By on May 29, 2018

2019 Acura RDX A-Spec 051

Set to appear on dealer lots within the next few days, Acura has released pricing for the newest version of its compact crossover, the RDX.

Now in its third generation, the trucklet, contending in the savagely competitive compact luxury crossover segment against such heavies as the BMW X3 and Lexus NX, will make an opening bid south of $40,000, even for customers that want all-wheel drive.

Absent of power going to all four wheels, the new entry-level RDX is priced at $37,300, representing a $1,300 hike from last year’s base price. However, that machine required an option package to equip itself with the AcuraWatch suite of safety nannies, features which now come standard on all RDXs regardless of trim. The cost of that old package? You guessed it: $1,300.

All-wheel drive is more dear, however, in 2019. Such an expenditure would have vacuumed $1,500 from buyer’s wallets; now it will cost an extra two grand. That still puts an entry-level RDX with four-corner grip under $40,000.

We will likely be writing stories in the next 12 months about the RDX trading at a higher average price than in years past. In addition to all-wheel drive being more costly, other trims have hiked their prices as well. The mid-range “Tech” trim will now cost $40,500, an extra eight hundred bones, while the top-spec “Advance” model stickers at $45,400 in 2019. That’s a full $2,700 walk from last year.

It seemingly all adds up to a push by the manufacturer to move the RDX slightly upmarket. Top-spec X3s and GLCs can easily park themselves north of $50,000. The new Acura does offer some natty features as standard equipment for the extra simoleons it commands this year, including a panoramic moonroof and adaptive cruise.

This new RDX cribs some styling cues from the company’s Precision Concept vehicle that made the rounds on the auto show circuit, including a version of the family diamond-esque five-sided grille and the snazzy jewel-eye headlights. This author is glad Acura binned the old grille that looked like a guillotine or a really bad chrome overbite.

A-Spec trim visits the RDX for 2019, bringing the total number of trims to four. That model, imbued with a couple of unique colors including an extroverted Apex Blue Pearl, is priced at $43,500. It’ll be an extra two grand if you want all-wheel drive, of course. All models get a 2.0L turbo making 272 horsepower but the A-Spec gets a few unique interior and exterior treatments including 20-inch wheels, black accents, different trimmings inside, and a tachometer that reminds this author of the gauges found in the RSX of my youth.

We’ll have a full first-drive review of the 2019 Acura RDX later this week.

[Image: Acura]

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86 Comments on “Inflation Alert: Acura Prices the 2019 RDX...”


  • avatar
    Sub-600

    I love the grille and that blue is incredible. It would look nice on, y’know, a car.

  • avatar
    chiefmonkey

    That goofy-looking grille and enormous emblem.

    I just can’t take Acura seriously…

  • avatar
    ACCvsBig10

    Give less options to choose from, and make it standard, add dubs raise price = profit. Eventually we’ll get to a point where luxury cars will just make 1 model with everything fully loaded standard and only choices will be color.

    • 0 avatar
      gmichaelj

      I think for buyers of most things, that is what they are looking for. Why waste any time learning about this option/package or that?

      If you are buying the “best” shouldn’t it have everything standard?

      Leaving colors and textures the only thing to personalize your choice.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      …and that color choice will be 3 shades of gray.

      Honda/Acura have traditionally used trim levels vs options, but there was a time when A-Spec was something special in the handling plus appearance area.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      …..Including the $1mill diamond in the steering wheel you once could option the Veyron with, I presume…… :)

      As long as wealth, hence purchasing power, discrepancies are increasing, profits are increasingly concentrated at the silly end of the option scale. With the volume, pleb, versions being there just to help amortize tooling.

    • 0 avatar
      Secret Hi5

      @ACCvsB1G: Internet commenters have also criticized luxury brands for NOT including features as standard equipment. Can’t please everyone.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Price hikes don’t seem so bad given the new equipment and refinement. Looking forward to AoA’s review which should be up today.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      $48K is pricey with no discounting from Acura when this competes with NX and Envision 2.0T’s.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Norm, I hate to say it—especially as someone who drives a GM car—but because of the Envision’s build quality, choice of materials, and underwhelming design (inside and out)…it’s more upmarket than luxury. At best, it competes with higher-spec Tiguans and Escapes. Aside from the optional twin-clutch AWD system, it doesn’t do anything particularly better than its corporate sisters, the current Equinox and Terrain. And, once the price crests $41,000 or so, there are better options to be had elsewhere.

        This RDX looks a lot nicer, I’m sorry.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          The Equinox and Terrain have upped their game and are much better deals that. A CR-V 1.5t. One reason the Equinox sales are similar to the Honda for the first full year of 2018.

          The Envision offers things like color heads up display, sliding rear seat, tri-zone climate control thay is not even an option on the new RDX.

          Sryling wise the Envision will never be confused with its D2XX siblings like the RDX thay resembles a HR-v with a front clip.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Well, the RDX is actually based on the CR-V, not the HR-V. I agree they look similar.

            For another, there’s a difference between throwing a bunch of features on a car and having it actually feel like a luxury car. The Envision…doesn’t feel like a luxury car. It definitely doesn’t hold a candle to the GLC, X3, Q5 or XC60, and barely runs with the NX and MKC.

            The jury is still out on the RDX because it hasn’t even hit the market yet, but it looks like it will at least feel more like a special item than does the Envision.

            And, really, GM’s true compact luxury CUV is the new XT4, which, despite being compact in length, is actually on the midsize C1XX platform, meaning it’s wider than average and essentially a sawn-off XT5.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            Well, J.D.Power said Buick Envision was most reliable subcompact suv in initial quality, surpassing anything from the Japanese. Actually Acura and Honda only had one showing.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Good God, there’s NormSV650 making outlandish claims about the-assembled-in-China, of 88%+ Chinese-fabricated components, sloppy, wallowy, sponge-cake like Bruick Invasion – that’s like a KIA of 15 years ago in terms of fit/finish, toxic interior odor from the VOCs, excessive weight given its under-engineering, disposable quality/durability and laughably high price,’ actually trying to favorably compare it to this.

        I’m a strong critic of Acura, the RDX included (Acura is a rebadge Honda division that’s incredibly lazy and unimaginative, with overpriced, underwhelming cehicles), yet this vehicle is worth 3x of ANY trim Chinese rolling dumpster fire Bruick Invasions in terms of fit/finish, resale value, refinement, telia polity, durability, and overall quality.

        Keep up the awesome comedic Guangzhou Motors fanboism, NormSV!

        • 0 avatar
          White Shadow

          The new RDX is not based upon the CR-V. I’ve read that over and over again.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            “Acura is calling it an all-new, exclusive platform—but the RDX started with the Honda CR-V architecture and modified the chassis and upgraded the powertrain. Obviously, the sheetmetal is much different, too.” Motor Trend

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    So Advance af $45.4, but I take it that it’s $47.4k with SH-AWD?

    I mean really it only matters how they lease anyways.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    What does the RDX do that a Forester won’t?

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      Not have a CVT.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Accelerate to 60 in under an hour (now that the turbo Forester is gone).

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      RDX uses premium fuel to make you feel special.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      …or any other CUV, from Kia to Cayenne.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Actually, RDX had better AWD system. I mean, much better AWD system

      • 0 avatar
        VW4motion

        Slav, please post this data on “much better awd system”.
        From what I’ve been told by honda owners , you’re better off just buying a fwd Honda.

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          SH-AWD is one of the very few systems with real (not brake based) torque vectoring. It is very good. The on-demand system in the CR-V and 2G RDX is…not.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          VW Here is your data https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2H8GNku0mE

          And remember, your Subarus, all but WRX come with FWD biased AWD. It used to be better but it is not same anymore.
          This RDX has real deal AWD

          • 0 avatar
            VW4motion

            Slav, must be “better” if tfl guys say it is. Outside of the sh-awd the 1st gen RDX was a not a very reliable vehicle. Probably the worst Acura ever built.

          • 0 avatar
            Stumpaster

            Where do you people get this? I drive a Forester stick shift. It’s not slow, not at all. It sticks the rear out on slippery snow/gravel if you have the traction control off, not plows like a FWD car. It’s very balanced fore-aft. I also drive a TSX wagon. The Forester is much roomier, just as quiet, the engine is about the same harshness as the 2.4, and of course softer ride by design but not giving up a whole lot in the hard turns.

          • 0 avatar
            VW4motion

            Stump, saying the Forester and Outback CVT are slow and suck is just the thing to say. Guaranteed majority of people that put down the Subaru’s and CVT’s probably have never driven a new Subaru with or without a CVT. This is pretty much slang for people that don’t know much about vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        The *first-gen* RDX had SH-AWD. The outgoing one does not. And even then, I don’t know that it’s better than Subaru’s system.

    • 0 avatar
      carve

      The Forrester IS a lot of car for the money, but here’s what more you get in an RDX

      Better styling
      Nicer interior
      An extra hundred horsepower or so not the the XT is cancelled
      Nicer stereo
      Torque vectoring differential
      Ventilated seats
      10 speed auto rather than a CVT
      Dual power seats that offer ventilation

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Either will have a valet cringing at how small their tip will be. Maybe the Subaru owners more so.

      SH-AWD is still limited to 70% torque fore or aft. GM Active Twin Clutch can 100% to a single wheel while the other three slip. Looks like the RDX will get stuck on rollers under three wheels again.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    The center console in this new model is ridiculous.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    Not use premium fuel to make you feel special.

  • avatar
    18726543

    In my opinion this thing looks so very much better than the hideous NX. I cringe every time I see one of those overly angular, predator-faced things on the road. I also really like the grill, finally. I thought the chrome beak/cheese slicer would never end. It’s been 10 long years since the 2008 TL-S…in my eyes the last front-to-back good looking Acura.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    “a push by the manufacturer to move the RDX slightly upmarket”

    If they keep removing cylinders, how they push it UP market? Pseudo-upmarket

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      The marketing is a lie.

    • 0 avatar
      pinkslip

      “If they keep removing cylinders, how they push it UP market? Pseudo-upmarket”

      Every model Acura aims to compete with offers a turbo 4 cylinder: X3 28i, NX200t, GLC300, Q5 2.0T, etc., etc.

      Turbo fours ARE the up market.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        “Turbo fours ARE the up market.”

        oh, really? Then Civic is upmarket then. Gonna grab one of those tomorrow

        • 0 avatar
          pinkslip

          Are you intentionally being obtuse?

          MB was adamant they wouldn’t put a 4-banger in their U.S. fleet. Then, only a few years after making that bold claim, the C-class (and other models) went to a 4 cylinder powertrain. Then, the CLA was launched in the U.S.- a model with transverse layout that can’t even accommodate a V6.

          If MB can learn to adapt, you can, too.

          V6 =/= “premium”.

          What are you going to complain about when ICEs are replaced with BEVs? The loss of “rumble?” I’ll argue an EV is more premium in it’s quietness and torque delivery, with zero cylinders. And I’ll argue that a modern turbo four cylinder is imperceptibly different from a V6 to most buyers, except it offers better torque and fuel economy in most instances.

          I’m a fan of naturally-aspirated engines, but equating a number of cylinders to a level of luxury/premium qualities is an archaic mindset. And trying to equate a 4 cylinder Q5 or GLC to a Civic is a bridge too far.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            pinkslip,

            If this is how you understand luxo cars – fine with me. But I will not buy expensive car with 4. Like 4cyl E-class for 75K. Luxo means smoothness to me. 4 is not smooth. Electric car is fine with me too. But can I make my 6-hr trip without stopping to recharge? no? then forget it. I would rather burn fuel in the car than in electric power plant in this case. To me this is handcuffs. When they come to the point that you come to exchange station, replace battery in 10 minutes or less and keep going, I might get interested.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Then, only a few years after making that bold claim, the C-class (and other models) went to a 4 cylinder powertrain.”

            ->And they are horrible, warbling engines that belong in antique farm equipment.

            “What are you going to complain about when ICEs are replaced with BEVs? ”

            ->I’ll be happy when EVs take over the market because all these cruddy 4-clylinder luxury cars will finally be dead. I am very willing to one day own an EV, but I’m not going to even consider a $40K+ 4-cylinder car.

            “but equating a number of cylinders to a level of luxury/premium qualities is an archaic mindset.”

            ->Tell that to Ferrari and Rolls Royce.

      • 0 avatar

        My Fusion has turbo four. Is it upmarket? (It is titanium though). Why you need Lincoln then? But anyway, forget it – Ford is not car company anymore.

        • 0 avatar
          pinkslip

          Funny. You made the same illogical response at Slavuta. I say a 4 cylinder does not exclude a car from a luxury status and somehow your brain turns that into me saying “everything with a 4 cylinder is luxury”.

  • avatar

    Sport trim, not a sport package. Thanks again honda.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Yeah, you adjustable dampness for comfort and not performamce.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      It has been my view of Honda through the years, that this is a company that shortchanges the consumer.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        But at least the dealers are a joy to work with.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Slavuta, Acura is not full luxury, but near luxury with Buick which outsells Acura. Don’t want to gwt.short changed get the less costly Honda.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Norm,
          I mean Honda. they play stupid game (good for them, bad for me). For example, there were times that their base model came with drum brakes and one piece folding seat. If you wanted disk ans split folding, you need to go to EX. That will require sunroof and something else. when I was purchasing my Mazda3 I checked civic. for 2011, to me it was like no brainer. ‘3 was way better car. One of the items was that if I wanted blue tooth, I needed to go for Civic that was 21K+ and ‘3 with this device was under 18K. ‘3 came standard with disks, split folding, all power, a/c. And iTouring added blue tooth, alloys and some other small things. Perfect package – everything you need – nothing you don’t. And cost me in the end 16K. This is why I really despise honda – for their packaging system. They give too little in the base, to lure you into higher trims. Equipment that others include as standard. My base ‘6 vs base Accord is just loaded car.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    I think Acura’s biggest problem is apathy.

    Not their own apathy. The apathy of most car buyers.

    I’m not sure what the compelling case is for it anymore. It’s not like Hondas are spartan, so you’re not picking up a ton of luxury for stepping up from a Honda. If you are concerned about “prestige”, there is no reason to prefer it to a Lexus.

    Acura is just sort of there.

    There are no Acura snobs. There’s no reason to be a hard core Acura fanboy.

    Shame really.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Had Acura ever had compelling case? Its honda’s #metoo thing. It is sold only in 6 countries or so.

      “It aims to be a global brand, but its U.S. engineers have little experience designing global vehicles…. Acura is an American brand”,
      Yoshiharu Yamamoto said

      “Kelley Blue Book data show Acura buyers cross-shop Toyota, Honda, Ford, Nissan and Mazda more than any premium brands, underscoring the gap between Acura and its intended rivals. ”

      so, yea. It ain’t your Lexus

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Acura is an Ohio brand most of all. Even its flagship NSX is designed and built there.

        • 0 avatar
          geozinger

          Packard is an Ohio car company.
          Willys is an Ohio car company.
          Jeep is an Ohio car company.

          GM, Ford and Chrysler are Ohio car companies.

          Each has closed more factories in Ohio than Honda will ever open in North America.

          Acura is a marketing entity of Honda Motor Company. With today’s technology you can design and build anywhere.

          I am a native Ohioan. I grew up in the shadow of the car & truck factories and steel mills in the Northeast corner of the state. Myself and many of my friends and relatives had careers in each one of the big three and their suppliers.

          Acura is about as Ohio as Kabuki theater.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          Acura was a brand thay sold well on the east coast. It sure today as it might be H/K.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            Did you post a bunch of stuff on this article, and then go home and get drunk and post a bunch more replies to yourself 6 hours later? Show us on the doll where the Acura touched you.

  • avatar
    Bocatrip

    I just can’t get used to spending all those bucks for a 4 cylinder car! I just won’t buy anything without a V6.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      If it is anything like GM Ecotec 2.0T it is turbine smooth and never rough even at higher rpms while the v6 is coarse and does t have much thrust beyond throttle tip-in.

    • 0 avatar
      pinkslip

      I remember meeting an old guy who wanted to buy a Q5. He told me he wanted the V6 because he tows a boat to the lake. I explained to him that- though all Q5s were rated the same towing capacity (due to curb weight, brakes, and wheel base), the 2.0T was actually better suited to towing with it’s broader and more generous torque curve.

      Then the old guy says ‘NO, I need the V6!’, because he also drives to the mountains and needs the extra power. So I explained that the turbo is actually better at maintaining power at altitude than the naturally-aspirated V6.

      The old guy says ‘NO! I need the V6!!” So I realize. Old guys don’t want what is better, they want what is familiar to them.

      It’s like in Back to The Future, when Doc says to Marty (paraphrasing) “No wonder this is broken; all these parts are from Japan.” Doc was from a time when Japan was not the leader in electronics, and Marty (and presumably most of the audience) grew up in a time when Japan was the icon of excellent electronics.

  • avatar

    It is not a Duesenberg for sure. And not even a Cadillac of Hondas:) Look at that sad face :(. No, thank you. Please Lexus.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      you think Lexus is that great? I drove NX for 4 hours 2 weeks ago. My mazda, less than 1/2 price of that thing has way better brakes, steering and command center control. Consumer Reports rates IS as worst in its class.

  • avatar
    ernest

    I personally find it unbelievable that Acura finally canned that hideous old grill… and made it worse. I swear this division is on a suicide mission.


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