By on May 11, 2017

2016 Chevrolet Impala Midnight Edition - Image: Chevrolet

We knew General Motors’ strategy for the tenth-generation Chevrolet Impala would be different when the big sedan was launched in 2013. No longer intended to be the fleet queen and a hugely discounted showroom sedan, the tenth-gen Impala moved upmarket.

Consequently, sales decreased, and did so in dramatic fashion. The Impala’s U.S. volume in 2014 was down by more than half compared with 2007 output. Sales continued to fall, with the Impala’s 2016 calendar year result of 97,006 U.S. sales representing the sixth consecutive year of decline.

The Impala’s numbers are getting lower. Much lower. After averaging more than 8,000 monthly Impala sales in 2016 and nearly 10,000 per month as recently as 2015, Impala volume has cratered in early 2017. Only 3,213 Impalas were sold in the United States in April 2017, down 73 percent compared with the Impala’s April average over the last five years.

But don’t assume the scarcity of Impala sales will translate to an abundance of deals at your local Chevrolet dealer. Impalas are thin on the ground, and GM isn’t playing games with incentives.

“Many of our competitors are building large cars for practice. We are building them for profit,” GM spokesperson Jim Cain (no relation) told TTAC yesterday.

Rather than chasing volume with the kinds of significant discounts FCA and Ford are using to move Chargers, 300s, and Tauruses, GM is attempting to protect residual values and thereby improve customer satisfaction in the long run.

2016 Chevrolet Impala rear seat – Image: Chevrolet

This means the Impala is nowhere near as common today as it once was, not even remotely as common this year as last. Among mainstream brand full-size cars, the Impala’s market share shrunk from 23 percent in 2016’s first four months to 19 percent this year. The Impala was easily the segment leader at this time last year; now it’s 4,000 sales back of the Dodge Charger.

But according to J.D. Power PIN data obtained by TTAC, there are key differences.

As a percentage of their average transaction prices, incentives on the Dodge Charger and Chrysler 300 in April stood at 21 percent and 31 percent, respectively. The Impala’s average incentive as a percentage of its April average transaction price was just 12 percent. The new Buick LaCrosse, which is quickly becoming a truly uncommon car, was incentivized to the tune of just 13 percent. In the large car segment, only the Toyota Avalon’s 7-percent average incentive as a percentage of ATP was lower.

Moreover, the Impala’s average transaction prices are rising. Year-to-date, the few Impalas that are leaving Chevrolet showrooms are $600 more costly than they were a year ago. In the full-size segment, only the LaCrosse, Avalon, and Impala have seen average transaction prices rise. The Nissan Maxima, Ford Taurus, and Chrysler 300 have all seen their ATPs fall by more than $1,000.

Aside from the fresh-faced Maxima, newly launched for the 2016 model year, those cars are also suffering from declining sales. (Maxima volume is up 2 percent so far this year.) But their declines are not as severe as those experienced by the Impala and LaCrosse.

Meanwhile, the inventory glut that plagues GM, and GM’s car division in particular, is not a problem that involves the Impala. According to Automotive News, GM has just a 19-day supply of Impalas in an industry that now has a 73-day supply of new vehicles.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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76 Comments on “There Are Hardly Any Chevrolet Impala Buyers, But The Few Remaining Impala Buyers Are Willing To Pay...”


  • avatar
    Wardotron

    Belatedly GM have realised that it is better to make money selling some cars, than to lose money selling a lot more.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      Remember too that back in the bad old days (pre 2008 anyway) that overproducing cars was done at least in part to offset labor costs that arose from the jobs bank. It was less expensive to pay workers to produce cars that had to be sold at huge discounts than it was to pay workers to do nothing, i.e…..the jobs bank.

      I agree that it is great GM is profiting on the few it sells, but it really is an exercise/practice as GM claims other manufacturers are doing because at such low volume, it will not be produced indefinitely. It is a nice car, as is the Lacrosse and hopefully once the automarket stabilizes production with demand, they will be more attractive. But when you can get a comparable car from another manufacturer for huge discounts, they just aren’t going to move many.

      Bottom line, it is a buyers market big time when it comes to sedans right now. Great time to buy if you will be in the market in the near future. Don’t wait until they cut production and trim bloated inventories.

      With manufacturers falling all over themselves trying to get as many crossover models to market as possible, the tide will turn with an over abundance of crossovers and steep discounts. Times moving too fast for product cycles these days.

      • 0 avatar
        Truckducken

        So true. I’m getting a new sedan in the next twelve months for sure.

      • 0 avatar
        tellucas

        I dont think GM is profiting at the lower unit volume due to fixed plant costs. Back in the “bad old days of pre 2008” GMAC was used to transfer the profit center from production over to vehicle finance. This tactic probably allowed corporate to contain union demands based on lack of priofits on the manufacturing side of things. The LaCross appears to be a nice car that wasn’t priced or marketed right. Buick needs a functional halo car such as the Avenir to get folks into the showrooms. As it goes you’ll look at the Avenir and leave with a LaCross if the two models can be tied tightly together.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Economies of scale are real. Is there a GM production line making Lacrimpalas in small batches? Big European cars that seem like niche players here often have impressive production numbers because they’re sold in many markets. That’s not the case for the last of the 1985 style GM cars.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Hey, if they’re okay with those volumes, good for them. I see a decent number of these on the road, way more than the number of Tauruses.

  • avatar
    TR4

    We’ll make it up on volu… er…margin!

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      And the problem with that is exactly what?

      If inventory is low, you’re not slapping as much cash on the hood as the competition, CR loves you for the product and quality, along with TD and JDP, if the magazines are giving it a big thumbs up, and you’re making more money than last year on everyone you sell — color me stupid but gee, I thought the purpose of a public traded company was to, oh I don’t know, turn a profit.

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    I see lots of police Tauruses but almost no civilian versions. I see a *few* Impalas, almost all of them civilian.

    I’d like it a lot better if it wasn’t such a huge boat.

    • 0 avatar
      Sloomis

      I know 4 or 5 people who drive newish Tauruses and literally every single one got issued it through work. I don’t think anyone buys them for themselves.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The shrinkage of full size continues, if you think the Impala is huge. There was once a time you could drive a sedan 5″ longer, 3″ wider, with a 4″ longer wheelbase than the current Impala, and it was considered midsize. That midsize was about the size of a 2017 Mercedes S class in all but wheelbase. I’d hate to think how you would react to a 1975 Impala!

  • avatar
    John R

    I get it. But I just priced one with V6 (they offer the 4-cyl in these things??) Came to roughly $28.5k after incentives. I fairly certain one can twist a dealer’s arm for new V8 Charger for that.

  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    I thought the Impala competed with the Avalon in class, size and weight.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Yeah, I think it does. It’s about the same size.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        No mention in the article of Avalon. I always thought that Avalon was a formidable competitor in that size and weight class.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Huh? Avalon is mentioned all over the place.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I should have been more clear.

            No mention in the article of Avalon and its impact on Impala sales vis-a-vis all others in this size and weight class, considering that Avalon routinely sells upwards of $30K, depending on trim, and Impala is routinely discounted in many regions of the US just to make the sale to a willing buyer.

            I’m wondering if Impala is really in a class by itself, since Buick likes to compare itself to Lexus and Avalon is already there?

            The Taurus and Chrysler 300 are probably also priced quite a bit higher in transaction price than the Impala. Very few of these two around and usually priced at $38K and up.

            Could be MY region, though. Not much call for these “big” sedans.

            But I do not consider the Maxima with its CVT to be a worthy competitor in that size and weight class, with even the Impala being the better option than the Maxima.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            @highdesertcat

            …Avalon routinely sells upwards of $30K, depending on trim, and Impala is routinely discounted in many regions of the US just to make the sale to a willing buyer….

            Ummmmmmmmm, errrr, the story above indicates the Impala is NOT heavily discounted as ATP data indicates.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            If only I couldn’t plug new Impala and 200 mile radius of my zip code into cars.com to reveal that there are almost 800 of them in central Virginia. They’re discounted more than 20% at the low end, with negotiations opening at less than $22K. It’s a nice press release though.

            https://www.cars.com/for-sale/searchresults.action/?mdId=21291&mkId=20053&page=16&perPage=50&prMx=45000&rd=200&searchSource=UTILITY&sf1Dir=DESC&sf1Nm=price&stkTypId=28880&zc=22901

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            APaGttH, it depends on region. Impala is not a big seller in my region.

            I’m certain that in some regions Impala sells at a premium, but not everywhere.

            The article even states, “There Are Hardly Any Chevrolet Impala Buyers, But The Few Remaining Impala Buyers Are Willing To Pay…”

            and that indicates to me that GM wishes there were more Impala buyers.

            So, if some buyers are willing to pay jacked up pricing for exclusivity because there aren’t that many Impalas on the road, I say super!

            If dealers need to get an Impala off the floorplan, they’ll discount it to the first person showing some interest.

    • 0 avatar
      eManual

      The Avalon does not have a fold-down rear seat, only a pass through. Likewise, the Buick Lacrosse doesn’t either. That’s a deal breaker to replace my 2000 Impala.

  • avatar
    mikey

    I had an 09 “W”LTZ. I also owned a 14 Epsilon LT. The 14 was a much more refined vehicle than the 09. That being said, the LT equipped with the naturally aspirated 2.5 four banger, was grossly under powered.

    To get away from that, a buyer needs to go with the V6..For the money you might as well move up to the LTZ.
    In Canada your looking at way north of $50 K, out the door. As the article states,,the “incentives ” are just not there.

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      I was always puzzled by the I4. The GM 3.6 V6 is good. The 3.0 V6 is still rattling around somewhere – I think they finally fixed the timing chain. I enjoy everyone of the 275+ HP that motivates my Taurus land barge. The Impala has to be heavier than Regal, and I remember driving a regal with that I4 and thinking it was a complete dog, and the ugly 2013 Malibu with the I4 could not get out of its own way, either.

      If it’s going to be an aspirational car, put the big engine in it.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    Rented one a year or so ago, wasn’t anything special, no better or worse than a Camry.

    • 0 avatar
      quaquaqua

      The Impala is one of the most comfortable road trip cars you can buy, and it also handles better than anything in its class. It’s quite special for what it is. I drove one through California and Arizona and absolutely loved it.

      • 0 avatar
        z9

        I agree, rented an Impala a year ago or so and it had to be among the nicest driving / riding rentals ever, vastly superior to a Fusion for example. I also think it looks cool, on the outside at least. Hate that weird blue-green glow GM uses on its instrumental panel for everything.

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    At least they are profitable. I grew sour on the Epsilon platform and its children from ownership. I never could look at the Buick because the local dealers weren’t interested in showing me one. So I bought a new Taurus to replace my last D3.

    For those who never see the Taurus, it depends on where you look.

    I normally park at a Kroger where my Taurus is one of four in the same lane. I remember one particular morning where I parked between a black Taurus and a black Taurus, behind a blue Sable (one platform back), across the lane from a black Taurus SHO, there was a white Taurus SHO just beyond the cart corral, and somebody had a Five Hundred in the handicap spot.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    “Rather than chasing volume…”

    Selling less than 40,000 Impalas a year creates its own problems, even at full MSRP. There needs to be balance, including fleet sales.
    But fleets my not be buying much of anything right now.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      How so?

      GM is slowly retreating from fleet sales and for some makers picking up the gap, the impact of moving volume through fleet is starting to chip away from their strengths.

      Not all fleet is bad (government, corporate, livery) – but rental fodder at scale definitely hurts.

      Just ask FCA – or price out a used Altima S

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        GM just can’t get crazy with fleet sales, but a good balance is necessary for the Impala.

        But just so we’re clear, how profitable, thousands (for GM), do you guesstimate the Impala is (per car) at current average transactions, considering current volume?

        Remember “volume” is everything at this end of the market. The lower the volume, the more dollars each car must generate.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    As the article does note the cheapest advertised price feature for feature is the Charger/300.

    The funny thing is when I look at Auto Trader, Cars.com, TrueCar, etc. I see Avalon’s advertised much more cheaply than the Impala or Lacrosse (incentives be damned.)

    If the Avalon has small incentives then why are the dealers undercutting the Impala on price, let alone the Lacrosse? (Dealers within 300 miles of me – YMMV.)

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      That is a great observation and one new to me because in my area there are so few dealers. IOW, What ya’ see is what ya’ git!

      For selection, availability and price, we have to travel to Albuquerque or Santa Fe. Or take it out of state and go to El Paso, TX.

      Las Cruces being a University town caters mostly to lower-income clientele with cheaper vehicles sold for overinflated prices, because…… “What ya’ see is what ya’ git!”

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Here’s what happens when I search Auto Trader within a 300 mile radius. In my area it brings Phoenix, Albuquerque, and Denver into play. I make sure that I specify V6 at a minimum and heated seats (because that’s what I want to drive.)

        300s and Chargers are usually being advertised in the mid to high $20s, Avalons just a hair over or a hair under $30K depending on the option packages, Impala in the very low $30Ks, and if I set the upper limit at $35K I often don’t get ANY Lacrosses in the search.

        I can’t see how Buick can expect to sell any Lacrosses if you can get an Avalon cheaper.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Buick has positioned itself as a Lexus competitor, and maybe that accounts for the pricing differences.

          You might also want to try the Colo Sprgs area. My best bud bought his Grand Cherokee from Perkins and took delivery at Mark’s Casa in ABQ. But they’ve got GM dealerships there too.

          Visit the desertsunmotors.com website to see what they have in Buicks,and maybe Sbarro in Las Cruces.

          There’s always El Paso, TX with Mission Chevrolet and its various GM subsidiaries, or the Nissen Family’s Rudolph Chevrolet and its GM subsidiaries.

          Pricing tends to be higher in El Paso, TX because of a lot of cross-border trading when rich Mexicans come across the border to buy a car cheap in the US, put TX plates on it, and then drive it cross-border.

          But sometimes you can get a great deal by going out of town. Mark Ronchetti from Chan13 did when he bought his 4Runner from desertsunmotors.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            “Buick has positioned itself as a Lexus competitor, and maybe that accounts for the pricing differences.”

            That may be GM’s plan, but who in their right mind would buy a Buick over a Lexus? It certainly wouldn’t be for resale value, brand perception, reputation for quality or refinement.

            GM can yammer on all they want about positioning, but they are perceived as a lesser brand. Proof is in the sales.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            jkross22, my sentiments, exactly.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            Jkross, Lexus doesn’t hold its value better than any other luxury car maker with the ES anf GS probably being lowest residual holder for Lexus.

            There is a reason the LaCrosse beats the Lexus ES in comparison tests.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            Norm, you’re hopeless. Seriously, the GM obsession is nearly pathological. There’s a reason the ES beats the LaCrosse in sales, almost 2:1 recently.

            https://www.kbb.com/new-cars/best-resale-value-awards/best-resale-entry-level-luxury-car/

            https://www.kbb.com/new-cars/best-resale-value-awards/best-resale-luxury-car/

            https://www.kbb.com/new-cars/best-resale-value-awards/best-resale-high-end-luxury-car/

  • avatar
    uncle_dave

    Get one while you can – they’ll be axed in 2 years – GM can’t cut it with a 40K volume model – the margins aren’t that high. I also don’t know where the no incentives talk is coming from – current $2000 cash back, 0% for 60 months and an additional $500 on Impalas in the midwest. They shouldn’t have wasted money on redesigning a large sedan – they’ll never recoup the investment. The large sedan market is trading in their car keys for life alert necklaces and adult diapers.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Is their a rationalization of platforms coming at GM? I agree that the Impala/Lacrosse/XTS platform can’t hold it’s own as a standalone, but does the new Lacrosse platform also underpin a big CUV?

    • 0 avatar
      2drsedanman

      The large sedan market is alive and well, they just happen to have a bed on the back instead of a trunk. Silverados and F150s are the Impalas and LTDs of yesteryear.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Yep. They’re all 4-door, V8, RWD, BOF sedans, just like the 1960s-’70s. Except they now charge extra for the lockable metal trunk lid! At least now you have a choice of hinged trunk lid or electric roller lid.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          This is another argument for the Impala NOT being “huge”. The Ford supercrew is about the size of a 1970 Cadillac Fleetwood. Compared to the Impala, it’s 2-1/2 feet longer and 2/3 of a foot wider. THAT’S a huge boat.

  • avatar
    BrentinWA

    I think this is one of the best looking cars on the road….. I recommend this car to a lot of friends looking for a nice quiet ride. There’s a lot of pleasantness that comes with having a large, comfortable boulevard cruiser. This is much better than having an Accord or Camry if you want to shuttle your adult friends to dinner out and events.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    I’m on vacation right now. I have a ’17 Chevy Cruze rental. I parked next to a current Impala rental. Not sure how widespread Impala are at rental companies, but I’m not convinced they are seeing only to retail customers at near full price. Are a few thousand Impalas a month really enough to cover expenses?

  • avatar
    ajla

    “GM is attempting to protect residual values”

    Is this actually true though? I went on Autotrader, and checked MY2014s with under 30K miles and here is what it showed as the average asking prices:

    300 (filtered out SRT) : 21,962
    Impala (V6 only, filtered out “Limited” versions) : 22,500
    Avalon : 24,305
    Charger (filtered out 6.4L) : 23,102
    Taurus (V6 only, filtered out SHO) : 18,682

    Granted, this isn’t the most scientific test and it is possible as the years and mileage pile on things will change more dramatically, but for now the Impala’s residuals seem midpack.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    This article fails to mention the Impala Limited, basically an unchanged 9th gen W-body Impala that GM sold to fleet customers for model years 2014-2016. It ended production in May 2016.

    The current Impala went on sale as a ’14, however GM did not break out the numbers between the current Epsilon II Impala and the old W-body Limited.

    Look I love, the “dubya” body GMs as much as anybody else, but a lot of people suspect that GM was dumping as many Impala Limiteds into fleets as possible, and then claiming that the new Impala was a sales success.

    If you look at the monthly volume in 2014-2016, there is much more volatility than in previous years, which makes me suspect that large fleet orders played some role.

    Can anybody clarify? I read that “In 2012, 78.3 percent of Impalas sold went to fleet customers.” So, basically GM just walked away from fleet sales is what happened rather than develop some stripper trim level for the Feds and Hertz of the world.

    • 0 avatar
      plee

      I was surprised that the writer did not see that also. Also the W body Impala was sold in respectable numbers as a police package until right up until the end of its production. We will never know actual sales of the larger current model from when it was introduced since all sales were lumped together. There are a good number of the newer model Impalas selling at auctions that were previous rentals so it definitely is not a retail only car.

  • avatar
    whitworth

    It’s too bad, the Impala is about the only GM car I could see myself possibly buying. The last Impala I liked was the 1996 SS.

    It had been in a bad place for a long time.

    I still think though that GM overprices their offerings, a loaded Impala gets pretty close to $40k. That buys a lot of nice alternatives.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Rent one first, then decide.

      We rented an Impala with all the bells and whistles in Phoenix, AZ to attend MLB Spring Training last year, and we thought the doors sounded tinny when closing. Even with the V6, it was a slug.

      The leather seats were too damned hot for sunny Phoenix, and the AC could not keep the car cool enough as we shuttled between stadiums between the different games.

      Yeah, rent one first. If I needed a ‘large’ sedan, the Avalon would be my #1 choice, the Chrysler 300 my #2 choice, and either a Buick or a Ford as the #3 choice.

      • 0 avatar
        whitworth

        Funny you should mention Avalon, that’s one I’m looking at. Also the ES350 which is on the same platform.

        I like big, comfortable sedans. I don’t trust GM quality, but if the price was right I might take a gamble. But the price I’m seeing new, I would just rather get like a 1 year old Lexus ES.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Take it for a spin first, regardless of what you choose to buy.

          And I mean a thorough, all around test drive, pot holes and Interstate included.

          The ES350 has a lot more luxury than the Avalon but that also depends on the Avalon’s trim level.

          If there are any to be had in your area, an off-lease Avalon or ES350 can usually be had for ‘reasonable’ money.

          But both of them do keep their value, so don’t expect any bargains on an off-lease Avalon or ES350.

          There are NONE to be had of either in my area.

        • 0 avatar

          Avalon and ES350 are the same car as well as Impala and LaCrosse. According to reviews I read about Avalon/ES Avalon is a better executed sedan and they cost about the same too – reminds me Fords Ford/Mercury strategy. I never drove one of these cars but as a passenger I was impressed with Avalon, I thought why someone needs Lexus if you can buy Avalon for less. Taurus and 300/Charger are very dated – you would expect them to sell for less.

          Saying all that – Avalon and Impala look better than ES and LaCrosse outside. But Impala’s interior has that Chevy quality/design that sucks IMO. Why GM cannot figure out how to make decent looking and feeling interior?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            It depends on the trim of the ES.

            The Avalon in top trim gets pricey, but the ES in top trim is even more pricey.

            The Avalon is hugely popular in MY region, and MY area, and different buyers choose different trim levels.

            The best place to buy an Avalon in MY area is Vescovo in Las Cruces, NM. They are interested in moving iron and having happy campers for customers.

            I know three people that bought there, 75 miles away from our local Toyota dealer. Go figure!

            My best friend bought the XLE trim and its already pretty darn nice! It’s got everything he needs and it serves them well as a long distance, fair-weather cruiser. Imagine if the Avalon had AWD!

            The Avalon today is what Buick used to be in the distant past – a great road machine for long distance cruising.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    had one of these in LTZ trim a year ago for a long cross country trip with the wife and two teenage passengers. We . All. Loved it. Absolutely impressed. Big, comfy, lots of trunk space, lots of power and 32 MPG doing 75 down the interstate. But here in the northeast I’m not seeing serious discounts. I will keep watching. If I could get a premier trim Impala out the door for 30 grand (new) I would make the move. Low mileage used examples are available for around 20 grand but this is one car I’d prefer to buy new and keep off the roads during winter to make it a long term keeper.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Look online through the auto for sale sites. There are usually better deals in different regions and most of the time they will sell out of region and also do allot of shipping of those cars when the discounts are big

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    I’d be interested in one, but the v6 is too expensive IMHO.

  • avatar
    MLS

    Tim — Care to share the ATPs alluded to in the post for Impala and its competitors? I’m curious.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    If I were in the market for another car, the Impala would be first – no surprise there, of course.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    I think it’s a good looking car, except the rear is so plain

    I have to congratulate the General for keeping the inventory so low, it’s really out of character.

    In the Boston area, used ones – even v6 – seem to be readily available at decent prices. So much so I would never consider new, the pricing is just too high.

  • avatar
    fireballs76

    I’ve been wondering if this model was ever going to show up in the gov’t fleet as a police package. It seems it would be a good size for a cruiser. I bought a ’15 Limited LTZ & can’t figure out how there’d be any room for a cage in the thing. That aside it’s a powerful rig with the 3.6, can’t imagine this new style with a 4 banger. Maybe it’s all in my head but these seem a lot bigger than my W body.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “Maybe it’s all in my head but these seem a lot bigger than my W body.”

      They feel a lot more bulky because the W-body has a wonderfully old school belt-line and low dash, owing to its ancient roots. One of its most endearing traits, that and the nice ‘mouse fur’ velour cloth that frankly blows just about everyone else’s threadbare cloth out of the water (exception: Subaru Legacy/Outback).

  • avatar
    Johnster

    Just out of curiousity I wonder what’s going on with the Hyundai Azera and Kia Cadenza. I’m guessing they’re also not selling very well?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I think the full size cars days are numbered with the exception of Mercedes, BMW, and Jaguar. I think GM is not offering more incentives on the Impala because there would not be enough increased sales to make it more profitable. I rented a W version of the Impala LTZ 2 years ago when I was on vacation in San Francisco and Napa Valley. It was smooth riding, handled well, plenty of power from the V-6, and the fuel economy was outstanding. If I were interested in a full size sedan either the Impala or Lacrosse would be at the top of my list. GM knows their market and will continue to sell the Impala and Lacrosse as long as it is profitable, but eventually they will be discontinued along with Ford and FCAs full size sedans. As others have stated the crew cab full size pickup has become the replacement for the full size sedan along with the crossovers. After replacing a Taurus with a CRV I will never go back to a sedan even though I really liked the Taurus and got many years of reliable service. Crossovers are easier to get in and out of and are easier to load things into.

    Many of the older generation are replacing sedans and vans with crossovers especially CRVs, Foresters, Outbacks, Escapes, Equinox, Santa Fes, Sorrentos, Encores, and other like crossovers. I work with many AARP Volunteer Tax preparers and many of the vehicles they drive are newer crossovers. Many went from sedans and mini-vans to compact and subcompact crossovers. It is not so much of the older generations trading sedans for life alerts but that they are buying vehicles that are easier to get in and out of with bigger windows, and many in the colder climates want the all wheel drive. Many of these crossovers are fully optioned with heated seats. For many the crossovers will be their last vehicle.

  • avatar
    honda1

    I live in DFW with the highest volume chevy dealer in the country 10 miles from my
    house. I just heard an ad on the radio, they have 173 impalas in stock at
    30% off.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I think they shuttle unsold vehicles to a dealership in a large metropolis that agrees to take them and push ’em hard, with big discounts.

      Ever so often I see a huge ad in the El Paso Times for dealership that advertises a vehicle at a heavily discounted price, with the annotation “xx-number to choose from”.

      Much of the time it is a Silverado. On a few occasions it was a Cruze.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The 30% off cam be found throughout GM vehicle lineup but only a few select Dealerships based on my research while shopping nationwide.

      For that kind of discount on a new car who cares where you have it shipped from.

  • avatar
    cognoscenti

    We’ve had two of the new Impalas in our stable at home, and I just LOVED them both. Seriously. Both were LTZs. The first was the 4-cylinder and I remember thinking that all it needed was the V6 because it lacked maybe 50 ft-lbs of torque in my estimation. Then, we got the V6 and ironically I found myself missing the 4-cylinder because it handled so much better! This is actually the car I recommend to people, and everyone who I gave a ride to in a new Impala came away impressed – even Camcord owners.

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