By on March 21, 2018

Image: Daimler AG

Mercedes-Benz’s C-Class line maintains a steady stream of customers by being attainably aspirational. A dignified, confident car, the C-Class doesn’t feel the need to be something it’s not. Watch a realtor pull up in one, and a feeling of quiet assurance falls over the would-be home buyer — certainly, not the same feeling you’d get after seeing them pull up in a CLA.

In a bid to maintain this respectful relationship, Mercedes-Benz has a host of changes in store for the refreshed 2019 C-Class sedan. These niceties are now bound for the coupe and convertible variants, too.

Isn’t it nice to talk about an honest-to-goodness sedan, coupe, and convertible, each carrying the same model name?

Not wanting to mess with a good thing, exterior changes are subtle for 2019, echoing alterations made to the sedan. The front fascia grows more aggressive, adopting larger side intakes, while a “diamond” grille keeps the shiny bits well behind the prominent three-pointed star. LED headlamps come standard, though buyers can spring for M-B’s Intelligent Light System if they feel the need for extra-wide high beams.

Out back, it’s the same story: a reworked lower fascia and LED taillights. Evolutionary, but just enough to keep the model fresh.

Image: Daimler AG

Like the sedan, the C-Class Coupe and Cabriolet see power gains across the board. C300 models now make 255 horsepower from a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder, up 14 hp from previous versions. It’s a top-end power gain, as torque stays put at 273 lb-ft. Supposedly, this engine now ekes out greater fuel economy, but we’ll have to wait and see what the EPA says about it.

For those choosing the hopped-up C43 model, Mercedes-AMG saw fit to give the twin-turbo 3.0-liter V6 a power boost of its own. Output now stands at 385 hp, 23 hp more than before, though toque holds firm at 384 lb-ft. New light-alloy wheels and front air curtains aim to make the C43 slipperier than its predecessor, while a new, all-black AMG Night Package aims to make it stealthier, too.

Vanilla C-Class models make do with a nine-speed automatic; AMG buyers gain a faster-shifting unit with the same number of cogs. The 4Matic all-wheel-drive system that’s standard on the C43 remains optional for C300 customers.

Image: Daimler AG

While changes to the two-door C-Class line appear subtle on the exterior, expect an obvious upgrade in the cabin. Hoping to lure Millennials while keeping returning buyers in its fold, M-B is going all-in on tech and touch. Upgraded leathers and woods mingle with new features like touch-sensitive steering wheel controls, a 10.25-inch multimedia screen poised above the center stack, and an optional fully digital instrument display. Voice controls now cover things like the seat warmer, and a broader range of driver-assist features are available to keep the C-Class out of the rhubarb. Active Brake Assist comes standard on all models, as does Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Yes, these C-Class models can cautiously drive themselves under certain conditions (think: on the highway). Besides assistance from improved camera and radar systems, the vehicle borrow info from the vehicle’s navigation system to help predict the road ahead.

Mercedes-Benz hasn’t released pricing just yet, but expect mild inflation to cover the cost of the added equipment. The 2019 C-Class Coupe and Cabriolet debut later this month at the New York International Auto Show before rolling into dealers in late 2018.

[Images: Daimler AG]

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25 Comments on “2019 Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe and Cabriolet: Real, Actual Two-doors Gain Power and Content...”


  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Ok, if the Europeans and Asians can do it, why can’t the Americans?

    2-doors forever!

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      Because hardly any Americans actually BUY 2-door cars anymore (see: SUV). Sad, because that coupe really does look rather nice.

      • 0 avatar
        MoparRocker74

        Challenger, Mustang, Corvette and Camaro say you’re wrong. BMW 2/4/6 series, Audi 5 series, and the Toyobaru twins might have something to say.

        The point of a 2-door car was NEVER to be a volume sales leader. Properly executed, 2-doors are the halo of a make. You want to see what an automaker is REALLY capable of in terms of style, performance, and overall lustworthiness, unshackled with compromises in the name of practicality or max mpgs? Look at their high end coupes.

        • 0 avatar
          Stanley Steamer

          Don’t forget Cadillac ATS and ATS-V, which I can tell you are a far better value even before MB releases pricing.

        • 0 avatar
          civicjohn

          Mopar, funny that you mention BMW 2/4/6, I actually saw the first 4-series in local traffic yesterday. I’d seen the 2 and 6, my neighborhood is pummeled with music biz executives, so the Executive assistant gets a 2 and the EVP gets a 6, but it was actually the first time I have seen the 4 in reality. I thought it looked great, and I think this car looks even better.

          Unrelated – We’ve also got a local Tesla dealer, so I’ve seen a few Model 3s lately, and sorry to slag TSLA, but the 3 looks like I left my “S” polo in the dryer too long. .The rear view must be as bad as in the Camaro a friend of mine owns. You can’t see s*** out of the rear window.

          The 4 I saw yesterday and the photos of this car at least give me some faith that when I leave my company that I may be able to find a ride like this so my old self can at least see something in the rearview mirror!

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          “I really like the Mustang, so I bought an Escape”, said nobody in the entire history of the human race.

          Halo? No no.

          (Corvettes, maybe, but not because it’s a coupe, as such.

          The Focus was a coupe some years. Did it ever halo anything? No, sir. It did not.

          2-door cars have been volume sales leaders at the bottom of the market; those days are dead, fortunately.

          I’m not seeing them as halo cars now, in general, either.)

          • 0 avatar
            MoparRocker74

            “I really like the Mustang, so I bought an Escape”, said nobody in the entire history of the human race.
            Halo? The Focus was a coupe some years. Did it ever halo anything? No, sir. It did not.”

            I think youd be surprised. The Mustang is what you drool over, but if your wife and kids say CUV, you get stuck with a CUV and that’s that.

            Focus is an economy car. The coupe offered no special performance package…although the 1st gen 3 door could be had as a ZX3 which offered a little extra oomph. Now, over in the UK, that Focus coupe DID have a worked up variant. Had Ford offered it here and coupe only…THEN you have a halo car for the tuner crowd.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Challenger isn’t Charger; Mustang isn’t Fusion; Corvette isn’t Sonic and Camaro isn’t Impala. So no, they don’t say I’m wrong. The Merc is a C-class, essentially the same car as all the other C-class Mercs, only with 2 doors, not four.

          • 0 avatar
            MoparRocker74

            “Challenger isn’t Charger”

            Technically theyre the same car…Challenger is literally nothing but a sawed off Charger with different body panels and an available manual transmission. I know for a fact there is a LOT of cross shopping and hand wringing over which one to buy among people that own them, and rightfully so.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Challenger isn’t shaped like a Charger, doesn’t have the same nose and tail as a Charger and is absolutely marketed as a High Performance car. Ergo, Challenger isn’t a charger, no matter how much of the rest may be shared between them.

          • 0 avatar
            Sub-600

            The Charger is closer to the 300 than it is the Chally.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Yup. But it still has two too many doors.

    • 0 avatar
      SunnyvaleCA

      I just don’t see the point of 2-door cars that have back seats. They aren’t cheaper, lighter, stiffer, easier to open/close, or easier to get into (especially if parked in a perpendicular parking lot). If they were cheaper I could see it for low-cost vehicles, but this vehicle isn’t low-cost and, in fact, the 2-door costs more than the 4-door (albeit with slightly different equipment levels).

      I think all you’re really left with is “style.” I can forgo a little bit of “style” for better functionality, thanks. Judging by sales figures, I think I’m with the vast majority on this one.

      I’ve had 2 different 2-door vehicles and I’ve hated that feature of both of them. I have a Cayman now, but since it shares pieces with the 4-seat 911 it has huge doors.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        “I just don’t see the point of 2-door cars that have back seats.”
        — Who said they had to have back seats? True, they aren’t cheaper, but if you don’t need seats as seats, then they’re just wasted space. Give it a proper liftback and all of a sudden you’ve got a remarkably spacious cargo area with easy access from the front door or under the hatch. They also tend to discourage the, “I need a ride” people.

        I don’t have a family, other than a wife, a dog and two cats. I don’t need that wasted space but I WANT a comfortable car that doesn’t scream, “I’m a PERFORMANCE CAR!” Lower insurance rates as a result.

        And you can get away with half-doors that aren’t overtly sedan-like, making access easier for those “perpendicular parking lots” while still letting the driver sit back just that little bit farther.

        I will note that I have not once in my life bought a sedan–EVER–in 40+ years of driving.

      • 0 avatar
        MoparRocker74

        “I just don’t see the point of 2-door cars that have back seats. ”

        In some cars, like the Mustang and Camaro, the rear seats are literally nothing but package shelves that help with the insurance bill. But on the Challenger…its more than usable. Ive had 5 people in mine…Ok, I’m the only one who with a tall broad shouldered frame…but 4 guys my size (6’1 250 ish) could comfortably roadtrip a Challenger.

  • avatar
    hpycamper

    Wouldn’t it be nice if American and Japanese auto makers gave us choices like coupes and convertibles? And don’t tell me it’s bad business, the Germans seem to be doing ok. Also, thumbs up for “hardtops”.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    My only qualm if the realtor pulled up in a CLA would be if I had to squeeze into the slightly theoretical back seat. But certainly the C-class is nicer.

    I’m rocking a C300 4-matic sedan this week in northern VA. Will be braving the storm for a 1.5hr drive back to Dulles after lunch in it. Seems reasonably sure-footed even without snows, but I’d rather have the RWD version and proper tires.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Now MB bring the damm C class wagon to the US, you let Canada have it why not the US. These cars look nice inside but please MB ditch the add on iPad it ruins the interior of these cars.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Agreed -the C-class wagon is a looker. I swear MB and BMW have some sort of gentleman’s agreement – MB doesn’t bring over the C-class wagon but gets to sell the E-class, while BMW doesn’t bring over the 5-ver wagon but sells the 3-series. So they don’t compete head to head in this small space.

      The ergonomics in general are a hot mess in these cars though. That terrible shifter, the control knob for the infotainment, the stupid roller volume control. Ugh. Just spent three days in a C300. But I agree, the iPad stuck to the dash looks simply awful. BMW does this all so much better. Audi is about the same as MB.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    “Everybody knows coupes have four doors and a swooping-down greenhouse, brah!”

    (Me, I think even this coupe has too little rear headroom, from the looks of it … and I’d prefer it as a shooting brake.

    As seth said, import the wagon, fer God’s sake – it’s not like nobody buys them in the segment.

    Volvo sells ’em, BMW sells ’em, and you might even capture a few Subaru people looking to move upmarket.)

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