By on January 24, 2017

2017 Honda Ridgeline Sport - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About Cars

2017 Honda Ridgeline Sport

3.5-liter V6, SOHC, (280 horsepower @ 6,000 rpm; 262 lb-ft @ 4,700 rpm)

Six-speed automatic, all-wheel drive

18 city / 25 highway / 21 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

12.8 city/ 9.5 highway/ 11.3 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

19.8 mpg [11.9 L/100 km] (Observed)

Base Price: $30,415 (U.S) / $38,415 (Canada)

As Tested: $35,855 (U.S.) / $41,415 (Canada)

Prices include $940 destination charge in the United States and $1,690 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada, where all-wheel drive is standard equipment.

Imagine a world full of hefty, four-seat, eight-cylinder muscle cars. Then, appearing out of thin air, the Mazda MX-5 Miata arrives. You can draw parallels. The end goals are similar. But these are strikingly different machines.

Or consider a world in which buyers in search of family friendly SUVs are limited to Chevrolet Suburbans and Ford Expedition ELs. But after decades of dominance, in walks a totally different kind of answer: the Toyota Highlander Hybrid.

Like the first-generation Honda Ridgeline that bowed more than a decade ago, the all-new second-generation Ridgeline is a pickup truck. There’s a cab and a bed. It can tow and it can haul.

Yet the 2017 Honda Ridgeline is dramatically different from other pickup trucks, and not only in terms of construction. For better or worse, Honda’s truck is a whole ‘nuther kettle of fish. As a result, comparisons with other pickup trucks are, if not unfair, rendered largely invalid.

PICK UP A COMPARISON TEST
And so we compare.

A prime example of America’s best-selling line of pickup trucks, the Ford F-150 SuperCrew 4×4 with a short bed, is 22 inches longer than the new Ridgeline (which is three inches longer than the old Ridgeline thanks to three extra inches of wheelbase). Though nearly two feet longer and roughly half a foot taller, the F-150 is only about an inch wider than the Ridgeline. The F-150’s bed is also a few inches deeper and a couple of inches longer. At a minimum, that F-150 can tow 7,100 pounds, or 2,100 pounds more than the Ridgeline.2017 Honda Ridgeline Sport white - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About CarsOn the other hand, America’s top-selling midsize pickup truck, the Toyota Tacoma, is only two inches longer (in Double Cab short bed form) than the Ridgeline. But the Tacoma is more than four inches narrower, and the Tacoma’s bed is 8.5 inches narrower.

Aside from option packages that can make the Tacoma even more capable off-road, the Toyota provides two extra inches of ground clearance and 29°/24°/21° approach, departure, and breakover angles, respectively, compared with the Ridgeline’s 19°/21°/19° angles.

Payload, topping out at 1,580 pounds in the Ridgeline, is entirely competitive in the midsize segment. But note that in a PickupTrucks.com comparison, editors, “loaded it to 90 percent of that amount,” and the Ridgeline, “sagged worse than any of its competitors, all of which were carrying close to their own maximum payload capacity.”

ALL THE RIDGELINES
Different as the Ridgeline is from potential rivals, Ridgeline trim levels do not deviate from a core Ridgeline standard. Aside from one major mechanical option, cosmetics, and interior technology, a Ridgeline is a Ridgeline: 280-horsepower 3.5-liter V6, six-speed automatic, five seats, 64-inch bed, 18-inch wheels. All-wheel drive is a $1,900 option on the RT, RTS, Sport, RTL, and RTL-T but standard on the RTL-E and Black Edition. Honda’s all-wheel-drive system is supplemented with normal, snow, mud, and sand modes.

(Cross-border equipment differences mean the Ridgeline Sport with which I spent a week is not directly comparable to American Honda’s Sport. For the purposes of this review, equipment levels are in U.S.-speak.)

Truck buyers who want leather seating will need to step up to the $34,720 RTL. The $36,870 RTL-T adds LaneWatch, auto-dimming rearview mirror, upgraded audio, an eight-inch touchscreen with navigation, Apple CarPlay/Android Auto.2017 Honda Ridgeline Sport profile - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About CarsThe $42,410 RTL-E adds memory for the driver’s seat, lane keeping assist, collision mitigation braking, road departure mitigation, adaptive cruise control, LED headlights, auto high beams, blind spot monitoring, front and rear parking sensors, sunroof, power sliding rear window, 400-watt bed power outlet, heated steering wheel, conversation mirror, and further audio upgrades, including sound in the bed. At $43,910, the Black Edition is essentially an RTL-E blacked out.

All Ridgelines come standard with pushbutton start, cruise, auto up/down windows for the front windows, and a tilt/telescoping steering wheel. The $32,455 RTS adds proximity access, tri-zone climate control, body-colored mirrors, exterior temperature indicator, and fog lights.  The $33,955 Sport is to the RTS what the Black Edition is to the RTL-E.

It only sounds complicated until you remember that Honda has no options or option packages.2017 Honda Ridgeline trunk - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About CarsNOT A DUCK
No options? In the truck world, that’s tantamount to heresy. But a nonexistent options sheet is the least of the ways in which the Honda Ridgeline is not like other trucks.

While the typical American truck buyer will look at the Ridgeline and see limitations — much less towing capacity, modest payload downgrades, low-slung ride height — Honda’s pickup distinguishes itself by being liberated from natural pickup truck confines.

Free from the constraints placed on trucks that must be extremely capable, the 2017 Honda Ridgeline rides over rough roads better than any other pickup truck. Far better than any other pickup truck. Far better than most vehicles of any kind.

That ride quality is not associated with excessive float but rather impeccable isolation. Likewise, handling is exceptional, with responses to sudden steering inputs that resemble an Accord, not a Silverado.

Steering, too, is very nicely weighted, not made to feel artificially heavy so you’ll know, “I’m driving a truck,” but not so artificially light that driving a truck needs to be made to feel easy. With no play, no vast area of deadness at the straightahead, the Ridgeline reveals its roots.2017 Honda Ridgeline doors - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About CarsIt doesn’t ride like a duck, handle like a duck, or steer like a duck.

Must not be a duck.

It doesn’t consume fuel like a duck, either, though the Ridgeline’s thirst certainly resembles the species’ norm. Over the course of a week, we observed 19.8 miles per gallon in this Ridgeline Sport. That’s only mildly superior to the 19.4 mpg we saw in an F-150 EcoBoost 2.7 and didn’t quite measure up to the 20.1 mpg results we observed in the Chevrolet Colorado Z71 Crew Cab and Ram 1500 EcoDiesel.

Yet much of this test was completed in urban settings with four aboard. The temperature was also consistently below freezing. According to the EPA, the only trucks with better combined ratings are either four-cylinder GM midsizers or diesel-powered.

We may also have been inclined, more often than not, to dip deeply into the Ridgeline’s power reserves. In this power-mad age, 280 horsepower doesn’t sound like much, but the 4,485-pound Ridgeline’s six-speed automatic smoothly and quickly shuffles power to all four wheels. Aside from a torque peak arriving 2,000 rpm sooner, I wouldn’t change the powertrain or its sound. There’s no V8 rumble, of course, but Honda builds a V6 that is always happy to rev.

Compared to midsize competitors, the Ridgeline’s rear quarters are demonstrably roomier and certainly more comfortable. While full-size crew cab trucks provide greater space for families, all truck rivals miss out on the Ridgeline’s in-bed trunk and dual-action tailgate.

Everybody will think of different uses for that trunk. Certain organized crime syndicates will be particularly pleased, of course.2017 Honda Ridgeline Sport interior - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About CarsIMPERFECTIONS
Undeniably exceptional as a pickup truck on the road, the 2017 Honda Ridgeline is nevertheless flawed as a real-world family car.

Accessing the expansive rear seat requires entering through a very narrow portal. This might be acceptable to the former owner of a midsize pickup, but it will be annoying for an F-150 Supercrew owner. It’s particularly bothersome when loading an infant seat or extricating a sleeping three-year-old.

Speaking of child seats, Honda seemingly went out of its way to make installation a pain, with tethers that need to go over an extra loop on the seat back before — in the case of outboard seats — sliding under the lower cushion beside the door. The lower anchors aren’t easily accessed, either.2017 Honda Ridgeline interior detail - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About CarsSpeaking of access, the in-bed trunk is wonderfully deep. It’s evidence of engineering brilliance. But for petite individuals such as Mrs. Cain, perhaps even for average-sized adults, bags that are placed in the trunk are rendered inaccessible unless the dual-action tailgate is opened from the side, which requires a lot of pre-arranged space behind the truck.

Back in the cabin, the Ridgeline is bestowed not with the 2018 Odyssey’s improved infotainment unit but rather the knobless and usually slow platform from older Hondas. At least in this case the Civic’s dreadful steering wheel volume control is gone in favour of conventional buttons.

Expect a refreshed Ridgeline in a year or so to remedy the tired touchscreen.

SIT RIDGELINE, SIT. GOOD DUCK.
Hindered from being a great car by its desire to be a pickup truck; blocked from achieving truck greatness by its car-like roots, the second-generation Honda Ridgeline is the one linebacker on a field full of cornerbacks and defensive tackles.

Alas, sometimes walking a fine line is more akin to sitting on the fence than finding middle ground. In the minds of 99 percent of American pickup truck buyers in the fourth-quarter of 2016 and 91 percent of midsize pickup truck buyers, the Honda Ridgeline was simply not enough truck, or at least not enough truck for the money.2017 Honda Ridgeline Sport - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About CarsBut comparing the Ridgeline to conventional pickup trucks misses Honda’s point. Clearly, the Ridgeline isn’t going to go down in history as an overwhelming marketplace success. It simply isn’t what most pickup buyers want. Moreover, it’s obvious just from looking at the Ridgeline that it isn’t sufficiently truck.

It’s also obvious that the Ridgeline is not supposed to be what most pickup buyers want. The 2017 Honda Ridgeline wasn’t designed to be the ultimate truck. It’s intended to be the ultimate compromise.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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125 Comments on “2017 Honda Ridgeline Sport Review – Looks and Talks Like a Duck, Isn’t a Duck...”


  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    In Middle America,the Pickup Truck has displaced the midsize car.

    The poor guys n gals drive older Silverados and F150s, and the bosses rock loaded Lariats. GMs former Camaro clientele have moved on to lifted Brodozers and Raptors.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Yep.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      The new Raptor has been clocked at 5.1 seconds from 0-60 so the straight line performance difference to a Camaro isn’t that great.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Lariat? Please! How plebeian! Talk to me when you have a Platinum or Limited.

      Seriously, these new pickup-truck prices are crazy. Although, for the first time ever, these trucks in upper trims genuinely do have the build quality, features, comfort and craftsmanship that warrant a $50K+ price tag on a luxury car.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        You can get big discount on a lot of the trucks though (at least at GM and RAM). My stepfather’s truck had an MSRP of like $63K and he got it for $49K. And he’s hardly some stone-cold super negotiator.

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          Large domestic trucks and SUVs have long subscribed to the “Mattress Store” pricing model: inflating the MSRP so that they can deflate it to create the impression of “getting a great deal”. Just like the local mattress store that has a “Limited one day sales event” everyday.

          Besides, a loaded up 1500 from one of the Big 3 or Toyota is not a bad thing to spend a few bucks on. That same $50k will barely get you into a basic 5-Series/E-Class, let alone a moderately well equipped one with 6 cylinders, saying nothing of navigation/adaptive cruise/fancy headlights/etc. That same $50k gets a loaded to the gills pickup with a V8 and all the toys.

        • 0 avatar
          OzCop

          Which falls pretty much in line with what I paid for my Laramie Longhorn Ram in 2014…stickered at 53 K and purchased for just under 42 K. I received a “dealer promotional check” for 41,500 last week good for an amount “up to” that much toward the purchase of a 2016 or 2017 truck of the same or near price range, 53 K. A quick look at their inventory showed those trucks marked down to 42 K. Do I think I could go in there and trade up for under a grand? Hell no, but I am considering checking it out to see what I can get, even though my truck is fine and has only 23 K miles…

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Oh, that’s lovely in white.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Score! A review, and no presidential politics.
    *commences happy dance*

    “Hindered from being a great car by its desire to be a pickup truck; blocked from achieving truck greatness by its car-like roots”

    It occurs to me that this Ridgeline has followed the same gameplan as CUVs after the 1990s SUV craze. It retains some of the utility and general form factor as the body-on-frame descendants but offers a more “civilized” car-like experience at the expense of some core virtues. I don’t see this supplanting F150s the way the CUV did the SUV, though.

    An entirely different animal than the Tacoma reviewed earlier. This would be a much more enjoyable vehicle to drive daily at the expense of any real capability off road. Nice to have a choice in the segment.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      It’s a nice, big hobby cart that can highway. Honda knows its customers.

      • 0 avatar

        Spot on.

        It’s really the truck that most people will ever need.

        • 0 avatar
          jonnyanalog

          And the one most will never be caught dead in.

          On a recent trip I pointed one out to my wife and she thought it looked like a minivan with the rear section lopped off. The kiss of death if a woman says this! No guy in his right mind would have one.

          @Koreancowboy- I do agree with you, though!

          • 0 avatar
            la834

            The first-gen Odyssey was advertised as the “minivan for people who aren’t minivan people”. It had a 4-cylinder engine and hinged rather than sliding side doors, It turned out most minivan buyers *were* minivan people and gave the Odyssey a wide berth. Successive generations adopted minivan norms like sliding doors. With the Ridgeline, we have Honda’s pickup truck for people who aren’t truck people. Those folks will like the Ridgeline. Real truck people will continue to look elsewhere for a real truck with RWD, body on frame construction, usable load capacity, approach angles, departure angles, and breakover angles that won’t scrape the pavement, and other real-truck attributes. For them, there’s the Colorada, Takoma, and upcoming Ranger. But for those who call on their small trucks only for light-duty fare, the Ridgeline may deliver.

        • 0 avatar
          Higheriq

          And less truck than buyers will ever think they have.

  • avatar
    omer333

    A CAR REVIEW!!!

  • avatar
    wintermutt

    the Ridgeline is the 21th century replacement for the Chevrolet El Camino. they sold a lot of El Caminos and Ford Rancheros last century and since the Ridegeline is the only current vehicle to fit that niche Honda will sell a lot of them. i hope they got the strut reliability better this time.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Tim, did you tow with it?

    I’m glad this truck exist. I may someday buy one because I usually put practicality and reliability high on my list. (and I’m cheap)

    This is likely to be the pickup I need as opposed to the truck I want (mega cab Ram with a diesel) or the truck I dream of (supercharged raptor) This is same reason I currently drive a Fit instead of a Mustang. :(

    Not crazy about the Ridglines looks but I could live with that since it rides nice and has a back seat that works for my family. The other midesizers don’t offer sufficient legroom in the second row for me.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Unfortunately no.

      I’m not crazy about its looks either: last time they did a nice job on the front and screwed up everywhere else. This time, they normalized the profile and left the front looking too soft.

      But day after day over the last week I realized that so long as I was in it, I loved it.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Since I really couldn’t care less about rear-seat leg room, this is one of the Ridgeline’s greatest faults for me–it only comes with four full doors and a lot of what would be wasted space. Then again, that truly flat floor under the seats makes for an advantage and I could probably get away with taking them out without too much squawk from the wife.

      Still, it’s bigger than I both want or need but is the best compromise currently available.

      • 0 avatar
        JustPassinThru

        Sadly, you’re right.

        I do not, repeat NOT need a back seat. I need space in the bed. The old Club Cab style was just fine – a little pocket to park groceries. My current POS, a Gen1 Taco, has exactly that. It’s a bit bigger than I’d favor – I’d have preferred the mid-nineties predecessor; but those are mostly gone, all of them worn out; and the Taco is the best option.

        When the time comes that it has to be replaced, this would be probably the best choice. Bro-Dozers…hey, I’m okay with anyone driving what he wants. Take a Kenworth two miles to work, for all I care. But that’s not for me…small and lighter, makes for easier parking and gassing up.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Those who desire 2 doors and a small cab are a definite minority. You have to buy a full sized 1/2 ton to get a regular cab. The Ridgeline is 0.7 of an inch shorter than a regular cab short box F150. Width is pretty much a wash.

        • 0 avatar
          JustPassinThru

          And why should that be?

          You need only look at the resale values of old Toyota trucks, the ones sold as “Hilux” everywhere but the States…and the first Tacomas…to see there’s a real appetite for a small quality truck.

          We know why it is; and consumer demand, for a product ostensibly made for the consumer, doesn’t seem to have a thing to do with what the market is allowed to offer.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Please note that I’m not asking for a Regular Cab, I’m asking for a simple, easy-to-access Extended Cab. Even Ford offers a proper extended cab with the suicide doors which, to me, is the ideal layout for functional access to the behind-the-seat area.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            Exactly.

            I’d even be okay without the suicide doors. My Taco stretch cab does exactly what I want – and it’s the best all-around compromise I’ve ever found.

            But it’s not to be…can you say “CAFE,” kids?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Colorado is waiting for you then.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I believe you’ve already seen my article on what current truck best meets MY needs and the Colorado is most certainly not it, though I admit it came close. There were certain design issues that simply screamed ‘early repair’ on a part that honestly should never need repair–the steering wheel.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            Lou, I had that Grate GM Feeling…feeling me up, right in my wallet.

            Once was enough; and especially when experiences of many others I knew, matched my own. You don’t see any 1997 S-10s running around these days; but the Pacific Northwest is just LOUSY with Gen-1 Tacos.

            I’ll not be buying a Colorado. And of course the Smart-and-Snarky Set at RenCenter will say, it’s because people don’t want smaller trucks.

            That’s fine. It’s not my role to tell these overpaid stooges their jobs.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Test drove one this past weekend. 38500k without a sunroof. Drove ok but I could never own one..why? its just way way too ugly…this is the worst looking truck since …since ever…its not aesthetically pleasing at all.

    • 0 avatar
      Jerome10

      Yeah I’m with you on this. Something is still “off” on it.

      It’s too bad. The last one was horrible, but I liked the vertical front end.

      They fixed most of what made the last one so ugly then just used the wimpy pilot face up front. I wish that vertical front was kept.

      I know it’s not a hard core pickup, but I think boxy on pickups looks very good. That one update I think would change it enough for me.

      They seem a bit pricey as well. Another hard buy when everyone else is gonna be willing to really deal to move the metal.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      “this is the worst looking truck since …”

      …the first Ridgeline.

      This new one may look like a minivan from straight on, but for me that’s an improvement over the incohesive predecessor.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Canadian equipment load is much better, I believe. Sport, at around $41K, is one up from base LX, and has standard all-wheel drive (they all do here), sunroof, almost all of that extra safety gear like LKAS and adaptive cruise, conversation mirror, heated front seats. American Honda is reserving much of that stuff for the top trim.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      You buy these things for utility, not fashion.

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    Strikes me as a Pilot with the station wagon back cut off and replaced with a pickup bed, as @wintermutt noted, the spiritual equivalent of an El Camino or Ranchero. Not a trucky truck, more of a gentleman’s truckish vehicle. I am surprised GM or Ford have not done something similar with one of their sedan platforms, but I suppose they don’t want to cannibalize their extremely lucrative trucky truck business.

    At least this one looks OK and isn’t the poke in the eye that the original Ridgeline was.

    • 0 avatar
      OzCop

      But it does have an independent bed, which differs from the El Camino and previous model Ridgeline examples…

      • 0 avatar
        igve2shtz

        It isn’t an independent bed, a la body on frame trucks. Instead, the new Ridgeline has the appearance of a separate bed, but it is just fancy bending of the sheet metal. It is in fact, all one piece with lots of bracing.
        http://truckyeah.jalopnik.com/mid-size-trucks-dont-need-frames-1785674405

        • 0 avatar
          OzCop

          Having never seen one other than passing, I stand corrected…it certainly looks like a separate bed in the pics and the few I have seen in passing. Thanks for the clarification…I like it…

  • avatar
    GeneralMalaise

    Other than weighing the Honda reliability factor in, I’m not sure why anyone would choose one of these over one of the Big 3 offerings, or a Toyota.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Clearly that’s the mindset of 99% of truck buyers. From a $ perspective, I might find it hard to take the Ridgeline plunge, too. (Plus I struggle with the looks.)

      But the Ridgeline drives exceptionally well, and not just by truck standards. So when you say, “I’m not sure why anyone would choose one of these over one of the Big 3 offerings, or a Toyota,” you have to take into account that there are many people who hate the way trucks ride and handle and steer. They will NOT hate the way the Ridgeline rides and handles and steers.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        The cost is just way too high. What are you paying for: Payload? Towing? Nope! Ride quality? Handling? Do truck buyers really care about those things. Apparently not. A Pilot with open bed in the back ala Explorer Sport Track would make mores sense for Honda. If this is a duck then I think I’ll stick with chicken or turkey.

      • 0 avatar
        MrCornfed

        This is how I view it. This is the only truck I’d ever consider (and have considered as a next vehicle) precisely because of the handling factor. I don’t want to have to keep hauling stuff just to get a decent ride.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          Have you driven modern trucks like the Ram 1500 with coil suspension?

          My wife thought the Ram 1500 was the most comfortable vehicle she’s ever been in, and thats despite owning other cars like newer cadillacs, a Porsche Cayenne, a Hyundai, among others.

          She keeps saying if she gets pregnant again I have to buy another Ram.

      • 0 avatar
        GeneralMalaise

        Point taken, Tim Cain.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Almost all of the one’s I’ve seen have been driven by women. Makes sense to appeal to that demographic. Minivans are no longer cool and that labradoodle can stink up the box and not the passenger compartment. This truck is definitely marketed as an SUV alternative. I’d buy it over a Pilot.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      You view is very subjective. It is clear that most red-blooded males from the middle-America do not ever want to be found dead in a Honda track. But speaking subjectively, it’s probably a great truck. It’s not a farmer’s or a plumber’s truck. It probably doesn’t tow ginormous boats well. But it’s a lifestyle truck for suburbanites who often go kayaking, skiing, fishing, picnicking, or camping. I admit I haven’t driven this Ridgeline, but the 2017 Honda Pilot SUV it is based on is a superb vehicle. It’s very soft and comfortable, but does not have this sloppy and floaty feel of the previous generation. The Pilot is surprisingly sure-footed on the snow, which I have confirmed recently by driving into ski country in New Mexico Rockies in a major snowstorm. And then finally, the Honda V6 engine is superb as usual. I understand the snobbery of people who think the V8 is the best, smoothest, most satisfying engine to have, but most them them haven’t experienced the 280HP Honda V6 used in those trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        A Ridgeline would be an ideal handyman’s truck compared to a conventional pickup. Slightly smaller than full-sized, it has room to carry people AND secure cargo where it’s an either/or for the conventional truck by means of its lockable ‘trunk’ which, while not all •that• large, can hold a conventional tool box and a few power tools. You also avoid that too-obvious and surprisingly-easily-stolen big metal box that bridges the width of the bed rails. The handyman also isn’t likely to be loading 1500# of cast iron engine block or a 10,000# trailer either.

        A handyman will tend to buy what he needs, rather than the biggest thing available. Then again, he will probably buy used rather than new, letting the original owner eat all the cost of the thing.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Does this use the same transmission as the Oddy and Pilot?

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Pilots now use eight and nine-speed transmissions. 2018 Odyssey uses nine and ten-speed automatics. Current Odyssey uses a six-speed, like the Ridgeline, and the gear ratios are the same.

      I’ve complained before about the Odyssey often shifting poorly – we own one – and I had no complaints about the Ridgeline. Not sure right off if they’re entirely different units, programmed very differently, or simply respond to different engine outputs differently.

      Edit: I asked TTAC’s Bozi Tatarevic, who looked into some part numbers. Bozi says it seems to be the Odyssey’s transmission but with different programming as the mechanical portion is mostly the same.

  • avatar
    igve2shtz

    Spot on review.

    Yes, this truck will be cross-shopped with mid-sizers and full-sizers, even though it directly compares to neither. No, that does not make it a bad truck. This is a truck that was designed with a particular set of requirements, and a specific customer in mind… and it absolutely nails it [minus the CR-V wimpy front end].

    I’ll give the full-size buyers a break because they may need the extra bed length for pallets of drywall, extra cab space, whatever. However, most mid-sizers I see in the North East are of the crew cab, short bed configuration, driving on the interstate with empty beds, empty hitches and shiny tires. I can honestly say that anyone who buys a Tacoma to be used for a daily commuter, occasional hardware store runner and never sees a rock trail, bought the wrong vehicle.

    This is all the truck a suburbanite like me needs. Anybody who says otherwise is lying to themselves.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      Isn’t that what life is about… lying to ourselves?

      I mean I have a Ford F350. I use it to take my dog to the dog park, but I like the F350 because I know I “Could” pull a house if I ever had a chance. Its the chance to escape my reality and dream.

      Its like 99% of sports cars. The owners can never or will never “use it” to its potential, but they buy it because they love the idea of it.

      I mean even normal cars. Why upgrade to the bigger engine? it won’t help your life, we just love the idea of “could”.

  • avatar
    carguy

    I like the idea of a modern El Camino but the Ridgeline misses on three counts:

    1. It provides no gas consumption advantage over a traditional truck
    2. Compared to other trucks, the value for money equation simply doesn’t add up.
    3. It really is not an attractive vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      The modern el camino is the Santa Cruz!

      I’m not going to buy it, but I love the idea of it!

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Depending on what’s available when I’m finally ready to trade off my ’97, low-mileage Ranger (currently under 25k miles), I’ll be strongly looking at the Santa Cruz, Ram700 or whatever else in that size range is available.

        If, on the other none of that size is available, it’s going to be an interesting toss-up between the Jeep pickup or a Fiat 128.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      1. Wrong. I drive Pilot it is based on, and I am getting 25mpg driving on highways, or 22-23 in mixed urban-highway driving.
      2. The Ridgeline MSRP is 30-33 grand. It gives you two rows of seats with a truck bed. Something like F-150 is already more expensive if you get the version with two sets of rows and doors
      3. Once again, an utterly subjective comment. I guess if you’re a guy who takes a pride in hanging a sack of rubber balls on your track, or raising your truck, the Ridgeline looks almost “gay”.

  • avatar
    arach

    I do wonder if the “Ridgeline is the answer” to the “Question nobody asked”.

    I want to want the ridgeline, but some of the key practicality points are missing.

    OK, customer ride is a big win, and I love the trunk setup….
    but is it “enough”?

    I would expect a fuel economy lift to accompany this… and I don’t even care about fuel economy much… or a big cost savings… and I don’t even care about money. The fact of the matter is, I don’t see a “reason” to buy this.

    It ignores stuff that people shouldn’t care enough, but then offers what- a trunk?

    I don’t need a big truck, I really don’t, but this has reduced resale because of reduced utility, and yet a relatively high cost of entry. It does have a nicer ride which is great (I was an avalanche driver and that was compelling), but doesn’t real add enough “extra” to the table to make it worth buying.

    I feel like its like a restaurant that says, “OK most people who go to a high end steak restaurant just want the steak, so we’ll sell steak without silly sides”… “but we’ll charge the same amount as the other steak houses”.

    The argument that it doesn’t have stuff you don’t need only makes sense when you don’t have to pay for it.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Reduced resale? It’s not a Tacoma, but it’s among the best in the biz. http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2016/01/top-10-vehicles-with-the-best-resale-values.html

    • 0 avatar
      dig

      It seems to me the TTAC crowd is typically urban and eastern N.A. We all like “enthusiast” machinery. However I just crossed shopped this Honda and a Taco TRD OR and ended up with the Taco. First smaller rig in years. Some of us actually live out west (and north in my case) and have driven trucks for decades for work and play. I have gotten to the point that I don’t need a BFT for work anymore but want a comfortable, smaller rig that still will get me where I need to go and handle my stuff. The Honda is a great attempt at that. The Taco fits my life better at this time. The Honda is very nice. Nicer than the Taco. It is also very ugly without enough clearence. I would destroy it in a year, but very nice. I have no issues with the uni-body thing. Maybe at the 2019-20 refresh they could just man it up a bit (i.e. raise it). I might be a taker. I was that close.

      Of course there will be new Fords, etc. out by then.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      I have trouble understanding your reasoning, arach.

      • but some of the key practicality points are missing.
      — What practicality points? Outside of heavy capacities, it can do anything any other stock pickup can do on the practicality side.

      • It ignores stuff that people shouldn’t care enough, but then offers what- a trunk?
      — What is it ignoring? And the ‘trunk’ is highly practical in many ways. If nothing else it’s a built-in icebox for tailgating and camping that is fully lockable.

      I do agree the price is high; but that price is hardly any higher than the approximate equivalent by any of the other mid-sized trucks. The AWD package has proven itself highly effective in situations the driver might find himself under normal operations and even under relatively ordinary camping circumstances though may not do as well as full-time 4×4 w/low-range transfer case. Still, the PickupTrucks dot com comparison of mid-sizers gave it remarkably high marks in the off-road segment.

      I will grant that the Ridgeline is a compromise of all things “truck”, but as a utility vehicle I see it far superior to those others where most people actually use those other trucks. It’s basically the exception that proves the rule that you need a pickup truck for heavy work while the Ridgeline can do everything else.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      I honestly have trouble understanding your arguments, or should I say ramblings there. What is a ridgeline? It’s basically a family SUV, but with two rows of seats, instead of three like in the Pilot, and a truck bed. The Ridgeline is a vehicle for people who owned or considered owning a Pilot, and then got enlightened that instead of having SUV with three rows seats, they can have a true “sport utility” vehicle that’s great for suburban driving and also for outdoor fun.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Jacob, I think his point is that the Ridgeline is far more utility than heavy lifting. It’s not just a “Pilot-owners option” but rather a truck that can be MORE than a truck when a conventional truck is too limiting. The only conventional truck that even comes close is the RAM, with its RamBox side-rail storage.

  • avatar
    zipster

    Yesterday, I inspected a 15 year old F-150 “Sport.” Later, I came upon the current version. Both had 6 foot boxes. You could easily load and get into the old one. The new version would require more lifting to load and one would have to climb to get into it. I envisioned the old one with current materials and technology. I am not a trucker, but I would almost want one, anticipating how well it would drive and highway mileage in the upper 20s.

    The differences between these trucks are a metaphor as to where we have gone in the last 15 years. Appearances trump practicality.

  • avatar
    Higheriq

    I gave the Ridgeline about 30 seconds of consideration a few months ago when I was looking. That was long enough to figure out that it comes standard with too many doors.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      Sounds like you have wasted too much time on trying to identify how many doors this vehicle has. Honda never intended this for people who need a two door track. Think about Ridgeline as a family SUV with a truck bed.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    A niche vehicle that is priced richly and didn’t require a lot of new tooling / capital investment.

    Likely a win for Honda no matter what the sales volume.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    This is (once again I may add) the perfect truck/car for thousands upon thousands of Americans who will (once again) not buy it. Some say it answers a question no one has asked, but that’s wrong. it’s just not the answer they wanted.

    How many people buy a truck once, keep it for a few years then sell it with low mileage? -tens of thousands each year.
    How many people buy a truck and use it only once a month? -tens of housands each year.
    How many people buy a lot more truck than they will ever need? -hundreds of thousands each year.

    How many of those above would want to be seen in a Honda with a truck bed?
    A few hundred thousand in a decade historically speaking.

    As for current Honda owners who think they want a truck, I guess they will mostly buy Ridgelines.
    And I think it would offer the Ford Ranger some competition here in Europe if it also had a smallish diesel engine available and not just the massively overpowered huge American v6.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      You’re sitting way out there, fishing in a fjord, and you know all about Americans’ actual vehicular use?

      Part of your charm, I say.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        He’s exactly correct, if my circle of friends and family who own trucks are even remotely representative.

        I know two women who own and love Ridgelines. Both are avid gardeners, so a Pilot with a pickup bed is perfect for them.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      @Zykotec: All valid points but the Ridgeline seems to have no real advantage over traditional trucks except for the ride quality. It offers no advantage on value, running costs and certainly not aesthetics.

      I really want to want a Ridgeline but Honda is making it very difficult.

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Last night, I had to wait while a shiny new F150 took three tries to attempt to back into a parking spot outside my building without hitting the car next to it. I can’t speak to their daily needs, but in that circumstance, they probably would have been better off with a Ridgeline.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Maymar – or maybe they need to learn how to drive.

          • 0 avatar
            Maymar

            Lou, agreed, but that’s a lofty standard for people in the GTA.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Maymar – this morning I parked my F150 quickly with minimal fuss at the parkaid next to my workplace. I watched a person in an other F150 flounder away. They got frustrated and drove off. A small SUV went for the same stall and floundered away. 3 readjustments later and they got in. Stall was the same size as the one I parked it.

            My 20 ft long truck is a PITA if people aren’t parked properly. I hate it in Vancouver since most parking stalls are tiny.

      • 0 avatar
        igve2shtz

        Why does it need to stand out among all the other trucks? It is simply another option.

        Every car maker has a compact car, with a 4 cylinder engine capable of 40 mpg, seats 5, has a trunk and costs between $14k-$20k. There must be 12 different compact cars made today that all meet this standard, yet thousands of each variant are still sold.

        This truck fits the same bill as other midsizers … carries 5, gets about 20 mpg, hauls 1000+ pounds. It only really misses on the towing front, but I don’t know many people who regularly tow more than 5000 lbs who aren’t already driving full-size trucks. It wins on ride comfort, and interior noise, and cabin space. It costs the same as equally equipped Tacomas, and neither manufactuter offers impressive discounts to use cost/value as a deciding factor.

        I’m not here to persuade anybody INTO a Ridgeline, but simply highlight that this isn’t a truck to be ignored simply because it isn’t body on frame.

        However, the front end is still ugly, and that’s a viable reason, if any, to dislike it.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Zykotec:

      I agree whole heartedly with your statement, except that I’m not a Honda owner of any type and yet I am one of those who would buy one in place of any other mid-sized truck currently available WHEN I am ready to trade in my older, “compact”, mid-sized Ranger. I don’t expect to be doing that before 2020 and maybe not until 2024.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      I think your line of thinking is correct. Most of the red blooded American males from the middle America who own trucks would never want to be found dead in a Honda truck. A lot of them never tow anything or go off road. They live in suburbs. There is no real logic explanation for them “raising” their American trucks. If they cared about the actual utility, they’d seriously consider the Ridgeline.

      But Ridgeline is not aimed at truck owners. It is aimed at people who want a big family SUV, and who also got enlightened that having an SUV with three rows of seats in a county with the highest per capita vehicle ownership in the world, offers less utility than ridgeline. The Ridgeline is basically a great suburban big family SUV with only two rows and a truck bed, which can be useful when they go out on an outdoor activity trip.

  • avatar
    GS 455

    Tim how does the ride and handling of the Ridgeline compare to the Pilot?

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      The Ridgeline’s wheelbase is 125 inches; the Pilot’s is 111. The Ridgeline is riding on 245/60R18s; the Pilot we tested was on 245/50R20s.

      It’s been more than a year, but here’s what we said at the time. “The Pilot marries its impressive steering and handling to acceptable ride quality, but that ride deteriorates when the big 20-inch wheels meet the worst of coastal Nova Scotia’s worst roads. Which are plentiful.” http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2015/10/honda-comparison-test-2016-pilot-vs-odyssey.html

      There was very little deterioration with the Ridgeline.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    So if the Ridgeline gets similar mileage as other traditional half tons does that mean the big three are better engineered/ designed? It’s puzzling that Honda could make the smaller truck get the same or worse mileage. What am I missing here? No dog in this fight. More choice, more competition , more better.

  • avatar

    A suburbanite’s dream.

    I’m happy being an exception and saying that the styling works a little more every time I see this truck. It’s very sharp here, in white.

    I don’t need a vehicle with off-road capabilities I’d never use, and which I’d find punishing in my daily commute. The priority is on MPG and ride comfort, and decent passing capability, all of which this thing apparently has, coupled with cargo flexibility and an open bed for stuff I wouldn’t want to put into a CUV. And it even has AWD as an option, meaning I could take it over the mountains in bad weather if I had to get my parents quickly for whatever reason.

    No one’s cross-shopping this thing with an F-150. But I could see traffic coming to it from the direction of the Subaru dealerships, for example.

    • 0 avatar
      AJ

      Yes, the AWD is a nice thing to have along with Honda’s build quality. I’d buy one over a Subaru myself. I think it looks better than the previous model, which a friend has one and loves it, as it sits up higher than a car, and for its rear lockable box. It also has 200k on it and runs great like a traditional Honda.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    Growing up, I spent my summers working on our family Midway assembling, disassembling and transporting rides all over the province (if you think being a car guy is cool, try being a ride mechanic. Hydraulics! Huge moving parts! Everything bespoke! Designed to last for decades! Often retrofitted pilot test equipment!).

    During that time, one of my uncles had a pristine 1976 F150 that he used for his primary hauler (he’d rolled the odometer twice on the thing before doing an engine swap, and rolled it again afterwards). We were all agog over the new Dodge Ram we’d acquired for moving rides around the lot, though – I’m not sure of the year but it would have been right around the time of the cross-grill facelift. Cummins Turbo Diesel dualie. I *loved* that truck. It was comfortable, looked awesome, and had genuine balls – we used it to pull a tractor-trailer out of the mud, the trailer still attached. It was a beast of a workhorse and the absolute top-of-the-line of what was available at the time.

    Since then I’ve always wanted something similar, but urban living precludes such a buy – when parking spots cost hundreds of dollars a month and parallel parking the norm, a huge full-size pickup isn’t really practical. Still, someday.

  • avatar
    ArialATOMV8

    I test drove one of these things over the summer when he was looking for a new car. The ideal use of the truck would be for tailgating. You could use the bed compartment as a cooler for all those beers and, a few waters while you wait for your BAC to go down to the point where you can drive responsibly! The bed also had speakers so, my grandfather would be blasting his Classical Music all to the world!

    While driving it, the ride was intresting. Of course it felt more refined than a “traditional” truck but, at the same time, it felt powerful too.

  • avatar
    Dingleberrypiez_Returns

    Seen a couple of these in the wild. The exterior design looks positively ancient.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Apparently this thing will hit 60mph in six and a half seconds and clear the quarter mile at 93mph with a similar curb weight, identical engine displacement & horsepower rating, and same number of gears as the much slower Tacoma. Interesting disparity considering Toyota’s V6 equipped cars keep pace with similar Hondas.

    What’s the secret sauce here?

    • 0 avatar
      klossfam

      Having owned both a Gen 1 Ridgeline and a current 2017 RTL-E, the sauce on the new Ridge is a combo of the new DI Honda V6 and the newer i-VTM4 AWD system. The engine revs super quick in usual Honda fashion but their is more torque at lower rpms and every last ft-lb goes right to the pavement…

      I saw an interview where even the Honda engineers were surprised with the 0-60 when they were testing the prototypes. I think they targeted 0-60 in about 7.5 secs but got a full second ‘bonus’. I had a 2014 RAM 1500 HEMI that ran about a 7.2 sec 0-60…Using the same GPS app on the same back road near my house, I squeezed a 6.6 sec run out for the Ridgeline.

      So, it is pin you back in the seat fast with absolutely zero wheel spin…Also handles the snow great with the SNOW mode on – even on the stock all season LT tires (Firestone Destination LE2s)

    • 0 avatar
      kefkafloyd

      I would probably pin it on gearing/final drive ratios, but I don’t know them off the top of my head for either truck.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      I drive a Honda Pilot this is based on, and it is true. You don’t need an engine more powerful than the 280HP V6 it already has. It’s also the best sounding V6 engine in existence.

  • avatar
    Silence

    I bought one. I wanted an SUV with a bed, and that’s exactly what this is; a Pilot with a bed fitted to it.

    I do enough hauling of various things to need a truck, but the full size ones were too big.

    This is the perfect size, and it handles very nicely. It makes everything else feel like ox carts.

    I had an older CRV, and this feels a little like it. Go cartish with a revvy and willing engine.

    I love it so far, and so does anyone who rides in it.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    I’m going to agree with Timothy Cain on this one, the Honda Ridgeline is the PERFECT compromise between truck and car, currently on the market. If for any reason I had to buy a replacement pickup for my ’97 Ford Ranger today, it would be the Ridgeline.

    However, it’s not exactly what I WANT. But that’s another argument.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “it’s not exactly what I WANT.” The infinite monkey theorem states that eventually someone will build a small truck that will be exactly what you want. They will go bankrupt shortly thereafter since the theorem of supply and demand will take over.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        The theorem of supply and demand might show you that a true, smaller, truck will sell far better than you imagine. After all, you were among those who thought the current round of “mid-size” trucks would fail.

  • avatar
    Charliej

    If you need a penis extender or need to prove your masculinity, buy a big three truck. The biggest and most powerful you can get. But, if you are sure of yourself and don’t care what others think, the Honda is worth a look. Don’t get me wrong big trucks have a place. That place is in business, not ego. I drove a F350 for years as a business truck. I never drove it home unless I had a need to haul something too big to get in the back of a minivan. If people could put their egos aside, Honda would sell a ton of these.

    • 0 avatar
      GeneralMalaise

      “If you need a penis extender or need to prove your masculinity… Go see Cal, go see Cal, go see Cal!

      Man, did Cal Worthington ever miss out!

    • 0 avatar
      FalcoDog

      If you have ever had a camper, horses, a hobby farm or livestock you would understand that a full size truck makes a lot of sense for some people. None of that has anything to do with ego.

      • 0 avatar
        Charliej

        That is true, but most people who buy big trucks have none of that. You can buy what ever you want, but don’t try to pretend that only a monster truck will do the job.

      • 0 avatar
        Jacob

        This is a suburbanite truck, not a farm truck.

        Moreover, there are too many sububanites in the middle America who still can’t get out of this mindset that they no longer live on a farm. Hence, a ridiculous amount of big-three trucks driving around the suburbs of middle America that never tow anything, or carry anything in their bed..

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I look like Zach Galifianakis and sound like Ross Matthews so I very, very much need to own a Tundra.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Charliej – I was wondering when someone would make a penis comment. Ego wasn’t my primary purchase metric. Interior room, 6.5 box, fuel capacity, tow/haul ratings all rated high on my list.
      Will the Ridgeline seat 6 and have room for a big dog or 2 in the cab?
      Will it fit a 12 ft boat on the top of the box rails with a few weeks of gear stored underneath?
      Will those tires hold up on a gravel road under load?
      How will that front fascia fair in -30C weather and hitting a snow drift?
      Are you filling in for Big Al from Oz?

      I’ve owned a few Rangers and a HD. Current truck is a SuperCrew F150 6.5 box.

  • avatar
    B_C_R

    It’s a compelling vehicle, that really fits the needs of most North American buyers than an actual full size body on frame pickup truck.

    Most buyers are compelled by numbers though, and buy with what they could ultimately use a vehicle for. Even if you buy a 4 door F-150 as a daily driver, knowing that you can tow 2,100 pounds more than the ‘sensible shoes’ Ridgeline, must make the F-150 a better truck and a better purchase — especially for what you get for your money.

    Personally, I daily drive a Tacoma, which certainly isn’t a perfect vehicle, but suits my off-road needs and almost suits my on-road needs.

  • avatar
    BigOldChryslers

    I don’t like how the bumpers are integrated into the bodywork like a car. In my experience, trucks occasionally bump into things, probably more often than cars. Every van, Suburban, pickup truck that I or my dad have owned have had damaged rear bumpers because someone backed it into something.

    This truck looks particularly fragile and expensive to fix if it bumps something. If I owned one, I’d put something on the back one to act as a secondary rear bumper. Either one of those wide hitch-mounted steps or a “rear bumper guard” specifically designed for that purpose.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      The rear-view camera helps to prevent those bumps, if you actually bother to use it. I’ve found that it makes setting yourself up in a parking space very easy and you can get within an inch of an obstacle without hitting it.

      • 0 avatar
        BigOldChryslers

        Nobody in my immediate family has ever owned a vehicle with a backup camera, though I am in the process of installing one in my ’07 Ram Megacab.

        I would probably be less worried about messing-up the bodywork on the Ridgeline with a backup camera.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          My new Renegade is the first vehicle I’ve owned with a backup camera and it has already proven itself very effective for avoiding objects behind the car, clearing the path to back up and stopping exactly where I want to as I am backing.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    I was loath to call this a “truck” until I learned that it does actually have something approximating a frame under the bed.

    I do still have to wonder why this midsize CUV-pickup is matched or even surpassed by some traditional half-ton trucks in MPG.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    You missed what Alex found in his youtube review, that the Ridgeline drives and handles better than all other pickups.

    For most buyers – considering their actual use – that should be the selling point.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    The Ridgeline is not for “traditional” truck buyers. It’s for Odyssey owners (lessors) like myself who don’t need a truck but do like some truck things. Like the occasional run to big box store. Yes, you can borrow the HD or Lowes truck, as long as it’s there. Or possibly rent one. And the Odyssey can take a lot with it, with the seats down and/or out. But vacuuming wet mulch or a broken bag of fertilizer out of a van is not fun.

    Putting the bikes in the Odyssey is a pain, putting them in the “truck” is easy. My folks had an 88 Supercab Ranger 2wd. All five of us could fit in there when we were young, but we outgrew the truck quickly. It seems like the Ridgelines backseats are fine, but the access is slightly lacking. Mine are out of baby seats and almost into boosters, so not a big deal for me.

    As for the size, the Ridgeline isn’t really that much smaller. But it is smaller and living with that day to day would be easier. The gas mileage is a toss-up. But in the hills I live with, the Ridgeline would probably do about the same as our current Odyssey. Turbos are hungry around here, since they never get a chance to really rest like the flatlands.

    We have another van, maybe two in us. But I could get the wife to consider a Ridgeline, not an F150. And I don’t have the garage/driveway space for more than three vehicles. And Odyssey with a bed, or Pilot with a bed, that’s what this is. If I want a real truck, I’ll get one.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Alex got 21.5 mpg, which was better than the competition and more than EPA. Plus 0-60 in 6.5 and A+ handling.

    Rated it Best-All Around.

    • 0 avatar
      klossfam

      Some people get all pissy when you bring up Fuelly but it is still the best site for true real world mpg averages (especially when you see the raw number of miles the data is based on – it’s A LOT of miles)…I have a 2017 RTL-E and still mostly city/short trip driving – I’m dead on the city rating at 18.0 (but I have a heavy foot). The 2017 Ridgeline average (with already 420,000 miles tracked) is 20.5 mpg. The real world for the new Tacoma is 18.3 mpg for the 2017 and 18.9 mpg for the 2016. Total miles tracked 3.7 million! So you’d have to say the Ridgeline gets nearly 2 mpg better overall…that’s 10% better.

      Comparing the Fuelly numbers on a F-150 with the 2.7L EcoBoost you are looking at 18.4 mpg with nearly 3 million miles tracked. So for gas full sizers, that is hard to beat. My previous ride was a 2015 RAM EcoDiesel and I averaged 22.4 mpg over 30k miles.

      I wanted to go back to midsize but stay within a couple mpg on a gasser, so the Ridgeline was the way to go. I had a Gen 1 Ridgeline and it averaged only 16.3 mpg, so the Gen 2 is a huge improvement with more space and a ton more refinement.


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