By on October 18, 2017

2018 Civic Sedan

There’s a good argument to be made that Honda has its mojo back, at least when it comes to the Civic. The ninth-generation car landed on the market with all the appeal of a wet fart, yet sales remained relatively strong, proving – once again – that no one listens to auto journos.

The latest Civic is leagues ahead of the old model, so much so that it has a very good chance of ousting the Camry from its perch atop America’s passenger car pyramid. Can the cheapest Civic, the LX, capture some of the luminescence cast by its more expensive brothers, particularly the Type R? Let’s find out.

Base Civic sedans start at $18,840, about the same price as a Corolla L but a full two grand more dear than the Elantra SE. Shedding two doors and turning the Civic into a coupe will add $410 to the note.

At this price point, Civics are powered by the naturally-aspirated 2.0-liter inline-four, making 158 horsepower and 138 lb-ft of torque. The smaller displacement turbocharged mill doesn’t show up until the EX-T trim, bringing with it an extra 16 horses, 30 pounds of twist, and an extra $2,760 on its Monroney. That’s an extra $172.50 per horse, for those keeping track at home.

The LX trim comes standard with a, um, standard. It is a six-cog box with hill-start assist to help new drivers avoid a sojourn into the front bumper of the commuter on their six. Four disc brakes (*ahem Corolla ahem*), 16-inch steelies, and reasonably sized rubber are all present and accounted for. Every color offered is $0.

2018 Civic Sedan

Economies of scale are the buyer’s best friend at this end of the automotive food chain, proven here again in the 2018 Civic LX. Power windows (one-touch for the driver and passenger), cruise control, and a tilt/telescope wheel are all on deck. Not only is air conditioning included, but it is of the automatic climate control variety, a feature once touted as cutting edge on the snazziest of luxury sedans.

However, I’ll freely confess to shutting the auto systems off immediately upon startup, no matter what car I’m in. I find the system rarely gets it right, either blasting the floor with air hot enough to melt the gumboots right off my feet or piping feeble amounts of conditioned air through the dash vents as if an asthmatic was wheezing at me through a straw. Anyone else feel that way? No? Only me? Very good, then.

Year-to-date, the Civic has sold 284,380 copies through to the end of September, compared to 282,507 Camry sedans. Of course they’re sedans, with the wagon and coupe both having been parked in death’s nursery for the last 20 years. If there’s one model that deserves a comeback, it’s the Camry coupe. Corey Lewis may have something to say about that later today.

Bluetooth, a 5-inch color LCD screen, and a USB port show up on the LX trim. Missing in action are satellite radio, Apple CarPlay, and a push button start system. Can’t expect economies of scale to take care of everything, I suppose. Whether one can live without those items is up to you. The absence of satellite radio would give me pause, but that’s because I hail from a part of the world where a clear FM radio frequency is more rare than caution-free NASCAR race.

The Type R is clearly the best Civic, but in terms of commuter car status, the LX trim makes a good case for itself in the model range — especially compared to the next-level EX, which is a full $2,400 adrift from the base model. If you’re spending that kind of money on a Civic, loosen the purse strings for another $360 and jump to the EX-T and its 1.5-liter turbo.

[Images: Honda]

Not every base model has aced it. The ones that have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selections.

The model above is shown with American options, sans destination fee, and is priced in Freedom Dollars. As always, your dealer may sell for less.

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64 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2018 Honda Civic LX...”


  • avatar
    MrGrieves

    After selling back my Jetta TDI earlier this year I looked at a Cosmic Blue Civic LX as a replacement. This car would have been just for general commuting needs – I didn’t want anything terribly fancy, just reliable and safe. Besides the somewhat funky looks it seemed like a great car. Unfortunately, after the test drive, the Honda salesman immediately went into full-scale “scumbag car salesman mode”, which resulted in me walking off the lot. My wife and I laughed afterwards… we couldn’t tell if he thought we were suckers, children, or some combination of both.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      So what did you end up buying after walking away from the greasy Honda salesman?

      • 0 avatar
        MrGrieves

        Corolla iM in Classic Silver. As a combination commuter car / dog hauler / weekend machine, it’s great. Only complaint is the weak engine and CVT combination. Toyota dealer was motivated to sell, no upsell or shenanigans.

        • 0 avatar
          dror

          Back in June 2014, I rented a car from Alamo in SFO, you walk to the section of cars you paid for and choose any one you like, it was a great opportunity for me to see if the new Corolla is any good, so far, I did not like any Corolla I have ever driven.
          Unfortunately, this new model was no different, very weak engine and on top of of it that terrible CVT.
          I think any other car would be better.
          If choosing a Corolla, the IM looks way better than the 4 door but you hardly see any of them on the road, that just prove why Toyota make the Corolla so boring and weak, people simply don’t care!

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      In LA, I doubt there are a brand stuck with more “stereotypical car salesman” guys selling them, than Honda. The Chevy guys may top them in the very limited case that a prospective customer walks in interested in a newly released Corvette, but across the breadth of the model line, the Honda guys are the most comical.

      Funnily enough, the much maligned BMW sales guys are, contrary to reputation, probably the easiest and most professional to deal with. At least for “enthusiasts,” who have normally bothered doing even the tiniest amount of homework before going in.

      • 0 avatar
        MrGrieves

        I’ve probably shopped at 13-15 different Honda dealers in various areas of the country over the past 25 years and they seem to be the most consistently shady. As I think back, I’m not sure I’ve been to a single Honda franchise that wasn’t stereotypically bad in that regard. And they are quite unrepentant – walking away from a bad deal garners an “Oh well, it’s your loss” type of response.

        If you consider a brand like Toyota, Ford, VW, it’s hit and miss… some good, some rotten. Again, just speaking from my experience.

        And I agree, BMW seems to get a bad rap. My last two sales experiences (at two different dealerships) were fine. Service, however… yikes.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Maybe wait a few model years for those quality ratings to go up.

    oi66.tinypic.com/18iwqq.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      Yeah, Honda has been having some serious issues lately. I would strongly caution against buying the first year of a new model and that is especially true for a car with such radically new power-trains. I’m hoping a refresh next year brings back a volume knob and tones down the ridiculous and ugly styling.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Ouch. My coworker’s ’17 EX-T had the windshield randomly crack (no rock impacts), apparently a few other people on the forums have had similar things happen. There’s some horrendously uneven stitching on the nasty neoprene-like seat covers as well. Say what you will about the cost cutting, but my ’12 Civic was assembled well and never had anything of note happen in 3 years and 53k miles. I guess the gas cap warning came on erroneously a few times.

    • 0 avatar
      lzaffuto

      If you read the fine print, it’s pretty much entirely due to bugs in the in the introductory 2016 EX+ trims digital dash and android tablet like center console. The latest cars seem to be completely fixed or at least almost there. But also this model (LX) as well as the hatchback sport model do not have these systems, which is one reason I bought an LX hatch for my commuter. No problems so far.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    I am with you on automatic climate controls. I wouldn’t pay extra for it nor would it, alone, tempt me to a higher trim level. I find the instant step up to full-blast of noisy fans annoying.

    My last two cars have had it and I find I only use it on longer trips and only after I’ve got the interior roughly where I want it to be on my own terms. Then again, I also enjoy driving manual transmissions, so perhaps having it my way is a personality trait?

    As for this Civic, it sounds like a good buy. The NA engine will likely prove more reliable long-term than the turbo and the car has more interior space than Accords of my youth. I personally can’t stand the styling but I guess nearly 300k people disagreed with me enough to buy them. Maybe the old “you don’t have to look at it if you’re the one driving” mantra proves true in this case.

    • 0 avatar
      earthwateruser

      Agreed that auto climate control is best used after you’ve got the climate where you want it. I generally don’t use automatic climate control on either of my two cars. Once you live with a car a short while, it is a quick and simple matter to manually adjust the HVAC settings for your preferred climate. Also, my girlfriend (who likes it much warmer than I do) is prone to just closing her vents when she wants to adjust temperature on her side of the car and the whole automatic system just devolves into chaos from there.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      The Lincoln has a very loud fan (as do most FoMoCo vehicles, in my experience).

    • 0 avatar
      lzaffuto

      I’ve had auto climate control on several of my past cars. As a guy that is always hot in a warm climate state I became ok with them as soon as I figured out I just need to turn the dial down to where I’m comfortable and ignore the number they display as it isn’t representative of how you feel regardless if whether it is accurate. If it’s like 85 outside and you set it to 73(colder than what I set my house thermostat at!) it won’t be long before not only has it cranked the fan speed down to nothing but it starts mixing heat in with the a/c. Meanwhile the sun is still baking you through those windows and you’re feeling it. So crank it down until it is comfortable even if the number displayed seems absurd… like 65, 60, lower if necessary… the number doesn’t matter.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      As with many things, you pay for a well-designed and thought out system. My 13 year old BMW’s Automatic HVAC slowly ramps up the fan if full blast is needed. If it’s been sitting in cold weather and I request heat, it keeps the fan on low until the coolant is hot enough to actually provide heat.

      My 2017 Mazda is the opposite. Do you want full A/C, right now? The fan speed will change as quickly as you can turn down the temp dial. Not annoying to me, but certainly not as refined as on my BMW. I haven’t tested it in the winter yet to see if it “waits” for the coolant to get hot.

  • avatar
    jeoff

    Didn’t see a mention of “Honda Sensing” safety stuff—it’s standard now, right?

  • avatar
    Raevox

    The automatic climate control in my ’17 Elantra VE, steps the fan speed up and down quite nicely, in small intervals. It works well.

    Our ’16 Fiesta, on the other hand… the auto climate in THAT car takes titanic leaps between fan speeds, on auto.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      My E70’s climate control was good. Too bad the car in general never worked properly…and now that I think of it, a complete failure of the iDrive infotainment system did take out the climate control system.

  • avatar
    vvk

    BMW automatic climate control has been pretty much perfect for me, except on the E60. E46 was the best — really spot on, set it and forget it. E90 is almost as good. E60 you need to adjust it from warm to cold and vice versa for some reason.

    Every other car I have tried, automatic climate control has been pretty unusable.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      My E70’s climate control was good. Too bad the car in general never worked properly…and now that I think of it, a complete failure of the iDrive infotainment system did take out the climate controls.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      Currently leasing a ’15 320i and it has the best auto climate control I’ve ever experienced, and credit-where-credit-is-due, the best “max AC” button I’ve ever experienced. Max really means Max. Thank you stolid German engineers!

    • 0 avatar
      Car Ramrod

      See, that’s funny, I think the BMW F30/F80 climate controls fall short in the summer. Unless I hit the max button, the fan will never kick above about half speed. Never had that problem in an E39, though it does go through a fan resistor every 6 months or so.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    “Four disc brakes (*ahem Corolla ahem*)”

    Enough of this pearl clutching about rear brakes on plebian daily drivers.
    For someone that just wants a reliable and trouble free commuter with minimal running costs in the salt-belt, rear drums win every time. Those rear disks have multiple failure modes due to rust: Rotors rust to the point of reducing swept braking area significantly (by year 7 or so), rust forming on caliper bracket behind the pad hardware casuses pads to jam and misalign, leading to uneven pad wear and brake drag (by year 3-5 in some cases), finally calipers can freeze entirely (often on cars that regularly sit unused for several weeks at a time).

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I’d still want 4-wheel disks. I think Toyota should at least offer them as an option on the lower trims.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’ve had five cars since 1993 with rear disc brakes.

      Combined mileage: probably approaching 750,000 miles.

      Combined failures: zero.

      I’ll take the better stopping power versus the “risk” of failure.

      (And Toyota’s a total skinflint for not offering them on base Corollas.)

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        FreedMike try living in the salt belt for a few decades and get back to me. I’ve literally never replaced a rear rotor due to actual wear down to minimum thickness, they always rust irreparably first. I’ve also never had to mess with a rear drum brake before a car hit 15 years old and 150k+ miles, except for my 4Runner due to a rear bearing seal contaminating the shoes with lube.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        As far as braking performance/stopping distance is concerned, IMO that is much more correlated with tires than what you have on the rear axle doing the braking. Heck I’d take a beefier front rotor setup with rear drums before I insisted on 4 wheel disks, given how much more work the front brakes do in stopping a car (particularly with modern EBD in play). Again, I’m speaking in the context of regular daily driving duty where emergency stopping is a concern but repeated hard stops and smoking brakes much less so.

        • 0 avatar
          bullnuke

          I’m in agreement with @gtemnykh. Nothing wrong with rear drums and the parking brake setup is much simpler and efficient than the weird systems used with some rear discs such as an extra small parking brake drum, electric motorized cable pull, et al. Here in salty Ohio the rear drums on our horse-trailer-towing ’98 Yukon lasted from new to 210k miles before needing attention.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      This. I’m only barely in the salt belt and I’ve had to repair crudded up rear discs twice in the past 10 years. I, nor anyone else not blessed with a closed course race track leading to the office and grocery, ought to be driving hard enough for fade to become an issue. So, why?

      At least the pads are easy.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I’ve had rear disks since 2012, all older cars in the rusty salt belt, I’ve had zero issues thus far barring occasional noises.

      On the other hand the goofy drum e-brake setup in my current car is going to need some work, likely it’s been neglected.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      Last car I had with rear drums was a ’90 Taurus. That’s 27 years ago. They sucked, and I do not miss them. No excuse whatsoever for drum brakes today I’m afraid.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Matthew, believe that you owe Clarkson some royalties and/or at least credit for the “as if an asthmatic was wheezing at me through a straw” comment. He used it to refer to how Lamborghini’s A/C traditionally worked.

  • avatar
    coherent-rambling

    Oh, you’re still doing these?

    There were 226 car models in the US market last year. You’ve already done roughly 65 Ace of Base columns, depending on how many times you count “All the Half-Ton Trucks” and separate articles for the Colorado/Canyon.

    Do you really, genuinely believe that every car you’ve done this for is best in the most basic configuration? If so, it seems you could have saved a lot of time with just one well-reasoned article saying that “You should pretty much always buy the base model.” At this point, if you’ve already covered 30% of the market, you might as well keep going until you get them all.

    • 0 avatar
      spreadsheet monkey

      I like these articles. They’re clearly signposted so they can be avoided by those who don’t like them.

      Living in the UK, I find it interesting to see what features base models have in North America, compared with what we get in Europe.

      Keep up the good work!

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I personally have never driven somewhere in a Fit/Corolla/Civic/etc where I thought “damn, if only I had rear disks!!!” I did however have to address some brake drag on my wife’s ’12 Camry: removed rust from rear caliper brackets, re-greased, reassembled with new pads and hardware, good to go. The rear rotors will need replacement in a few years due to rust. As a DIYer the cost is fairly trivial, but to a person going to the dealer, that’s a $400+ job. Hell I had the Toyota dealer have the gal to tell me that both rear calipers should just be replaced entirely to the tune of $1200 when they noticed the brake drag issue.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I live where it doesn’t rust or even drop under 40. My Seville still has intact factory assembly stickers on its undercarriage.

      Make it an optional “summer driving package” or something, but gimme four rotors.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Why would you think that? But in reality it is all about performance. Wet/dry/hot/cold performance. And ease of replacement. Disks are better

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        “ease of replacement”

        Yeah, and they seem to need replacing at about three times the rate of drum rear brakes over the lifetime of a car in the salt belt. Again, I’m not convinced of the performance benefits within the scope of daily driving duty (at least the kind that I do, and I’m sure that applies to most motorists commuting to and from work). To reiterate, I’m talking about rear brakes only.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          There are very clear reasons – heat and moisture. Drums keep heat inside while disks are cooled by passing air. And if you drive into water, it goes into drums.

          I don’t think, replacing shoes is more rare event. Pads can stay on for nearly 100K on rear wheels. I never noticed shoe being able to hold longer than pad. Also, with shoes it is always uneven wear issue. And also, periodic adjustment issue. I don’t think, this is fun to spin that gear from under the car. Really, it is hard to find a single area where shoe/drum is better than pad/disk.

          Salt belt… I think, it is more related on how it is made. For example, I had to replace rotors before pads. Where did you see that? In Mazda3. Rotors caught rust that eventually started destroying pads. This is bad rotor. In my ’98 Protege I changed 2 pads before front rotor. I used to have Villager. It went through front pads every 50K. Now, same-weight Highlander, replaced pads once, nearly 120K and second set is still pretty good. And calipers and rotor are in great shape. I totally believe it is based on the car and not generally related to rotors vs drums

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “I don’t think, replacing shoes is more rare event. Pads can stay on for nearly 100K on rear wheels. I never noticed shoe being able to hold longer than pad. Also, with shoes it is always uneven wear issue. And also, periodic adjustment issue. I don’t think, this is fun to spin that gear from under the car. Really, it is hard to find a single area where shoe/drum is better than pad/disk.”

            I’ve personally never had to touch a set of rear drum brakes before 150k, except for the case where the shoes became contaminated with oil. And this is generally how things go. The internal wear surfaces of drums generally stay pretty well protected from the effects of corrosion. Conversely, living in Central NY and now Central IN, I’ve never NOT owned a car with rear disks where the rotors weren’t replaced due to rust rather than reaching a minimum thickness threshold due to wear.

            Any drum brake mechanism made within the last, oh I don’t know, 30-40 years is self adjusting, the star is the there to get things in the right range when reassembling. If the adjustment mechanism is frozen, then perhaps you do have to support to adjusting using that star.

            In the past few years I’ve replaced rear rotors on a ES300, Maxima (already had rear calipers replaced at least once), just now on my Pilot (had been resurfaced previously). My wife’s ’12 Camry needed the caliper brackets cleaned up with a grinding disk and a new set of pads since uneven wear had started. All rust related issues. The exception to all of this was my ’97 Ranger (128k miles), which was thoroughly crusty underneath everywhere including the front rotors (and frame and everywhere else). The rear drum brakes were just fine and never needed messing with. I can almost guarantee you those rear drums had never been so much as taken off.

  • avatar
    Dan

    The EX with the turbo motor is another $3,000 but all of the hatchback trims get the turbo, and base model to base model the jump there is just $1,000. You get alloy wheels instead of steelies with covers, too.

    If you can live with that atrocious, boy racer front end, which I couldn’t, that’s clearly the value spot.

  • avatar
    ScarecrowRepair

    My biggest gripe with the auto climate system in my 2015 Mazda 3 is its inability to cope with even the smallest change in sun direction. If the sun is hidden or high enough to not really have a direction, it might do ok, but that’s rare enough, especially for commutes, that I seldom give it a chance anywhere.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    As an ‘older’ person, please educate me, is there anyone who would refuse to purchase a specific model of a vehicle specifically because it does not have a ‘starter button’?

  • avatar
    nels0300

    This exact model, with the 6 speed manual, along with the Corolla Im and Mazda3 2.0L were on my shopping list this past spring.

    I was willing to overlook the wheel covers and styling for some Honda K series 6 speed manual goodness.

    It drives really nice, but in the end couldn’t pass up the Elantra Sport for nearly the same price.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      you give civic too much credit. It had none of these great – steering and brakes. Clutch will go as OK. What they said it starts, 18,840? – I’ve got Mazda6 for less than that. What is your ElSpo clutch like? Is it grabbing right of the floor? This was one of my “meh” moments when I drove it.

      • 0 avatar
        nels0300

        I like the base Civic engine, I’m a old school Honda fan and the 2.0L is Honda old school style. Unfortunately, you’re right on the brakes, but that’s old school Honda too, they’ve never had good brakes.

        Speaking of brakes, the Elantra Sport’s brake feel is great.

        Regarding the clutch on the Elantra Sport, this is my 12th manual transmission car and I think the clutch is really easy, it catches mid travel and is very forgiving. I have zero complaints with the clutch.

        The Corolla Im clutch on the other hand, catches all the way at the top of the long pedal travel. I’ve been driving manuals for 25 years and I found it hard to drive. It’s bad, like it’s not adjusted properly. Can’t believe Toyota can’t figure out something that simple.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Elantra Sport brakes feel super good. Even better than 2011 Mazda3 and on par with 2017 Mazda6.

          I had 1990 Civic, where clutch was catching at the top. But the elantra Sport I drove was right on the bottom. I stall the car twice during test. I stall the car? – must be kidding. I have to admit, 2010/11 Mazda3 has very stiff clutch pedal. After Mazda6, it is like, WTF? No wonder, I had issues in almost all other cars. Now I understand why my left leg is so strong.

          I test drove 2011 Corolla. 300 yards long drive was enough. None of controls or pedals felt good. Shifting gears was rubbery-noisy event.

  • avatar
    deanst

    The base hatchback with the turbo would seem to be the value model, unless you can buy the Canadian $16,690 DX model.

  • avatar
    ijbrekke

    My brother bought one of these. He was shopping in the $15k range (very attainable with the Korean brands and subcompacts) and stretched his budget slightly because the Civic drove so much better than the other stuff. It’s a nice car.

    Personally, I’d be cross-shopping the Civic Sport hatch against the Elantra Sport.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Civic “Ace of base” is pushing it. Its finally got rotors in the rear!! yea!! But it has one-piece folding rear seat and no variable intermittent wipers. Camera is no longer count as it is mandatory. Add to this the price, and ace of base image is gone

    “Anyone else feel that way?” – yes. don’t want auto climate and don’t want to pay for it. Keep the sunroof too.

  • avatar
    Heino

    I truly don’t understand the Honda dealers. The internet price is not the best, you must come into the dealer for the best price. Honda is stuck in the 90’s with their business model. The cars that sell themselves is simply no longer true. I have always been agnostic about the Japanese manufacturers, but Toyota seems to be going out of their way to work with you. Pride and prejudice for Honda.

  • avatar
    DearS

    In the used car market they are $4k under retail with 15,000 miles or so. I great savings.

  • avatar
    syncro87

    I’m late to the comments, but anyway…

    You’re nuts to buy the base LX sedan when the LX hatch is available. Yeah, it looks odd, but the turbo transforms the new Civic. Standard on the base hatch. Even available with manual, if you so desire. The small sum saved by buying a Civic sedan exemplifies penny wise, pound foolish, to me.

  • avatar
    VoxMortis

    Picked up a 2018 Civic Coupe for $16,800 (before tax, tag etc) for my daughter. Pretty nice ride at that price. Only thing that would have been nice is push button start. Other than that nice little commuter with 39 MPG highway.

  • avatar

    Came here to say I bought this exact car last week. Blue, 6MT, steel wheels and all. Zero frills.

    Regular cruise control, no HondaSense, doesn’t have that execrable touch screen or “blind spot camera” that’s both useless and distracting.

    Thus far I’m getting equivalent real-world mileage to my 1st Gen Ford Fusion Hybrid (35 mpg mixed) and it’s a ball to drive. The K20C2 reminds me of the SR20 Sentra I had back in the 1990’s.

    I’m hoping to drive it until the wheels fall off or I give it to one of my kids as a first car.


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