By on September 1, 2016

2016 Jeep® Compass 75th Anniversary edition

Are comfortable seats the secret behind the popularity of the Jeep Compass/Patriot siblings?

Many would argue that rock-bottom pricing and a lack of knowledge of better choices could have something to do with it, but a study by J.D. Power finds that drivers stay loyal if their seats treat them right.

In its 2016 Seat Quality and Satisfaction Study, J.D. Power ranks the top cushions in each vehicle category, based on feedback from 80,000 people who bought or leased a 2017 car or light truck. Drivers were asked about any seat defect, malfunction or design problem in their vehicles.

Seats aren’t sexy. Well, the non-massaging kind, anyway. But we spend a stupid amount of time in our vehicles, and an uncomfortable seat can break a driver-vehicle relationship (in addition to our backs and asses). Reliability isn’t everything.

When asked to rate their loyalty to their vehicle, 68 percent of drivers who gave their seat comfort a perfect score said they’d “definitely” re-purchase the same vehicle. Only 45 percent of drivers who gave their seats a nine out of 10 would do the same. What about seven out of ten? Seats that are just okay? Less than one-third of drivers said they would buy the vehicle again.

The Jeep Compass and its boxier sibling will die early next year, and this study hands it a solitary accolade as it heads to the gallows. J.D. Power claims the fantastically old model has the best seats in the mass-market compact SUV category, followed close behind by the Ford Escape and Chevrolet Equinox.

The Acura RDX carried the luxury SUV field, while the Toyota 4Runner pleased the most backsides in the midsize/large SUV category. Ford’s Super Duty topped the list of mass-market trucks and vans.

Among compact cars, the funnest entry (Mazda MX-5) nailed the top spot. In the midsize/large car category, the far, far less fun (but still comfortable) Toyota Camry ranked the best. We’re not sure how many taxi drivers J.D. Power surveyed. The best luxury car seats are found in the Porsche Cayman, a vehicle that would still be fun if there was a pin in each cushion.

[Image: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

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72 Comments on “Leading from Behind: Vehicle Seat Comfort and Owner Loyalty...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I wonder how Nissan’s Zero Gravity seats fare in this survey (maybe they’re in the Altima on the list provided?). Reviewers love them, and I was impressed with a few moments in them at the auto show.

    • 0 avatar
      dwbf11

      I’ve rented plenty of Altimas, and I don’t find them to be anything special. The “upmarket” base seats in the Infinitis are abysmal, and don’t even include adjustable lumbar support unless you tick off the Premium Package option box.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        A lot of the rental Altimas don’t have the Zero Gravity seats, which only come on upmarket trim levels. The base seats are nothing special.

        • 0 avatar
          dwbf11

          Fair point. I guess I should clarify, National has the Altimas in base as well as 3.5SL trim and I’ve rented both…assuming they’re standard on the 3.5SL then I’ve tried them and wasn’t particularly impressed.

        • 0 avatar
          mchan1

          Zero Gravity seats were supposedly ‘standard’ on all models 2013+ regardless of trim.

          The seats are nothing special though the cloth version’s seat cushion was more cushiony and more comfortable than the leather version.

    • 0 avatar
      2drsedanman

      We had a 2013 Altima with the Zero Gravity seats and I loved them? I thought about finding a wrecked car and adapting the seat for use in my office. Too bad in was in such a piece of sh!t car. Wish I could have traded the seats in my Avalon for those Altima seats.

    • 0 avatar
      mchan1

      Nissan’s Zero Gravity seats aren’t anything special.
      Have them on my 2014 SL trim and the seat bottom needs more cushioning.
      Also, there’s hardly any lumbar support. Detest manual/auto lumbar support because as it’s used more, the cushioning thins out over time.
      Better to just put in lots of back cushioning and seat cushioning.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      I hope they’re better than literally every Nissan seat I’ve sat in over the past decade or so. With the exception of the XTerra and the Z, I’ve always felt like I was sitting on them rather than in them, which was always uncomfortable and somewhat disconcerting. My impressions of them at recent auto shows has been the same as I felt in rentals, so I’m doubting it.

  • avatar
    dwbf11

    Given how subjective such an award category is, I struggle to believe that this result can be considered scientific in any way. That said, I am shocked that Volvo did not make an appearance on this list. Hands down the best seats in the business and they’ve been making them that way for more than 20 years.

    I’ve sat in the base FCA seats found in the small CUV’s and found them abysmal. The other cars are all common rental fleet staples and I’d say they’re about average, though for base, non-powered seats the F250’s thrones are not at all bad places to be.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Possibly not popular enough to make a dent – I love the seats in my XC70, too.

      (And equally, my F250 is quite comfy, yes.)

      Equally, the link, sadly, only points to a summary/top-3 (because JDP results aren’t free!) and talks about manufacturers.

      I’d love to see the details.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    I don’t know about the RDX but the seats in the MDX suck. I am not particularly tall and they have zero thigh support, the bases are just too short. I can’t imagine how anyone taller can tolerate them.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Iron, I wouldn’t be surprised if that lack of thigh support is because they sized the driver’s seat for women in acknowledgment of its role as a school bus. I seem to hear this comment a lot about cars I’d expect to have mostly women buyers, like cute-utes and Corolla-class cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      It kind of seems to be an ongoing problem with Japanese cars and leads to jokes about the cars being designed for short Japanese drivers, men, as well as women.

      • 0 avatar
        Flipper35

        The seats in our 2013 Nissan Rogue are a horrible fit for both my 5’11” frame and my wife’s 5’5″ frame. There is no lumbar support and the upper bolsters roll your shoulders in and forward. We thought we needed the extra space over our 4 door sedan so we took the Rogue for our vacation road trip. My chest was even hurting from the stupid seats.

        I can’t for the life of me figure out why they are so popular. The seats, A/C, ride, Bluetooth integration and sound system suck. If you work it hard in the mountains the CVT goes into self preservation mode and you are lucky to maintain 50mph.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    I had a choice back in 2012 when faced with the reality of our mortgage combined with the payment on my 2011 Accord: refinance the car to lower the payment (the Honda already had positive equity) or sell it and get something less expensive.

    The Accord was and still is remembered as my favorite car that I’ve ever owned, but god damn those seats were some of the worst. They made my leg go numb all the time, and my passengers complained often as well. My raggedy 2007 Altima with cloth seats that I’ve had for 2 years now is leaps ahead in comfort.

    It wasn’t an easy decision, but I sold the Accord to CarMax. So there’s some truth to comfort and loyalty. It’s my biggest fear when I consider getting another Accord coupe in the near future.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      I remember that gen of Accord having really hard & flat seats, but we have that gen of Altima and i don’t find them all that nice either. No lateral support, kind of a vague shape to the bottom and backrest cushions. It doesn’t really hurt on road trips but it isn’t that comfy either. Probably my biggest complaint with the car. Contrast them to our Sportwagen and oohhh man…the VW is the road trip car.

      FWIW, I think the current generation Accord coupe seats are more supportive and comfortable than the sedan’s, which were pretty unremarkable but at least not rock hard anymore.

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        I’ve heard the 9th gen seats are leaps and bounds better. I’m tipping more towards an EX instead of an EXL because I’ve found that I don’t really mind not having leather. We’ll see.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    I wouldn’t be surprised if seat comfort seriously affects owner loyalty. I would not put too much stock in the rankings here, though, given the breadth in body size, type, and preferences among drivers. This shouldn’t be a guide as to what car to buy for comfortable seats, but rather a warning to pay close attention to seat comfort on your test drive.

    Camry seats are surprisingly good now, but I still find VW’s to be notably better. I expected the 4Runner’s seats to be uncomfortable given the high floor it shares with the Tacoma, but they were quite good. Toyota’s seats have sucked for a long time but they seem to have come around in the last several years.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Driving has changed, for the worse. Now drivers spend more time sitting… still. I think this is the same reason why buyers place such a higher priority now on audio/Bluetooth features – it’s all you’ve got to pass the time.

      That said, what drivers are really looking for now is lack of discomfort, of every kind. Of course, the discomfort of unreliability rules out VWs, no matter how the seats feel.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        True enough about creature comforts becoming priority when stop-and-go is your primary experience behind the wheel. But, the GTi and Lexus IS are proof to me that a good seat works for both rush hour and actual driving.

        I chose my VW carefully; the model and powertrain had four years of good reliability rankings on CR and I haven’t been disappointed over 6 years. So I’ve had excellent seats with convenience and running costs akin to Toyota ownership. So far anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          Wheatridger

          Those wonderful seats, plaid and all, are a big factor that brought me back into the GTI fold. Although I don’t often use more than half the car’s performance potential, those sturdy bolsters tell me “I’ve got your back” whenever I do. And they’re comfortable over long rides, though some might find them firm at first.

          The main reason I love my Mk V GTI’s seats? They allow a lower adjustment than the regular models. I sit tall in a car, thanks to my body type, so dropping the seat makes a positive difference in headroom and sight lines. With other cars, I feel like I’m in a booster seat.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Yeah, no.

        When I’m spending 8 or 12 hours on a road trip, I also want audio features, and comfort matters a lot.

        “Hooning around recreationally for a short time” is the one thing every car isn’t sold for.

        (Everyone always wanted reliability; that’s nothing new.

        It’s just that now you can *get it*.)

  • avatar
    JimZ

    I soured on my Mustang after realizing I couldn’t take sitting in the seat for 45 minutes.

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    Yay Porsche! However, there are so many seats available, especially since the Cayman, Boxster, 911 are mostly seat-compatible. I assume the non-adjustable 5-point harness bucket seats weren’t the ones tested.

    When shopping for my 2008 Cayman S, I tried the non-powered seats and couldn’t find the perfect position. I went with the powered base seats and they have been wonderful. Admittedly, my longest stint int he cars was only about 8 hours. Oh… and you can either push the seat towards the back _OR_ tilt the seat back down; there’s not enough room behind to have both adjustments simultaneously. Larger/taller people would probably be happier with the 911 configuration, where their is no engine in the way of making both adjustments simultaneously.

    Times have sure changed. When I was a kid we were glad to even have rear seats. Before that, you sat on the floor and had to stop every few miles for more hay! Also, misbehaving kids in the back would have to do time in “the hole” … the footwell of the front-right rider.

    • 0 avatar
      Nostrathomas

      I’ve driven cross-continent in my Cayman (5 days of 12+ hours of driving) and the seats were never an issue. Not quite Volvo Level of comfort, but still more than adequate. Pretty great for a sports car.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    If seat loyalty was what got folks back into the same brand Volvo would win hands down and Saab would still in business, say what you want about the swedes but they make great seats, I spend hours in my car at a time and the seat makes or breaks it, one of the reasons Volvo is on my list for my next car. Surprising my Jetta TDI wagon has good seats, no issues after 6 hours of driving.

    • 0 avatar
      Nostrathomas

      I know everyone knows them for safety, but the seats in a Volvo is what truly sets them apart from everyone else. By far the most comfortable seats I’ve ever sat in. My ranting about the seat quality has led to 2 other family members buying Volvos.

      • 0 avatar
        mattwc1

        I could not agree more. Volvos have always had phenomenal seats.

        • 0 avatar
          86er

          I wonder if the Volvo-derivation of the Flex has anything to do with the comfort of its seats, both back and front?

          • 0 avatar
            Wheatridger

            Ever the contrarian, I hated the seats in he last Volvo I sampled. Or, rather, the headrests. They were tipped forward more than any car’s I’ve tried. They forced me to mash my head against the headrest, as if braced for impact. When I straightened my back the way the way I wanted to sit, with head against the headrest, there was a three-inch space behind my back. And no adjustments were possible, of course.

            That was a V50, a car I really wanted to like as a rare Euro wagon alternative. Maybe the newer Volvos are different, but I doubt it. Bracing the head against the seat should improve rear-end crash test results, but it prevents normal head and neck motions that help absorb normal chassis movements on uneven roads.

            Headrests tipped too far forward are a trend that I noticed at the car show five years ago, but lately the rental cars I’ve had were no so bad on this score.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Bingo. The wife’s Volvo has the best seats I have ever experienced. Even more amazing is my wife is short and curvy and I’m tall and thin yet both “shapes” fit the seats perfectly. The Volvo has the only headrest’s that actually seemed to support your head/neck properly.

      My Dodge Dakota has the worst. They have no shape and stop half way up my back, the head rest is more like a shoulder rest. The bottoms are bench flat and too short. Now my Z is pretty comfy, but for “sport” seats I actually find them too wide and too soft. I sat in Ford’s new Focus RS Recaro’s and oh my… those things grab you and don’t let go, they are super firm too. I’d loved it, but I’m thin so anyone of more normal size is going to hate them I bet.

      • 0 avatar
        dreadnought

        Everybody’s different I guess. I think the seats themselves are great, but the headrests are a dealbreaker for me-they push my head too far forward. Very uncomfortable for me, and they’re fixed in place, there’s no adjustment at all-at least none in the S60.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      The seats are much of the reason I was a multiple serial Peugeot, Saab, and Volvo owner over the years. With Peugeot being in a class completely and totally by themselves. The Germans do OK, but I have yet to find an American or Japanese seat I can stand for more than an hour. The sofa soft couch seats most Americans think of as “luxurious” being the absolute worst offenders.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I did 4500 Interstate miles this summer in my ’13 Sonic, including a couple 12+ hour days. I was rather pleasantly surprised to experience zero back pain. Not enough to get me to buy another Sonic, but still…

  • avatar
    86er

    Speaking from the experience of my sister-in-law’s Patriot, what the seats in those vehicles seem to have that a lot of vehicles don’t is *padding*.

    (For what it’s worth, I didn’t find the rear seat nearly as comfortable as the front).

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Seat comfort is amazingly important if you ever drive your car on trips longer than 15 or 20 minutes. I can’t say I’ve ever noticed that Patriot seats are particularly comfortable, though.

    Good seats I’ve used in recent memory:
    – Volvo S60. So comfy
    – BMW 7-Series multicontour. So adjustable you’ll find a position
    – My old Pontiac G8. Nice shape, very supportive, all-day comfortable.
    – Rental Camrys. They just work for me somehow.
    – A rental Chevy Malibu. I was surprised, but they were fantastic.

    OK seats:
    – My current C-Max. They are supportive but kind of hard, and I think they’d make my butt sore on long trips. But it’s not a long-trip car.
    – Surprisingly, my LS460. The bottom cushions and the lumbar are great, and work fine on the longest trips, but the top part of the seat is a bit too narrow for my wide shoulders and can’t be adjusted.
    – Rental Altimas and Maximas. It’s a seat.
    – Rental Fusions. Like the C-Max, a bit too hard, and the headrests are too far forward.

    Really bad seats:
    – Rental (pre-2015) Mustangs. I don’t know how anyone can get comfortable with the limited travel, horrible headrest, and hard bottom cushion.
    – W-body Impalas. A combination of unsupportive cushions and terrible leather that slides you around.
    – Subarus. I’ve never driven one I found comfortable. Way too short and poorly shaped.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      I recall Kyrie swears by BMW’s optional “comfort seats,” but not their standard ones.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        The standard ones in the current 3-series are horrible. No lateral support and if you were ever curious about what sitting on a vinyl-coated HDPE resin barrel feels like, there’s your chance. I already went all frothy on this in a prior article so I’ll stop there.

      • 0 avatar

        The Standard BMW seat is like the standard BMW stereo. Once you compare them you are forced to pay the upgrade. If you are buying a badge and getting out of a ten year old Accord you won’t notice either. If you know and care the difference is glaring.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Depends on how you are shaped. I prefer the standard BMW seats to the sport seats (I own both). If you are narrower than I am, I could very much see how opinions would differ. The 4-way lumbar support is utterly mandatory for me for either, and is pretty much the only reason I ordered my ’11 328! with the Premium Pkg.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      My data points:

      Agree on the Volvo and Camry.

      The one Subaru I’ve spent any real time in is a 2016 3.6R, and it has excellent seats.

      But it’s also their top-end car, in terms of trim, as far as I can tell.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      Agree on BMWs having the worst seats. I had a 2003 3-series and couldn’t drive for more than 30 minutes without my butt going numb.

      The only other car I ever drove that did the same thing was a rental Focus, and that could have just been because so many big behinds had broken down the seat.

      Interestingly, I once read that the two places where auto manufacturers historically scrimp to save money were the seats and brakes.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    I will never buy another Toyota for myself because of their seats. From an early 90’s Celica, to a 2009 Camry SE – I just can’t get comfy. Must be me – because everyone says how comfortable Camry’s are – I just don’t see it. I looked at a used Avalon a few years ago, sat in it, and felt the same way. Not enough seat travel, and not enough thigh support.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Currently drive a 2016 Hyundai Genesis with the driver sear exrender. Its heaven

  • avatar
    never_follow

    Best seats I’ve experienced: URs4 sport seats with expandable bolsters. Supportive, comfortably padded, donut headrests, which make so much sense.

    Worst seats I’ve experienced: Bench seats on an F-750 straight truck. Shitty foam that didn’t support weight, so any pressure points were really pressure points.

    Narrowed down to CAR seats, I could not stand the rental grade Accent I had a couple of months ago. The seat seems designed for a very short person, as both the back and seat pan stop well short of where they should on my 6 foot frame. This lead to discomfort in just over an hour. The cheesy fabric really didn’t help at all either.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Seat comfort is my number 1 priority. I am dtiving a rental focus hatch and it is abysmal. It is like that on most cars now a days, ridiculously tiny seats…

    I will give the charger or 300 a shot when i go new car shopping, but if they are horrible small srats then i will be stuck with a truck or full size suv.

    Remember when regular cars had regular sized seats that would fit a regular adult male? I think that died out with the gm h body…

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      Sorry f9r my terrible typing. I am on mobile. I fail at touch screens due to my fat fingers.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “I am dtiving a rental focus hatch and it is abysmal.”

      Focus has absolutely the worst seats, forced knee-high positioning and most foot-restrictive pedal well I’ve ever endured. Five hours in one with a two month-old hip replacement was literally crippling.

  • avatar
    James2

    I would get a Mazda 3 if the driver’s seat wasn’t so uncomfortable. Would/can the dealer swap the driver’s seat from a Mazda 6? (I know, just get the 6, but I prefer the smaller car.)

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    My 13 Optima Hybrid’s seats seemed fine during the test drive, but they’re terrible for longer trips. The back seats are even worse.

    Maybe it’s my age (52) or my height (6’6″), but my Sedona is much more comfortable.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      6’6″ and driving a modern sedan?

      Do you keep a buzz-cut or always carry a comb?

      • 0 avatar
        dreadnought

        Maybe he’s all legs. Once I was at a meeting, and sat down next to a guy. I’m 6′ 2″, and he didn’t look any taller than me sitting down-once the meeting was over we were talking as we both got up- suddenly I’m looking way up at a guy who must have been close to 7 feet tall.

  • avatar

    Great seats…My VW Scirocco…My two Diesel Golf, My TDi. Pretty much all VW. If nothing else, it proves you can put a great seat in a cheap car….there isn’t an excuse.

    My SAAB (rip) 900T and 9-3. Volvo Turbo Sedan (80’s)

    Special and worthy of separate recognition -the BMW Sport seat. They use the same basic seat in everything from series 3 to 6, with slightly different cosmetics. The best seat ever for adjust-ability, but not too tight for touring. The current seat looks almost like the one in my 2003. I wonder why everyone just doesn’t steal this design. Extendable bolster at the seat bottom is my ideal of seat perfection.

    Hyundai Elantra….not bad-but the ergos show they copied the Germans.

    Worst ever-Chrysler…worst was a rental LeBaron, but the recent 200 rental was no better. Shame, too, as the rest of the car was OK for the class, but I gave the car back for rental and got a Sentra…and that seat was bad too.

    I agree that some cars are just designed to different size person. I like Subaru but could never fit in a WRX. Long legs tend to fit in euro designed cars, and less so in Pacific rim designs.

    A short seat puts the force on your lower back, and with enough time, the mis alignment hurts. Proper support of the mid and lower thighs is the cure.

    • 0 avatar
      chuckrs

      I miss my Saabs, 99 EMS and 9000CD. Actually, I miss the seats. The seats in the 99 were nicely upholstered chairs that just happened to be in a car, as opposed to car seats.
      My brother had bad back problems and in his first car, a Dodge Omni, he replaced the drivers seat with a Scheel(?) aftermarket seat. He had a $500 seat in a $5000 car. For him it was a worthwhile investment, but that was before seats became as integrated with the car as an ejection seat with an aircraft.

  • avatar
    zip94513

    I can’t disagree with this article as I like everything about my 2016 Ford Fusion but the seats. Around town they’re fine but on long trips they’re backbreaking, leg cramping, and neck straining. My 2003 4Runner has better seats.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    A big reason I sold my Subaru was the seats, good friend also got rid of his for that reason also, but different Subaru model. Never could get a comfortable position, I would dread driving it.

    I don’t know how you screw up seats, just copy the good ones, seems pretty easy.

    I had a Volvo with great seats, Lexus also does a great job and allows a lot of configuration options.

  • avatar
    Dan R

    The drivers split bench seat in my 1993 Ranger is pretty good.
    I have driven 750 miles in one day and was pretty comfortable.
    Not much worse than a Volvo 960.

  • avatar
    JustPassinThru

    The more things change, the more they stay the same.

    Once upon a time, cars had LOUSY seats. That was one thing that set the Beetle apart – not that the seats were so good but that they were actually designed to something approximating human form. Compare that to the “bucket” seats of the 1960s; which were inverted – huge rises in the center; zero lateral support; little thigh support.

    Things improved a little; and then Recaro and other aftermarket companies went mass-market. For a short time you could buy bolstered, orthopedic automotive seating in just about any modern car. One brand, I forget which, put a Recaro option on its factory build sheet.

    It was too good to last; and so it didn’t. Big Brother decreed that there needed to be all sorts of blow-up pillows positioned everywhere, INCLUDING the seat itself. Aftermarket seats from universal-fit bases wouldn’t do. Nor would easy removal of the seat itself.

    So we’re right back where we were…lousy car seats and no way out of them.

  • avatar
    theoldguard

    I like hard seats with a lot of lumbar support. German cars tend to give more of that than others. I did very much like the seats of current Buick Regal and recent Honda’s. They all had a lot of lumbar support, so much so that they get dinged in some reviews. Seats are a big part of my car making decision.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    For pure cushy sofa comfort, the old Buicks I’ve owned were great. The Roadmaster was great as was the Park Avenue.

    On the other hand, the ’01 Marquis with cloth seats I had made my thighs get numb. It was a great car for eating up highway miles, but a little extra padding or perhaps a longer seat would have helped.

    I’m driving a ’09 Mini Clubman now and I find the seats perfectly suitable, and with lots of leg room for my long legs.

    My previous car, a 2nd gen Scion xB, was okay during the test drive but I learned to hate sitting in that car. I could never get comfortable. It was okay for city driving but drove me bonkers after an hour on the highway. Not enough travel and it felt like sitting in a church pew.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Yes. The Roadmaster I have now has fantastic seats. Too comfortable, and so large that backing up is a chore.

      Your Marquis experience mirrors mine with the Vic I had. I didn’t experience any numbness, and the seats were still good for such an old tired car, but indeed the seat cushion length could’ve been longer, and could’ve been a bit softer.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    let’s see – looking at the cars my family has owned over the last decade or so…

    Great (also all current)
    S2000 – great seats, especially considering the only adjustments you get are recline and fore/aft.
    2010 Mazda3 – See S2000, plus a manual vertical adjustment
    2014 Santa Fe Limited – almost too many adjustments, but the 4-way lumbar is the best.

    Good
    04 RSX – almost as good as the S2000, but cheaper leather and not as soft. Held you in place better though. 2-way lumbar helps on long drives
    02 XTerra – surprisingly good considering how basic it was, but didn’t hold up over time

    OK
    96 A4 – decent adjustment range, but the twist lumbar was terrible, comfort on long drives was lacking, and it had no bolstering to speak of.
    96 Altima – basic seat. Not good, not bad. Also, rose colored glasses because it was my first car.

    The worst
    06 Altima – see my above comments on recent Nissan seats in the top thread. I would burn this car to the ground if my opinion of it was only based on seat comfort.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “The Jeep Compass and its boxier sibling will die early next year….”

    I wouldn’t bet on it, rumors of their demise have been greatly exaggerated, and wrong, more than once over the last six years, i.e., “We’re getting rid of the Compass and keeping the Patriot”; “No, we’re getting rid of the Patriot and keeping the Compass”; “No, we’re getting rid of both of them” and “Fuggetaboutit we’re keeping both of them for now”; who really knows.

    Observation on seats, I owned a Jeep Cherokee XJ for 25 years, the front seats were fantastic – they never lost their basic support or comfort. I also owned a 2003 Durango with the worse seats that I have ever encountered, I drove that blasted thing from Florida to California in 2014 and had to sit on two pillows the entire way but the seats were trash when the car was new. I have a ’12 Grand Cherokee too, the seats are neither good nor bad and I am indifferent to them (and to the car in general too).

    In every instance however, the seat comfort, or lack thereof, didn’t make me feel loyal or un-loyal towards the vehicle, brand or model. There are just too many other, what I would consider more significant characteristics, to consider.

  • avatar
    Frylock350

    I think the seats in most new vehicles are generally pretty good, though there are a few exceptions in both directions. For me as long as there’s a height adjustment, fore/aft tilt, and some way of reducing lumbar I’m happy. For most folks lumbar support alleviates back pain; for me it causes it.

    The Chevy Captiva seats are terrible. I could not get comfortable.

    The seats in my Silverado are fantastic. They’re a good combo of soft and supportive and I can and do drive for hours upon hours in them.

  • avatar
    Hemi

    Funny enough I have a 2016 Compass rental and surprisingly it is very comfy and nice. It’s very basic, but I would take it over a Crv/rav4 due to the cheap price.

    Some of the worst seats I’ve sat in is the 2013 C and E class. I sat in a 2017 E class and we’re slightly better. The Benz seats don’t do it for me.

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  • ToolGuy: Here’s some clarity from the top guy: “It’s like, you know, what we have with — and we’re making...
  • ToolGuy: @Matt, “So I’m bailing so I can have a four-car garage and a big yard.” Are you actually...
  • EBFlex: “ Yeah, that Taycan really sucks at about everything it tries to do. What a POS.” I mean….when a used...
  • EBFlex: Oh thank god. Now that this liberal mouth breather has fox all of NYCs problems, he can focus on the real...
  • namesakeone: Can you extend the life of the car by installing a replacement fuel cell?

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