah there Rodney Dangerfield

    Oddly enough that you mention the Juke, I saw a Juke yesterday in Mississippi with Manufacturer tags.

  • avatar
    John R

    NISSAN JUKE (OFF-SCREEN CHANNELING AGAMEMNON FROM “TROY”): “THIS is what you left me for?!”

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    A NISMO version of this would actually be pretty cool. Any word on whether that’s in the cards, Tim?

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      What’s the souped up engine of the Sentra R? (Sheeesh, I’d rather ask here then look it up – the webpage just depresses me).

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      OEMs don’t like to comment on future product, but I wouldn’t be shocked if there’s at least a NISMO package at some point. That’s just my speculation, not anything I’ve been told.

  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    Yes, these will sell in droves. Basically a Versa in CUV form, which is what America wants right now…EVERYTHING in CUV form.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Yup. Like I’ve said before, the SMART car would have sold like hotcakes if they simply would have butched it up a little and called a crossover.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        The only way the Smart would have sold is if the company mastered the Jedi Mind Trick.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Explain Encore and Trax sales then?

          (BTW dealer gave my wife an Encore loaner during her last service – My first impression made me miss the power and luxury of my 1982 Celebrity, after a 5 min drive I missed the utility of my 1997 Escort wagon.)

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Encore and Trax are the same size as the Smart? Same seating and cargo capacity?

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            You don’t think Encore and Trax are equally big POS to the Smart?

            I’m not taking issue with the Smart’s size and capacity I’m taking issue with it being TERRIBLE.

  • avatar
    snakebit

    Wow, so the Juke is gone from the US market. You sure know how to raise my spirits even more on a Friday office day. Those were solely attention-getters for people who aught to think about blending in while they get a new prescription for their corrective eyewear. ‘Yahoo’ to the Kicks for replacing the Juke(not a replacement says Nissan? Ya, right). The Kicks should put Nissan closer to the first tier of affordable Japanese import auto companies along with Honda and Toyota(remember in the early 1970s when Datsun/Nissan was?). Based on Tim’s evaluation, I have nothing but praise for Nissan for bringing the Kicks to market. I don’t feel every basic transportation car has to have AWD, some buyers haven’t seen a snowflake near home since their last Trump rally. I say, well done Nissan and good luck with the Kicks model.

  • avatar
    TW5

    Wish I could charge $975 for D.

    Anyway, I can’t decide if this is an overpriced compact car or an underpriced compact CUV. The interior looks much nicer than standard Nissan compact kit, and it’s quiet and lightweight. I’m leaning towards overpriced compact car. At least that’s what Nissan is signaling. Not sure how the public will receive it.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    “Yes, all-wheel drive is noticeably absent, but I am not convinced you need AWD even in the snow belt.”

    I thought that too until living in a mountain state. Especially going in the canyons in the winter. I’ve seen many a vehicle stuck with snow tires and 2wd. Simply put, 2wd is for people that sit at home for the streets to be plowed.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      You and the other 6 people who live in places like that can upgrade to the Rogue. The overwhelming majority need AWD like a hole in the head.

      • 0 avatar
        Sloomis

        “The overwhelming majority need AWD like a hole in the head.”

        True to a certain extent, but it depends on where you live and how you live. I visited some outdoorsy friends in Colorado last March and we took several trips into the mountains to ski, snowshoe etc. Some times the roads were dirt that was in a current state of mud, and some times we’d get caught in a flurry of heavy snow en route to our destination. We were driving in their CRV and the AWD came in handy quite often. They said AWD was big in Colorado for just that reason, and it did seem like every other car was some kind of Subaru.

        But yeah, if you live in an urban/suburban area where they plow quickly and you’re only driving to work and the mall, AWD seems pretty pointless.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      I don’t think many would argue that Mountain states are a bit different that most Midwestern, eastern snowbelt states. I rarely opt for AWD. If you live in or near any sort of population center in a snow belt state, roads get plowed pretty quickly and frequently. If you live in Rural area, I can completely understand the desire for AWD.

      When it does snow, everyone is traveling at the same turtle speeds. AWD/4WD means nothing on flat slow roads and it is really only beneficial a half dozen days per year (in a typical year unless you live around lake effect snow, e.g. Buffalo).

      In a populated areas in relatively flat locations, FWD is all you need even in the snow. The other 360 days a year you are carrying around dead weight and using up unnecessary fuel.

    • 0 avatar
      road_pizza

      Born and raised in n.e. Ohio and still live here, we get a metric sh*t ton of snow every winter and I get by just fine in an RWD car with proper snow tires.

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      Or people who buy decent tires.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    It’s the logical successor to the Kia Soul, which made the cheap compact ‘cool’ until the CUV craze could mature enough to adopt that part of the segment. It’s time to seriously start worrying about compact sedans.

  • avatar
    probert

    It’s a shame the dynamics have been dumbed down. One of the pleasures of a small car, to me, is a sense of tossability, but in the US the mantra seems to be – “make a small car feel like a big car” which is sad. One thing about the juke was that it was a blast to drive, but murica wants soft slop, it gets soft slop. Hope the civic maintains it’s dynamics.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      well, a lot of people drive on the highway, even small cars. so the move towards big car characteristics is understandable, if regrettable.

    • 0 avatar
      road_pizza

      I don’t care how fun the Puke was to drive, it was an assault on the eyes. Easily one of the ugliest vehicles ever foisted on the driving public. A true rolling mud fence.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I truly believe that AWD, except in true SUV’s, trucks and perhaps luxury/performance vehicles is primarily a marketing ploy for the gullible. Having driven well over 1 million miles in Ontario, in everything from fullsize vans, air-cooled VW’s, rear wheel drive D3 luxo barges/PLCs/Sedans, SUV’s to econoboxes both RWD and FWD. I have only been ‘stuck’ twice in my life. And one of those instances was in an AWD vehicle. And both times, the vehicle did not have ‘winter’ tires. I truly doubt that anybody will take a Kicks offroading. So the lack of AWD probably means next to zero in sales terms. Particularly in regards to their target market. For an example refer to the Soul.

    As for an integral navigation system. That is for old people. All ‘youngsters’ merely use their phone. Why pay hundreds for a system that you won’t use.

    So, in my opinion, Nissan has checked all the right boxes with this model.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    For similar styling I would get a Veloster.

  • avatar
    Dingleberrypiez_Returns

    I’ve researched subcompacts quite a bit, both sedans and CUVs, and the Kia Soul easily came out as the best value while still delivering a desirable package. This seems to offer it some competition. I wonder if it’s as good as the effusive coverage on TTAC would lead us to believe.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      If every touchpoint is 1/2″ off-center for a driver that gave it a glowing review..

      it must be really really really good….

      For real, though– that tiny twist in posture makes any car unbearable after the honeymoon period. This review isn’t useful for anyone that isn’t giving a free car back after a week.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    While not marketed as such, the Juke was a legit alternative to the Mini Countryman. This car may be an alternative to a Chevy Trax. Progress?

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Tim, the Apple CarPlay will become more attractive soon (and the lack of factory less of a problem), as Apple announced this week that iOS 12 will support third-party navigation apps like Google Maps and Waze in CarPlay.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    This vehicle is the answer to a question nobody asked.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      That must be why this segment’s sales are on the rise.

      New/redesigned sedans would seem to be answering questions not many consumers are asking anymore.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Looks more interesting than I had guessed beforehand.

    Nissan makes a pretty durable car, and this could be just the thing for a lot of customers.

  • avatar

    I expected not to like this. At all.

    However, for that sort of money and as a Sentra alternative, I think it works alright. Certainly the interior looks nicer. And I like it more than the ridiculous CH-R or the HR-V.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    GTR it or GTFO.

    “Hey, VW, I got your R, right here…”

  • avatar
    asphaltcowboy

    I’ve noticed how Americans are now starting to warm to the compact hatchback car. The Kick joins the CX-3, CH-R, Kona and HR-V etc. They just had to call them subcompact crossovers instead of hatchbacks – although hatchback is quicker to say.

    I still can’t tell the difference between an Mazda 3 Sport and the CX-3 at a glance.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Is each new, smaller “cuv” (there’s a letter combination that’s gotten old fast) segment bringing us back to the days of cheap – even if not particularly cheap – and cheerful hatchbacks? It seems they’re trying to condition the buyers back into hatchbacks because functionally I see very little difference. Are hatchbacks (not SUVs) cheaper to manufacture being essentially one big box with a nipple?

    That said the proportions on the EcoSport, Trax/Encore and CH-R are an assault to anybody who has working eyes. This car, the CX-3, and the HR-V seem to nail it. I’m not familiar enough with the rest in the segment of cheap and cheerful hatchbacks by any other name to be able to say.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Crashdaddy430: The design is starting to really grow on me. In addition to the LC500 this is the best looking Lexus...
  • 285exp: If the nag screen made you agree to waive your right to sue the manufacturer in case of an accident before...
  • jetcal: Haven’t seen one in years. I actually looked at the SER, the kicker was the dealers marking ’em...
  • DrivingEnthusiast.net: That’s exactly it: decent suspension, symmetrical AWD, 6-speed manual, and another...
  • DrivingEnthusiast.net: CX30 compelling? Look under the back end for the same beam axle the CX-3 uses. Then crawl...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber