By on May 25, 2018

Image: South Jordan Police Department via Associated Press

The collision earlier this month between a Tesla Model S and a stopped fire truck in Utah didn’t result in serious injuries, but questions remain as to why the vehicle, piloted by a suite of driving aids, didn’t recognize the approaching danger.

Witnesses claim the vehicle didn’t brake in the moments leading up to the impact. The driver, admittedly distracted by her phone (for a period of 80 seconds), only reacted less than a second before impact, police said. Now, thanks to a South Jordan Police Department report obtained by The Associated Press (via The Detroit News), we know a little more about what happened in those last moments.

According to the docs, obtained via an open records request, the Model S accelerated for 3.5 seconds prior to the May 11th collision. Less than a second before impact, the 29-year-old driver manually applied the brakes.

The Model S involved in the accident had been in the driver’s possession for over two years, and had apparently been used in this manner several times. The driver even told police she had enabled its Autopilot functions on the same stretch of road. Obviously, she felt comfortable leaving the driving duties to the car, despite Tesla’s warning for drivers to remain alert, with their hands on the wheel. She told the police as much.

Unlike those other trips, however, this one saw her car plow into the back of a stopped truck at 60 mph. That’s the speed the driver set, police say, and records show the vehicle’s Traffic Aware Cruise Control slowed the car down to 55 mph shortly before the crash to match a vehicle driving ahead of it. It’s assumed that vehicle then changed lanes, prompting the Tesla to accelerate back to its cruising speed. At that point, the collision occurred.

The driver, Heather Lommatzsch, claims the car issued no visual or audio warnings in those final moments. Why the car’s forward-facing camera and array of sensors didn’t detect the stopped vehicle is something the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration intends to find out, as this isn’t the first time a Tesla has collided with a clearly visible object while under Autopilot control.

Light rain was apparently falling at the time of the crash, which occurred during daylight hours.

While Tesla heightened its calls for caution after a fatal Florida crash in 2016, the word “Autopilot” remains in the automaker’s lexicon. That’s irking safety advocates, as the name itself implies full autonomy. The actual system is supposed to be used as a semi-autonomous driving aid, regardless of what online enthusiasts post in their videos.

Just this week, two safety non-profits, The Center for Auto Safety and Consumer Watchdog, called on the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Tesla’s use of the word, calling it “deceptive and misleading.” Tesla countered by saying its customers know the system’s limits, and that the company provides proper instructions on how to use the feature.

[Image: South Jordan Police Department via Associated Press]

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68 Comments on “Utah Police Docs Add New Detail to Utah Autopilot Crash...”


  • avatar
    Sub-600

    “Autopilot” + American Consumer = Loaded Gun.

    • 0 avatar
      road_pizza

      Yep.

    • 0 avatar
      erlebo

      The only way to stop a bad driver with Autopilot is with a good guy with a gun.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      My gut says that knowing there are some very stupid people out there, Tesla is at least to some greater or lesser degree culpable by providing these features. I would imagine they have their legal details worked out that protect them. Pity the bell curve when it comes to the population, but is there, and it does not correlate with the the wealth of the population, some of the wealthiest are the dumbest.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        “My gut says that knowing there are some very stupid people out there, Tesla is at least to some greater or lesser degree culpable by providing these features.”

        Perhaps. I think of it like when airbags became widely affordable in the early 1990s. I didn’t blame carmakers for the “I definitely don’t need to wear my seatbelt now because the technology magic airbag will save my life” people.

        I deeply resent those people who, when they are in a crash that would have been minimum injury with a seatbelt + airbag, instead of life-threatening injuries that result in the highway getting shutdown for a long time. I resent them because their decision to forego their seatbelt leads to my inconvenience of being late to my own destination. Yes, that’s some pretty cold logic on my part, but geez, buckle up, people!

        I wonder how many people who put blind trust in their automotive autopilots have IT problems working on a home computer or an office computer. Answer- every single one of them. How do they believe that somehow the technology magic autopilot car will never make a mistake, zero bugs, ever? Yes sirree, it will be totally different than every piece of electronics they have ever used!

        You don’t need a STEM degree to understand this. Common sense is called that for a reason. Anyone can figure this out…

  • avatar
    road_pizza

    The general populace has no idea what “Auto Pilot” REALLY means so stop already, Tesla.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Nah con man Elon knows better. He’s superior to everyone (look at all the “air time” he gets on this site alone) and we should always assume he is correct.

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      The problem is not the name auto pilot. The problem is that American drivers apparently think pilots play around on their cell phones when the auto pilot function is enabled.

  • avatar
    civicjohn

    Don’t forget to add “Full Self-Driving Capability” for the low, low price of $3,000. For that you get 8 cameras instead of 4 on a Model S, and a bunch of legalese on the website, and EM gets an interest-free loan.

    If that’s not the definition of bs, I don’t know what is.

    MobileEye gave Tesla the middle finger salute and after that breakup, “AutoPilot 2” worked almost as good as AP1 according to owner blogs. The latest news is that most AP cars will need a hardware upgrade.

    Nobody has a clue as to whether they will use an off-the-shelf CPU, or if Tesla is planning to design their own and send it out to a fab company for manufacturing, but Sir EM said most cars will need a new motherboard.

    I thought I was crazy to buy Apple at $90 bucks, but my company had about 60 Macs, and I was blinded by the light when I got my first iPhone. Probably the last stock purchase I will ever make on a gut feeling, but I’m glad I did. They will OWN the AI deployment in mobile, and it has been a great run.

    However, I digress. I should have scooped up some TSLA at $100 back in 2013, and I would have danced to my brokerage office. But, Apple will never have to jump through the regulation at the State and Federal level to bring new iPhones and services to the market.

    And I don’t drive my iPhone. This will not end pretty. They knocked out one class-action suit this week, terms not disclosed, but I tend to think that won’t be the last one.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Maybe Teslas just REALLY like (or hate) fire trucks?

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    I sincerely hope that the State of Utah revokes her driver’s license and doesn’t reinstate it. While I think the Autopilot system is bogus and full of bugs, she should’ve known better. If she keeps her license, then what? She gets a replacement Tesla and keeps on doing it.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      I hope she does get a replacement Tesla. And then when she crashes it because the softwares desgned to detect vehicles doesn’t detect a vehicle, it’s another Tesla off the road. Win/win.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        The way this works is that Tesla will pull the sensor data from this crash, and use it as part of their software-release acceptance tests.

        The car’s firmware is updated via OTA updates.

        So, this problem will be solved. And the problem which leads to the next crash will be solved the same way. At some point in the future (and it might be a long time), each release of the autopilot software will end up with more “driving experience” than you or I could possibly gain in a lifetime of driving. But we’re not there yet — the software barely has a learner’s permit. The crashes will continue until Tesla and distracted drivers find every corner case.

        The good news is that the autopilot is not a static thing the way, say, the Honda Sensing system is. It’s updates regularly with “bugfixes and performance improvements”. The stakes are a little higher than your average software project, though.

  • avatar
    whisperquiet

    Her phone should go on auto pilot and shut down upon entry to the Tesla and then she can devote time to driving with no distractions. Actually, all phones should be inoperable while a motor vehicle is in motion.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      There’s no way you are being serious.

      • 0 avatar
        OneAlpha

        Why is that not a serious idea?

        The best way to fix this problem is to develop and foster a culture of driving where getting into a crash because you weren’t paying attention is SHAMEFUL and EMBARRASSING.

        You don’t need high tech for that.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          There’s a huge corner case you’ve overlooked: passengers.

          Also, I use my phone for navigation and situational awareness while driving (Waze).

          Android Auto does a pretty good job of coming up with a sane middle ground. When you plug your phone into the car, it locks the screen and displays and automotive-specific interface on the infotainment system. It’s still crashy and doesn’t work well with all phones but it’s a good idea.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            ^ this

            Just because a driver *might* be distracted with a phone is no reason to deny service to anyone else in the car, including a driver who may use his phone properly and safely (hands-free).

            Who wants to go back to 1989 when it’s virtually impossible to get a hold of someone driving or in a car at all? My mom had the state police stop my dad on a cross-country trip because his mother (who he was coming from seeing) had passed. There was no other way to get in touch with him. Not even a simple message like “call asap”. Today, that situation wouldn’t exist. It’d be handled in a matter of seconds. And, he’d be using the SYNC system in their current car to not have to fumble for a phone when it rang.

            Its called progress, and with progress, there are bumps along the way. Just try to take solace in the fact that if it wasn’t for phones, people like the driver in the Tesla story would be distracted (by something) and poor drivers anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      Sub-600

      Some folks break the rules so let’s ban phones in cars? You must be a liberal. I suppose you want guns banned too? Narcotic pain relievers? I suppose you like the idea of locking up razor blades because people shoplift them? Lock up the Sudafed too because some people cook meth. Society loves to penalize everyone instead of calling a spade a spade and enforcing laws.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Know what I think should be banned? The “you must be a (fill in the blank)”
        silliness.

        Crap ideas are crap ideas, and it doesn’t matter if the idea is ‘liberal’ or ‘conservative.’

  • avatar
    gmichaelj

    So I followed a couple of links but didn’t see why the firetruck was stopped in the middle of the road.

    I know it’s not really the issue, but was it stopped for traffic at an intersection, or just randomly?

    I’m not trying to blame the stopped car. I just wonder if the system would react differently if the stop was within a 100′ (or whatever) from an intersection.

    • 0 avatar
      Wunsch

      I believe it was stopped at a red light.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Vehicle to vehicle communication would make this sort of collision less likely.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @brandloyalty: From what I could tell from the pictures, it seems to have the old MobilEye single camera autopilot system. I’m no fan of single camera systems. I’m even experimenting with stereoscopic FLIR.

        • 0 avatar
          brandloyalty

          I have an aftermarket Mobileye 560 system. While it is remarkably capable, it makes enough mistakes that it would be disastrous if it could control the car. Not a good comparison, I realize.

          • 0 avatar

            Just curious as to what lead you to make this purchase? They installed these in my company vehicles a little over a year ago and I agree with your assessment entirely. I get false lane departure, collision and pedestrian alerts frequently and it often tells me I’m doing 45 over the limit on a freeway with a 55 mph limit, meaning somewhere along the line it read a sign that it saw as a 10 mph limit. Are the insurance discounts for it really that good?

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            At least Tesla was smart enough to ditch mobileye, but they really need to think about disabling the old systems. Or even better, upgrading them.

            https://techcrunch.com/2016/07/26/mobileye-wont-supply-tesla-self-driving-tech-beyond-current-eyeq3-processor/

          • 0 avatar
            brandloyalty

            @Andrew
            I fell asleep at the wheel years ago, and getting this system was part of my self-punishment.

            I don’t use the speed limit function because I don’t drive more than 10kph over the limit. The speed limit recognition reads offramp speed warning signs and gives false warnings. Such signs may look more different from regular speed limit signs in Israel, where Mobileye was designed, than in North America.

            Yes it gives false warnings. The most common I get is parked cars on the side if sharp corners. At the same time I give the system credit for working very well on dark rainy nights and even roads with snow cover. It goes into an error state on gravel or fully snow-covered roads.

            Has it prevented a crash? Hard to say. I drive in a lot of very dense traffic (Vancouver). There have been a few times that were close. How many times it precluded an incident is also clouded by the fact it discourages tailgating.

            The closest I came to a rear ender, I reacted faster than the Mobileye did. In heavy and suddenly slowing traffic the driver ahead slowed even more abruptly because he hit the car ahead of him. Had I braked a fraction of a second later or less firmly I would have hit him.

            I get no insurance discount for it.

  • avatar
    Hogey74

    I’m watching this one with interest. The autonomous car thing is strange in general, as if a bunch of nerds are trying to make “the future” happen without any particular community push for it. Hmmm

    These issues are very similar to those with aircraft in previous decades. Automation and digital information displays brought improvements for pilots but didn’t result in reduced accident rates. Well auto pilots reduced workloads and fatigue but plenty of aircraft drove themselves into mountains or the ground.

    Perhaps the best example IMO is the Cirrus with the first widely installed whole-aircraft parachutes. Despite the obvious benefits of a parachute, accident rates didn’t drop. It turns out that the technology was taking people out of the situation awareness that is what really protects people. I see a straight line connection to these recent car crashes: people overly impressed and reliant upon automation. This is only the start too. Eventually this tech will bring about significant reductions in crash rates but this won’t be the full story: crazy crashes will happen that really upset us. And the same availability effect that makes us think the world is super dangerous even when it’s actually getting safer will mean we’re more aware of a shrinking number of crashes.

    • 0 avatar
      OneAlpha

      Nerds, geeks and dorks all have this starry-eyed view of technology and the idea that machinery can fail genuinely seems to surprise them.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “Nerds, geeks and dorks all have this starry-eyed view of technology…”

        Indeed, and allow me to quote one such dork:

        “What if free people could live secure in the knowledge that their security did not rest upon the threat of instant U.S. retaliation to deter a Soviet attack, that we could intercept and destroy strategic ballistic missiles before they reached our own soil or that of our allies?”
        Ronald Reagan
        March 23, 1983

        And 35 years later, and untold billions of dollars later, SDI is still not a reality.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Has the aircraft industry rolled back safety systems, or decided what degree of equipment is best?

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I also have seen that the Cirrus aircraft have no spin-recovery procedure, except to pull the chute!

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      …”as if a bunch of nerds are trying to make “the future” happen without any particular community push for it.”

      That’s exactly what is happening.

      This approach has been wildly successful in the recent past. If you don’t believe me, look at the computer/phone you’re using to read this website.

      Yes, there are some unitneded consequences… But it’s usually a net-posotive. Except that part where Facebook made it easy for Russian spies to impersonate Americans and microtarget voters likely to turn out for Trump. That continues to be a real egg in our face.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      On the topic of those nerds, those are society’s inventors. Poo-pooing them a little bit for their tinkering and experimentation is fine. Most of their work goes nowhere. Poo-poo them a lot, consider the company you’re putting yourself in- historic poo-pooers who couldn’t see past the present day. No need to improve on the telegraph, why would anyone want to talk with electricity when you can travel there by horse drawn carriage (driven by a professional teamster) or steam train, candles work fine to light your house, airplanes don’t need to fly unless it’s on clear, sunny days…

      Be careful when poo-pooing nascent technology, and those who would seek to improve it, lest your opinions plop on the wrong side of history.

      Yes, I like puns about bodily functions. Maybe someone could make an app for that.

  • avatar
    James2

    Looking on the bright side, it seems the Model S’ crumple zones are engineered well. The cabin seems to be intact –and didn’t the woman involved just suffer a broken ankle? Too bad safety standards didn’t exist/apply to: 1) the Autopilot technology and 2) her level of awareness.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      My impression is that the damage is vastly less than what would result from a 60 mph crash. The sturdy part of the car went under the truck bumper.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Agreed on that. I really though that damage reflected a 25-35 mph crash.

        • 0 avatar
          civicjohn

          SCE,

          +1. They do seem to be good at crash protection, but they have to fix the freaking problem of ignoring static objects like fire trucks. It’s just silly press fodder for the haters.

          I also agree that it the US government should ultimately push these “AutoPilot” people to their own lane. The car/ phone controversy should be dealt with at well, however I will say that having a button on my steering wheel to answer a call actually makes me more aware and also to end the call ASAP. I can quickly see who’s calling and unless it’s a kid emergency, I won’t answer.

          AP and FSD are promoted “as the next logical step”, I don’t buy that crap.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Here’s the problem with “pushing the autopilot folks into their own lane,” though: there aren’t enough lanes to begin with.

            How about this for a logical next step: if you’re driving without your hands on the wheel while on Autopilot, it’s a six point ticket, and if you cause an accident doing that, it’s twelve points and it’s Vaya Con Dios to your license.

            To me, this isn’t much different than causing a wreck because you’re using both hands to Facetime, or texting, or some such nonsense.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      What is the passenger cell built from? Carbon fiber or some other super high-strength (and expensive) material?

      One wonders, since there isn’t an engine to absorb the impact. (Though I suppose it’s better not to have an object like that which can be pushed back into the passenger cell!)

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        The Model S is mostly aluminum. As you say, the front crumple zone is huge because of no engine block. But even the AWD version does quite well in accidents.

        What impresses me about this incident is how little of the car participated in the accident, yet the driver was not seriously injured.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Who needs drunk drivers with Teslas on Autopilot bouncing off solid objects? So far Tesla Crash Test Dummies have only been a menace to themselves, so the circus continues, and it’s all fun and games, but once one takes out a bus full of kids, the Feds will have step it up and crash the party.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    Ole’ Charlie Darwin must be spinning in his grave – with 100% torque available at zero RPM.

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    After discussions with several friends and coworkers who apparently love the idea of riding in a giant RC car so they can have more time to play on their phones without the distraction of operating a vehicle, I think I’ve got a partial solution. At least for the highway.

    Let those who don’t really want to drive be driven about in their amorphous transport pods – IN A RIGHT-HAND LANE SPECIFICALLY CONFIGURED FOR THEM.

    Let those of us who want to drive ourselves have the center and left lanes to ourselves.

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      I think we should just hack into the auto pilot software and use it to eliminate the gene pool of people who think it is a good idea to let machines and corporations control all aspects of our mobility.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      OK, but that doesn’t solve the overcrowding problem that the autonomous vehicles were designed for.

      I think the technology will eventually evolve to a point where it’s used to do things like pilot cars or trucks autonomously on long stretches of lightly traveled roads, or in bumper to bumper traffic on a freeway. But I don’t see it ever replacing human drivers fully, particularly on crowded urban streets, where there are just too many variables to depend on the technology alone.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    What I’d like to know is, why does auto emergency braking seem to work well on cars costing a third of the price of a Tesla? And if the system should fail on a Subaru or VW, would we hear about it, and would we be subjecting the driver to the same amount of scorn?

    • 0 avatar
      islander800

      My bet is, like everything else Sir Elon has done with Tesla, he has ignored the 100 years of accumulated expertise in the traditional auto industry because HE KNOWS BETTER. I wondered the same thing, seeing a Volvo ad the other day showing their auto braking feature. It’s such a fundamental safety device that works, isn’t rocket science, but hey, Elon didn’t think it up, so forget about it.

  • avatar
    TW5

    These auto pilot crashes are fascinating. They prove there are as many morons in the elite zip codes as there are in the plebeian slums. The middle class might be the only people to survive the digital century.

  • avatar
    incautious

    Nice. Hey elon the New York Times did a real number on you yesterday. Called you a con man who without the govt tax incentives would’t be around. Also made a point as to well as to your hubris in thinking that you know whats best for us citizens. When the left starts to call you a BS artist, well I would look out. After all its the lib,tree huggers that believed in all the crap you espoused

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Most of the car plants in North America wouldn’t be around without billions of dollars in corporate welfare for the mfrs.

      Just look at the latest deals for the Toyota-Mazda plant, or the GM Oshawa deal from Ontario. And, car mfrs aren’t the only ones that get such sweeteners.

  • avatar
    islander800

    “Tesla countered by saying its customers know the system’s limits, and that the company provides proper instructions on how to use the feature.”

    Well, Elon, your customers obviously DON’T know the system’s limits. And that’s the problem. It’s simply a case of human nature: tell people you have a “(mumble mumble) autonomous” system, and they hear “self-driving”. The thing that amazes me is that the purveyors of these autonomous driving systems point out that you should stay alert and keep your hands on the wheel. Then what’s the frigging point?

    These systems, at this stage of development, should not be allowed on public roadways, since people obviously can’t be trusted to handle them properly, putting themselves, passengers and the public at risk. I put it in the same category as smart phones: as another poster pointed out, they should, by law, be automatically disabled from sending texts and making voice calls when the vehicle is in motion. We have enough evidence that people are incapable of treating the task of driving with respect when they are distracted by cell phones – as they seem to be incapable of understanding what a semi-autonomous driving system means.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Should they be allowed? Yes, but with one caveat: if you’re caught driving without your hands on the wheel, or your eyes on the road – which the car itself can validate after the fact – it’s a twelve-point ticket. Say goodbye to your license.

      And I think that’s fair – instances like the one we’re talking about in this story are clear, obvious cases of unbelievably irresponsible driving habits. This is like texting while driving to the second power. So far, people have only crashed themselves into stationary objects. It’s a matter of time before some idiot Autopilots himself into a school bus full of kids, or takes out a family of six in a minivan on its’ way to Sunday brunch.

      Put some consequences into the game, and maybe this kind of nonsense will stop. But if that’s the course we’re going to take, then the law had better do it now, before this tech becomes far more commonplace.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        “Should they be allowed? Yes, but with one caveat: if you’re caught driving without your hands on the wheel, or your eyes on the road – which the car itself can validate after the fact – it’s a twelve-point ticket. Say goodbye to your license.”

        Yes- exactly!

        Here is another good comparison- the nitwits who figure out how to roll an SUV that has electronic stability control. I don’t hear an irrational public outcry that the automakers convinced their customers that they were buying “rollover proof” technology. Listening to some people, you’d think Musk was some bent-on-world-domination Bond villain/evil genius who convinced all these poor, innocent sheep that now they can sleep in the driver’s seat… sheesh.

        Put the blame where the blame belongs, on the nut behind the wheel.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Exactly. I think tech like Autopilot is actually a positive…IF it’s used the way it was intended, as an enhancement, not a driver replacement. People just have to understand what the limits of the tech is.

  • avatar
    MidLifeCelica

    I drove 300km yesterday, from my home to Halifax and back, on the most modern, up-to-date highway in the province, and during the trip I kept noticing things that made me smile with the thought that ‘Autopilot’ is never going to be a problem around here. Winter has more or less erased all the lane markings that would give it any guidance. In many places the only way you knew there were lanes at all was the parallel wheel grooves in the road. Dozens of places where guardrails had somehow vanished, leaving nothing but half-rotted bare posts sticking out of the ground. Asphalt patches on top of older patches, disguising the massive potholes that would rip the wheels right off your car if you hit one. Does Autopilot even detect these? And this is on the Trans-Canada highway…wait till you see our back roads! Now add some fog and drizzle, a couple of dead deer on the side of the road but not quite out of the way, and some 4′ squares of chipboard in the middle of the road that fell off a truck. Happy driving!

  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    I have a relatively easy idea that might help Tesla out with AP failures and inattentive drivers… Why not have pressure sensors in the steering wheel that if no hands are present on the steering wheel, AP is automatically disabled?

    I’m sure there’s a fly in this ointment somewhere and I’m sure someone will offer counterpoints to this, but it seems like a relatively easy abatement technique. They (Tesla) already recommend that when using AP, the driver remain attentive with hands on the wheel.

    I know at the end of the day, technology is improving and the only method of widespread improvement is to discover all flaws (with some unfortunate consequences) but technology will never overpower the ability of people to be dumb.

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