By on November 29, 2017

2019 Subaru Ascent

Subaru went heavy on the family values motif as it rolled out the 2019 Subaru Ascent three-row crossover at the 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show.

The company used models portraying a happy family to show off the Ascent, only with a twist – this fictional family, called the Barkleys, is of the canine variety. Sure, there were actors portraying a happy human family, too, but Subaru was using only dog puns in its presentation.

Personally, I’m hoping the dog and human show cuteness wasn’t meant to distract from a model with potential shortcomings, but there’s no way to know that until we drive it. No doubt the brand remembers the failure of the B9 Tribeca (maybe it should’ve been called K9?) and is working overtime to push its next foray into the three-row crossover arena.

2019 Subaru Ascent Limited, Image: Subaru of America

Certainly, the styling is less, um, adventurous than that of the Tribeca (which I never thought was really all that bad looking, but I digress). Of course, the Ascent is positioned as a volume vehicle, so it’s not shocking that its looks lean towards the generic.

Not to mention that the plain-but-handsome formula already works for the brand’s other crossovers/tall wagons. Not everything has to be sexy, man.

2019 Subaru Ascent

We already know the seven- or eight-seat Ascent will be built in Indiana, and it should shock no one that it arrives with standard all-wheel drive and a turbocharged boxer four-cylinder. This is Subaru, after all – the company is as known for those two things as much as Los Angeles is known for good fast-food burgers and crappy drivers.

The turbocharged mill displaces 2.4-liters and makes 260 horsepower and 277 lb-ft of torque. It’s also intercooled. Subaru claims up to 5,000 pounds of towing capacity, with a system to assist with trailer stability. The Ascent also brings 18-inch wheels and a familiar 8.7 inches of ground clearance.

As per usual with Subaru, the transmission is a continuously-variable automatic (CVT), but it does have an eight-speed manual mode.

2019 Subaru Ascent

The 113.8-inch wheelbase helps make the Ascent the biggest Subie to ever ply the roads, with the company claiming 153.5 cubic feet of passenger volume. In fact, the model’s wheelbase is longer than that of many midsize rivals, including the Honda Pilot, Ford Explorer, Toyota Highlander, and Hyundai Santa Fe. Only the Volkswagen Atlas and Nissan Pathfinder sport more distance between the axles.

Available comfort and convenience features include Starlink infotainment, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, eight USB ports for maximum phone usage (and family member avoidance), tri-zone climate control, 19 (!) cupholders, in-car 4G LTE Wi-Fi, first- and second-row heated seats, cooled front seats, heated steering wheel, navigation, Pandora, Bluetooth, and satellite radio.

2019 Subaru Ascent

When it comes to safety and driver-assist features, expect the usual suspects. Among those niceties are adaptive cruise control, lane departure and sway warning, automatic pre-collision braking, blind-spot detection, lane-change assist, and rear-cross traffic alert. A front-view camera system is available.

Evaluating the features, which are spread across base, Premium, Limited, and Touring trims, it appears Subaru has a fairly standard content mix for the class – nothing stands out, nor does anything notable seem to be missing. Subaru says pricing will start in the mid-$30K range when the vehicle goes on sale early next summer.

2019 Subaru Ascent Touring, Image: Subaru of America

Looking at the Ascent up close, I saw hints of the Nissan Rogue/Pathfinder in the side profile and perhaps a little Toyota Highlander up front. I also saw what appears to be a much better-looking infotainment system and an interior that’s class competitive, if not particularly remarkable.

What matters more is what Subaru execs are seeing, and that’s likely dollar signs. Subaru has long required a three-row crossover to compete with the bigger boys; now it has one that at least checks all the right boxes – on paper, anyway.

[Images: © 2017 Tim Healey/The Truth About Cars, Subaru]

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88 Comments on “2019 Subaru Ascent: Subie Takes Another Shot at the Big Time...”


  • avatar
    wintermutt

    I like it but i think they should offer the non turbo 6 as an option. It does not make sense to offer the 6 cylinder in the Outback and not the Ascent. Unless they are getting rid of the six in the Outback :-(

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Unless they are getting rid of the six in the Outback”

      We have a bingo.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Dogs don’t care about cylinder count.

        • 0 avatar
          gasser

          With the NA 6 cylinder, this would BE a dog!

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            Why? I’ve driven an Outback 3.6R, and it’s *plenty zippy*.

            (Apart from the lower low-end torque from not having a turbo, it didn’t feel any slower than my XC70 T6 in everyday driving, and what difference there was seemed more in the transmission programming.)

            This can’t be that significantly heavier, and at normal speeds the added “giant brick” factor is irrelevant.

            I agree this 2.5T is a *better* engine for the Ascent (or Outback), but the 3.6R would not be a dog … just not especially interesting or efficient.

            On the other hand, this vehicle is not about “interesting”.

    • 0 avatar

      The six is down on power and up on fuel consumption. It’s either time for it to leave, or for them to develop a brand new one.

      You pick which you think is more likely.

    • 0 avatar
      legacygt

      Subaru’s H6 is not particularly good and is getting quite old. No reason to offer it in an all new car. Still, I’m a little wary of the 2.4L Turbo in such a bit car. The CX-9 does great with 2.5 and the Explorer is so-so with 2.3. This splits the difference. The fact is that Subaru sells tons of Outbacks with the 2.0L that is very underpowered.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The only thing the 3.6 H6 has going for it is outstanding reliability. It’s one of the least troublesome engines Subaru’s ever made. But it uses a lot of fuel to generate mediocre power.

      I assume this new 2.4T is a bigger FA. We’ll have to wait and see if it does as well as the smaller turbo FAs (which is pretty well, thus far).

      • 0 avatar
        fendertweed

        Agree the 3.6 (’17 Touring in my case) is just decent performance and so-so fuel economy.

        It does, however, get about the same (at times better) gas mileage as my former ’09 Limited 2.5 (4 cyl.) with auto transmission, while putting out ~80 more hp and being much more enjoyable to drive on long trips, esp. with a kayak or two on the roof.

        Although I miss my ’85 Saab Turbo, I’m not necessarily interested in going turbo now. Since an alternate to another Outback in about 5-6 years may likely be something like an Audi SQ5, I may be stuck in turbo land, we’ll see the state of the art in 2023.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Mazda CX9 wheelbase is 115.3 inches…so there’s that…

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    Unless Subaru has made great strides in refining its coarse and agricultural-sounding pancake 4-banger this will appeal only to members of the Subie cult.

    • 0 avatar
      Rnaboz

      It would have worked for my wife and I. Haven’t owned a Subie since 1988. The CVT kills it for me.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Now you’re channeling me.

      They won’t be able to build them fast enough.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        You’d think so, but I’m not so sure. LOTS of competition in this class of vehicle, and there are two brands (Honda and Toyota) that have strong appeal to the same “I’ll only consider something that CRUSHED it in Consumer Reports for my little snowflakes Kyler and Madison, and Bo the Golden Retriever” demographic that buys Subarus. VW also has strong traditional appeal to the “socially conscious” buyer.

        It’ll be successful, but a runaway hit? We shall see.

        • 0 avatar

          The competitors offer a V6, aside from Mazda. This could end up with CX9 levels of sales.

          However, Subaru customers are just as loyal as Mazda ones, except there are a whole lot more of them.

          And they want a car larger than their Outback, and have for a long time.

          I predict sales win.

          • 0 avatar
            legacygt

            The Outback sells very well and it is underpowered. There is clearly a segment of the car-buying public that doesn’t care.

          • 0 avatar
            VW4motion

            I didn’t know Mazda had loyal customers.

          • 0 avatar

            I think there are some who are repeat buyers of the 3, their hatchback versions of whatever, and also the MX5.

          • 0 avatar
            VW4motion

            Corey, you could be correct on the 3. I just don’t see many people excited about saying they just bought a Mazda. Seems different when people buy a Subaru.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            “The Outback sells very well and it is underpowered. There is clearly a segment of the car-buying public that doesn’t care.”

            Per above, I’ve driven an Outback with the 3.6; my parents’ car.

            I’ve also driven an Outback with the 4-cylinder; one of my friends’ cars.

            *Neither* one was what I’d call “underpowered”, though the 4 was hardly “exciting” …

            Are you using gearhead ideas of “power”?

            Because the market demonstrably *could not possibly care less* about that for these sorts of vehicles.

        • 0 avatar
          Ubermensch

          “VW also has strong traditional appeal to the “socially conscious” buyer.”

          VW killed any of their green-cred goodwill with their diesel emissions scandal.

  • avatar
    brettc

    So Subaru is going to be selling a supersized Outback now. How exciting. Too bad they didn’t bestow a “Flying Vagina” grille upon it.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Dog puns from the Barkley family? Excuse me for a moment…

    OK, I barfed. All better now. So what were we discussing? Oh, yes, another crossover. And now I need to take a nap.

  • avatar

    Someone in Subaru’s marketing department must really, really, really like dogs.

    As a cat person, their ads involving driving canines and old dog spirits, and now this presentation, just don’t resonate and make me want to buy their cars

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      Subie is marketing to a segment and it seems to be working.

      Cats are pretty lacking in most all auto adverts but it sounds like you’ve uncovered another niche for somebody to target.

      • 0 avatar

        Cats are not relatable like dogs. You can go find a dog (someone else’s) in a random place and it will be happy and friendly, and you can pet it.

        Cats are not in public places, and are not happy or friendly. You do not take them on hiking adventures in AWD places.

    • 0 avatar
      srh

      I’m a cat person, in that I own a cat and not a dog.

      I’m also someone who enjoys the outdoors and, as such, I fully understand the correlation between enjoyment of the outdoors and enjoyment of dogs.

      Subaru is actively courting the outdoor crowd, and dogs are universally relatable to that slice of the population.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I think it looks a lot like the Highlander from the front and side view. However, the argument could be made all of the mid size 7 passenger CUVs look essentially the same.

    Subaru will have people lining up for these, as I can not argue with the month over month growth the brand has had for the past, what is it now, 7 years. How many of those converts need a 7 passenger rig for their growing family? The outback gets passed over to the next driver so on and so forth. I am also confident most of these people will not be too concerned with the underpowered 4 banger mill up front nor the CVT as they are used to it with their previous Subaru’s. I believe the Ascent will take the bulk of its sales from Toyota and Honda as it seems that Subaru buyers are most likely to have one of those also.

    Would I buy it? No. I owned my one and only Subaru back in 01′-02′ and have a strong preference for a bow tie and pushrod V8 up front in my 7 passenger SUV. But, admittedly, my automotive proclivities are not the preferences of the masses.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    19 cup holders…??? Not counting wine and liquor glasses, I think I have 19 total glasses and mugs in my entire house!

    Curb weight (dry) = 4,000 lbs
    Curb weight (wet) = 4,150 lbs
    Curb weight (all cupholders occupied) = 4,400 lbs

  • avatar
    kosmo

    5k towing capacity seems a bit optimistic for a turbo 4 mill, even at 2.4 liters.

    It’s all going to boil down to pricing, IMO. Most or many people looking to move “up” from their Outbacks will also be looking at other brands, esp Honda and Toyota.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I respectfully disagree. Up until this is released Outback owners who need to move “up” in size are forced to go to Honda and Toyota, soon that will not be the case. I really don’t think they want to, they like their Subbies for whatever reason, and want to remain brand loyal.

      However many Ascent are built, you can count probably equally between Toyota and Honda as less sales.

  • avatar
    Car Ramrod

    That third row has got to be claustrophobic with those tiny windows. The Odyssey may be ugly with its side window zigzag, but at least when you’re in the third row of one it feels like it was designed for people. I feel bad for the middle children of Subaru cult parents who end up in the back row of this thing.

  • avatar
    MLS

    I don’t doubt that the Ascent will sell, but it looks surprisingly more like a lifted wagon than a proper crossover to my eyes. I don’t object to the lifted wagon form itself, but the styling details here are typical Subaru goofy. I’ll never grasp the brand’s appeal.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Place Outback on copier – set for 125%.

    BINGO! Ascent.

    • 0 avatar

      The current Outback is MUCH better looking than this. It has a boxy look about it now, and seems quite solid.

      This one, not so much.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Honestly I’ll probably have to look twice in traffic to determine which one I’m looking at.

        Can’t wait until my first trip to Santa Fe after the Ascent hits dealer lots. I’ll probably end up at a traffic light with a new Outback in one lane and a new Ascent in the other. I’ll really get to eyeball the size difference.

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      More like the Forester and Outback had a child that has adolescent diabetes. But man will this sell well. I have two coworkers that have been putting off buying an suv until they saw this new Subaru. They have both contracted their dealers to see when they can order a new Ascent. The dealers said they have had dozens of calls this week on Ascent. This will be huge in the mountain states.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    In the past year, the CX-9 shrank (a little) and the Acadia shrank a lot. Meanwhile the Traverse grew (a little) and the Atlas and Ascent are entering near the top of the size chart. It will be interesting to see who read the market correctly. I personally think bigger is better in this class as all of these manufacturers have other cars for people who don’t need as much space. 8-passenger seating can be a selling point and it’s smart of Subaru to offer it.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Did Toyota just license them use of the K platform Highlander?

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      That honestly would have been a very cost effective and rational approach IMO. There’s even a bit of precedent (sort of) in that Subaru built overflow Camries at the Lafayette plant, and Toyota makes Highlanders at the Princeton plant in Southern Indiana. Subaru gets an awesome V6, maybe puts in more aggressive viscous coupling and traction control tuning (the current Highlander is a dud in the rough stuff).

      • 0 avatar

        That was my thought as well. Use Highlander parts, and gain access to the 3.5L as your new V6 offering.

        But no, gotta boxer it up and use Subaru platform.

        I think there is some parts sharing between Subaru and Toyota, my dad mentioned something (I forget now) on the Outback which was the same as their Highlander.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I wouldn’t be surprised if the platform was flexible enough to do a longitudinal drivetrain.

          Looks like it may be possible with GA-L, since both it and K come from TNGA.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_New_Global_Architecture

          • 0 avatar

            Since this engine choice seemed so obvious, I asked Bozi the knowledge master about this a while back, and he said the 3.5 won’t work with Subaru’s layout.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            No, it would not but the parent TNGA vehicle platform may work with Subbie’s longitudinal layout, which was my speculation.

          • 0 avatar

            The enthusiast side of me says they should make that happen for greater engine variety and increased profit off six cylinders.

            But I don’t think they care.

  • avatar
    gtem

    This car was a no-brainer for Subaru, and like many others I predict a huge sales success. It will definitely be supply-constrained for quite some time. Not on some kind of standout specifications or performance, but just adding a rung on the Subaru size ladder. They are bleeding potential repeat owners that grew out of their Outbacks.

    • 0 avatar

      This is as big as they can go, I’ve just been thinking. I can never see them doing a truck-based item to compete with Yukon.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        It would be interesting if they’ve ever thrown around the idea of an AWD minivan. Subaru buyers seem to like to exude the “pragmatist” vibe, so the minivan vibe could perhaps be less of a negative than to the general population. But yeah I can’t see them going the BOF route at all. But I could see them attempting a Ridgeline-esque Brat reincarnation.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        “The new Subaru ST-3500 full size pickup truck, now with a new Boxer 8 cylinder turbodiesel with 1,200lb-ft of torque!”

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “They are bleeding potential repeat owners that grew out of their Outbacks.”

      I don’t quite understand this. How much sh1t do ya need, so to speak?

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        I will say for ourselves, an Outback could not serve as the main family car, not once we have a kid anyways. For weekend trips to the inlaws (a 2 hour drive away), we already use up a lot of the available space in either the 4Runner or the Pilot. A lot of that is from our 2 larger (60-70lb) dogs. We take both of their collapsible crates, and just some weekend bags. Over Thanksgiving we also had a passenger in the back so it was 3 people, 2 carry on sized suit cases, 2 backpacks, 2 larger dogs and their 2 folded crates. I built a platform for the rear of the SUVs so I can slide the folded crates underneath and the dogs sit on top. Now imagine a baby in a car seat with perhaps a folded play pen or maybe a stroller or something and an extra bag with baby stuff. And now imagine a second kid. Things spiral out of control quickly haha

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        I love my Outback even with it’s dweeb 2.5 – it’s a beast in our torrential rains, playing on the beach, or traversing the national forest service roads – but at 6’3″ it was a big adjustment from my Trooper seating position and comfort-wise. I’ve gotten used to it but would prefer to sit more bench-like. Otherwise I have no problem with driving smaller vehicles as a rule of thumb as long as I fit comfortably (I’m really trying to convince my kid a Golf Wolfsburg is the best first car ever).

        The Ascent will sell well, if only to give Subaru loyalists some place to move up to. It will probably impact Outback sales. My uneducated guess is now they go for the Highlander, Pilot and Atlas (which I’m impressed with).

        My Subaru wish list includes hybrids across the board, as well as a true minivan based on the Outback and pickup based on the Ascent.

  • avatar
    Slocum

    Given the higher ground clearance and Subaru AWD system, how much more capable will this be off-road than Highlander, Pilot, etc? And how much less than a similar sized Jeep Grand Cherokee?

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “Slightly” and “who cares, since nobody on Earth has ever taken a Grand Cherokee offroad”, respectively.

      I kid.

      But only a little.

      And to be fair, nobody takes a Pilot or Highlander “offroad” either.

      (Offroad? Subaru is not for actually-offroad. Is for dirt road, snow, rain, just like Pilot and Highlander, at best.

      But is not cross-country vehicle, any more than Volvo is, no matter what the old-school badging claimed.)

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    Looks like an Atlas to me…thankfully our last kiddo is in college and we don’t need a 3rd row vehicle. In fact, we’re replacing CUVs with smaller cars…in my case a ’17 Jetta, my wife’s CR-V will likely be replaced by a VW Sportwagen or Alltrack next year.

    I do resent the assertion that VW owners are socially conscious…I for one am NOT.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Zzzzzzzzzzzzzz….wake me when this SUV/CUV nonsense is over.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    Same head unit, gauges and steering wheel as the Impreza/Crosstrek. Gives me a good feeling, the more cars that use the ergonomically sound but firm-challenged head unit, the faster they will completely fix it for the rest of us… I hope.

    (Still turns on automatically when the car turns on, doesn’t read meta data off of USB properly. Station listings and media title don’t scroll. Most of the really bad bugs seem to have been sorted).

  • avatar
    dal20402

    They will sell a crapload of these in Seattle alone. A friend of my wife’s just ditched her old Forester for a Highlander, and would have probably stayed in the Subaru family had the Ascent been available.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Meh.

    The styling doesn’t have to be sexy, but maybe it could be distinctive in some way. I cannot remember the last time I saw a totally new model with such uninspired styling. At lest the ugly of the Tribeca was a “style” of some sort.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      It’s *not* bad, but just not distinctive like the Highlander or Atlas. As much as I love to admire Hondas, the Pilot 1st generation was perfect and it’s gone downhill from there. The current Pilot is IMO pure blandest at best. Even the Santa Fe is better looking.

      As was said before, the Ascent looks like an Outback put on the copier at 125%. Not crazy about the front fender though….

  • avatar
    WRC555

    HP and torque seem understated. Current generation 2.0T engine in their family SUVs generate 250HP/258Torque. So 2.4T will yield a conservatively tuned 300HP/310TQ engine in the Ascent.

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      According to Subaru Global website, this FA24 engine runs on 87 octane gas, not the premiun needed for the WRX and Forester XT. Not much point tuning a minivan engine, oops sorry crossover, engine to run on premium – it wouldn’t sell. On the other hand, max power is at 5600 rpm, so the wilting power the CX-9 exhibits above 4500 rpm won’t happen. The gerbils on speed turning the CVT in the gigantic engine room for a physically small engine will allow high rpm if needed and you won’t even hear them moan much down there, unlike the underfed ones in the Impreza much closer to the driver.

      My hope is that tuned up a bit and running on premium, this FA24 will power the next STI.

      To answer queries from other people, why would Subaru bother with commodity level TGNA when they have their new global platform that is torsionally as stiff as an S class at 44,000 lb-ft per degree? No reason at all.

      I look foward to the inevitable comparo test between Atlas, Ascent and CX-9, just for the fun of it. Driving around in one of these elephantine hatchbacks doesn’t appeal to me, but competition in this dull market space does, just for the fun of it.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    66 comments allready and I get to say this…?!

    Subaru Ass-Scent

    Love. It’s what makes a Subaru a Subaru.

    And: Dogs love it. LOVE IT!!!

  • avatar
    Stanley Steamer

    Is that shiny strip along the bottom on the sides the end of a retractable running board?

  • avatar
    newenthusiast

    AWD.

    Similar design cues to other Subarus.

    A vehicle sized for the segment their customers (both current and potential) have been asking for (I looked at a Tribeca, too small. If this had existed then, I might be driving it today).

    What appears to be better visibility than its competitors.

    Full range of Subauru’s safety tech.

    Assembled in the USA.

    Love it or hate it, this thing will sell. We often see use the phrase “it will print money” for automakers…but this is something Subaru would have to intentionally sabotage in order to screw it up.

    It’s a profit maker for sure. If you tell me that in 8-10 years, Subaru needs to expand SIA, or build or acquire another plant, and is selling over a million vehicles in the US, I’d say that sounds like a solid bet. And I think the Ascent is going to be a key reason.

  • avatar
    loguesmith

    As the owner of a 2015 Outback 3.6R, I’ll disagree with the assertion that it’s thirsty.

    We routinely get 20-22 around town, and I’ve seen upwards of 28MPG on longer highway runs.

    The CX-7 (2.3T) we owned before it struggled to get 20 around town, and we never saw higher than 25 on the highway.

    Not that I think folks who are looking at this are concerned about mileage.

  • avatar
    jfk-usaf

    No interest in a 7 passenger SUV with less than 300hp. I know that Subaru is not alone here. The CX9 has only 250 with premium gas and the Atlas is under 300 with it’s 6 as well. This is part of the reason that neither of them reside in my driveway at this point. The other reasons are CX9 too small, Atlas has a really boring interior (from a company that really excels at interiors… go figure). The highway drivability really suffers with inadequate power (regardless of what Mazda says about HP at higher speeds) What is wrong with the V or straight 6? If its a space issue then make it bigger..?!. Its not an MPG issue because we all know that the technology is there to get good MPGs out of 6 cylinder engines. CVTs are another issue. No interest. I know that they sell in some models but, again, no interest. Terrible driving experience. I’m having flashbacks of Altima rental cars that I have been stuck with in the past…. just.. No!

  • avatar
    Ryan

    Well, when it is time to replace my current daily driver – the Ascent will get an honest look. As a longtime Toyota/Honda/Subaru/Mazda owner the Ascent will likely be the only CUV I’ll consider. The 4Runner fits my needs and I’ve always enjoyed their off road poise, so the Ascent will have to really win me over. I know the 4Runner and Ascent are apples and pears but Subaru’s excellent 8.7 inches of G.C. has always been enough for my “soft roading” habits.


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