By on August 5, 2017

Nissan Titan XD assembly plant, Image: Nissan

The United Auto Workers spared no effort in its attempts to organize foreign automakers operating in the United States, but the workforce — and the South, for the most part — remains off limits to the union.

Yesterday, workers at Nissan’s Canton, Mississippi assembly plant voted overwhelmingly to reject the UAW’s overtures, spelling an end to a heated, nearly decade-long unionization bid that saw the union file complaints with the National Labor Relations Board. Both sides have accused the other of dirty and unfair tactics aimed at swaying worker sentiment towards or against organized labor. Both sides, of course, deny any wrongdoing.

The UAW, which failed in two previous attempts to unionize Nissan’s Tennessee plant, described Nissan’s Mississippi efforts as one of the “nastiest anti-union campaigns in the modern history of the American labour movement.” Ultimately, it all came down to the vote.

According to the NLRB, employees voted 2,244 against unionization, with 1,307 voting in favor. Contract workers, who bring the plant’s workforce to 6,500 people, weren’t eligible to vote.

In a statement, the automaker said, “With this vote, the voice of Nissan employees has been heard. They have rejected the UAW and chosen to self-represent, continuing the direct relationship they enjoy with the company.”

The UAW, burned in its attempt to expand its presence into the South, rife with foreign automakers, left the battle bruised but, according to president Dennis Williams, not broken.

“The result of the election was a setback for these workers, the UAW and working Americans everywhere, but in no way should it be considered a defeat,” Williams said in a statement.

The Canton plant, opened in 2003, produces the Altima, Murano, Frontier, Titan, and NV vans. In the vote’s run-up, the UAW claims Nissan engaged in intimidation tactics, even playing anti-union materials on a constant loop on televisions in the plant’s break rooms. Managers, it alleges, engaged in one-on-one discussions with employees about the dangers of unionization, with ominous presentations delivered to larger groups.

The automaker countered the complaints by saying UAW affiliation would make the plant uncompetitive, threatening workers’ livelihoods.

Given the area’s socioeconomic makeup, race and money factored into the battle, with Nissan claiming the plant lifted the region’s economic fortunes, providing well-paying jobs for workers, many of them African-Americans. Some pro-union forces accused the automaker of favoring white employees, something Nissan denies, while anti-union forces accuse the UAW of trying to buy support in the African-American community through donations to local civil rights and religious groups.

At the end of the day, longstanding workers stand to make nearly as much as those employed by domestic plants in the North, with Nissan matching contributions to 401(k) savings plans and offering a defined contribution retirement plan. Money, especially in a region without much of it, talks.

It’s unlikely the UAW has given up on Nissan. However, last night’s vote will surely turn its focus — at least temporarily — to automakers with a more receptive workforce.

[Sources: Reuters, The New York Times] [Image: Nissan]

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63 Comments on “Foreign Automakers, the South, Remain Off-limits to UAW as Nissan Workers Reject Unionization...”


  • avatar
    Dr. Claw

    Desperation will trump information, each and every time.

    Sure, it “brings the jobs back”, but if those jobs don’t yield a life with much enjoyment, how “great” can it all be?

    amazing how so many people fall for the con jobs that these corporations (and other moneyed entities) routinely pull on the populace.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      True, but UAW is so toxic at this point those crappy jobs would disappear over time. The only real solution would have been a new union without political baggage or corruption.

      ““The result of the election was a setback for these workers, the UAW and working Americans everywhere, but in no way should it be considered a defeat,” Williams said in a statement.”

      You’re defeated, accept it. You can’t save this sinking ship Dennis.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        I do agree with 28-Cars-Later’s statement. The UAW has a very poor reputation. Workers rather take their chances on their own.

        Some of the big successful unions in the province I live in have been very careful with public image and public opinion. Any successful PR campaign focused on everything but higher wages. Unions that focused on selling worker wages and benefits have failed miserably.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I am truly surprised a new union has not been contemplated by rational men in the manufacturing industry. Hell, look to the Great White North for inspiration.

          • 0 avatar
            Eyeflyistheeye

            Unfortunately, the Democratic Party, who doesn’t want to lose a guaranteed donor/voter/campaigning base would do anything for the UAW/AFL-CIO/NEA/CWA to stay alive no matter how toxic they become or what collateral damage they wreak.

            I’m not against workers organizing and think it’s necessary for labor to have a voice within their companies, but what do modern American unions do except extort and lie? An ideal situation would be similar to Japan or a lesser extent Germany where company unions exist and a labor representative sits on the company boards.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      “amazing how so many people fall for the con jobs that these corporations (and other moneyed entities) routinely pull on the populace.”

      By “corporations” you mean “unions”.

      The simple fact is, the union is just another money-grubbing corporate entity that wants to stick itself in the middle and grab the largest share it can from the overall transaction.

      Just like health insurance companies. Remember when “universal care” back in 2008/2009 turned into “universal coverage”? Yeah, that was because Big Insurance wasn’t going to let themselves be turned away at the door, and demanded middleman status. Same with Big Unions.

      Those who labor, and who aren’t the sharpest knives in the drawer by definition, really need protection against the unions.

      BTW, did everyone see the story about Chicago going to sue the DOJ? Yeah, the DOJ will specifically deny federal money to sanctuary cities–but Chicago, king of the union towns, is taking the DOJ to court on the basis that they are entitled to federal monies no matter what.

      It’s that entitlement mentality that’s killing us as a society. Wall Street bros are entitled, Big Pharma is entitled, unions are entitled… Everyone, just go to work, contribute to society, and shut up.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        “It’s that entitlement mentality that’s killing us as a society. Wall Street bros are entitled, Big Pharma is entitled, unions are entitled… Everyone, just go to work, contribute to society, and shut up.”

        They did and look at the US forty years later. Fat bunch of good it did to shut up and contribute.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          It looks like you also have to take an active position regarding those you elect to legislative office–instead of just sitting back, watching TV, and accepting whatever those people shove at you.

      • 0 avatar
        dantes_inferno

        >Remember when “universal care” back in 2008/2009 turned into “universal coverage”? Yeah, that was because Big Insurance wasn’t going to let themselves be turned away at the door, and demanded middleman status. Same with Big Unions.

        Remember when HMOs and the other “managed” healthcare ilk never existed? I did. Until 1974 (Nixon Administration – imagine that???) – a year that will live in infamy in healthcare circles when legislation was enacted which gave birth to the managed healthcare industry. I remember when we had a family doctor. Who made housecalls (imagine that???). And when services were rendered, the doctor presented my parents with the bill (which was actually affordable and reasonable – imagine that???)- and they paid it. End of transaction.

        That concept was kissed goodbye when the HMOs arrived on the scene – and the healthcare industry has been on a downward spiral ever since.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      I spent a few days in the Nissan warehouse across the road from the assembly plant, the largest warehouses I have been in. Standing at one end, it seemed to stretch to infinity; and it was fun trying to identify what the various car parts were for when I was walking through it.

      Canton, MS would another one of those small, slowing dying Southern towns were it not for the Nissan Canton facility, as young people move away to Jackson and other large cities; leaving the elderly and poor behind to slow fade away. Instead, the courthouse square was beautiful during Christmastime, and there was a thriving Wal-Mart and two hotels there, along with the usual restaurants and small businesses. Given it’s location, it could not help but benefit all races in Canton and the surrounding area.

      I am glad to hear the workers rejected the UAW contract; the UAW could only possibly benefit workers with the lowest skills and poorest work habits. Their track record of keeping facilities open and wages high is dubious at best.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        A thriving Walmart is a bellwether for a town’s economic success… and a leech is a dependable indicator of quality medical treatment.

        • 0 avatar
          jhefner

          Yeah, I should have mentioned the vocational training center a bit south and across the interstate from the plant, and the industrial gases plant.

          As one who had driven through more small southern towns than you ever will; I can tell you the bellwether of which you speak are the dollar stores.

          The thriving towns like Canton have a Super Wal-Mart.
          The towns just hanging in there have a regular Wal-Mart.
          The dying towns have an empty building that used to be a Wal-Mart, or nothing at all.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Once you know who owns the dollar stores, you’ll know why idiots who spend most of their money on Amazon spend so much of their time trying to keep low income people from having access to the quality of life increase that comes from shopping at a big box store when they aren’t protecting Warren Buffet’s spill-prone railroads by attacking new pipeline construction while existing ones escape their detection. The teachers’ unions didn’t turn our schools into imbecile farms by accident.

          • 0 avatar
            joeaverage

            ToddAtlasF1: care to elaborate on your statements about Amazon and the dollar stores? You just threw alot of stuff out there that is hard to follow.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            People who lobby against Wal-mart often claim that Wal-mart is a net-negative for local employment and imaginary locally owned department stores. The reality is that they’ve been mobilized by corporate owned Dollar stores that align low prices with small quantities, often keeping actual price per unit high in favor of the owners of the chains. Meanwhile, anyone who complains about the well-being of local laborers and shop owners while getting everything from Amazon is dumber than an aloe plant. If you don’t care about anything other than your own bottom line and convenience, shop Amazon all day long. If you think Wal-mart is a force of evil and you shop Amazon, you’re weaponized stupidity.

        • 0 avatar
          dantes_inferno

          >and a leech is a dependable indicator of quality medical treatment.

          Never underestimate tried-and-true medieval medical techniques such as blood letting. Don’t take my word for it. Ask those who benefited from the treatment….oh, wait…

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            “Never underestimate tried-and-true medieval medical techniques such as blood letting. Don’t take my word for it.”

            Absolutely. Just ask Theodoric of York, Medieval Barber.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Very good at ignoring his point entirely, and picking bits and pieces to deflect from what he said.

          Where there is a Walmart, there are other businesses. There are people, spending money, paying taxes.

          His argument is not that Walmart somehow benefited the community, it is simply a sign that the Nissan plant has benefited the community by bringing in people and money.

          Flourishing businesses are a sign things are going well, no matter if you are in support of that particular business or its ethics and treatment of its workers. That’s missing the point entirely.

          You don’t need/won’t see a Walmart if nobody is there to shop. You can b¡tch about it all you want, but that’s all there is to it.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Some businesses don’t indicate a healthy economy. The leftist dystopia I live in has been strangled by no-growthers to the point that there are thirteen payday loan storefronts and somewhere up to seven title loan shops fighting for their piece of the usury available when the Democratic leeches eat their hosts.

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            The “rightest dystopia” where I used to live was just lousy with payday loan stores and title loans places too. The county went 75+% Republican in the 2016 election.

            I swear there were more places to get a cash advance than there were to get lunch or a cup of coffee. Roughly half the places on the big scenic downtown square were either bottom-feeder finance businesses or vape shops.

            Turns out that people of all political stripes are terrible with money.

    • 0 avatar
      delow48

      As opposed to the ones who fall for the big con job the unions present? I assume by “well moneyed” that applies to the big time unions as well since last I checked they were quite flush with cash.

      If these workers are making similar wages and benefits to similar unionized employees elsewhere where is the benefit? All they would wind up doing is paying into the coffers of a union that would just send their money to politicians who do not represent their views.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    When the UAW started talking about how dirty Nissan was playing in trying to influence the vote I was pretty sure they were providing a convenient scapegoat for the loss they could see coming. The problem for the UAW is they don’t have a good story to tell except perhaps to the workers with the lowest skills and poorest work habits, which tend to be the ones that benefit from union protection. But there probably aren’t many fitting that description since this is a pretty prestigious employer in that area and so attracts good applicants that have already proven themselves as non-voting temps before earning full-time status. The pay and benefits are also high for the area and competitive with UAW plants, and voting yes means they will be having union dues deducted from your check, which will go to support corrupt UAW administration and the 2020 campaigns of Hillary, Bernie, or Fauxcahontas even though all of them will lose ‘deplorable’ Mississippi by 20+%. It is also hard for the UAW to argue they provide better job security since UAW plants have been shut down in considerable numbers. So the real mystery is not why the UAW lost, but why the vote was even as close as it was.

    • 0 avatar
      anomaly149

      One of the major reasons is most of the transplants use contractors for the bottom-tier jobs that would benefit the most from unionization. Only the more skilled jobs end up being direct for the automaker. It’s not quite as divided as mainline UAW vs. Skilled Trades, but there’s some of that going on.

  • avatar
    bikegoesbaa

    Of course they rejected the UAW, the UAW is a dying organization with a decades-long track record of declining influence and predictable high-profile defeats. Sorry, I mean “setbacks”.

    If I was for some reason going to attempt t unionize my workplace I sure wouldn’t be talking to the UAW, as they’ve done very little in my lifetime to convince me that they even know how to be successful.

    It would be like contracting with the Washington Generals to help me with a Globetrotter problem. They’re obviously not the guys you want on your side.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      ACCOUNTANT: Let me get this straight. You took all the money you made franchising your name and bet it *against* the Harlem Globetrotters?
      KRUSTY THE CLOWN: [miserable] Oh, I thought the Generals were due!

  • avatar
    thelaine

    They managed to get a 20 billion dollar taxpayer funded pension bailout from the Obama administration, with NO repayment obligation. Straight-up payoff. That was quite a coup for their workers. Can’t take that one away from them. Non-UAW Delco workers took it up the as*. Nice corruption, if you can get it.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    Good. The sooner the UAW dies, the better. Same goes for all unions.

  • avatar
    carguy67

    “… last night’s vote will surely turn its focus — at least temporarily — to automakers with a more receptive workforce.”

    If there were ‘automakers with a more receptive workforce’ then why didn’t the UAW go after them in the first place?!

  • avatar
    tonycd

    I’ll volunteer to be the flamebait in this thread.

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/07/in-defense-of-the-united-auto-workers-uaw/

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Baruth’s comments in that article are spot on.

      Most of the union bashers here probably couldn’t keep their pristine clean hands holding a DC tool on a balancer for more than 3 hours before they cramp up walk out the door.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        I am aware that working in an assembly plant is not easy; but the old timers in Canton will tell you it beats working in the cotton fields, in the cotton gin, or the railroad for much less pay.

        Mississippi is one of the poorest states in the nation. Driving through downtown Canton, you can see that the big businesses used to be cotton and the railroad. Now the cotton is processed with machines in the field, pressed into container sized modules, and shipped out by truck; and aside from Nissan Canton the only trains that stop in Canton is probably Amtrak’s City of New Orleans.

        So the cotton gins in town are derelict with their machines scrapped out; and there are waist high weeds on the tracks that used to service them. Canton knows they have it good having Nissan Canton there; that is why the vote was not even close.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “Most of the union bashers here probably couldn’t keep their pristine clean hands holding a DC tool on a balancer for more than 3 hours before they cramp up walk out the door.”

        Society doesn’t place the value on that task that they do on, say, a doctor.

        Nobody cares about that task. Seriously. That you’re proud of yourself for being able to do it, doesn’t mean I’m supposed to shower you with praise and cash.

        Get over yourself.

  • avatar
    Tj21

    So roughly half of the 6500 employees were eligible to vote? I assume the contract employees receive considerable less wages, vacation, pension etc…

    I’m sure they’re happy with the outcome of the vote and that there not considered employees.

    Wonder what the average service time is for them to be considered full time employees.

    • 0 avatar
      here4aSammich

      Contract workers at Nissan are just like the contract workers at Toledo Jeep, which is in fact a UAW plant. The interiors are made by Hyundai Mobis, and there is at least one other major contractor on site as well. They are not UAW, and dont get to vote o contracts either. Only difference? Those jobs carry the UAW seal of approval.

  • avatar
    whitworth

    Unions in general would fare much better if they stopped being so political on issues that have nothing to do with their purpose.

    It was smart for the foreign automakers to locate their plants in politically conservative states.

    • 0 avatar
      Eyeflyistheeye

      While I don’t agree with the unions getting political, they would have been gone a long time ago if they didn’t buy off politicians for self-preservation in the grandest American tradition.

      Seeing how Trump won Michigan, and around 28% of UAW members voted for Trump, they now have to also contend with the fact that their rank-and-file are revolting against their endorsements. The 2016 Clinton campaign, led by the aptly-named Robby Mook also spit on the unions in the rustbelt and told them they didn’t need their help. I’m expecting the unions to go all in for 2020 as long as the Dem nominee’s campaign manager isn’t stupid enough to repeat the mistake of trading solid Democrat constituencies like the UAW for the Hamilton/Lena Dunham crowd.

      • 0 avatar
        whitworth

        There’s plenty of effective organizations that are still around without specifically identifying with one political party or engaging in partisan issues outside of their charter. Modern unions have simply become extensions of the Democrat Party, so don’t be surprised that right off the bat around half of potential members feel alienated.

        • 0 avatar
          tonycd

          Whitworth, if you want to be taken seriously, get basic facts right, like the names of the organizations you’re criticizing. Specifically, it’s the “Democratic Party,” just as it’s been named for over 100 years. That incorrect name you used is the one applied to it by the other party and disseminated, incorrectly on purpose, by Fox News, so its name is not confused with a compliment.

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    I can’t help but wonder what the transplants would offer as a wage package if the UAW did not exist. Keeping that threat at bay is easy – offer a compensation package generous enough so that union representation is viewed as an unnecessary expense. Should the UAW fold the wages at these plants will likely stagnate.

  • avatar
    honda1

    EFF the uaw. Bunch of low life thieves. Hahahahaha no union at nissan. Love it now gfys uaw.

    • 0 avatar
      nrcote

      How old are you? 12? 14?

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      And there you have it, an excellent example of the anti-union illiterati.
      Anyone who has had a good union representing them understands their value. Of course you have to pay union dues – in the long run you’re much better off. For some reason a lot of working class folks like to shoot themselves in the foot.
      Anyone who prefers to not be represented by a union can go apply at Amazon. They seem to be constantly hiring. But first take a good look at the reality of working conditions there.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        You are correct in many aspects. But the UAW, with its extensive history of corruption, malfeasance and losing, needs to give up the chase. It would be great for another organization to form. Last I knew the alternative organization attempting to offer the VW plant a choice was blown to oblivion by UAW maneuvers.

        I love how the UAW doesn’t like the secret ballot. Um sure we’ll trust you with that card gathering mechanism you so desperately want to utilize.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        Well said, RHD.

        Unions are far from perfect. But when you look at who wants to get rid of them and why, it’s the best testimonial to their value I can think of. Simply put, history proves that all working people have more leverage, more benefits, more money and more power in the workplace when even some of us belong to a union (even though I happen not to do so). It sets a bar that other employers have to meet in order to be competitive for talent. The Toyota and Honda transplant factories, in particular, met that competitive standards to keep unions out.

        Nissan is not doing so now, and I find it odd that anyone who is not a billionaire is titillated and thrilled by the success of their campaign to abuse their workers further for the right to keep abusing them in the future.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Here is a good example tonycd – I have several friends that work for NYC. Two are mangers (no union representation) and one is a mechanical engineer (union). When Mayor DeBlaz decided to provide some paid leave for maternity needs, the money had to come from somewhere to pay for the anticipated costs. It came from stripping senior managers of two paid vacation days and diverting funds that were earmarked for said managers’ last .5% of their raise. No discussion; it was simply done. Those represented by a union had no such cut. Unions are certainly flawed (UAW is a great example) and often like the pigs and dogs at the end of Orwell’s “Animal Farm”, its hard to tell union management from corporate management.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “And there you have it, an excellent example of the anti-union illiterati.”

        Not to be confused with the union illiterati, of which there are many. In fact, they’re the preponderance of the union member population.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The UAW in it’s attempt to takeover the Canton Mississippi plant really shows they are desperate in expansion.

    First you must look at the research or groundwork carried out prior to the UAW’s attempt and the decisions made prior, during and after the standover attempt failed.

    The UAW would of known it was a fruitless venture, so why did they move on the Canton Plant?

    The only reason I can think of is an attempt to undermine the manufacturers, by using bullying tactics. To create dissent within the plant. Now if I owned a business and some fnckwits screwed around with my workers how would I feel?

    So, you can see why the UAW is losing it’s power and value to the auto workers. The workers viewed the UAW as standover men and bullies.

    I do believe if the UAW want to improve their standing within the industrial community and society they must look at how they operate. Desperate, irrational and illogical moves like we just witnessed at Canton can only harm the UAW further.

    The UAW leadership will only appeal to the dimmest of workers. Anyone with brains will go it alone as the UAW has again shown it has poor leadership, no plan, poor communication with poor ideals which don’t fit into the modern industrial landscape.

  • avatar

    Japanese and German companies for the most part don’t treat their workers like crap. So there is really no need for a union. They certainly don’t force their downsized workers to train their foreign replacements like the Disney IT department did in 2015.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    willing to bet that a lot of the stuff workers really want isnt about money. if the company is already following seniority for jobs, hours, schedules and vacations, thats whats important to a lot of people.

    im 26 years union and its nice to know im going to get the hours, shifts, days off, and weeks of vacation when i want. and when i want a change, im one of the top people to be offered any job posted. money is good, but stuff like THAT is what makes me like what i do and who i work for.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      “im 26 years union and its nice to know im going to get the hours, shifts, days off, and weeks of vacation when i want. and when i want a change, im one of the top people to be offered any job posted.”

      Did you achieve that status by being of value to the company? Or did you achieve that status merely by existing and showing up every day?

      There’s the difference. Union members think that simply showing up every day, regardless of the quality of labor they provide or how well they advance the business they work for, means they’re ENTITLED to things like what you describe.

      And in the real world, nothing is further from the truth.

      • 0 avatar
        Ubermensch

        Jalop1991 sounds like a college freshman who just read Ayn Rand and thinks he now has some “special knowlege.”

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          “Jalop1991 sounds like a college freshman who just read Ayn Rand and thinks he now has some “special knowlege.” ”

          Wow. Just wow. Really? Is that how you interpret the world around you??

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      That’s a company that can’t recruit anyone who has options. They’re doomed to hire people who see their best opportunity for advancement to come through social promotions. Why would anyone smart and hardworking accept those conditions?

  • avatar
    jonnyanalog

    The UAW tried to unionize in Peterbilt plant in TX and the PACCAR engine facility MS. Both failed miserably because the UAW offers the workers nothing that PACCAR has already given them.
    I’m not anti-union just anti-UAW. If there was something like AG Metal in Germany or the like I think unions might be more popular. The UAW is walking dead; antiquated and useless, working for the betterment of the high ups and the common worker.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The greatest enemy of unions is the media and the internet.

    Free dissemination of information – where anyone has a voice – helps keep poor pay, unsafe working conditions, long hours, and discriminatory labor practices at bay. No company wants to be the target of such charges.

    But the UAW would have workers believe they’re working in slave conditions and should forfeit part of their pay to change it, or prevent it.

    These days, it’s pretty easy for a worker (or a company) to figure out what is acceptable in the workplace and what isn’t, and adjust accordingly.

    However, I’ll argue that the white collar workforce is ripe for unionization. Companies will say that exempt employees (who are typically paid more) are thereby compensated for their long hours. The problem is that unrealistic project deadlines force unrepresented white collar workers to put in ridiculous hours in order to keep their jobs. Airline pilots are protected accordingly, and I’d argue that office duds like me might consider collective bargaining as a means of regaining our sanity.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      A-men.

      I wondered years ago why there wasn’t at least a couple smart union types going after the cube dwellers. It was ripe for unionization.

      But overall people are dumb, and they keep doing what they’ve been doing–never mind that the world has moved away from wanting or needing what they grew up doing. And so union types kept going after the auto workers instead of the coders.

      • 0 avatar
        Eyeflyistheeye

        I think one reason you wouldn’t see coders unionize is that unlike a factory, where one has to build tooling and infrastructure, coding can be outsourced with the filling out of a web form or a phone call. Not to mention there are tons of hungry and aggressively-priced programmers inIndia and Eastern Europe.

  • avatar
    Sgt Beavis

    Dear UAW,

    In case you haven’t yet noticed, the South F’ing HATES you. That isn’t going to change anytime soon.

    Best Regards,
    The South.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    Ah, unions:

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/08/07/padma-lakshmi-expected-testify-teamsters-trial/unOKJz13GfxCEXWE6QWTZP/story.html

  • avatar
    mchan1

    Are there any Good reasons why the UAW still exists considering the drop in membership?

    When it was first created Decades ago, the auto union served a good purpose.. to watch out for the workers. Now, it’s as corrupt as the companies that it was created to fight against.

  • avatar
    123GONE

    Being raised by pro union parents (pipe fitter) and me working at a unionized Whirlpool at age 18 I was full on union most of my life until just a few yrs ago.
    Being in my 50’s I even went and got the UAW and tried for almost 2 yrs to unionize the last plant I worked at where we made automotive parts for most makes. It was voted down but man it was close and now I’m so glad we failed to get them in. Yes’ I’m very glad!!

    Today’ I still support most unions just not the UAW and It has nothing to do with failing to get in at my old job but more what they done at NUMMI in Cali. Anyone thinking they want them involved in their workplace better think again. They are straight up liars to both sides and may likely send your company running to another country to simply start over.
    I strongly suggest everyone to read this and please spread the link around too because this was just wrong for everyone involved.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2010/03/09/firestone-revisited-was-toyota-a-takedown-target-in-the-name-of-nummi/

    .


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