By on May 27, 2018

Tesla Model 3, Image: Tesla

So far, 2018 hasn’t turned out to be a great year for Tesla Motors. The company has been plighted with production issues, some quality control problems, bad press over the questionable safety of its Autopilot system, and concerns over the financial stability of the company. While all of these matters remain fixable, the compounding pressure seems to have left Tesla CEO Elon Musk a bit unhinged — which has caused some complications of its own and been exacerbated by negative media attention.

The automaker needs a win, even a small one, so it can help rebuild its reputation and alleviate some of that pressure. Fortunately, it seems to have found its opportunity.

Last week, Consumer Reports gave the Tesla Model 3 a very mixed review. While it claimed to enjoy the vehicle’s handling and superior electric range, the outlet said its in-car controls were distracting and noted its average stopping distance of 152 feet was “far worse than any contemporary car we’ve tested and about 7 feet longer than the stopping distance of a Ford F-150 full-sized pickup.”

As a result, it could not recommend the the Model 3 to consumers. Musk immediately flew to Twitter to respond, saying the matter would be fixed without customers needing to have the vehicle serviced. 

Although Tesla was also careful to hint that Consumer Reports test data could have been an anomaly, going on to say that later examples of the Model 3 shouldn’t be affected by any braking issues. “Tesla’s own testing has found braking distances with an average of 133 feet when conducting the 60-0 mph stops using the 18″ Michelin all season tire and as low as 126 feet with all tires currently available,” the automaker said in a response to the review. “Stopping distance results are affected by variables such as road surface, weather conditions, tire temperature, brake conditioning, outside temperature, and past driving behavior that may have affected the brake system.”

A few days later, Musk announced that the braking issue had been solved. In a Twiter response from Friday he said that a “firmware fix for upgraded brake performance on standard Model 3 started rolling out yesterday. Should improve braking distance by ~20 ft for repeated heavy braking events. Thanks @ConsumerReports for excellent critical feedback!”

The final line was in direct opposition to his critical response to the media of late, which has become increasingly antagonistic. Last week he suggested that he was going “to create a site where the public can rate the core truth of any article & track the credibility score over time of each journalist, editor & publication.”

Public response to this had individuals claiming everything from a global conspiracy that had the mainstream media trying to ruin Tesla stock via false reports to the possibility that Tesla had suffered some very real setbacks that were reported without giving the company the benefit of the doubt. Either way, the vast majority of Elon’s followers voted on a poll that his hypothetical website, intended to keep the press honest, would be a good step.

“The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to sugarcoat the lie, is why the public no longer respects them,” Musk said in a tweet from earlier in the week. He then went on to say the repeated coverage of the Model 3’s production delays were obsessive and outlined a “general increase of misleading clickbait” within reporting.

This was followed by Musk’s former communications director throwing in his two cents. “At a time when Western democratic norms and institutions are being eroded, and journalists around the world face mounting threats and persecution just for doing their jobs, I’m proud to know so many amazing reporters,” said Dex Torricke-Barton, who was previously employed by SpaceX, Musk’s spaceflight company. “Thanks for fighting for the truth.”

As for the strategy itself, we’re not entirely sure how well it will play in the long term. Musk’s war with the media has already received more coverage than the company’s firmware update — an impressive and advanced technology that seems to have solved a tangible braking issue on at least some of the Model 3s sold to consumers without their needing to have it brought in. That’s impactful and something even highly biased outlets would have found exceptionally difficult to spin. But reports of it were largely buried by the bickering between Musk and the media.

[Image: Tesla Motors]

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75 Comments on “Tesla Fixes Braking Issue Over the Airwaves, Musk Wages War Against the Media...”


  • avatar
    MartyToo

    Next week, Tesla reupdates brakes and screws them up again. Sorry, no worries, there was a bug in the software. These things happen! Progress must march onward, comrade.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    I would think any car company tests its brakes and brakes of comparators cars to see how they compare. If it was just a change in some software that took about a day, why wasn’t it that way when they first designed it?

    Also he says the press doesn’t treat him fairly, perhaps he and President Trump should get together! For the record, I Iike Trump.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Why did the Model 3 ship without a functioning radio? Because Tesla.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      He’s not wrong on the press being full of itself, they act like they are a class above everyone else, when in reality they are filled with the most unintelligent puppets in existence.

      Case in point

      Really proof that Elon has a reasonable distrust, these “journalists” are purposely misleading their followers to make Elon look bad.
      http://i.magaimg.net/img/3dqw.png

      This one is just an example of how far this profession has sunk when a writer for Scientific America, BBC, and Wired writes something like this.
      https://i.redd.it/rufxamwcii011.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        anomaly149

        Followers of “dearest Elon” appear to misunderstand how these types of press jaunts work.

        You take journalists through a very carefully curated Potemkin village of things you want them to write about, and you let them write whatever they want about what you’ve shown. If you’re remotely honest, that village might actually be connected to your real products or facilities, but it will be staged nonetheless. You certainly don’t walk them past the “omg top secret11 for real guys!” section of the company, no matter what any journalist or executive might claim for some “exclusive.” (you think reporters got to go into the real actively working design clay studio when the Ford GT was unveiled?)

        This is how every company, inclusive of Tesla, operates, and Tesla spends way too much money on marketing and PR to not have this fully implemented. The difference is Tesla tries to project this weird image of ignorant innocence.

        It’s straight up gaslighting. Tesla wants to have absolute control of all media attention around them, and is just doing so under with the excuse of “oh our tech is just so high-tech we don’t want you to spill the beans!”

        Spoiler alert: everyone can lose $5,000/unit filling a floorpan with laptop batteries. That ain’t tech. Look at the TNGA, or the Bolt, or cell phones if you want to see modern and innovative electrical systems pushing the boundaries of tech.

  • avatar
    agroal

    Pretty nice business model when the government subsidizes these toys for the wealthy. Look at them up close. The build quality is horrendous.

    • 0 avatar
      Ion

      Most of these “green” businesses are an artificial market. Like home energy storage batteries (also Tesla).

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        At least the GM EV1 fanatics finally shut the heck up now that they see with Tesla what happens when the government pours billions in subsidies into an EV car company on top of giving them a ready made auto plant.

        Also, “the next revolution in battery tech is just 5 years away!”.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          “Giving them an already made auto plant”

          Where do you get this from? Didn’t Tesla buy the plant from Toyota? Perhaps there were tax incentives from the state, but that is a far cry from “giving them” the plant…

          Links?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I was able to check out (but not drive) a Model 3 this weekend. I saw no build quality issues. The one I sampled seemed at least as well built as, say, a 3-series BMW or Audi A4.

      The touchscreen controls, though, were incredibly annoying. To adjust the outside mirrors, you have to pull up a menu on the touchscreen, and then use the buttons on the steering wheel to adjust the mirror. If you want to turn on the windshield wipers or headlights, you have to pull up a menu on the screen. Thankfully, stuff like the power window and seat controls was done the old-fashioned way. Anyone who’s computer literate will be able to handle the controls, but I like my car’s controls to be literal, not virtual.

      That would have turned me off on owning this vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        rudiger

        To be fair, how often does one adjust their outside mirrors? I’ll give them that one.

        But windshield wipers and headlights? That kind of depends. I’d venture to guess that a vehicle as supposedly as technically advanced as the Model 3 would have automatic, rain-sensitive wipers and light-sensitive headlights. If that’s the case, touchscreen controls would seem alright.

        The braking issue is an interesting one since it actually is an age-old auto industry tradition. In years past, when an auto manufacturer wanted to cut costs, two of the primary areas they would do it was brakes and seats.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I think the Model 3 does have rain sensing wipers, but what happens when you have to hit the washers in the snow, or you just want to clean off the windshield, or want to vary the intermittent setting? Stuff like that’s a pain, and if I’m dropping upwards of sixty grand, I want as little of that as possible.

          • 0 avatar
            rudiger

            I guess it depends on how ‘smart’ the wipers are. Maybe the idea is if the wiper sensors are clever enough, they’ll clear snow or other debris on their own, so the few (if any) times it would be necessary to override the automatic setting isn’t worth having a dedicated, separate wiper/washer control on the dash.

            In fact, I can see the autonomous feature being directly related in that a camera would be constantly checking to make sure the windshield is clear.

            But that’s all a big ‘if’ and, frankly, I agree I think I’d like to have a traditional wiper control.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @FreedMike: The touch screen was the biggest reason I cancelled my Model 3 reservation. I consider it a potential safety hazard.

        There were other reasons, but the screen is something you have to live with every day.

  • avatar
    dwford

    It’s a little scary that such things can get fixed over the air with a few tweaks to code. It’s not hard to imagine a programming error getting sent out that creates a dangerous situation for unsuspecting Tesla drivers.

  • avatar
    NG5

    Has someone independent verified that the braking issue has actually been fixed via software update? The article seems to say Tesla said it has been, but I’d like to see it from another source. Would be an incredible result if so!

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    [code]apply.parking.brake.when.brake.pedal.is.actuated[/code]

  • avatar
    hpycamper

    A much more temporately written article about Tesla, as opposed to the one of the 24th.

  • avatar
    kwong

    So let me get this straight. The media discovers a critical braking issue that was replicated across many Model 3s, reports it to the manufacturer, and now he’s waging war against them. He should be taking them before NTHSA, CFPB, and every other motoring association goes after him. How many days and how many accidents would it have taken for Tesla to have discovered that their brake “fade” issues existed? In my mind they saved his bacon, even though I still don’t trust Tesla. If the program was flawed from the beginning, who knows if the patch is flawed…or any other program in the car’s systems?

  • avatar

    Musk and Trump have many things in common. Both are celebrities/geniuses who cannot stop tweeting and both are desperate for media attention and have an urge to be in news 24 hours a day.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    My guess: They removed some margin from the system in order to improve braking distance. Such a change doesn’t come for free. Perhaps the brakes are now closer to activating the ABS, or maybe the pads will wear out much faster.

    But for all the purists out there – you should realize that your car’s brakes are also attached to a computer. The days of hydraulic-only brakes ended in the 1990s.

    • 0 avatar
      Hogey74

      I think they should be talking openly about this. Lexus in the 00s demonstrated how to turn a serious safety recall into a PR win. I reckon your guess must be correct but why are we guessing here? This is important to more than just car nerds: why wouldn’t the maximal application of brakes lead to maximal stopping? This isn’t regular braking, this is when it really matters. I know I can out-brake ABS in older cars, isn’t the latest tech supposed to make skill obsolete? If some design committee decided full braking wasn’t needed, that’s a very big deal. Or if they only just realized they made a serious mistake in code, that’s similarly concerning.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      +1

    • 0 avatar
      SkiD666

      Likely what was changed was the ratio of mechanical braking to regenerative braking ratio. Before the update it might have been 90% mechanical : 10% regen to allow for energy recovery, after the update it’s likely 100% mechanical and max ABS.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        This was my theory from the get go. You can’t fix brakes via a software update because they are hydraulic. You might be able tweak the brake booster pressure or distribution via software, but the rest of the system is very much mechanical. What you can change is the rate of regen and threshold for ABS. Both of these could make a difference in braking distance.

  • avatar
    Hogey74

    Folks there is an old-school log in issue… I got here eventually but I had to come find the article again.

    Look I take most things with a grain of salt, with extra for anything coming out of the US at the moment. It’s a bit of a pressure cooker over there by the sounds of it.dsad

    This braking situation is just plain bad. I reckon Musk got the very rough end of the pineapple from Top Gear over that roadster story and I bet he’s a bit scarred by that. Add some pressure from various directions and here we are. The correct response is cautious but instant mortification, urgent tests and a notice to all current owners about the whole thing. I believe he has their email addresses. Inherent to this is a basic humility: nothing else matters until safety is dealt with. The best model for this is aviation and specifically the FAA: a recent wing failure and fatal crash of a common aircraft resulted in a bulletin to all owners and urgent investigation. This is one of many over the decades. Being defensive over safety stuff is very dangerous: NASA pioneered and demonstrated the benefits of open communication as part of a positive safety culture with the space race. RIP Alan Bean :-(.
    Sadly they then demonstrated a negative safety culture with the disastrous Space Shuttle.

    More generally, I know I want Musk to succeed. The US auto industry has been perhaps the best example of a sector falling into a rut and doling out progress at the minimum possible rate for at least 30 years. It’s criminal IMO that this got to the point that Toyota is the best selling passenger vehicle in the US. The home of cars. The. Home. Nothing against Toyota, I’ve done most of my driving in them. Those who instinctively dislike Musk typically have some healthy skepticism mixed with some unhealthy fear of being wrong. I get that. But if this isn’t merely a blip and Musk has been having a bad week, if this hints at a wider underlying culture of defensiveness, Telsa can not succeed.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      The FAA does a commendable job on safety–and it will continue to do so, at least until it gets ‘privatized’ into greed and incompetence–but it’s the NTSB that generally gets to the root of issues. Ideally, the two work hand-in-hand, but there is often some contention. Note the NTSB now has ‘eyes’ on Tesla.

      In my mind, the all-time ‘Champion of Safety’ was Hyman Rickover when he was developing the ‘Nuclear Navy.’ His motivation might be suspect–he was possibly more concerned about bad PR than about submariners–but the loss of the Thresher showed what happens when cost and expediency supersede good practices and safety (the Scorpion, well, nobody knows for sure).

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Hmmm, you can walk into a Nissan dealer and buy the new Leaf or go to your local BMW dealer and get a new i3? e3?. Today. Range anxiety? Toyota will sell you one of many Prius’ or you can gt 4-squared at your Chevy dealer and come home with a Volt. BTW, the Volt is proof that GM can do things well when they want to. Reference Corvettes,Suburbans, and well, anything Body On Frame when you’re wanting to find GM dong things well. I still don’t understand why people are waiting on Teslas when evs/hybrids are on sale NOW.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Because brand, although some sheen is getting worn off Tesla with 800 grit sandpaper. Musk just can’t help himself.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Well, yes, brand, but also style and performance.

        • 0 avatar
          Damski

          +1
          The closest competitor, the Chevy Bolt, is a small, frumpy, FWD car. I would choose a model 3 all day long due to its performance and looks in comparison to anything else out there. The constant software updates would worry me, but Tesla does fix its mistakes quickly. I would never buy, use, or trust autopilot, but I like driving, not the norm these days.

        • 0 avatar
          carguy67

          “Style???”

          I’m OK with the rest of the car, but the front end is still a duck-billed abomination (or, at best, an acquired taste I haven’t acquired).

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Yeah, I agree on the front end styling. Still, these are FAR better looking cars than any other EV on the market.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      @el scotto: You obviously haven’t driven a Tesla, nor do you appreciate the reasons why many people buy EVs. Hint: It isn’t to save the planet.

      I’ve driven the Leaf for 3 years, test-driven the i3, i-MiEV, Bolt, and Model S. I also own an Optima Hybrid, which is zero fun to drive.

      The Leaf is torquey and responsive, and I liked it. But Tesla is the sales leader because their cars are truly exciting to drive. Point-and-shoot acceleration is awesome.

      Looks are subjective, but to me the Model 3 is beautiful. (The only reason I kept my Model 3 reservation so long was because of its looks, but eventually the reasons to cancel overruled my vain bias.)

      If you think people are waiting for a Model 3 just to hug a tree, think again.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    This article raised two significant topics of discussion.

    Technical Tesla challenges and Tesla’s internal political challenges.

    Tesla is behind the 8 ball in all areas of the Model 3’s rollout and I do believe much could of been alleviated by having less internal Tesla politics driven by one personality and personality is what drives Tesla. At least Apple produced a usable product profitably.

    Tesla is facing considerable challenges in the engineering of the Model 3. When I state engineering I’m stating all from production engineering to product engineering. All outcomes and aspects of vehicles produced by Tesla has been subpar.

    Elon Musk seems to be central to all the poor decisions made by Tesla. Musk is similar to Trump with the challenges he faces. The people surrounding him. Musk is also a good marketer as is Trump. He’s a salesman with little substance, but much vision.

    I think Musk started out with a poor strategy in place for the production of the Model 3, planning and execution could only be described as poor and the risks under valued. All the remedies Musk has used showed and over estimation in Tesla’s capacity to resolve the challenges.

    Tesla need’s to create an acheivable and believable plan, but, Musk needs to sell and show what processes Tesla will use to bring Tesla around.

    The apparent simplicity for the rectification of the “fading brakes” to me the field of work I’m in smells of a lie and is a marketing ploy by Musk ….. again ….. to placate shareholders and give a rallying cry to the brainwashed Tesla fans.

    Musk needs to go and someone with industry experience needs to revamp Tesla from the top down to make Tesla a viable proposition for the future.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      Tesla seems like it’s one major catastrophe away from bankruptcy, something like Musk dying unexpectedly. Without Musk, there is no Tesla. Or maybe down in flames like Fisker.

      Barring that, maybe the endgame for Tesla is for Musk to ultimately sell to a high-end player with deep pockets like, say, GM (for Cadillac) or maybe Daimler, who doesn’t seem to have a lot of EV presence.

    • 0 avatar
      Damski

      Why do Tesla fans have to be brainwashed? Is there any electric car on the market that can compare with the Model S or Model 3 for aesthetics and performance? No.
      The growing pains of a new car company are to be expected, especially one that has decided to start from scratch with every aspect of vehicle design.
      It is so easy to be a hater, and call Musk names, but he does what he is going to do. Resupplying the ISS anyone? The first non-government entity to do that by the way. These are not easy things, but he finds a way.
      Admittedly his timetables are all out of wack, but if you say one year and it ends up taking three; you are still ahead of the Big 3 with a five year production timeline.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      @Big Al from Oz: While much has been made of the ‘slow’ Model 3 rollout, the Model 3 will be the highest-selling EV this year, and Tesla will extend its market dominance.

      YTD, Tesla has 63% of the BEV market. The Model 3 alone is 31% of the BEV market, and this will only increase.

      Tesla won’t go away if Musk does. People still want their cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        SCE to AUX,
        Whilst you are correct about with your numbers, you still need to be able to produce at a profit.

        A similar situation is confronted by Ford at the moment. The difference is Ford are making a profit, abeit, less than the competition.

        The F-150, even selling in the numbers it does doesn’t generate the profits of a Ram or GM pickup. Eventually a slump will hit and I think Ford will realise those aluminium wunder trux wasn’t such a great idea. CAFE changes have also given Sergio and Barra a helping hand with pickups.

        Back to Tesla. Tesla even concentrating on the higher margin Model 3s isn’t cutting the mustard on the profit side of the sheet. This can’t go on for much longer.

        Popularity driven by price is not the best way to run a business.

        I don’t see Tesla resolving the production issues it currently has. They will improve, but I think the improvement will not meet Musks declarations or what the markets will require.

        I think Tesla will become Chinese.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’d like to see someone test the same vehicle that performed so poorly after the re-code and verify that this fixed the problem.

    If that’s the case, then I don’t see much of an issue here.

    As far as Musk’s verbal diarrhea is concerned, a) if we have a president who can act the same way, then Musk can too, and b) the guy’s basically saying the same things that every CEO says when the press gets hold of a damaging story, the difference being that Musk doesn’t have much of a filter.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Not sure anyone will see this comment, but it was just verified by CR:

      https://insideevs.com/tesla-model-3-not-recommended-by-consumer-reports/

  • avatar
    stingray65

    If some code changes to the braking software actually solved the problem, then the question is why did they let the cars out the door with the “inferior” code in the first place? Will the new software tweak reduce the regen function in favor of early application of the mechanical brakes? If so, I would expect that the range might be now lower than the advertised figure, and we will soon have stories about unhappy owners that can no longer make it to their lake cabin on a single charge after this brake update.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Stingray,
      It means with such a simple fix Tesla is using the customer (and reviewers) as apart of his product testing plan.

      a. Tesla would of known about the Model 3’s braking issues, or

      b. Tesla has the wrong people involved in product testing.

      From the massive amount of articles, opinions I’ve read on Tesla operations, it wouldn’t surprise much bad news is filtered out before it reaches Musk.

      Musk, like Trump are overly defensive when bad news arrive. When it does I don’t think they learn much for the future. Its about them, the best.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Per my comment above, I’m sure this change comes with a cost – probably to regen or pad wear, or some other detail, since all the hardware stays the same.

  • avatar
    TW5

    Musk’s war with the media seems like a calculated move. He already has the CNN crowd wrapped around his little finger. The only threat to his empire are the anti-MSM crowd. Therefore, start bashing the media, especially since they are already signaling that a takedown of Tesla’s stock price might be in future talking points.

  • avatar
    jthorner

    Musk’s relationship with the media is very much like Donald Trump’s. Had neither of them ever been written about and covered on the TV they would have almost no power or influence. “The Media” literally gave them much of what they have. Tesla never buys advertising because it doesn’t need to. The “news” departments of media outlets gladly hand countless words and hours over to Tesla. Ditto for Trump.

    The two men also know that they can leverage their profile and get MORE media attention by bashing the media. If all of the media simply never covered it when either of these guys went off, Musk and Trump would both have greatly diminished power. Bottom line: These guys know how to play the media against itself.

  • avatar
    jthorner

    Tesla has brought the consumer software mindset to automobiles: Get revenue now out of something that sort of works and keep patching it later.

  • avatar
    arthurk45

    Tesla produces dangerous brakes, doesn’t realize it until notified by an automotive magazine, then fixes the bug and acts as though it is providing its customers a superior product. So, Elon, how many wrecks and fatalities happened before your grand gesture?

  • avatar
    The Comedian

    If they re-kajiggered the mechanical vs regenerative braking to shorten stopping distances, it should have some impact on the range for the vehicle.

    Turning that kinetic energy into heat instead of capturing it must have a cost in range.

  • avatar
    Tennessee_Speed

    A high performance sedan should have a 60 to 0 distance of 115 ft. or less.

  • avatar
    incautious

    the easiest fix is to ship a firetruck with every 3. Yea that’s proven to stop a Tesla on a dime!

  • avatar
    Fordson

    Definitely not an apologist for Tesla, but after Musk said that on the standard tires, they were seeing stopping distances of 133 feet, and as low as 126 feet on some optional ones, Edmunds tested their very early production Model 3, and came up with…exactly 133 feet on the 18″ older MXM4 Michelins and 128 feet on the newer, optional all-season Conti 19-inchers. I don’t know if there is a summer-only option for Model 3s.

    So Musk was exactly right and Consumer Reports looks like they don’t know what they’re doing or have a very nonstandard friction surface they’re testing on.

    Note that Musk said that the tweak will result in better stopping distances on repeated stops, not initial stops. So not sure we’re all talking apples to apples.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Why does a Tesla need brakes? They obviously crash into Emergency Vehicles often.

    Brakes will not help.

    https://www.news.com.au/technology/innovation/motoring/another-tesla-on-autopilot-crashes-into-emergency-services-vehicle/news-story/59fa4ff263578747ec04d6f13410f57c

  • avatar
    incautious

    And in other news a Tesla slams into a parked police car. No word as to weather he was aiming for a firetruck instead.


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