By on December 29, 2016

Ford Police Interceptor Utility

North America’s romantic entanglement with the sport utility vehicle is not limited to retail consumers, as police fleets in the United States and Canada have been getting in on the action for a while now. Valuing durability and flexibility above all else, law enforcement’s gradual shift toward SUVs seems to have been inevitable.

Ford said that sales of its Explorer-based Interceptor Utility surpassed its Taurus-based Interceptor Sedan in 2014, claiming that the SUV had “officially” become North America’s most popular police vehicle. While that might not be entirely accurate until current fleets retire the horde of large sedans that proved so popular in the past, the utility trend is growing and departments have plenty of praise for them — especially departments rife with oversized officers. 

“We’re all dealing with the same issue, and that is the vehicles are getting smaller, yet there’s still demand for more gadgets and equipment put into those cars,” Julie Furlotte, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s national mobile assets manager, told Automotive News. “It’s always a bit of a tradeoff and a challenge to make it all fit.”

When Ford retired the Crown Victoria P7B Interceptor, its replacement was praised for superior performance and versatility but universally loathed for its less spacious interior. This week, South Carolina’s Greenville PD gave those very reasons for why it decided to swap out its entire fleet to sport utility vehicles.

“We’re trying to make sure we have a fleet that serves many purposes. Having all-wheel-drive vehicles will help during bad weather, we’ll be able to respond to calls more quickly,” Officer Gilberto Franco told WYFF 4. “For officers who are very tall or just bigger in size, they were having a difficult time trying to get in and out of the vehicle.”

While it’s easy to scoff at chubby cops and make jokes about staying away from the donut shop, interior comfort and space are incredibly important when considering a vehicle that doubles as your office — even more so when you are big-boned.

“The larger the guy, the harder it is to get into a smaller car,” said Sgt. Michael McCarthy of the Michigan State Police’s precision-driving team. “The SUVs are up higher, they’re easier to get in and out of. I love driving the sedans as long as I can stay in them but if I have to get in and out of them all day I much prefer a taller vehicle.”

Every year, the Michigan State Police tests all available pursuit vehicles, and those evaluations become the deciding factor for many departments’ purchases. McCarthy says that, in recent years, the performance differences between police sedans and SUV has become much less noticeable.

“LAPD are buying a larger percentage of SUVs than they are of the sedans,” McCarthy said. “They are very capable. They have a fairly short turning radius. They’re deceptively fast.”

Ease of entry and egress for husky or hulking officers isn’t the sole benefit, however. Durability plays a massive factor for fleet vehicles in general and is another reason the Crown Victoria was the darling of so many police departments and cab companies.

Fred Dixon, GM Canada’s manager of fleet marketing and sales, told Automotive News that the body-on-frame design of the Chevrolet Tahoe has kept repair costs down.

“I’m hearing from my customers anyway that when they look at the sedan versus the SUVs, the SUVs are a little bit more expensive (but) they actually get better durability out of them,” Dixon explained.

Meanwhile, Ford’s Interceptor Utility shares many parts with the Interceptor Sedan, reducing maintenance expenses and making it easier to rationalize adding them to a fleet already brimming with spare components. The Blue Oval also had the foresight to design the SUV as a pursuit-rated vehicle — bullet-resistant armor and all.

Those factors helped Ford quickly retake a dominant share — over 61 percent — of the police fleet market in 2015.

Introduced in 2012, the Police Interceptor Utility only needed a couple of years to become America’s best-selling police vehicle. By 2014, Ford starting selling roughly 25 percent more Interceptor SUVs than it does the already popular Interceptor sedan.

Cops want utility vehicles, and all available data points to a future where —outside of major urban centers — SUVs are the most common squad car on the road.

[Image: Ford Motor Company]

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112 Comments on “SUVs Likely to Become Dominant Police Vehicle, ‘Bigger’ Cops Rejoice...”


  • avatar
    White Shadow

    Terrific. Now I’m going to have to keep my eyes peeled for SUV cop cars in a sea of SUVs on the roads. Wait, wasn’t that the case when cop cars were cars and the roads were filled with mostly cars?

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Great! Smokey is a lot easier to spot in these things.

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      Yeah, except for the fact that there are like 70 million Explorers on the roads already, so Smokey can hide in plain sight.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        Most Explorers even have the same black grill that the cops have. You really can’t tell unless you can see the wheels.

        • 0 avatar
          White Shadow

          It wasn’t long ago that I was on the NJ Turnpike moving along at a good clip (80 mph seems to be my average speed and I’m certainly not alone) when I spotted what was surely a cop in a black Explorer coming up quickly from behind. I thought I could even see a low-profile light bar on his roof, so I immediately dropped 10 mph and waited for him to pass. Turns out it was just some regular Joe with a Thule crossbar rack system on his mommy-mobile. I can see similar scenarios occurring quite often across our nation’s highways.

          I guess it’s no different than the 80-year-old retiree traveling between NY and Florida in his Chevy Caprice or Ford Crown Vic that used to cause me to use the same caution. Ah, the life of a serial highway speeder….

          • 0 avatar
            HotPotato

            I’ve made the same mistake! Dear citizens, please wrap your crossbars in fluorescent green tape so the rest of us don’t panic.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Sedans SO suck. Thanks, CAFE and stylists and Chinese purveyors of interior plastics and Obama!

  • avatar
    JMII

    While many will make the donut joke if you’ve seen the gear officers wear (like a bulky bullet proof vest & Batman utility belt) you can understand why bigger vehicles are preferred. And for the record I saw 3 police vehicles today on the way to work… 2 of them were SUVs.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      Plus, bigger isn’t necessarily bad. Lots of bar bouncers, football lineman, etc don’t look like they can run a 5k under 20 minutes but are well suited for their jobs.

      • 0 avatar
        Matt Posky

        All teasing aside, even a slim cop would probably not mind the extra interior volume. Those new sedan interiors are noticeably tighter than what the Crown Victoria had to offer. If I had to spend 8 hours a day inside of the same car, I’d absolutely want it to have more space.

      • 0 avatar
        April S

        Yeah, who needs to run after them when they can use their guns.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        If your job involves chasing bad guys on foot, though?

        So there I am, lifting my sick dog into the car outside the veterinarian’s office, and some wiry kid comes sprinting by. In the distance I hear what sounds like Homer Simpson hollering while riding an elephant. The noise comes closer: the heavy footfalls and bellowing are coming from a sheriff’s deputy, who in his tan uniform resembles nothing so much as a mammoth jelly donut running after the kid. Some guy dining outside the McDonald’s down thee street, blessed with more situational awareness and fewer 100-pound dogs in his arms than than I, trips the perp and sits on him until the cop gets there. And I think: maybe we’d have fewer police shootings if more cops were fit enough to catch perps on foot…

    • 0 avatar
      iama

      I generally agree with JMII. I’ve driven the CVPI more times than I can count, the PI Sedan several dozen times, and the PI Utility about a dozen times. Durango and Tahoe a few times (serve a purpose, but neither can touch the Ford products for routine patrol duty).

      Yes, some cops are fat. A lot of cops are just big (built like a brick house). Add to that the vest and belt, it’s hard to bend and it’s just easier to move in and out of an SUV. Many smaller cops actually prefer the PI Sedan, but they tend to be outnumbered.

  • avatar
    Eyeflyistheeye

    In California, the CHP has switched almost completely to Explorers and F150s on the highways, closer to cities, I still see Crown Vics.

  • avatar
    carguy

    “We’re all dealing with the same issue, and that is the vehicles are getting smaller”

    Really? Which ones?

    • 0 avatar
      eparch

      Was thinking this exact same thing? Cars getting smaller? That’s news to me

    • 0 avatar
      -Nate

      The Ford Patrol Sedan thing ~ it’s laughably small for a funny kitted out Officer .
      .
      I know some here really hate cops and will make stupid endless fat jokes but I know some Officers (Hi Nick in CRASH !) who are normally sized Americans, not fat nor tall but they full kit they have to wear makes room for movement critical .
      .
      I dislike SUV’s in general but I guess that’s what we’ve got to accept now as no more decent size American Sedans .
      .
      -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      According to the EPA’s website, a ’92 Caprice had 115 cuft of interior volume and a 20 cuft trunk. A ’96 Fleetwood was 125/21. A ’94 LHS was 108/18.

      A Charger is 105/16
      An Avalon is 104/16
      A CT6 is 110/15
      Taurus is 102/20
      The Genesis G90 is 113/16

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Almost all vehicles are getting “smaller” in the dimensions that count if you’re wearing a utility belt and/or a padded vest.

      Modern vehicle cockpits usually have quite a large centre console. Police vehicles might have these reduced or removed, but often sub-in in-car computer terminal and communications gear, which takes up even more space.

      The Panthers and B-Bodies were wide and had a lot of foot & knee space that is pretty much gone from anything non-truck. I’m surprised that the Explorer is an option, as it, too, is pretty cramped for such a large car; you’d expect more use of half-ton pickups and SUVs.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      carguy, they’re saying that the few remaining large domestic brand sedans are smaller than a Ford Crown Victoria. The Taurus isn’t as wide and the Charger doesn’t have as much interior length. Doesn’t matter that all other vehicles have been getting larger because the market niche that get made into police cars is going extinct.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      I know, that was my reaction. My 2015 Accord Sport makes my E36 M3 look like a toy car when parked next to it. That thing is a boat, and I’m sure get even a huge cop with full gear could easily get in and out of it. Of course, no cop would be caught dead in an Accord or a Camry, which is really what they should be driving.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    Here in Chicagoland, almost all cop cars are Explorers, except the odd Tahoe and legacy Panther that just hasn’t bit it yet. Doesn’t hurt that we build the things nearby. And the undercover ones are STEALTHY, almost nothing to give them away, I just treat all Explorers as cops until I see proof otherwise.

  • avatar
    don1967

    It sounds so good to say that Ford Explorers are “more durable”, based on their truckish appearance and ability to clear an 8″ curb instead of a 5″ curb. This is gonna save the taxpayer a bundle!

    Reminds me of when the City of Ottawa justified a fleet of alloy-wheeled, sunroof-equipped VW Golfs for its parking enforcement division. The huge price premium over the outgoing Hyundai fleet would be recouped in no time, they said, due to reduced disability claims thanks to the Golf’s superior lumbar support. The impeccable logic of government.

    Show me the data which proves that anyone ever saved money with an overpriced, gas-guzzling, transaxle-busting CUV, and I’ll give you some magic beans.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      Saved money vs what? The Taurus? It doesn’t. However, it offers things police officers like and Ford has done a good job developing the Explorer into an excellent police platform.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I think its literally $1,000 more and is pursuit rated like Taurus. I think if the Taurus didn’t have horrible interior ergonomics you would see a 50/50 split on these but in reality its probably 70/30 or 80/20 in favor of Explorer at this point.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      Save the taxpayer a bundle? It costs more to buy. It costs more to fuel. It costs more to maintain. Both have the same curb rating. The PI Sedan does most things better, except in the area of space, which is what officers appear to need right now. That’s why the PI Utility is winning.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Here in Colorado, the state troopers are even beginning to drive pickups. Saw one the other day.

    Makes sense why they’d drive something like that – I can’t see some FWD sedan offering the same kind of long term durability that a BOF truck or SUV can.

    • 0 avatar
      nels0300

      Yeah, I don’t see how the Explorer, with a transverse mounted twin turbo V6 and AWD is going to be as robust as the plain ol’ BOF RWD V8 Crown Vic.

      Who would’ve guessed cop cars would be replaced by SUVs with a similar drivetrain to a Mitsubishi 3000 GT VR4?

      • 0 avatar
        mikeg216

        What if I told you that design and engineering has gotten better in the last 40 years..

        • 0 avatar
          nels0300

          Yeah, thanks for that.

          So a transverse mounted twin turbo V6 with AWD on an old Volvo platform is better “design and engineering”?

          Better than what? Why would a complicated setup like that be better for police fleet vehicles?

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            It’s not an “Old Volvo Platform”. The current Ford D4 platform can trace it’s roots to the Volvo P2 platform, but all platforms evolve from something else.

            And yes, the Explorer is better designed and engineered than the CV. The CV certainly costs less and has cockroach durability, but the Explorer is significantly better at everything else. Not all municipalities are buying the 3.5TT versions. Ford offers other engines too.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “It’s not an “Old Volvo Platform”. The current Ford D4 platform can trace it’s roots to the Volvo P2 platform, but all platforms evolve from something else.”

            expecting the “B&B” to understand that is a fruitless endeavor. To them, the Explorer is just a 1998 S80.

            Platforms don’t “rot.” so long as they’re updated and improved throughout their life, that is. Why do you think Honda and Toyota have been steadily evolving and modifying their car platforms for decades?

            throwing everything out and starting over from scratch is something the Detroit 3 have traditionally been too eager to do, and that takes up a ton of money and resources which would be better spent elsewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            nels0300

            “but all platforms evolve from something else.”

            Sure, and you can trace the Panther platform all the way back to the Model T, or maybe even the horse and buggy. Depends on what your definition of “evolve” is.

            But really, the Panther platform started in 1978-79, just like the Taurus/Explorer started in 1998 and have been revised since then like you pointed out, but trace their roots, like you pointed out, back to a 1998 Volvo.

            So where is the disagreement?

            I understand the concept of a platform just fine BTW, smarty pants, JimZ.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “I understand the concept of a platform just fine BTW, smarty pants, JimZ.”

            clearly not, otherwise you wouldn’t be calling it an “old Volvo platform” like it’s a bad thing.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Under Volvo Cars, the P2 platform for many years was mired by problems with its drivetrains and electrics, although this was not the fault of the basic structure. Since Volvo Car was sold to Ford because of the P2 platform, Volvo faithful may argue it was a “bad platform” for this reason alone.

          • 0 avatar
            nels0300

            I’m not saying the Volvo platform is bad, but I do question whether or not it truly is better than the Panther or a similar platform, for police duty.

            Is Ford using this OLD VOLVO PLATFORM because that layout is inherently better for police duty, or are they using it because:

            1. It’s what they have available.

            2. Civilians don’t buy Panthers anymore, therefore Ford sees no reason to update that platform. They do buy Explorers, so Ford picks the platform that has the better economy of scale.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @nels0300

            The latter. An updated CVPI would have been a better choice but as you pointed out the civilian market stopped buying them and it simply became a profit center for Ford. Some departments also see a great advantage to AWD cruisers depending on their locale but they fail to take into account the additional fuel, rubber, and other maintenance costs.

            Here in PA, the police standard followed is supposed to be 75,000 miles and replacement or relegation to secondary status (X cars is the parlance used by our city’s dept). Assuming this is followed, even an AWD Explorer or Charger should last this long without catastrophic issues in heavy police use. In reality, at least here, X-cars (W-Impalas) are still used as active patrol cars both for the reasons of short supply of new cruisers (Taurus/Explorer AWD here) and also because the new cruisers are frequently at the dealership being serviced for a variety of problems.

            The W-Impalas are not much better but aside from the 3900 variant chewing through about three transmissions every 100K, they run, Christmas tree dash and all. In several years when the D4s are X-cars I predict our city police are going to be in a heap of trouble. This is where the advantage of CVPI would come in, departments would be wise to retain their Panthers as long as possible even if they were partially mothballed.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Under Volvo Cars, the P2 platform for many years was mired by problems with its drivetrains and electrics,”

            what do the drivetrains or “electrics” have to do with the platform?

            the f***ing platform is a set of dimensions for the vehicles structural hardpoints. nothing more.

    • 0 avatar
      SirRaoulDuke

      I think a police pickup makes a lot of sense out in the sticks.

  • avatar
    tbone33

    Just for the record, a new Explorer is $32k BEFORE all of the radios, lights, etc…

    How about a Charger or Impala at 12.5% less, or a Malibu at 32% less. Does the amount we’re willing to spend on law enforcement have no limit? Can’t we use two cars in a fleet? Hey, it’s only my money I guess.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      They were using Chargers for a while, but apparently durability wasn’t there so they stopped. Cheaper isn’t necessarily always cheaper long term.

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        I just had this conversation with two separate buddies of mine who are cops. The one guy is huge, he an needs an suv,full stop. I don’t know if he could even get in my gti with his belt on. My other buddy is a big guy, 6+ and hardly slim, but he strongly prefers the new chargerawd. He said that they switched to chargers after looking at transmission replacement rates on their fwd impala fleet. The chargers have been their lowest cost maintenance wise. They have explorers and chargers as a mix, which I think is what we’re seeing here.

        Both of them immediately said hell no when I asked them if they would be comfortable at high speed on what passes for our local roads in the explorer. The explorers are highway pursuit or radio cars, not a full spectrum solution where the roads are interesting.

        Both of them said they wouldn’t bother with the lights if a driver in a car like mine decided to give them a run off the main roads while they were in the suv. That might be a change in policy which makes the suv’s more palatable.

    • 0 avatar
      ericb91

      Facts from a Ford salesman- the standard-issue Police Interceptor Utility stickers for $32,830. Most enforcement outfits only pay $25k or less for them. For a comfortable, AWD utility vehicle. Makes sense.

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    Wait till they start flipping over as they take curves too fast chasing someone.

  • avatar
    Snooder

    Guys, guys.

    We’re all talking about the driver, but what about passenger comfort?

    I, for one, think it’s very nice of the police departments of America to switch to a mode of transport that maximizes the backseat passenger’s head and legroom.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    “Husky officers”..I love that word husky. Makes getting fat kinda sexy.

  • avatar
    countymountie

    91 to 96 Caprices were great. It was all about shoulder room. A new Taurus is horribly cramped in the shoulder room department and the front door opening is tiny. I’ve ridden shotgun in an Explorer and it’s a little better. Chargers are okay in all aspects but the Caprice was still king. Crown Vics felt similar to the Charger.

    Hard to believe how much performance has improved since the days of the LT1. With stability control, the increased ride height of an SUV is not as big a detriment as it would seem.

  • avatar
    JustPassinThru

    Oh, this’ll be fun, on LiveLeak, to catch dash-cams of PoliSUVs rolling over during high-speed pursuits. Why do I get images of the 1970s, when some rural New York State sheriff’s departments tried the big SJ Jeep Cherokee four-doors as police rigs? Watching one of them move fast was like watching a Keystone Kops chase.

    I don’t know if the “pros” will outweigh the “cons” here, except that there is one major con – the price of these things, all of it paid by John Q Taxpayer.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Roll center of the U502 is lower than an SJ Cherokee—-it also has ESP, something vehicles of the 1970’s was lacking along with the Crown Vic.

      But yea lets make more apples to oranges comparisons.

  • avatar
    bufguy

    Buffalo police cruisers are again getting a new look.

    After switching from Ford Crown Victorias to the larger, but more fuel-efficient Chevrolet Tahoe SUVs, Buffalo police are now turning to Dodge Chargers.

    The Tahoes got too expensive, costing about $49,000 each for the police-package vehicles, said purchasing director William L. Sunderlin.

    The Chargers will cost about $38,500 each, he said.

    And in addition to being less costly, the Chargers will have all-wheel drive, a feature expected to be a plus during Buffalo winters, officials said.

    The Tahoes are two-wheel drive, according to Lovejoy Council Member Richard A. Fontana, who chairs the Common Council’s Finance Committee.

    Fontana said he’s heard from police offices who have complained the Tahoes don’t always perform well in the snow. In fact, at one point, the city had to put snow tires on its Tahoe fleet, Fontana said.

    Sunderlin appeared before the Council’s Finance Committee Tuesday to discuss the police car purchases. The Council in coming weeks expects to authorize the city to purchase 20 to 25 of the new vehicles, all Dodge Chargers, Fontana said.

    The result will be a fleet that is a combination of Dodge Chargers and Chevy Tahoes, Fontana said.

    The city began buying Tahoes in 2014, when it purchased about 50 of the SUVs. At the time, the price was less than $30,000, Sunderlin said.

    The Tahoes became the police car of choice for many departments after Ford phased out the Crown Victorias, previously thecruiser used in Buffalo and by many other police departments.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “In fact, at one point, the city had to put snow tires on its Tahoe fleet, Fontana said.”

      I’m sorry, is this in Buffalo, NY? And they’re complaining about having to equip vehicles with snow tires?

      Snow tires shouldn’t be optional in a city that’s known for regular snowfalls measured in feet.

      • 0 avatar
        bufguy

        I totally agree….I found that statement confusing…All I can figure is that they thought that “trucks” shouldn’t need snow tires….Pretty ignorant. I always remember the police cars getting snow tires. I’ve lived in Buffalo all my life and even put four snow tires on my BMW X3 x drive.

  • avatar
    SD 328I

    Makes sense. They like it for the same reason people like cross over SUVs, easy to get in and out of. More convenient for the majority of your life.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    “Those factors helped Ford quickly retake a dominant share — over 61 percent — of the police fleet market in 2015.”

    Good job Ford. Your two miserable police vehicles now can’t even come close to matching the 80% share you had with the Crown Vic.

    I guess that’s progress at Ford HQ.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Your tax dollars at work. Cops used to be in cheap, bare bones Crown Vics, now they rock $40k a piece Explorers.

  • avatar
    namstrap

    Our local constabulary has an unmarked Tahoe with a stick figure family on the back window. The wheels give it away though.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Do the stick figures depict 3 white cops shooting an unarmed black man? Dead giveaway.

      • 0 avatar
        OldManPants

        “3 white cops shooting an unarmed black man”

        Merely an overabundance of caution.

      • 0 avatar
        namstrap

        No, just the typical family, complete with dog. I’m in Canada.

      • 0 avatar
        JustPassinThru

        “Do the stick figures depict 3 white cops shooting an unarmed black man? Dead giveaway.”

        Watch much Fake News, do we?

        (sure, it’s off-topic. So was the above comment. SJWs should know their targets sometimes punch back.)

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Another one who forgets that America was founded on social justice.

          If this is what you teach your kids that ‘fighting back’ looks like, they’re in for a rough time in middle school.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            “Another one who forgets that America was founded on social justice.”

            Another one who uses his onboard BS detector. America was founded on TRUTH, not SJW narratives. Fake News, of the sort your side peddles, goes against that. And “Hands-Up-Don’t-Shoot” is something other than truth.

            Back in the days of honest discourse, we had a word for it.

            A LIE.

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            “America was founded on TRUTH”

            This!!

            “Kill them f*ckin’ redskins and Spaniards and you can have their land!”

            -Andrew Jackson

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            ““America was founded on TRUTH”

            This!!

            “Kill them f*ckin’ redskins and Spaniards and you can have their land!”

            -Andrew Jackson”

            Judging the Eighteenth-Century conflicts and pressures by New Age SJW moral codes is one more exercise in sophistry.

            Before the Eeeevil Whites came to steal the land from the Injuns, they first were evicted first from England and then from Holland. The Pilgrims were Dreamers, to use Barry’s current term. They were persecuted and forced to the water’s edge by political anti-religious government persecution.

            And in the centuries beyond, the descendents of the Pilgrims had boom-sticks. The Injuns rejected that technology. The result was a no-brainer.

            The history of humanity is that of the aggressive use of force. If you reject that, there is only one answer – the gas pipe.

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            “The history of humanity is that of the aggressive use of force. If you reject that, there is only one answer – the gas pipe.”

            How selective would I get to be?

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            “How selective would I get to be?”

            You use it on yourself.

            Because, in a civil society, you, or any other SJW self-appointed elite, does not hold the power of life and death over others.

            You accept reality or you take the pipe.

            You accept that you require certain foods, including meats and carbon substances, and that you need fuel to heat your shelter, however crude…and that you emit methane and excrete substances which your betters have declared pollutants…

            …you accept that or you take that pipe. Huff deeply; and make the world a better place. One death at a time.

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            “One death at a time.”

            Well, pshhh.. that ain’t gonna get you nowhere.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            JPT,
            Whenever people use insults as an argument, people tune out. You’ve already lost the discussion.

            If you cannot state your point without the term SJW, then you obviously have no point to make.

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            “the term SJW”

            I get such a kick from him calling *me* one :-D

            I dreamed I Made America Great Again in my SJW bra!

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            ” “One death at a time.”

            Well, pshhh.. that ain’t gonna get you nowhere.”.
            .
            No kidding ~ hey, I’ve got an idea : lets take those old Army bobtail vans and re rout the exhaust into the enclosed bobtail body whilst we’re transporting those prisoners, see how that works ….
            .
            BTW : America being founded upon social justice (for the correct, White folks) does _not_ make the current crop of whack-a-doodle buttinski sjw’s right .
            .
            -Nate
            -Nate

  • avatar
    tylanner

    This transition, based on the increase in vehicle size, really sets up a ton of potential for additional technology or accessories for departments to spend money on. I bet they literally could not fit anything else in a loaded CV.

    It will also enhance the domineering nature accompanying even the most benign of traffic violations.

    The wiring for all those LEDs alone must take up a good bit of space.

  • avatar
    Sam Hell Jr

    So what they really needed was a minivan. Ideally the rental-grade Sienna with the 2.7L I4.

    Jack called this one years ago. Cops liked the CV because it had a long hood. They liked the Charger because it had a crosshair on the grille. They like the Explorer because it rides high and has an imposing visage in interceptor trim.

    I don’t doubt it’s a pain to get into a modern sedan with a vest and a belt, but if the answer to that is a Tahoe or an Explorer, then this is first and foremost about the paramilitary theater of modern policing.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Cops liked the Dodge Diplomat because it looked like a no-nonsense cop car… that’s a good first impression to make with both law abiding citizens and with miscreants.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        “Cops liked the Dodge Diplomat because it looked like a no-nonsense cop car… ”

        Musta been cheap, too, the way they stacked up the ChiTown P.D. cars in the Blues Brothers movie. :-)

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Those were all C-body (maybe a few B-body) Monacos. It also explains why so few C-body Monacos are left, and why 75% of them have been turned into Bluesmobile clones.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            They should all be as such, just as all surviving 80s GM vans should be converted to A-Team clones.

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            “Those were all C-body (maybe a few B-body) Monacos”

            This place is like Khan Academy – free education! :-)

            “Bluesmobile clones.”

            Including the giant PA horn?

  • avatar
    George B

    The most common police vehicle in the Dallas suburbs is the Chevrolet Tahoe. Black and white, slightly lowered, steel wheels, and 2WD. Not many Crown Vics were replaced by Tauruses.


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