By on April 12, 2018

Last time on Buy/Drive/Burn, we took a look at full-size sedans of an American persuasion and non-luxury intent. The consensus was loud and clear on which vehicle of the trio to burn; the Taurus was the subject of a flame war. Citing the sedan’s outdated everything and bad packaging, most of you didn’t like it.

Some of you also complained that the three offerings were too basic, and lacking in content and luxury. Today we turn up the luxury dial and look at three full-size Americans which are a bit more aspirational.

Ready, comrades? This might be tough.

A target price of about $45,000 for our premium large sedans nets different badges on the grilles of each. Chevrolet becomes Buick, Ford becomes Lincoln, and Dodge becomes Chrysler.

Buick LaCrosse Avenir

2018 Buick LaCrosse AvenirFor 2018, Buick rolled out a brand new top-spec for its LaCrosse large sedan. Sharing the platform with the Impala from our previous sedan trio, the Avenir comes loaded with standard equipment. A panoramic sunroof fills the cabin with natural light, highlighting the black leather seats. Bose sound pairs with the 8-inch infotainment screen, along with standard navigation. Front-drive is the base Avenir configuration, and standard is the 310 horsepower 3.6-liter V6 from the Impala. Not present here is the HiPer Strut suspension option. Avenir asks $45,795.

Lincoln Continental Premiere

Initially, there was going to be a Taurus SHO in this space, but the visceral B&B reaction to the regular Taurus means we need to aim higher (and remain within budget). The Premiere is the base model of Lincoln’s new Continental, a name which returned to dealers in 2017 after a 15-year absence. Standard on this model is the 305 horsepower 3.7-liter Ford V6 and six-speed automatic. The 3.0 twin-turbo is very much out of our price range.  Soft Touch (read: not leather) seats are yours in either black or light beige. Sync is included on the Premiere, but unavailable are the adaptive cruise control, or indeed any navigation system. Premiere owners also make do with a 10-speaker Lincoln audio system, rather than the Revel 13-speaker arrangement. The Continental Premiere is $45,160.

Chrysler 300C

The upmarket brother of the Charger is of course the 300, and today’s price range nets us the top-tier C trim. It’s not exactly new like the other competitors for your cash, but Chrysler makes that up to you in equipment. Standard is rear-drive and a 5.7-liter Hemi V8. Said V8 produces 363 horsepower, and shifts through an eight-speed automatic. Your rear rests on quilted Nappa leather seats (brown or black); also standard. The low base price of the 300C allows the addition of a $3,695 option package including premium 19-speaker Harmon Kardon sound, dual-pane sunroof, Sirius XM, and navigation on the 8.4-inch UConnect screen. Again, FCA offers more no-cost color options than the other two. Total price rings in at $45,785.

Which of these full-sizers ends up putting a $45,000 dent (less in reality) in your bank account?

[Images: Ford, General Motors, FCA]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

90 Comments on “Buy/Drive/Burn: 2018 Upmarket American Sedan Showdown...”


  • avatar
    jrhurren

    This is easy for me: buy Linc, drive 300, burn Buick

  • avatar
    01 Deville

    Drive is easy- Chysler 300.
    For long term buy I would take the Buick which means I have to burn the beautiful Lincoln.
    For short term buy Lincoln being the base would hold its value better than the Buick and thus will be the buy even if I have burn the much highly optioned Buick.

  • avatar
    NoID

    Buy: Chrysler 300C, because Sergio told me to, and because I can get it in AWD in that sweet olive-ish metallic green color

    Drive: Continental, because it’s supposed to be uber comfy and the Twinster AWD system gives it dynamic abilities that it shouldn’t possess. But I couldn’t own it, because there’s just something mildly frumpy about the styling that irks me.

    Burn: Lacrosse Avenir. Not because I dislike it, I think it it is the most beautiful luxury car available today and is head and shoulders above the Lacrosse of prior years. I’d burn it as an offering to the car gods to spare the endangered Buick sedans from withering on the American vine and dying a sad death at the hands of the cold, cruel market.

  • avatar
    gtem

    Buy 300C for a proper RWD+V8. Drive the Continental, burn Buick.

    If I could get my hands on a blue-interiored Continental “Rhapsody” the outcome would be very different (I’d insist on burning any and all other options to get that sweet sweet blue interior).

    • 0 avatar

      You’d have to spend about $25,000+ on top of this to get the blue interior and the special seats.

      • 0 avatar
        la834

        I’m glad to see i’m not the only one who places a high value on having a fully color-keyed interior in a REAL color, not grey/black or beige, and not bright red upholstery but black everywhere else. The blue is nice, but I’d really jump for the all-burgundy available in the new Navigator.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Oh I’m well aware. They should at least bring the blue interior (minus fancy seats and other upgrades) down to cheaper trims!

        • 0 avatar

          What you could do on the 300C is spend $1,800 for the blue/linen interior, which nets you the blue and white Bentley-like wheel, seats, and a blue dashboard.

          I didn’t put it on here, because it seemed too expensive for a color option, and we were at price max already.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Damn I like FCA products “on paper” but fear that I won’t like them by the time I make my final payment.

          • 0 avatar

            I would definitely be thinking about things like:

            When is this going to start rattling?
            Will my suspension be shot at 50k miles?
            Am I going to have issues with the exterior trim falling off?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “I would definitely be thinking about things like:…”

            • When is this going to start rattling?
            —-You mean like Fords do in less than a year?

            • Will my suspension be shot at 50k miles?
            —- Unless you beat it to death, whose suspension is shot at such a low mileage? Certainly nothing I’ve ever driven, and that INCLUDES FCA vehicles.

            • Am I going to have issues with the exterior trim falling off?
            —- Again, whose exterior trim falls off any time soon? My cars live outdoors and I’ve NEVER had a trim failure like that. Again, that includes Chrysler and FCA vehicles.

            Methinks Principal Dan is more biased than he wants to let on, Corey.
            Maybe you are too?

          • 0 avatar
            MLS

            The Premium Leather Wrapped Interior Accents package is actually $1,995, but it’s more than a color option. Indeed, as name implies, all dash and door surfaces from the armrests up are wrapped in stitched leather in place of the standard soft-touch plastic.

            Indigo/Linen combination requires this package, but it’s optional for other interior colors (i.e., Deep Mocha and Black).

            “Premium” steering wheel is standard on 300C. Lesser models include wood-trimmed or simpler leather-wrapped versions.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Coworker has a low-mile (40k) 2010 300C he recently acquired. It’s got some wonky ancillary electrical stuff and this spring’s rough roads has got something in the suspension clunking. He’s also needed it towed to the dealer after a flat battery made the immobilizer disassociate from the key (after 5 failed attempts it will lock out). So they’re a bit nuanced I guess.

          • 0 avatar
            Roberto Esponja

            Principal Dan, my dad has a 2010 300, which he has beaten the hell out of (I love my dad, but he is a major car destroyer). And yet, like the Energizer Bunny, it just keeps going. I helped him with some errands a few days ago, he insisted that I drive, and was surprised at how nice the car still felt, even after all the abuse it’s received. So, I wouldn’t be afraid of this car long term.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Very, VERY difficult decision. Given the choice, I would take the Buick over both of the others for both buy and drive; it’s the best looking one of the bunch. Then again, I’d rather see it in a two-door, T-type edition instead.

    Of course, the camera angles don’t really help the other two all that much on appearances alone. I’d have to give the Chrysler 300 my second pick… preferably as a wagon, though. It’s too ‘chunky’ for me to see it as a luxury car, though its shape is still somewhat reminiscent of the old upright limousines (not ‘stretch’) that put a chauffeur behind the wheel. It’s the most retro of the three in so many ways but honestly is just not ‘me’. I’d drive it, but I wouldn’t necessarily like it.

    As for the Lincoln, despite the nose treatment, it still looks like a generic Ford. From a distance, it would be hard to differentiate this on a profile view from a Taurus or a Fusion. And Fords are not legendary for their quality–rather the opposite, really. Ford’s trucks are better than their cars but it seems to me that no one tends to own any given Ford for more than a few years unless they simply have no choice.

    Conclusion:
    Buy: Buick LaCrosse
    Drive: Chrysler 300
    Burn: Lincoln.

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

      “Ford’s trucks are better than their cars but it seems to me that no one tends to own any given Ford for more than a few years unless they simply have no choice.”

      That is just flat out wrong. Ford is known for its quality and reliability. Ask a Mustang owner. Ask a Town Car owner. Ask a Focus owner.

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        Was that a serious comment? The town car hasn’t be around for a long time, and the focus is probably the most unreliable small car you can buy.

        • 0 avatar
          Maxb49

          “Was that a serious comment? The town car hasn’t be around for a long time, and the focus is probably the most unreliable small car you can buy.”

          Yes, it is a serious comment. The Town Car ended production this decade. The last new Town Cars were offered for sale in Western New York. Town Car owners had a hard time obtaining the last model year due to demand for the last of the available inventory. You are unlikely to find a reasonably priced privately owned Town Car if you are in the market ofr such a vehicle because people who bought them kept them. Black car and limousine companies had no trouble keeping a Town Car with the original engine in service for 400,000 to 600,000 miles. Anemic as it was, the 2v 4.6 V8 was as bulletproof as an engine ever came (the modular V8 in 5.4 liter format clocked in at 1 million miles without having to remove the heads).

          I don’t know about you, but I’ll take real world evidence of sarcasticc Internet comments any day when it comes to how I’m going to spend *my* money.

          • 0 avatar
            MrIcky

            Except my real world experience on the 5.4s has been VERY different than yours. Glad you had good luck though.

      • 0 avatar
        cognoscenti

        Maxb49 wrote: “Ford is known for its quality and reliability. Ask a Mustang owner. Ask a Town Car owner. Ask a Focus owner.”

        I beg to differ. J.D. Power did a long-term vehicle durability and dependability study and published the results in 2017. Ford ranked 26 of 31 vehicle manufacturers.
        Vehicle Dependability Study (VDS) by Make (2017):
        http://www.jdpower.com/ratings/study/Vehicle-Dependability-Study-%28VDS%29-by-Make/1881ENG

        Buick landed in 4th in the same study, tops among all domestic car makers. Ford ranked lower than all other domestics by a considerable margin.

      • 0 avatar
        Bazza

        You forgot the /sarc tag.

      • 0 avatar
        ernest

        Agreed. I’ve got well over 600K (troublefree, reliable) miles out of Ford products over the past 25 yrs. My personal experience does not mirror what I’ve read here or on other forums regarding Ford quality.

        Which makes me wonder about something else- everything I’ve read about FCA build quality tells me my Charger will fall apart any minute. It’s been almost two years, and the Charger has been as reliable as my wife’s Camry. Hmmm.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I have. They all complain of rattles and squeaks within the first year

    • 0 avatar
      slap

      My Ford is 14 years old, with 254K miles.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Mine is 23/24 (built in late 1994 as a 1995) with almost 240k, original drivetrain, I’d trust it to go anywhere.

        My dad’s Ford has ~330k.
        Neither of us are “forced” into keeping them, and I can bet you anything: if they are replaced, it’ll be by something also wearing a blue oval.

        • 0 avatar
          turbo_awd

          @JohnTaurus. Your 1995 Ford is NOT representative of a 2019 Ford.

          First, counter-anecdotes: my father-in-law’s 1997 Aerostar with ~85k that’s on its last legs (too many problems to list). It’s their emergency car when their ’00 Caddy has issues. I’ve had to drive it on occasion.. UGH. And their 1995 Contour that they traded in for the minimum many years ago.. And no, not a rust issue – California..

          I think the point is that: Ford probably made quality vehicles at some (multiple) point(s) in the past. And also not – relay fires, anyone?

          Doesn’t mean it’s guaranteed to stay that way forever. 25 years later, things can change. For example, no one in their right mind with the means would have taken an ’89 Hyundai Sonata over an ’89 Taurus.

          2019 Sonata vs. 2019 Fusion? Impossible to call unless one has a “must-have” feature and the other one doesn’t.. 2019 Genesis vs. 2019 Taurus? Totally swings the other way now..

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I own a 2015 (F150). No recalls and no dealer trips except to pick up an oil filter when it is due. 50,000 miles and the only isue I have had was the clearcoat on the powdercoated wheels failed because my dumb kiester kept cleaning them with chrome wheel cleaner. I needed tires anyway so I got some of the 17’s with the chrome wheel covers and like it better because I can simply replace the cover should I curb it and It is a truck and it looks right with 70 series tires. I’ve had several Fords as has my family. A couple of mid to late 90’s Rangers were the only ones that gave us any issues. Hell we put 300k on one of those supposed cylinder head eating Bronco II’s and it to this day is the most reliable vehicle my family has ever owned.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          … and the people I know tend to switch brands. I’ve personally owned three Fords in my life. One cost me $400/month in repair charges, one had a temperature gauge that read backwards and the third had to have the hydraulic clutch totally rebuilt after less than 20,000 miles.

          I’m still driving the third one. Now just shy of 26,000 miles.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      “despite the nose treatment, it still looks like a generic Ford. From a distance, it would be hard to differentiate this on a profile view from a Taurus or a Fusion. ”

      They have completely different roof lines. Because the Lincoln shares some chassis bits with the Fusion, its automatically relegated to being a tarted up Ford. But, no way does the Buick resemble an Impala (to which it is much, MUCH more closely related to than Continental is to Fusion), no sir, its the beauty queen.

      Why couldn’t you just say “burn the Lincoln because I am biased against Ford products”? Why make crap up in a vein attempt to justify your unfounded opinion?

      • 0 avatar
        Maxb49

        “Why couldn’t you just say “burn the Lincoln because I am biased against Ford products”? Why make crap up in a vein attempt to justify your unfounded opinion?”

        Because they’re Internet fanboys, that’s why.

        • 0 avatar
          MrIcky

          “Why couldn’t you just say “burn the Lincoln because I am biased against Ford products”? Why make crap up in a vein attempt to justify your unfounded opinion?”

          Because they’re Internet fanboys, that’s why”

          LOL, like you’re not.

          But OK, I’ll bite- burn the Ford because I’m biased against Ford because my family and I have had terrible luck with Fords.

          Drive the FCA product because I have had great luck with FCA products (and no I’m not being sarcastic, I have 3 now and they’ve been great). I love the 5.7/zf combo- they just mate so well together.

          Buy the buick and hire it out to a personal rental corp.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        “Why couldn’t you just say “burn the Lincoln because I am biased against Ford products”? Why make crap up in a vein attempt to justify your unfounded opinion?”

        — Because the damn thing doesn’t LOOK like a Lincoln! It looks like a Ford. The Buick doesn’t look like a Chevy, either. And I don’t like GM either. Why? Because they’ve become as untrustworthy as Ford in my experience. But between these three cars, I’d do exactly as I said. Buy Buick, Drive 300, burn Lincoln.

  • avatar
    Maxb49

    Buy: Lincoln Continental. It’s cloud like ride is reminiscent of the Town Car and features an over engineered, reliable EcoBoost engine.

    Drive: Chrysler 300C. A powerful Hemi engine and RWD make the car fun but depreciation and reliability leave something to be desired.

    Burn: Buick LaCrosse: This car is a piece of garbage that reminds me of everything wrong with GM from 1990-2009.

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      “Over engineered, reliable EcoBoost engine” – okay, now I know you’re joking.

    • 0 avatar
      slap

      Base model Continental doesn’t have an EcoBoost engine.

    • 0 avatar
      Bazza

      “…over engineered, reliable EcoBoost engine.”

      Man, the comedy is coming hard and fast today.

      • 0 avatar
        Maxb49

        “Man, the comedy is coming hard and fast today.”

        You must not have any experience with the EcoBoost. I’ve had an Ecoboost Lincoln since new that has given us nearly 100k trouble free miles. The low-end power on this engine is incredible. This person put 300,000 miles on their EcoBoost F-150: http://www.f150ecoboost.net/forum/6-f150-ecoboost-chat/28082-300-000-miles-my-2011-eco-boost.html

        But, it must be a terrible engine because someone on the Internet said so.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          In defense of the ecoboost, while current Ford’s have had plenty of stupid issues like that steering wheel thing on the Fusion, Outside of the fire thing on one of the small ecoboosts (which is no longer sold IIRC), I havent heard of engine issues with the turbos. I am driving my 2.7 between Huntsville and Augusta every week and I get around 25 MPG (about half backroad, half interstate with Atlanta traffic in the middle). I may shy away from several Ford models right now, and I am a Ford guy, but not because I’m scared of the engines. Again my 2.7 is a first year motor and so far it has been great.

    • 0 avatar

      There is no Ecoboost engine in this Continental. It’s a naturally aspirated 3.7.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Buy the Continental. In a vacuum I prefer the 300 hands down, but outside of that vacuum there are by now eight years of them being driven by the vibrant people who buy used 300s. The Continental at least looks special even if its bones aren’t.

    Drive the 300. 8 cylinders and right wheel drive. Do you even have to ask?

    Burn the Buick. Another forgettable jellybean with an insulting sticker price.

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    continental for every day drive(hopefully with suicide doors)and buick on weekends burn the french chrysler!

  • avatar
    wabb

    Buy and Drive the Buick, burn the Chrysler and the Lincoln (Ford)

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    Honestly the 300 is a great car powerful.awd fast and looks……………dated. and it’s no longer an american car company

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Buy the 300. Yes, it’s likely not going to be great reliability-wise, but I don’t care. I’ve always loved this car, and it’s the last of its’ breed.

    Drive the Continental…and get envious glances from every Uber driver on the road.

    Burn the Buick. It’s a great car at a $35,000 price point, but at $45,000, it’s way out of its’ league.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    Buy: Lincoln Continental – simply a beautiful sedan with the most comfortable front seats. Also drives like a extremely well.

    Drive: Chrysler 300- fast sedan with some luxury. I still don’t love the visibility and it’s getting a little old looking.

    Burn: Buick LaCrosse- well it’s a Buick and seems extremely overpriced. Doesn’t have much to offer. Maybe buy this one used for half the price in 2 years.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Buy – 300C. A proper car, with a proper V8 and RWD, and actual features.

    Drive – Buick. It will be comfortable

    Burn – The Continental because it’s a near luxury rebadge.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      That’s a great reason to burn the Lincoln, because the Buick and Chrysler sure aren’t based off non-luxury cars like Impala and Charger.

      Which Ford can you buy here today that is directly rebadged as the Continental? I’ll LMAO if you say Fusion, because it’ll just prove your ignorance.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Buy the 300. I have experienced FCA build quality pain first-hand. But, it takes a lot to overcome my affinity for a V8/RWD configuration.

    Drive the Continental. Although the base trim you picked isn’t the one I’m most interested in, I like the 3.7L a lot.

    Burn the Buick. No Dynamic Drive Package on your chosen model hurts its standing with me. Undefeatable stop/start finishes it off.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Buy the 300

    Drive the Continental in Rhapsody Blue

    Burn the blob

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Buy the Chrysler- I’ve had a few of these in Charger or 300 form as rentals. If I could justify having a gigantic car in my driveway, I’d go with one of these. It’s old, old school and very much the last American luxury sedan (big,rwd,V8 available). Also, I imagine the Chrysler will not be anywhere near it’s 45k asking price once the papers are signed.

    Drive the Lincoln- Not a big fan of this car, but if I wanted wallowing Ford luxury, the Town Car has been dead for a long time, so this is it.

    Burn the Buick- Buick has no need to exist and neither does this car.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    Do I have the option to take the 300C without the option package? Short as I am, I find them a little too cramped with the sunroof. If so, that’s my pick to buy.

    I’m tempted to say drive the Continental because I find it really underwhelming (bland looking, like a 10-year old Mitsubishi concept, and cheap inside), but it has decent greenhouse and might be nice to drive if I don’t have to think about it being poor value.

    That leaves the Buick to burn, even if it’s nice looking, and probably a perfectly pleasant way to get across several states in a day.

  • avatar
    junkandfrunk

    Man, you sods hate Buick something fierce on this site.

    Buy the Lincoln.

    Drive the Buick.

    Burn the 300.

  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    Buy is easy – The Lacrosse.
    I’ve test driven a 2017 Lacrosse recently and it is everything I want in a car. Having it in Avenir trim is just icing on the cake.

    It’s Drive and Burn where it gets difficult…

    Normally, I would choose Drive for the Lincoln and Burn for the Chrysler.
    I like the Continental a lot. I think it’s a great design and some of the available features are top-notch…like “Magic” seats and twin-turbo engine.

    The 300C feels too dated. I know all the talk of traditional rear-wheel drive and the “no-replacement-for-displacement” V-8. But I don’t need all that. The Charger/300 twins always seem to be marketing themselves to the Neanderthal set of drivers. Driving the 300 to me would feel like one step above “Bro-dom”.

    BUT

    The above mentioned features aren’t available in the Lincoln in this edition of B/D/B (one of the reasons this thread is always so interesting). Additionally, at this price-point, you should get leather seating, I don’t care what car you’re buying.
    The amount kit in the 300 at its price-point is impressive, so using it as an occasional driver seems to be the better choice. And I probably could resist the urge to turn into a slavering caveman every time I got into it.

    So final tally…
    Buy Lacrosse
    Drive 300
    Burn Lincoln

  • avatar
    ernest

    Buy- 300. I suspect over the long term this will hold it’s value better than the other choices.

    Drive- lincoln.

    Burn: The Buick. Not because it’s a bad car- it just doesn’t speak to me.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    God this is actually hard for me… because of what’s NOT included at the price point.

    Buy the Continental (voting with my dollars – want Ford to know I approve of the way they’re running Lincoln v. Cadillac)

    Drive the 300 – cause RWD Hemi, Baby! I honestly think it’s a better car that the CT6 which is insanely overpriced.

    Burn the Lacrosse Avenir – I think a Lacrosse Prefered is a great car for the likely transaction price but Avenir $45K with no Hyperstrut? WTF GM? However I do think Buick’s marketing for this car should say: “Lacrosse Avenir – giving Cadillac XTS no reason to live”

  • avatar
    la834

    Buy – Continental. Nicest interior, though still not as good as it should be (or higher-end trims are). I like what Lincoln is aiming for these days, prioritizing comfort and opulence rather than trying to ape a German sports sedan like Cadillac is, which even the actual Germans aren’t doing anymore. I just wish the execution were better.

    Drive – 300. Probably my last chance for an affordable V8 rear-driver.

    Burn – LaCrosse. Really, I want to like Buicks. But the interior quality, appearance, and ergonomics are not up to where it needs to be at this price level (or where my old mid-’90s Park Avenue was for that matter). I do like the smooth ride on recent big GM sedans I’ve driven though.

  • avatar
    gottacook

    I would take the Continental because it’s the newest design, or seems to be – but I happened to see one last week parked on the street and it just seemed dinky. Maybe it was the paint color (light).

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    Buy the Buick
    Drive the Lincoln, pleather seats and all
    Burn the Chrysler…FCA products just age so poorly that 5 years from now you’ll see its twin on a BHPH lot. I wouldn’t want to be seen in it.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Buy the Buick because reliability and resale calculated from actual out the door pricing wins.
    Drive the 300: RWD, Hemi, 8 speed, Uconnect, Leather; depreciation and service bay time followed by after warranty repairs and the safety of the oldest platform keep it from the buy list today.
    Burn the Conti… These rules suck. 3rd place shouldn’t be you’re fired (pyred).

    Real $: I can have my GS 350 F-sport in a low miles 2016 for this $.

  • avatar
    Polishdon

    It’s easy !!

    Buy: Buick
    Drive (like you stole it): Charger
    Burn: Lincoln MKZ… Oops ! I meant Lincoln Continental

  • avatar
    seth1065

    ok I will try again, buy the lincoln bc way not, good looking

    Drive the Buick esp if Cory allows ac seats in this price range ( no idea what package you need) it looks the best , well screwed together based on past ones and I value driving over buying so in a toss up driving takes first place, the pano roof is great , black leather not so much but I will still take it.

    Burn the 300 I do not need the old school rwd v8 and the rapper look is not for me and I do not trust FCA to make a car I would drive for 5 years 100000 miles to be a place I want to be in.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    At this price point: Buy the 300 (and no doubt get a $5000+ discount). Drive the Continental because it’s novel, looks cool, and rides nicely, but I wouldn’t want to own any car this sparsely equipped. Burn the Buick, although it’s always great news when I get one as a rental and there’s no real passion in my burning.

    The 300 has properly aligned door handles which allow me to enjoy the LX platform’s strengths without irrational anger.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Drive the Chrysler, because even though I don’t need a HEMI, it would be fun for a minute. Buy the Buick, because they are actually pretty darn good cars if you are looking for a motorized sofa. Burn the Continental. No particular reason, never driven one, it just seems to be neither fish nor fowl. And bloody expensive for what it is.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    A tough call since I’m partial to all three.

    Buy: Chrysler 300C- The Hemi engine with RWD or Pentastar 8 speed with AWD and early in the century underpinnings from the E-class have evolved well. Plus the U-connect have been made more user friendly.

    Drive: Lincoln Continental- It’s Maybach or Equus like accoutrements in a traditional American car.

    Burn: Buick LaCrosse- Nice but it’s platform mate the Impala is a better value.

  • avatar
    mknevada

    “I like big boats and I cannot lie”” Buy em all. Ok. No.
    Burn the 300.. Dated..See too many around here running on Donuts with Garbage bag windows.
    Drive the Buick. Slow, and in the passing lane. In the real world,a Buick is still a Buick.
    Buy the Lincoln. Just looks like the a good cruise wagon. 3am on LSD in Chicago, Kool and the Gang, “Summer Madness”.. Yeah.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Buy the Buick. Drive the 300 and burn the Lincoln. Just never cared for the new Continental and so far several owners have had issues with those gimmicky electric door closers. The Buick should be reliable and I’ll take a chance on the 300 and would expect it to be decent since it has been in production so long.

  • avatar
    brn

    Drive all of them.
    Burn none of them.
    Buy? Not sure. Lincoln or Buick.

    I’m just not playing the game right.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    I know, it breaks the rules, but If I am buying a sedan in this price range it will be a base Alfa Romeo, FCA reliability be darned. As to the choices…Probably buy the 300 (RWD, Big Motor, etc), drive the Lincoln (Assuming the seats are as good as the one I sat in) Burn the Buick because in my mind a FWD Buick without 3800 is wrong. Flame On

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      I took a Guilia on a test drive and enjoyed it.Then the salesmen put it in Track mode on a back road and I loved it. I drove right past the BMW store I was planning on stopping at because I knew the 3 series would be a let down.

      The only real issue I had with it during the test drive was the low speed performance of the transmission(in normal mode). Kind of jerky, clunky, but it was the demo car too with 1500 who knows who drove it miles. It was more than I wanted to spend on a lease. It was RWD but it was a Ti, so it had a ton of options. I’ll wait and maybe pick one up in a few years as a buy.

  • avatar
    Farhad

    Buy the Lincoln
    Drive the Buick
    Burn the Chrysler


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Lie2me: I agree, or at least greatly reduce the amount of salt used. Here in southern Wisconsin I appreciate that...
  • Featherston: +1, ajla – You’ve hit the nail on the head. I think up-engined FWDers skew “bad in...
  • Lie2me: Really? That explains why they use so much salt on the road toward the end of winter
  • ToddAtlasF1: And that’s why you shouldn’t be dependent on people who have no interest in your well-being.
  • ToddAtlasF1: Because they know EVs belong back in the Victorian era, where they were first rendered obsolete by the...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States