By on April 27, 2018

2018 Nissan Kicks, Image: Nissan

Replacing the toenails-for-turn-signals Juke, Nissan created the Kicks and has been showing it off for some time now. Scheduled to appear on dealer lots later this spring, the company has been mum on pricing, no doubt in an effort to not show its hand in the murderously competitive subcompact crossover segment.

The Canadian arm of the company apparently has no such concerns, releasing pricing details this morning for that market. Safe to say, Nissan is angling for the budget crown, as its base price of $17,995 undercuts its competitors in the land of maple syrup and hockey sticks.

Three familiar trims will comprise the front-drive-only Kicks family, from base S to volume-leader SV and sport-themed SR. I say “themed” because the same powertrain team is offered across the board: a 1.6-litre DOHC 16-valve four-cylinder making 125 horsepower and 115 lb-ft of torque. Hooked to the company’s Xtronic transmission, highway fuel economy is rated at 35 mpg.

“The new Kicks is designed to fit the needs of singles or couples looking for expressive styling, personal technology, smart functionality and advanced safety features at an affordable price starting under $18,000 CAD,” said Scott Pak, a senior manager in product planning at Nissan Canada.

Emergency braking and a rear-view monitor will be available on all Canadian trims, as are seven airbags and an infotainment system featuring the latest toys. While American content levels haven’t officially been released, a quick perusal of Kicks propaganda on that country’s Nissan website reveals a promise of similar equipment.

It’s natural to assume that any new car will be cheaper in America, but Nissan has a history of bucking that norm. The 370Z, which is in production for its 342nd year, stickers at $29,998 in Canada and $29,990 in the States. Content levels and powertrain options are all but identical. With this in mind, your humble author thinks the Canadian price point is a reasonable ballpark for the American Monroney, as well.

If so, it would certainly undercut its rivals. Like-for-like, the Kicks price is $2,000 less than the base Qashqai Rogue Sport, a machine advertised for $19,995 in the Great White North. Customers stateside see an MSRP of $22,110. Perhaps they’re paying extra for a name that is not inscrutable.

At other showrooms in Canada, customers will pay more for similarly sized machines. The alarming Toyota C-HR starts at $24,750, while a base EcoSport will hack your life for $22,099. If that pricing gulf carries over to America, there’s every reason to think the Kicks will post strong sales numbers and take a piece of the subcompact crossover pie in short order. Its non-alien styling will probably help, too.

Canadians will be able to get their Kicks in June. We’ll keep our ear to the ground for American pricing.

[Images: Nissan]

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17 Comments on “Value Menu: Nissan Slaps a Low Price on 2018 Kicks...”


  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Well I have recently been informed it is my responsibility to acquire for our family sometime in the next 14 months a ‘small’ FWD, SUV/CUV type of vehicle. No argument allowed against this on my part.

    The mandatory options/requirements being heated front seats and 2 pedals (as we still do have a 3 pedal vehicle in our ‘fleet’ and split folding rear seats.

    Quite frankly based on these ‘requirements’ I will probably be looking at a 36 to 60 month lease, preferably with zero down. And the decision will largely be based on price. Lease primarily because ‘not a Toyota/Honda’ and in 4 years or lifestyle may have a drastic change.

    The current favoured choices being the Kona and the Soul. The Nitro would be #1 but is most likely outside my pricing parameters. Based on these criteria,the suggested price point and the fact that our local Nissan dealer is actually quite ‘professional’ it appears that depending on its ‘sightlines’ from the driver’s seat, that the Kick may become our first choice.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I would probably jump into Kona or Soul. At least, they can have more than 125hp

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Meant Kia Niro, not Nitro which is in my original post.

        As for H.P. since one of my offspring drives like ‘Goggles Pisano’ and since the cost of gasoline is rapidly escalating (here in Canada at least) and is expected to reach record highs within the next 12 months, ‘just enough’ HP is probably more in line with what is required.

    • 0 avatar
      genuineleather

      Buick Encore leases for peanuts; even the new GMC Terrain has been going out the door with pretty fat incentives. Try Leasehackr.com; plenty of people post the cheapest lease deals they’ve been offered.

      • 0 avatar
        redgolf

        I second the Buick Encore, 1.4 turbo plenty of power, at least for this old man! 2016 I lease it, not exactly a super lease deal but zero down, $25k could of bought it for under $20k as they had $5k on the hood! I’ll decide at lease end if I want to buy!

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Nissan really xB’d the Juke. What a shame.

  • avatar
    St.George

    It looks decent, is of the ‘form factor du jour’ and will likely fit in to a lot of peoples budgets. I predict we’ll be seeing a lot of these.

    Nissan gets a rough ride in these comments. We have a 2015 Pathfinder that has served us well, the purchasing criteria were:-

    – 3 rows (it actually has a usable 3rd row, better than most!)
    – Cheap (it was 25k new)
    – refined
    – not a van (wife’s decision)

    It does not steer like a Porsche but handles fine for what it is, and the maligned CVT actually works very well. No ‘rubber-band’ feeling, strong acceleration, no complaints to be honest.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Maybe next they can slap an attractive front end on it.

  • avatar
    Groovypippin

    I am not going to argue with how well Nissan is doing in terms of overall sales because they are doing well, but boy oh boy do they sell some sub-par offerings. In terms of approach they really have gone “full domestic” in that they sell on the basis of incentives, feature content and price – not quality, not long-term reliability, not re-sale value.

    Can anyone here think of a single Nissan model that would realistically be in a “best vehicle in its class” conversation? I can’t.

  • avatar
    Dutcowski

    Death blow for the Canadian Micra, Sentra & Versa Note sales.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Vehicles like this are the natural end result of crossover mania. What exactly makes this any sort of utility vehicle above and beyond a regular hatchback? The answer is NOTHING but the styling. This is the same phony baloney Ford is about to foist off on us with the Focus Active. Throw some black cladding around the wheels and jack it up 1/4″ and suddenly its a crossover!

  • avatar
    threeer

    “The new Kicks is designed to fit the needs of singles or couples looking for expressive styling, personal technology, smart functionality and advanced safety features at an affordable price,” and not one word on anything resembling driving dynamics. Yep, that’s where we are today, folks…

  • avatar
    Carrera

    Infinitely better looking that the Juke.

  • avatar
    jcisne

    342 years making the 370Z? That’s a record. 17th century drivers surely must have had a hard time finding suitable roads for their 370Z.

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