By on September 14, 2016

2017 Mondeo ST-Line Front

As an automotive journalist, I’m bound by blood oath to promote the manual transmission and station wagon, preferably together. And I acknowledge that arguments made in support of three-pedals and D pillars are often more emotional than practical.

Not today.

There are no fewer than four sets of logical reasons Ford should reintroduce the midsize, mainstream wagon to American life (though probably with an automatic).

Forty years ago, 62 wagon nameplates existed in the U.S. market. They accounted for 10 percent of overall sales. By 2004 the wagon count had slumped to 26. According to JATO Research, there are presently eight wagons for American consumers to choose from. None are of the full-size mainstream variety, and the only midsize wagon is a crossover. They are compact (VW), premium (Audi, BMW, Mercedes, Volvo), or Subaru. The last product to carry the mainstream torch was the 2008 Dodge Magnum (Charger Wagon). The once common family conveyance is not even an endangered species; it survives only in pre-owned captivity.

Automakers are pragmatic bureaucracies that make decisions based on thorough analysis and long study. That does not guarantee good product decisions, but it does ensure heavy doses of risk avoidance. Combine their abhorrence for taking chances with anemic wagon sales, as well as the decline of the midsize sedan upon which the mainstream station wagon is traditionally based, and few product planners would have the fortitude to suggest their reintroduction.

Why should Ford consider a wagon now?

THE SWAMI

Automakers expend great effort and expense understanding the future of their market. Ford even employs a Futurist, Sheryl Connelly, to assist in improving Ford’s comprehension of long-term trends and how they may impact the Blue Oval.

In spite of these investments, the future is difficult to predict, and notoriously lengthy development cycles for automobiles compound the challenge. As a result, cars are often optimized to fight yesterday’s market battles rather than succeed in the competitive environment in which they are launched. Consider how the domestic manufacturers were caught with a dearth of fuel efficient cars in the 1970s and again in the 1980s. How long it took the European manufacturers to capitalize on the SUV opportunity. How excruciatingly long it took the Japanese OEMs to enter the full-size truck market.

Manufacturers plan tomorrow’s cars based on what consumers tell them they want today. But consumers don’t know what they will want in three, four, or five years. There are powerful externalities impacting consumer preference that do not operate on neat multi-year timelines. For example, fuel cost. The average cost of a gallon of gasoline is presently $2.20. But recent experience demonstrates that fuel prices can fluctuate decisively over a span of quarters or even months. Gas will not always be the inexpensive afterthought it is today. A return to $3.50 or more per gallon will impact buying decisions and the OEMs cannot adjust their product ranges as rapidly as fickle consumers can change their minds. The automakers who thrive over the long-term will be those that do not rely on a crystal ball, but rather those that hedge against a variety of alternative futures with a balanced product range.

SHOWING UP IS 80 PERCENT OF LIFE

Increasingly effective platform sharing and the application of new technologies, such as virtual reality, are being leveraged to shorten vehicle development cycles. But when it comes to market acceptance, there is no substitute for market participation. Creating and maintaining a balanced product mix is the best inoculation against shifting consumer taste.

Consider the case of GM’s two decade dominance in full-size SUVs. We take for granted that GM’s Tahoe/Suburban/Yukon will outsell Ford’s Expedition/Expedition EL at a clip of at least three to one. Yet if one sets aside subjective biases, there are no compelling product or brand-based justifications for GM’s superior segment performance. GM does not sell more full-size trucks than Ford and, as a brand, Chevrolet welcomes fewer customers to its lots than Ford. How did GM come to dominate the segment so comprehensively?

By showing up.

After posting second-place finishes to the Bronco through much of the 1980s, Chevrolet replaced the Blazer with the Tahoe in 1992. The Bronco soldiered on until its replacement by the four-door Expedition four years later. Although GM’s full-size SUVs have not been sales stars every year, the company has supported them and consistently delivered the best sales performance in the segment. What about Sequoia and Armada? They arrived in 2001 and 2004, respectively, leaving Toyota and Nissan to fight over the last eight percent of the full-size market, and lending further support to the value of being a first mover.

What are the mechanics that make being first to market so valuable? In a word, loyalty.

A simple rule of thumb is that half of consumers will be loyal with their next vehicle purchase. The other half will seek a new nameplate. Being first means an OEM has a strong chance at retaining half its customers when their ownership cycles, and thus only needs to conquest half of sales from other nameplates and manufacturers. Conversely, automakers introducing a new nameplate into an existing segment must earn essentially 100 percent of their customers through conquest. Yes, this is an oversimplification, but it underlines the value of being first and can justify the increased investment and patience associated with developing a new market niche.

GM dominates the full-size SUV segment today largely because they were the first ones there. Ford could earn a similar advantage by simply showing up with a station wagon when nobody else will.

2017 Mondeo ST-Line Side

CHARLIE DELTA FOUR

Ford does not need to develop a new Fusion-based wagon. It already exists as the Fusion CD4 platform mate, Mondeo. And a sleek, well-proportioned estate it is. The Mondeo wagon is produced in one of Ford’s largest, most flexible, state-of-the-art production facilities in the world. And the Valencia, Spain, plant has capacity to spare after its recent $2.6 billion expansion to accommodate the production of up to 450,000 cars per year. Moreover, Ford already exports another Spanish built, low-volume car to the U.S.: the Transit Connect Wagon.

The expense associated with introducing a Fusion Wagon to the U.S. would thus be limited compared to a clean sheet design. Some engineering adjustments would likely be necessary to meet U.S. safety regulations, though Fusion has already earned the NHTSA’s sought after five-star overall safety rating. Aside from the partial homologation required to bring the car to market, Ford would need to provide some marketing support.

As long as the Mondeo and Fusion are badge-engineered cars and the Mondeo estate exists to satisfy existing demand in other markets, Ford can introduce a Fusion wagon on less than 18 months’ notice. However, waiting for the market to demonstrate demand puts Dearborn behind the curve of consumer awareness. Leveraging the company’s global assets to nurture the wagon niche in North America would build consumer awareness over the long-term while delivering incremental sales in the near-term. Maintaining a wagon would be a relatively low-cost, low-risk project with limited downside, but the potential for future segment dominance.

FILLING THE WHITE SPACE

Introducing a Fusion Wagon is hardly a wacky idea. The Germans are extending their product ranges through myriad variations of the back third of their cars and SUVs. They are finding white space where no one knew it existed and proving that American consumers are open to a variety of form factors. Ford need not go as far as BMW or Audi in their creativity, but there is a clear space between the ultra-competitive midsize sedan segment and compact to midsize crossovers. The fact no automaker is there does not prove there is no demand. It simply demonstrates that no competitor is willing to make a commitment to the market. And if you’re a full-line global automaker like Ford, one of the most logical white spaces to color in is where the competition is absent.

What’s more, when will consumers begin to get frustrated with their need to move down a class to acquire a crossover at the same price point as the sedan they can afford? A fully equipped, front-wheel-drive Fusion Titanium with a 2.0-liter Ecoboost carries an MSRP of $35,000, the same price as a similarly equipped Escape. However, the crossover equivalent of the Fusion in the Ford product range is not the Escape; it’s the Edge, which tops $40,000 in corresponding trim. If I’m a Fusion driver, I don’t feel at home in an Escape — I want an Edge. If there were a Fusion Wagon, I would have an additional class equivalent option in my budget.

How many consumers would select a Fusion Wagon? As discussed above, the nearest comparable product, the 2004-2007 Dodge Magnum, averaged 44,000 units annually. But given today’s market dynamics and the fundamental differences between these cars, 44,0000 units does not seem attainable. Instead, the bottom end of Ford’s sales projection for its other segment exclusive Fusion, the Fusion Sport, can be used as a surrogate to forecast wagon sales volume. Ford is projecting 5 to 10 percent of Fusion sales will be Sports. At 5 percent of overall Fusion sales, Ford may therefore anticipate selling 15,000 wagons, which is likely right around the volume threshold necessary to justify the car on a purely financial basis. However, when the near-term opportunity is combined with the low-cost, low-risk nature of the exercise and its potential long-term market building advantages, the Fusion Wagon represents a compelling opportunity.

2017 Mondeo ST-Line Rear

The business case for reintroducing the mainstream station wagon does not rest on how fun a Sport or ST Fusion wagon might be, though that does sound entertaining. Nor is this a prediction that the wagon will rise to supplant the crossover. Rather the argument in favor of the Fusion-based wagon is about the fragmentation of the automotive marketplace, the unknowable future, and how well positioned Ford is to benefit and even extend its leadership with limited downside risk and significant upside sales potential.

So, how about a 2018 Fusion Wagon Ford — perhaps with that slick six-speed manual your European customers enjoy?

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224 Comments on “A Ford Fusion Wagon Could Be a Winner, and Here’s Why...”


  • avatar

    Sweet lord, that’s gorgeous.

  • avatar
    threeer

    …and it would sell all of three of them. I love the idea of a manual wagon (having just spent the week running around Croatia in a manual trans Skoda Octavia) and would consider this in a few years as a replacement for my 2014 Escape. But I’m just one person. I don’t see the business case here in the US for wagons, period. Ford already has a stable full of CUVs/SUVs, so there isn’t even a need to consider jacking this up to make it look *kind of* like a crossover. While a Ford Fusion wagon certainly looks very tempting (to me, anyway), I just don’t see anybody at Ford seriously contemplating such a move.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      Vw and subaru are making money in the segment and they’re the only players. Neither has anything like the messaging reach of ford in this market. Neither of their cars is as attractive as the mondeo fusion twins.

      I would shop the hell out of this car. Seriously, offer any engine with a stick, especially above base trim, and I’d probably end up owning one.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I’m sure they’re ecstatic about your requirement of premium trim, manual, and the “probably” at the end. On the phone right now to the factory!

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Volvo, BMW, and Mercedes all technically “play” in the segment.

        They just don’t move any volume, absolutely.

        Arguably all of Subaru’s vehicles are “CUVs”, by the same logic that my XC70 is – it’s higher!

        (I’d seriously consider a Fusion Wagon with the 2.7 – as I already have an XC70, I both have money-where-my-mouth-is on a wagon platform*, and don’t need another that has even vague forest road capability**.

        * Even though it’s tall it’s obviously “a wagon”, since it’s just a V70 with lift and cladding.

        ** Mushroom collecting and hiking and the like mean my XC70 leaves pavement more than most cars do, and forest roads can be awkward enough that “CUV” clearance is actually a big deal.)

        • 0 avatar
          Ihateusernames

          I am in the same boat, although I am in the ski industry rather than the mushroom biz. I had a series of subaru legacy wagaons, followed by an Audi Alload (6mt ftw!) So my money is money they would be after as well.

          The counterargument is by the time I option up my fusion wagon to where I want it, I don’t think I would be very far away from a V60xc (closer in size to the fusion) as far as price is concerned.

          Probably more of a spread to the new V90XC or whatever is comming out.

          Oddly I tried to replace my 2011 XC70 T6 this year but the new one had way less power, was less smooth, and was festooned with crap that I didn’t care about.

          • 0 avatar
            sfvarholy

            There are some of us where cargo space and lift height all paramount and a wagon fits the bill perfectly whereas a CUV does not.

            Most the the CUV’s and crossovers have very little cargo space behind the rear seats. And you have to lift everything to waist height to put it in the cargo area.

            I have a V70 2.5T that fits my needs perfectly. It has an unbelievable amount of cargo area behind the rear seats. If you fold down the rear seats two people can sleep back there. More importantly, two greyhounds and a whippet can easily get into the back without assistance and lay down with no endless “he’s touching me” bickering on road trips.

    • 0 avatar
      namesakeone

      Unfortunately, you’re probably right. America had a midsized, V6-powered wagon available with a manual transaxle about a decade ago (it was even Ford-sourced!) with the first-gen Mazda 6. After two years, the wagon was discontinued because of poor sales. Those manual wagons are now a semi-hot commodity on the used market, but that hardly counts as an incentive to build a new one.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        you should see the prices a good-condition C170 Focus wagon will go for.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          Nine grand at my local dealer, right now, on special. Nifty little unicorns, they are. It’d go for even more if it had the Mazda 2.3 engine instead of the Ford 2.0.

          An equivalently spec’d Focus sedan from that year, with plastic wheel covers on steelies, would sell for approximately … uh … Donate your car to your local NPR station and get a tax break! We’ll tow it away!

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Nice but, I’ll believe it when I see it on Ford’s “Build Your Own”.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    This idea is just utter nonsense. Here’s why.

    1) The Mondeo wagon isn’t a good wagon, it has poor space efficiency. The multiple Ford CUV options are better at being wagons, and are available in FWD or AWD like the Mondeo.

    2) Bringing over a model to the US requires federalization, which isn’t a negligible amount of effort and expense for something which -will- be niche because of body format and price reasons.

    3) Subtracting from the cash cow CUV offerings of Ford (even for a few sales) is a bad thing. Want a wagon? We’ve got the Flex. Want a CUV? Covered there. Want something utilitarian? Get a Transit.

    4) At the end of the day, importing a unique European knife to stab yourself in the hand isn’t a bright idea.

    • 0 avatar
      redliner

      How hard would it be to federalize? We aren’t talking about a vehicle that doesn’t exist in the US market. From the b-pillar forward this is just like any other Fusion. The crash structures and lighting and emissions certifications are the most expensive and complicated parts of the vehicle to federalize …engineering that has already been done for the Fusion sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I just know there’s always some BS around it. Otherwise, we’d have more car selection.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        it’s not that it’s “hard,” it’s the potential sales don’t justify the investment. The mainstream automakers know pretty well that Internet Car People are a bunch of bulls**tters who don’t actually buy what they claim they will.

        • 0 avatar
          Tosh

          LIES! Don’t you dare lump me in with the rest of those bullshiners…

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          Some of us do. Of my last nine cars, four have been wagons, three of those were Fords.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Funny, I’ve bought two manual transmission proper station wagons ($90K+ at MSRP) in the past 8 years, and would buy another one tomorrow for $55K+ if BMW would sell me one.

          Given the frankly ridiculous resale value of the one I still have, I am not alone. It’s not a huge market, but neither is the market for the 3GT or X6M…

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            two cars in 8 years in a market which sells an average of 15 million a year is nothing.

            you LITERALLY don’t matter. not one damn bit.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            If he can’t make grand claims about purchases and money, he’s got nothing left! Shh.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Well Corey, how many NEW cars have you bought, ever? Because until you are a regular new car buyer, your opinion counts even less than mine does.

            I at least put my money where my mouth is when it comes to my preferences in cars.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m fine with you putting your money where your mouth is, I just don’t need to hear it twice a week. You’ve really become quite the braggart lately.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Few of us can roll 2/3rds Old GM and all. Wait…

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            First it was “you won’t buy a new one anyway”.

            Now it is “you won’t buy enough new ones to matter”.

            Anyway who cares if some people on the internet complain that Ford or whoever doesn’t build the exact T-top, diesel-hybrid, manual transmission metallic brown wagon they want? It’s just a way to sh*tpost and waste time while the pizza rolls are in the oven.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Because until you are a regular new car buyer, your opinion counts even less than mine does.”

            Neither of your opinions really matter to the overlords of planned obsolescence.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            since we’re comparing dick sizes, I’ve bought 5 new cars since 2000.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            As have I. Have you put your money where your mouth is and bought what was important to YOU, even if that was not necessarily a mainstream choice? Or have you settled, because that is easy?

            In my case, two hatchbacks, two station wagons, and a high performance coupe, all with manual transmissions. So you can spout off all you want about how people say they will do one thing then do another, but I at least do what I say I will do.

            I’m at a stage in life where I am equally comfortable buying a $50K+ new car or a $5-10K project. If the automakers won’t sell me what I want new, I am *perfectly* happy to just say f’em and buy used. Or keep what I have until the cows come home. But I won’t compromise when spending real money.

      • 0 avatar
        smartascii

        IIRC, the breakeven cost for developing the CTS-V wagon was 6 units. So clearly, it doesn’t cost all that much. I think Corey’s thoughts about driving even a few customers away from higher-margin C/SUVs is the problem here.

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      “4) At the end of the day, importing a unique European knife to stab yourself in the hand isn’t a bright idea.”

      I LOL’d.

      I must say I just don’t get the enthusiast-wagon love affair. The only ‘wagon’ I’ve liked was the Forester, and that was more because of its absolutely single-minded practicality and execution than because it stirred any emotion in me. But people seem to genuinely be physically attracted to the wagon shape, and to me it’s like finding out that a bunch of normal guys are also totally attracted to women who have an extra butt on the small of their back. I just don’t get it. Can anyone explain this?

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Mostly because it’s not mainstream. If wagons were the norm, everyone here would be singing the praises of CUVs.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Drzhivago138 got it, 100%.

          I’ve never cared much for wagons, and the ones I do tend to like are impractical two doors. If Ford offered a Fusion wagon, I’d buy the Edge over it. And I’m not much of a crossover fan, either, but I’d probably take one over a wagon.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          I can’t speak for “enthusiasts” as such, but I like them because they’re useful *and* often aesthetic.

          (I mean, coupes aren’t super common anymore, and I *hate* them.

          I’m ambivalent at best about shooting brakes, for the most part.)

          People seem to genuinely like hatchbacks, and what’s a hatchback but a short wagon?

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        it’s just car snobs whining about something they can’t have simply because they can’t have it. Grass is greener, forbidden fruit, etc.

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          Yes, it has nothing to do with the superior space utilization. I can fit more cargo into my E class wagon then most crossovers. The whole time it doesn’t need 20 inch wheels and plastic fender arches. I would consider the Fusion wagon, but it would have to be a good wagon with a proper cargo capacity. This is where the CTS wagon was a let down. The tailgate opening was small, and the D pillars intruded into the cabin too much. As did the sloping roof line.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Exactly. I don’t understand the fascination with the sedan, ESPECIALLY in this era where aero and style compromise the functionality to such a huge extent. Super sloping back doors that make getting in and out of the back literally painful, and a trunk opening of letterbox lid size. Nope, not interested in the slightest. Either give me a useful wagon, or give me a useless but pretty coupe.

            My 3-series isn’t the best load lugger every by a long shot, but it has it all over a 3-series sedan. Jacking a wagon into the sky and calling it a CUV simply ruins the ride and handling for no useful purpose to me.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        It’s the “car guys love rarity” thing. They want to drive down the road, and -think- the following situation happens every day:

        “Heueheue cars driving the other way will think I have a regular Fusion, but when I pass them they’ll go OMGZ FUSION WAGON RARE WTFBBQ! Heueueuee, and it’s brown.”

        Having something unusual is the epitome of desire. Even if nobody but one person notices per year, it makes it worth the effort to them. It’s why rare JDM imports are exciting, and why Obscure Cars For Sale exists on Facebook.

        It’s the ultimate car guy form of what normal people do when they display prestige by purchasing the overpriced GMC which says Denali on it.

        Most of these guys don’t have the money or inclination to actually purchase such a car, but pretending and doing “If I didn’t…” statements is exciting.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          I love obscure cars, but it has little to do what I want people to think of me. I like something different, but its my own personal feelings that are the cause, not because I want to attract attention.

          I highly doubt that if I bought an early M45 and put Nissan Gloria badges one it that anyone would notice, except me, and that’s all that counts. I put alloys on my Taurus not because I thought it would make others jealous/curious/happy, but because it makes me happy.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You’re not describing the same thing I was referring to though. You’re talking badge and wheel swaps. I’m talking actual different cars.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            Yes, I realize that the second paragraph contains examples of badge and wheel swaps, but aside from your nitpicking, the same point still applies: being different and how not everyone chooses something different for the “look at ME” aspect.
            Clearly I was talking about obscure cars as well, only using the badge and wheels as a small example of being different.

            I’m sure some do want the attention, like those who buy “coupe” crossovers from zeee Germans. But, I’d drive a JDM car or another unique car if *I* like it. Screw everyone else lol.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You’re right. Leagues of people would buy the Fusion Wagon here because they’d love it. I’m glad we get to interact here, and you can prove how right you are about all things Ford all the time.

        • 0 avatar
          1998redwagon

          not quite. i find that i do have use for a larger floorplan, i appreciate the access that only a rear hatch can provide, it is cheaper to purchase than a cuv/suv and gets better mileage than cuv/suv examples of similar size. i like the lower ride height for driving and for accessing the roof rack because i have one on throughout the winter (skis etc). i prefer the lowered aesthetics. in 2013 i searched for a replacement to my 98 passat wagon but had no luck and instead purchased a sedan. why? because i still enjoy driving a stick. am i an oddball? you betcha. do i know what i want and why? yes, i do. would i purchase a mondeo wagon? when the flex gets passed to my younger son in a years time we will be looking for another vehicle. if it was here then it would get a good, hard look.

        • 0 avatar
          never_follow

          I love me some rare cars, and have owned two. The fun in it isn’t in having other car guys look at you, it’s the fun of hunting for parts and meeting cool (or not… but very nice!) people who are passionate about them.

          Having random people come up and talk to you about your car is sometimes fun, sometimes annoying. I’m generally a reserved person, so am not much of a fan, but it can come with the territory.

          At the end of the day though, as long as you enjoy what you drive, that’s what matters. I’ve been stuck in a German car rut, and while I love them, I’m now on the west coast, where I can get and insure JDM stuff for far cheaper – so I’m thinking of getting a Beat, Copen, or even a Crown, just as something different that I haven’t done before.

      • 0 avatar
        Tosh

        Mmmm, extra butt…

      • 0 avatar
        ThirdOwner

        Wagons’ practicality is #1 reason for me. I just don’t see why would I take a big chunk of perfectly usable cargo space in the back and just cut it out for no good reason.

        I can fit things through that large rear hatch port that even full sized sedans wouldn’t be able to take. I have carried a big stack of 2×4 boards in my E300 Benz, loaded diagonally from the front passenger footrest and sticking out the rear left passenger window. That didn’t feel natural to me.

        I also happen to simply like the clean outline of the wagons compared to the traditional 3 brick shape, and especially vs the jelly-bean shape of modern 4-door sedans.

        Their only upside to me is the ability to separate some smelly cargo from the passenger air space.

        I’m ok with coupes, convertibles, luxury and classic 4-door sedans as they have their specific applications. Everyday sedans and shooting brakes are pointless concepts to me.

      • 0 avatar
        torqueSteer

        My love affair with wagons/hatches started in College when looking for a replacement for my ’97 Cavalier that quit on me for the last time. Stumbled upon an ’03 Mazda Protege 5 (more wagon shaped than hatch) and bought it as the replacement. That car taught me how fun and practical a wagon could be! Co-workers poked fun at the family wagon but who cares what they think. This was back when there was no widespread internet love for the long roof. Compared to an SUV or truck, it retained the driving dynamics and comfort of a car with the space of an SUV. Ten years later I’ve never been without some sort of hatchback. I’m sure once my wife and I start a family we’ll upgrade to a minivan.

      • 0 avatar
        smartascii

        Speaking only for myself, a wagon carries the cargo of an SUV (and sometimes more) but handles like a car. They can be attractive or ugly, just like any other configuration, but unless I needed the AWD or ground clearance on a regular basis, I’d choose the wagon. But that’s me and three other people, which is why even if Ford decided to bring us a Fusion wagon, no dealers would order them, and the whole thing would be a giant flop.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          nobody cares about handling.

          • 0 avatar
            DevilsRotary86

            That is simply untrue. “Most people don’t care about handling” or “The average driver doesn’t care about handling”; those statements are true. But there are buyers who care about handling. I am one of them. And I believe it is for a number of users on this site. It’s not the sole criterion of my purchase but it’s a major one.

            I admit that we are a small minority of buyers but the wondrous thing about the US car market is it does an amazing job of providing something for every possible niche provided that you are willing to pay the price. And that price is often modest. Want a sharp handling car? Here is the GTI, Mustang, Camaro, BMW 2 series, and more. You say you hate CUV’s and want a wagon? Well then VW, Mercedes-Benz, and Volvo are happy to take your money.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The thing that makes the Forester more utilitarian than a low-roof wagon is the tall roof and rear opening. That makes it the descendant of the tall wagons with AWD the Japanese put out in the late ’80s and into the ’90s, to be replaced by the RAV/CRV for more money. A sleek wagon makes no more sense than a four-door coupe replacing a sedan with a usable rear seat with easy access and normal headroom.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      Re: #2, IIRC Mazda ≤200 wagons/month a decade ago, didn’t bring any other generations over.

      I put together a list of dead station wagons, but suffice to say that the only affordable one is the VW, and sales of 7,544 YTD, about 1/3 of prior sales with TDI, shows you how small the wagon market stateside is.

      How to do it: Kia Soul, 95,938.

  • avatar
    redliner

    Mmmm, delicious wagon juice! Put me down for a plug-in model.

  • avatar
    shedkept

    I would own that in a minute. Wagons are great haulers and an AWD version would be perfect.

    Bring it.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      So, an Edge? It’s a Fusion wagon with more vertical cargo space.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        Pretty much.

      • 0 avatar
        Nostrathomas

        Just like some people refuse to drive a minivan, there are those (and I count myself among them) that refuse to drive a CUV, even if its just a lifted wagon.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          That’s fine, as long as you don’t get mad that automakers don’t wanna cater to a minority of buyers.

          • 0 avatar
            Nostrathomas

            I don’t get mad, I just think it’s a missed opportunity.

            I’m also still confused why people want a wagon thats heavier, more expensive, and has sub-par driving dynamics.

            But I’ve long understood I’m in the minority!

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            “Driving dynamics” is a useless term for the average car buyer, as is anything dealing with weight. The average buyer wants a vehicle with an upright seating position and ground clearance.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            What “opportunity?” To federalize it they’d still have to re-run all of the NHTSA and EPA testing. It’d cost easy seven figures to federalize the wagon, and for what? So a handful of them can chew up dealer floorplan, all to satisfy some people on the internet who said they “would buy one” but actually won’t?

          • 0 avatar
            duffman13

            @ Nostrathomas

            We already saw CUVs outsell mid-sizers this month, or maybe it was last month. Most people don’t care about them being “heavier, more expensive, and has sub-par driving dynamics.” They see ease of ingress/egress, visibility, and perceived safety to be much more important purchasing factors.

            Also while they’re not exactly cousins, most compact CUVs offer similar passenger space (leg/headroom) to their midsize sedan brethren. The MPG penalty for going CUV is largely irrelevant now too. Given that and the fact that compact CUVs and midsize sedans are priced near-parity, it makes logical sense that people are making the move to CUVs.

            It’s not like jetta/golf wagons were flying off the shelf before the diesel scandal hit, and I haven’t seen a whole lot of Subaru Wagons around since the mid-2000s either. I think the outback is the only vehicle that can properly be classified as one? The Venza and Accord Crosstour got cancelled for a reason – they didn’t sell well enough.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            If I own stock in an automaker, I get mad that they’re leaving money on the table by not offering a vehicle for every purse and purpose, as Alfred P. Sloan put it. That strategy was because GM wasn’t in the carmaking business, it was in the money making business, as Sloan also said. The stock of automakers who can’t/won’t offer a full line to make the most money are poor investments. A perfect example is Fiat-Chrysler, which doesn’t have the small cars needed to avoid massive losses during an economic downturn. The only vehicles you don’t build are the ones you can’t build cheaply enough to price to sell at a profit.

        • 0 avatar
          wumpus

          But many, many people don’t want a wagon either (enough to kill hatchbacks in the crossfire). Apparently even more than don’t want a minivan.

          Also a wagon is basically a tube. Lousy for body roll and lousy for side impact protection. Expect a ton of “excess” mass for what could easily be accomplished by some sort of braces in the back (note that fold-down seats imply the engineers have found a way around this, but I’m sure that at least some of the bits that separate the passengers and trunk do wonders for the structure).

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            “Also a wagon is basically a tube. Lousy for body roll and lousy for side impact protection. ”

            Compared to … an SUV, CUV, or Van that is also “basically a tube”, just raised up a bit and maybe taller?

            (Arguably, being taller they’re “more tubular”, a not-tall wagon being more oval than circular in cross-section along the long axis.)

            I think you may seriously be overestimating the trunk barrier’s contributions – remember that so many sedans now already have a pass-through opening, eh?

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        The problem, as mentioned above, is that you are paying a huge price premium for the lift kit and 20 inch wheels. This is something most wagon buyers don’t want.

  • avatar
    Nostrathomas

    I’ve been calling for an affordable full/mid-size wagons for ages now. Right now there is nothing out there for us who want a family-sized wagon, but dont have 50K+ to spend. As nice as the E-Class, upcoming C-Class, and V90 are, it’s just too expensive for someone like myself. And unfortunately the smaller wagons (Golf, V60 etc) are just not big enough. Subaru used to be a player, until it SUV’d their whole lineup.

    Passat wagon, Accord wagon, Mazda 6 wagon, Camry wagon, Fusion Wagon….please somebody, step up to the plate. I have (reasonable) money to spend!

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      None of those things you just listed are “full size.”

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        The Fusion is pretty close to full size.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I have a hard time with that one. It’s large-ish, but still I think something like the Impala or Avalon qualifies as full size, while the Fusion doesn’t quite make it there.

      • 0 avatar
        Nostrathomas

        Put them under whatever classification you like, but the wagon derived versions of these sedans would be a perfect size for a lot of families out there. Right now, the smaller options out there are more suited towards “active lifestyle” 20-somethings than people with growing families.

        I’ve been looking to upgrade our V50 for a year now. Right now the best option is a used XC70.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I fully support the XC70.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            So do I.

            Though note that the Outback is – dimensionally – basically the same car, and available in comparable power levels and trim qualities.

            (I was cross-shopping them pretty heavily before I got the XC70.

            Mostly because of the seats and the T6’s advantages – not huge, but totally real – over the 3.6L flat 6.

            But if I hadn’t found a half-year-old XC70 T6 at a nice discount I would have been very happy with an Outback 3.6R …)

    • 0 avatar
      Tosh

      Accord wagon? Acura sold one until a couple of years ago, so the joke’s on you for not getting one then.

      • 0 avatar
        Nostrathomas

        Not in Canada. Which is surprising since we have way more of a market here for wagons. You see Golf Sportwagons and V50/Xc70s and A4s all over the place.

        I already put my money where my mouth is a bought a wagon. I just need a bigger one now.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          There is no world in which an A4 wagon is “full size”.

          Arguably it’s barely “mid size”.

          (I say this as someone who test drove an Allroad, which is basically an A4 wagon but taller.

          Loved it.

          Too small for me – and too small for someone who thinks a V50 is too small.)

    • 0 avatar
      dash riprock

      Isn’t the Regal(insignia) wagon coming over. Think it was announced to the Buick dealers in the winter.

      Go over to Europe annually and they are really good looking wagons

      • 0 avatar
        Johnster

        Yeah, and in Europe the Insignia (Regal) is sold marketed as a direct competitor to the Mondeo (Fusion), although it appears to be a bit smaller and to have less rear seat room.

    • 0 avatar
      S1L1SC

      Transit Connect – at least that was my solution. Placed a deposit two weeks ago and ordered to my specs.

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    We have a Fusion wagon and it is called Edge.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      I’m curious about this concept, Adam. In my mind, the Escape occupies the Fusion wagon space in the market. I know it is built on a size-down platform, but it runs the Fusion’s powertrains, has Fusion-like rear seat room, costs something similar to Fusion money, and sells in numbers closer to the Fusion. I’d make the same argument about RAV4, CR-V, Equinox, etc. What does your experience say about how most consumers and product planners view it?

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        Compact CUVs are sort of replacements for both compact and mid-sized sedans/hatchbacks. Consumers definitely view compact CUVs and mid-sized sedans as vehicles with similar purposes.

        Consumers view the Edge and Murano as a step up from mid-sized sedans. Instead of us getting a Fusion wagon, I can see Ford discontinuing the Fusion/Mondeo wagon altogether. Ford has started selling the Edge in Europe, and I’d bet that it sells more units for more money than the Mondeo wagon.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Got it, thanks.

          This drooling over midsize wagons has been nonsense for years, but dang it if it wouldn’t be nice to see some of these out on the road. Good looking car.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            I like the look of the Fusion wagon as well. To be honest, I’d settle for a Fusion liftback/hatchback. It makes the truck so much more usable.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I think we may see a return to the liftback soon. Tesla, Audi, and now the Civic – the feature is trickling down and gaining modern approval.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I’m still surprised all the midsize sedans with super-fastback rear windows and mail-slot trunklids haven’t just bit the bullet and gone to liftbacks. Do buyers have bad memories of the Malibu Maxx or something?

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            I agree, Adam, I’d buy a five door Fusion over a Fusion wagon any day.

            I also liked the Malibu Maxx.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            what’ll really bake your noodle is that there actually exists a Mondeo liftback in Europe.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            JimZ-

            There sure is. I haven’t seen one in person, but I’ve read and watched some reviews. I really like the concept and wish that was an available body style here.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        I’m in 100% agreement. We have friends with a CR-V, and my mom has a Hyundai Tuscon. In my mind there’s no argument for a vehicle between these and the 3-row super-CUVs (looking at you, Santa Fe Sport). The Compact CUVs are super space efficient, have very acceptable back seats even for fitting rear-facing child seats, and have at least as much trunk space as the equivalent mid-sizer when you consider the vertical component.

        I prefer the back seat of my Mom’s Tuscon to the Altima she had before it without hesitation. The only reason to go with a big 2-row would be for something like a GC (is there anything else in that class?) and only for actual capability for both towing and off-road.

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          Agree, duffman13. I’m a big fan of the “sit behind myself” test at auto shows, and in that regard I find even something with as small a footprint as the Buick Encore to be superior to most (all?) of the compact and midsize sedans on the market. When driving, I prefer a lower center of gravity, so I’d love a sedan packaged more along the lines of a Neue Klasse or a Fiat 124. But that ain’t happening in today’s market, unfortunately.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      You know what’s even better than a Fusion Wagon – a Crown Victoria Wagon, which is essentially what the Edge really is.

      WE ARE SO UNGRATEFUL

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    “Chevrolet replaced the Blazer with the four-door Tahoe in 1992.”

    Minor nitpick: The Tahoe wasn’t offered as a four-door version untl 1995, and the two-door continued through 1999.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “There are no fewer than four sets of logical reasons Ford should reintroduce the midsize, mainstream wagon to American life (though probably with an automatic).”

    and you yourself posted the biggest reason they shouldn’t:

    “Forty years ago, 62 wagon nameplates existed in the U.S. market. They accounted for 10 percent of overall sales. By 2004 the wagon count had slumped to 26. According to JATO Research, there are presently eight wagons for American consumers to choose from.”

  • avatar
    Jason

    If it’s AWD, I’ll go prep my financing.

  • avatar
    xflowgolf

    You keep comparing this to the Magnum, but is that really a competitor? The Chrysler was a V8 (optional) RWD based vehicle. I understand dimensionally it may be similar, but it would seem a more likely cross-shop would be a FWD based wagon that already exists…

    i.e. would not a Fusion be more in line with a Jetta? The Fusion has a good bit of length on the Jetta, and would be an interesting cross-shop proposal.

    They could even go the way of the early Outback, or the new Jetta (Golf) AllTrak and do a slightly lifted Fusion wagon to play the in between space between wagon and crossover.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The Magnum is only used for comparison because (at least, I think) it was the last “American” wagon. Also like the Magnum, the Mondeo wagon’s sloping rear roofline would prove to be its undoing were it released here.

      I dunno if there’d be room for a lifted Fusion wagon underneath (heh) the Edge. The Honda Accord Crosstour kinda filled that niche.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        was the Freestyle/Taurus X “jacked up” enough to be considered a CUV? ‘cos to my eyes it was pretty much a wagon. and it tanked too.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Nope, the Freestyle wasn’t. Same as the Venza.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          I actually call the Freestyle a CUV not because of its exterior ride height, but the interior–the third row was stadium seating, slightly higher than the first two. That puts it in the same category as three-row SUVs (mostly thinking of the TrailBlazer EXT and Envoy XL) in my book, and since the Freestyle/Taurus X was FWD/AWD unibody, that makes it a CUV. I understand if others see it differently.

          The Venza I see as a wagon, because I sat in one and the ceiling was too low in the back compared to the CUVs I was used to.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “A Ford Fusion Wagon Could Be a Winner…”

    But it won’t be because it isn’t tall enough.

  • avatar
    brettc

    With the Passat wagon not existing in North America, I’d seriously consider one of these and maybe even buy one. I’m looking for a replacement to my 2012 Sportwagen and am pretty sure I’ll get a C-Max is it’s the closest thing that has a somewhat similar size and similar fuel economy. The wagons on stilts (Escape, Edge) don’t do anything for me.

    The other affordable wagon option is really only from VW in the form of the current generation Sportwagen. I’m not buying another non-VW European branded wagon, and I won’t touch a Subaru with a 50 foot pole.

    Going to Ford’s UK site makes me sad. You can even buy a Focus ST wagon over there if you want. No such luck here due to people’s love of all things CUV.

    Anyway, bring us the Mondeo Estate, Ford. Can’t sell any worse than the C-Max, which Ford seems to forget that they make.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    The problem is cost, most wagons cost a few grand more than their sedan counterparts making them only a small amount less than a comparable platform CUV which has more space.

    I’ve found there are two demographics that want a wagon, older people who want some cargo capacity but don’t want anything large to drive (my mother, had two Escort wagons and now has a Focus hatch). Or the enthusiast that wants one vehicle to do it all, carry everything but dandle like a sport sedan.

    The second group is very small and very cheap and that is a hard sell for a manufacturer.

    I want a mid-sized or large wagon, Ideally a Camaro SS or Coyote 5.0 engine in something the size of a Magnum or larger with AWD. The AWD is a must for me. I’d love a manual but would deal with a good auto. The kicker is I won’t pay any more than I would on a Camaro.

    Very unlikely you will see any wagon from a non-German brand, I don’t count the plastic-fantastic Subaru Outback as a wagon. Even VW is going ride hieght and cladding in their All-track, Volvo All-track, Audi All-track or whatever, see the trend?

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    “A Ford Fusion Wagon Could Be a Winner, and Here’s Why”

    It is indeed a winner. It’s called the Ford Edge.
    Just don’t tell CUV buyers that they are really buying station wagons. If pretending it’s a truck is what it takes for people to buy station wagons then so be it.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I don’t think any buyer of an Edge, Escape, or Flex is under any pretension that it’s a truck. Explorers, maybe, given the name’s history.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        I am not so sure. Many CUV’s retained some “truckish” styling cue until only very recently. Like tall hoods, exaggerated grills, and a lifted-look to them (even if they aren’t actually lifted, they look lifted).

        Good examples are the Honda Pilot until 2015, Toyota Highlander, and the 2012 and earlier “I’m a baby jeep” Ford Escapes. The cues were only skin deep but were still there. It’s like a station wagon wearing cowboy boots.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Also include the GMC Terrain and Jeep Patriot. FWIW, I don’t mind that some non-truck vehicles have trucky looks. If you want a vehicle that looks boxy and tough but you don’t actually need the BOF architecture, you might as well have something that rides a little nicer and gets better MPG.

          But as far as Edges and Flexes go, no one gets one and says, “hey, check out my new truck!”

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      No CUV, with the exception of the Outback (or Allroad I suppose, or whatever VW is going to call the lifted SportWagon) has nearly the same space and fuel efficiency of a true wagon. The form-factor is quite different. CUV’s are usually tall and not nearly as long as wagons. (Tall space is generally, if not always, less useful than long space.)

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        “Tall space is generally, if not always, less useful than long space.”

        Really? /Always/? 100% of the time?

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          On the tall vs long space concept, at least in terms of cargo space I don’t know about you guys, but I’m a stickler for keeping my rearward visibility clear. So when I pack for trips, I like having the ‘long’ space so I can pack in all the luggage and/or whatever camping gear and not deal with an obstructed rear view. With hauling dogs as well, given their size, I don’t want them crammed in and on top of each other. Conversely, a low-roofed wagon would leave the taller one of them brushing the headliner with his head (inevitably getting it dirty). My 4runner’s 44 cu ft of long AND tall space has been ideal.

          My family’s old Civic wagon had a really nice shape to the cargo space as well. 27cu ft of decently tall but also spread out space, at a very low lift height. The ’07 Fit the followed was down to 22cu ft and the space was now deeper but shorter (with smaller windows to boot).

          I would definitely be shopping a Fusion wagon if they offered one. I’m perfectly neutral on the Fusion sedan in terms of its features and how it drives, I found the 1.6T motor a bit lacking to be honest (falls well short of the VW 1.8TSI). An Accord or Camry wagon would be nothing short of fantastic (or Passat), I find the Rav4 and CRV to be too stiffly sprung and simply not as refined overall.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        Yeah, I agree with DrZhivago here. Tall space allows for a more natural upright sitting position, and allows for a more natural sitting motion. Think of the difference between sitting down and getting up from a kitchen chair vs sitting down and getting up from a bean bag chair on the floor. A healthy and fit adult should be able to do both with ease, but the kitchen chair will be the easier of the two.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Just don’t tell CUV buyers that they are really buying station wagons. If pretending it’s a truck is what it takes for people to buy station wagons then so be it.”

      enough with the navel-gazing enthusiast drivel. I know you all like to pat yourselves on the back because you’re so much smarter than all of those drooling CUV-buying morons, but stop with the self-love long enough to realize that they might be buying CUVs because maybe, just maybe, they find the form factor more convenient.

      but I know, they’re all just too stupid to realize that a wagon would be the perfect car for them.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    I’d give this a good, hard, look, if it were available. I currently own an ’04 Passat Wagon, and it’s not going to last forever. (At 160k at this point, and currently suffering from the niggling, stupid, stuff that every car of this age suffers from; old rubber, rattles, worn interior, etc.)

    I WAS strongly thinking of getting a Golf SportWagen (especially last year’s “Limited Edition”), but the news that comes out of VW every day does not exactly point towards a strong US presence for some time. (Which feeds into little things like parts/service availability, resale value, etc.)

    The wagon form-factor really is ideal for a practical car, and it’s a shame they’ve fallen out of fashion in the US.

  • avatar
    la834

    If getting there first kept you ahead, the leader in big SUVs wouldn’t be the Tahoe and Suburban, but rather the International Scout and Travelall; the former was introduced in 1960 well before the Blazer or Bronco, and the crucial 4-door version of the Travelall goes back to the ’50s. The Suburban is even older of course dating from the 1930s but it wasn’t until 1973 that a 4 door became available. So being first isn’t everything; a good dealership network and adequate updating help too.

    That said, there is alot of correlation between age of a model/nameplate and popularity. The most popular cars in the US include the Toyota Corolla (which dates back to the 1960s), Honda’s Civic and Accord (both ’70s) and Toyota Camry (’80s). All of these have numerous repeat buyers who have traded an old one for a new one, often several times. Think of how many nameplates the Detroit 3 cycled through for their small cars that competed with Corollas and Civics while Toyota and Honda stuck with a single model name and built huge customer bases. (Mopar was the worst: think of how many small-to-midsize car nameplates they’ve had in the last 50 years that didn’t make it to a second generation. I’m hard pressed to think of *any* that made it to a third.)

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Actually, the ’57 Travelall had 3 doors; one on the driver’s side, two on the passenger’s, much like the Suburban would 10 years(!) later.

      http://kars4kidsgarage.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/travel-hatchback-2.jpg

      http://kars4kidsgarage.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/travel-hatchback-4.jpg

      This was also when we first saw the Travelette, America’s first factory crew cab; based off the Travelall, it also had 3 doors.

      http://www.binderplanet.com/forums/index.php?attachments/1957-travelette-2wd-jpg.50213/

      http://image.trucktrend.com/f/63117616+w660+h495+cr1/1958-international-model-a-100-custom-travelette-utility-pickup.jpg

      The 4-door Travelall first hit dealers (I almost said “showrooms,” but IH’s showrooms were full of Farmalls!) in 1961.

      http://www.leblogauto.ca/public/photos-mysteres/1222/International_Travelall_1961.jpg

      You’re absolutely correct about dealer networks and a willingness to hold on to storied nameplates making all the difference.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Did IH just not consider fender liners a thing? Or were they not a thing yet? Rocks are gonna go right into the exposed metal under there, rust in no time!

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Not a thing yet; at least, not on truck-wagons like the Travelall or Suburban. Pickups were much the same–the fender you saw on the inside of the box was what you got.

        • 0 avatar
          DevilsRotary86

          I am not sure IH considered rust mitigation in any way, shape, or form whatsoever.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            A pity, I like some of the things they made. Had some charm in them. The Travelall and Scout II especially.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Don’t need no more rust proofing than a tractor does, by crackey.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            We had a Scout…my brother wrecked it the first day he drove it alone after getting his license. By a set of circumstances too bizarre to recount, he ended up with the rear roof crushed. But the thing still ran. The shop we took our cars to bought it and used it as a push vehicle for years after that.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Was it an extra-brougham one with wood tone, automatic, and tweed interiorz?

            http://www.ebay.com/itm/Other-Makes-Scout-II-/162200054474

            I love this one.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Faux wood on the inside? How about faux wood on the outside? The final Travelall came with
            two pattern options for vinyl wood:

            http://www.vintagemudder.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/1973-International-Harvester-Traveall-4×4-green-woodgrain.jpg

            https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1a/1971_International_Harvester_Travelall_1010.jpg

            Bonus points for that second example being found in the Netherlands.

            Pattern #1 was also offered on the infamous Wagonmaster:

            http://13252-presscdn-0-94.pagely.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/1973_International_Travelall_Wagonmaster_1.jpg

            And a similar pattern on the Scout II:

            https://c3.staticflickr.com/4/3343/4643715114_0bbbc6f115.jpg

        • 0 avatar
          bullnuke

          Ahh, but when IH did discover fender liners, my buddies at the Springfield assembly plant discovered that many empty beer cans could be stored in the space between liner and outer fender. They also discovered that a hex nut on a string suspended in there made a fancy clunking noise for a new owner.

      • 0 avatar
        la834

        @Drzhivago138, I was off by a few years but my point stands – IH had a big 4 door SUV way back in 1961 while Chevy and GMC doddered around four 12 years before finally having a competitive 4 door Suburban (yet we’d have to wait twice that long, another 24 years before Ford finally built 4 door Expeditions rather than 2 door Broncos). As was noted in the original article, Ford has never caught up.

        Likewise, AMC’s Jeep Cherokee (XJ) debuted in 1984; by the time the 4-door Chevy Blazer or Ford Explorer arrived for the ’91 model year the Cherokee had built up an excellent rep for both its off-road chops and family-friendly utility. Today Jeep is a hot brand worldwide with a full slate of six 4 door SUVs and crossovers (and that’s before the Wagoneer/Grand Wagoneer arrive.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    My wife loved her 2007 Passat wagon. She’s driving a sedan now and refuses to look at a crossover or a minivan. I have a hard time believing that she is unique in her opinions.

  • avatar
    slap

    I’d be interested in a Fusion wagon. I’ve bought three Taurus/Sable wagons new, and my last one has 250K miles on it and is in need of replacement.

    I don’t care for CUVs/SUVs. I driven and ridden in them, and I just don’t like them, so a Ford Edge has no interest for me.

    Back when the Dodge Magnum was in production, I looked at them. The cargo area was horrible, so they were quickly crossed off my list.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The Mondeo wagon appears to have more usable space than the gunslit Magnum, but this could be photo trickery:

      http://s1.cdn.autoevolution.com/images/gallery/FORD-Mondeo-Wagon-5348_8.jpg

      What about CUVs do you dislike enough to write off the entire segment?

      • 0 avatar
        slap

        CUV/SUVs:

        Ride, handling, visibility. More difficult to load sea kayaks on the roof.

        I don’t like the visibility out of them. It’s harder to see small or lower vehicles in the “blindspot” areas. And there are enough tall vehicles out there that being up higher really doesn’t give you that much better visibility.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I bet a Lincoln-ized Mustang would do better.

  • avatar
    Rik from Chicago

    Beautiful car.
    Ford won’t sell it here. Why?
    1) Americans perceive size as valuable. CUV’s are big. People will pay more. A wagon or a CUV costs about the same to make, but Americans will pay up for bigger.
    2) CAFE. CUV’s are ‘trucks’ and have an easier CAFE target. Ford would rather sell a midsize ‘truck’ than a midsize ‘car/wagon’.

    I wish it weren’t so.

    • 0 avatar
      Driver8

      Yes this. The 2 CAFE standards should be either merged or dumped entirely.
      It has wheels, it drive on public roads, it’s a passenger vehicle.

      And FFS can’t Europe and the US settle on common standards to mitigate the issue of them getting the neat toys?

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        So a semi is a passenger vehicle? What about a bicycle? Those both have wheels and can drive on public roads!

        • 0 avatar
          Driver8

          “Why are you being so obtuse?”
          Passenger != commercial

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            You never provided that clarification, and I didn’t wanna assume anything! :P

            So where does, say, the Ford F-Series fall? The same body is going to be used for everything for an F-150 up to an F-550. F-450s and 550s are definitely for commercial use, but the smaller classes are used for a combination of personal and commercial use.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Considering that this Mondeo just launched in Europe, 2 years behind the US Fusion, who knows when the Mondeo will adopt the 2017 Fusion updates. A Fusion wagon would be nice, but I don’t see it coming until the next redesign. Maybe Ford can get the production sync’d up next time so the car launches at the same time in the US and Europe.

  • avatar
    gasser

    I bought new both an ’87 Sable wagon and a ’95 Windstar. I don’t see Ford bringing this Taurus wagon to market.
    1. Competition: In 1987 the competition was Blazers and Bronco II, now CUVs are everywhere.
    2. Safety: in 1987 we put our kids in the rear facing seat of that Sable wagon. No way I would do that now. I really doubt the third row will pass rear-ending safety tests. That 3rd seat is in the sedan’s crumple zone. If you flip the seat around to be forward facing, you need to re-engineer the 2nd row to allow access and how to weave through a forest of shoulder belt anchors. Additionally the long roof will need to be re-engineered for both strength (to distribute side crash forces and rear enders and for roll overs.
    3. Power train. I don’t think that adding a few hundred pounds to the vehicle and upping the average load (after all we buy wagons to carry things) will allow the use of either the 2.5 base engine or the 1.5 Ecoboost. This means moving to the 2.0 Ecoboost with an increase in cost and decrease in mileage.
    4. HVAC: In 1987 we tolerated the sweat box of the back of a Taurus/Sable wagon. Now, no way. You need to engineer air conditioning and heat for that third row.
    Some of these can be avoided by deleting the third row, but that loses the customer who wants it more for a family vehicle that for cargo hauling.
    Thirty years ago, the Taurus/Sable wagons were an amazing 30% of their body mix.
    It’s 2016 and the wave has passed.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    Sometimes the white space is white for a reason. Americans don’t buy wagons. Not in any numbers. I do. I had a Legacy GT Wagon that was a fantastic car. Got it at a time when the Magnum was on the market meaning there were two interesting wagons in the showrooms of mainstream (non-luxury) manufacturers. And nobody was buying them. Nothing has really changed. The Fusion wagon is more successful as an Edge. You have to go with the full CUV treatment to sell a wagon these days. You can’t even go halfway (see the Venza). If there were a Fusion Sport wagon with AWD, I would be waiting outside for the Ford dealer to open. Not gonna happen.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    I just don’t quite understand how BMW can chase ever-ridiculous niches that nobody cares about (I still don’t understand the X6) but a company the size of Ford can’t profitably make this.

    • 0 avatar
      Seth Parks

      This is exactly what I am want to know stevelovescars! For example, how many 3-Series GT’s is BMW actually selling? Are they in fact profitable.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      it costs X number of dollars to federalize the bodystyle. To recover those costs and run the program at a profit, they need to either amortize those sunk costs over a certain volume of cars. if they can’t, then the price of the car needs to increase. Which has the effect of suppressing volume. BMW can charge premium prices. Ford can’t.

      plus, remember that the car companies’ actual customers are the dealers/distributors. Dealers aren’t interested in ordering anything that’s going to sit on their lot for a long time.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        For what they are selling, I would call Ford’s pricing pretty premium these days. But certainly you are correct – BMW can afford to pay more.

        On the other hand, I am not so sure the costs are that high, nor are they the real driving factor. Cadillac was on record as saying the costs of making the CTS-V wagon could be amortized over a handful of cars. But the real motivating factor for the volume players has to be that it costs the same to make a Fusion wagon as an Edge, and they can sell the Edge for $5K more. Which is fine while CUVs are red hot. But fashion is cyclical. Minivans were red hot 20 years ago. The next generation of yummy-mommies that grew up in CUVs aren’t going to want what their Mom drove. Might be nice to get in now for the long haul and be better placed. Or for the next time the crap hits the fan somewhere in the world and the price of gas doubles.

        I can’t wait for “longer, lower, wider” to come back into style.

      • 0 avatar
        Trucky McTruckface

        Not only are the federalization costs probably not worth it, the question nobody is asking is…where are they going to build it?

        Because they sure as heck aren’t going to do it at Flat Rock or even Hermosillo. Tooling up for a vehicle with a unique body shell that’s going to sell, what, 5k units a year tops? Not a sound business decision.

        So that leaves importing rebadged Mondeo wagons from Spain. Except that it isn’t just a rebadge. I can almost guarantee that the Euro model is full of enough minor differences that it can’t be federalized as is. Fixing this is a logistical headache, not to mention costly. And when that’s all said and done, Ford still has to pay for shipping. No way that’s profitable.

        Besides, the Fusion’s already in its fifth model year. All that effort to sell this thing for maybe two years before the sedan is overdue for a complete redesign? Please.

  • avatar
    davewg

    I get all the arguments for and against this. I for one would take one of these especially in equivalent Sport/AWD trim.

    Why? Mid-40s, active, and empty nest in 3 years. I’d much rather put my kayaks, SUPs, bikes, etc on the roof of this than any CUV that requires me to drag out a ladder (or other gymnastics) to put shit on the roof. I’ve done it, it sucks…

    And I refuse to buy any Subaru on principle, not to mention the CVTs they’re equipped with. And, like someone else mentioned, I don’t have $50k plus to spend on a V90, E-Class, etc (yeah – I’d lease if they support was enough to make the monthly reasonable).

    VW Alltrack? They lost me at 1.8T…

  • avatar
    slavuta

    See, the problem is that people writing into these blogs, instead of sending this letter to FORD. You convinced me, but as long as FORD has no idea of these thoughts, the wagon is not coming.

    On the other thought – “A simple rule of thumb is that half of consumers will be loyal with their next vehicle purchase.” – it doesn’t work for Mazda

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/07/ttac-book-club-car-a-drama-of-the-american-workplace/

      Back in the early 1990’s, Ford product planners were looking to improve the DN101 Taurus sedan/wagon sales mix, to somewhere better than 60/40 with the outgoing model. A lovely rounded wagon was introduced, only to be sunk by its showroom rival, the covered 4 door pickup truck. It was axed at the end of 2004, 2 years before its sedan counterpart.

      The time to have sent Ford a message was in the mid-late 1990’s, by Americans buying far more Taurus wagons than dark green Ford Explorers. Or perhaps with overwhelming Ford Focus wagon sales, which was discontinued a couple of years later.

      Didn’t happen.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        People were fed-up with Taurus – a car that had just about every possible component failing. Every pump, motor, caliper, tie rod end. On top of that – engine gasket – and you have complete reason not to buy FOrd ever again.

  • avatar
    NickS

    I’ve just become a blue oval fanboi.

    F it, I am moving to Europe.

    P.s. it’s a lonely spot for me and the other handful of peeps who would find bliss in a midsize sedan based SW, but one can hope that some day the masses wil see the error of their ways with their CUV fad.

  • avatar
    syncro87

    Ford: We had 2001 and 2005 Focus wagons. The ’05, especially, was a tank. Great car. Hauled lots of stuff. Excellent MPG. Small, easy to park. Super reliable, cost us just about nothing outside of routine maintenance.

    It got old, time came to replace it. Wait…you don’t bring the current wagon to the USA. Bummer.

    We were generally import buyers, but we would have definitely stayed in the Ford fold if you had a current Focus wagon. Heck, we’d probably have stepped up in size to a Fusion wagon. We don’t want a CUV or SUV. We want a station wagon. Thankfully, you can still get a Subaru wagon or VW wagon. But we’d rather have a Focus or Fusion, honestly.

    The day the ’05 went away to a Craigslist buyer was a bit sad.

    Bring a small/medium station wagon back, please.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Nice looking wagon, would make my shopping list and I am not a ford fan at all, why would it make it on to the list bc it is a wagon, my TDI wagon may go back to VW soon and there is really nothing out there that I want to drop coin on, roll the dice w a used a6 wagon or e class wagon, a newer xc 70 which I have 2 in the house and they have not really changed in ten years or a Volvo V60 CPO, maybe the same space as my sports wagon
    or a golf wagon, the list is pretty small and none of them are good on fuel. But I get that 98% of folks want a CUV so I am out of luck.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    There are only a few non-premium wagons left on the market. Subaru essentially sells ALL wagons (their sedans sell in much smaller volumes) they just happen to call them “SUVs” and people buy them. VW’s Golf Wagon seems to sell well, also. Ford could have this mid-sized wagon niche all to themselves while they continue to compete head to head in the crowded small and mid-sized SUV market. Heck, Used VW Passat wagons sell for a premium over their sedan counterparts. I don’t really see the lack of demand as much as a lack of supply.

    Also, Wagon buyers have traditionally been a very high-end demographic. For a while, the E-Class wagon buyer had the highest avg. income of any Mercedes model. Just sayin’.

    I understand data-driven decision making, but sometimes the data set just isn’t all-inclusive. For example, just because dealers don’t order manual transmissions doesn’t mean end-buyers aren’t looking for them. The last mid-sized Ford wagon, the Taurus, sold well while Ford was making Explorers at the same time. I know, I still have an ’02 Taurus Wagon and it serves me well as a family truckster and winter beater.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      I used to manage the inventory at a decent sized VW store for a number of years.

      I subscribed to your line of thinking for a while. In other words, that buyers were indeed looking for manuals, but that they didn’t sell because dealers wouldn’t stock them.

      So, for a while, and since the management of the store gave me great latitude to order whatever I wanted to, I went out on a limb and ordered manual cars of all types. Even the odd stuff. There for a while, you could order all kinds of unusual stuff from the VW factory. You wanted a manual, turbo, 4 motion Passat wagon with cloth or leatherette or leather seats? You could have it. You wanted a Jetta wagon, stick shift, with sport package and the 180hp turbo? No problem. Base, manual diesel New Beetle? Sure. Stick shift front wheel drive loaded out GLX Passat V6? Yup.

      Here is what I found, and I live in a metro area of two million people, so not some little town where the market might be too small for a sprinkling of manual inventory…

      I found that even when you ordered the stick shift cars in the right colors, with the options everyone said they wanted (i.e., everyone complains that manuals are only in base cars, so we tried some manuals with toys, too), they just plain didn’t sell. Base, loaded, in between. Didn’t really matter.

      You’d have one guy come in during a month wanting some oddball stick car. You’d have the largest selection of stick shift cars in rare configurations within 500 miles. They would invariably want a different color, or one without the fancy radio or with the fancy radio. Then it would be a month until another person even came in wanting a stick shift anything.

      A few cars ended up being worth stocking in stick shift form. The diesel Jettas and Golfs sold well with a manual. GTIs, but we didn’t sell many of those in any format, really. You’d sell two or three NB Turbo S manuals a year. Really, though, the diesels were the backbone of manual sales. Gas cars, far less demand for stick shifts.

      A decade later, I still remember one guy who actually bought a stick shift Passat 4-mo wagon from us. His ancient Quantum syncro was hit by a snow plow and totaled. But he was a total unicorn, and probably the only syncro owner in the city.

      The bottom line ended up being this: we had a limited amount of inventory we could carry. Certain cars turned very quickly for good profit. You wanted many duplicates of those on the lot, since they were hot items. An unusual stick shift specialty car took up a spot for something that you knew you could sell next week for top dollar. Why waste a slot on that car that was a risk?

      Anyway, I used to think as you do. I thought that the lack of manual sales was due to lack of availability on the ground. If you stock them, they will come. Unfortunately, that was not our experience. The stick shift cars gathered dust. You’d occasionally sell one, and maybe if you were lucky, a dealer from 200 miles away would need your car and finally dealer trade it out of inventory.

      It was a sad reality to face. The fact was, hardly anyone wanted manuals any more, no matter what we stocked. The market was shifting strongly toward automatics, more every year.

      Each dealer probably came to the same conclusion we did. Not worth stocking most manual cars, in most cases.

      Sad, yes.

  • avatar
    jhughes

    I’ll say it again – bring over the Subaru Levorg as a WRX wagon! Subaru picked the worst time to drop the hatch version, with sedans becoming less and less popular, and now the Focus RS being a hatch that kicks the STi’s butt (and I say this as a Subaru fan). Like the Fusion/Mondeo, it already exists in other parts of the world, so it wouldn’t take much to bring it here.

  • avatar
    Driver8

    This also gets back to the other age old question of the dealers being the customers to the factory rather than the drivers.
    What a dealer can quickly sell will not often be what I want to own and drive.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    What’s the point of even suggesting this? Sure, I’d love a Fusion wagon (and I’d love a Focus wagon even more). It’s a great looking car. And I suppose it wouldn’t be all that hard to certify and start selling here. But it won’t sell…just like Accord wagons, Passat wagons and Camry wagons all stopped selling sometime in the early ’90s.

    Far as I can tell, the ONLY midsize wagon extant is a Subaru Outback. And it sells…because, Outback. Jack up the Fusion, give it AWD, and you have…an Edge.

    So, again, what’s the point?

  • avatar

    Ford already offers a wagon – a true fullsize wagon with better packaging, ergonomics, and efficiency than anything else in the segment.

    Its called the Flex. And, yes, they still offer it. Bet you forgot they did. Everyone else did, too.

    Also, it gets outsold by the Explorer by factors.

    Besides, if you offer this Fusion Wagon, why not offer it with AWD?

    And if you offer it with AWD, why not fully winterize it with additional ground clearance?

    Congratulations – you made an Edge.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      Lolol.

      Don’t forget, MkT is a wagon thing too. Or hearse/CUV.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “A friend told me I should get a Ford Flex. I asked ‘what is it?’

        ‘It’s a house…truck. It’s a car…building.\'”

        -Maria Bamford

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          I think the difference is that the Flex feels/drives solidly in the CUV realm of things, it’s size and weight dictate as much. Fuel economy is likewise closer to Explorer than midsize sedan. Definitely has the utility factor going for it.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            “I think the difference is that the Flex feels/drives solidly in the CUV realm of things…”

            And that’s what folks want now.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            The Flex isn’t midsized. At all. It had a 118″ wheelbase and is basically the same length as a Taurus. The related MkT is even longer than it’s sedan counterpart. They are both decidedly full size.

            I don’t think the MkT drives like a CUV. It rides like a big car.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            FreedMike I should add “large” to the CUV part of things. These suckers are long and heavy!

            A lithe Euro-driving Fusion they are not.

          • 0 avatar

            I would say the Flex/MKT drive far more like a full-size FWD sedan than even a crossover. And an MKT with 18/19″ wheels is about the perfect combination of tire, wheelbase, and suspension for a comfortable vehicle of that size.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I’d bet the Flex drives a lot like an Ecoboost MKS or Taurus.

  • avatar
    qfrog

    Since 2005 I’ve found that wagons offer the mix of attributes which fit my daily needs quite well. My last three daily driver cars have been wagons with manual transmissions (A4, Jetta, and Golf).

    I can load any of my road bikes into the back of my car without removing the front wheel (*except A4*) or adjusting the seat post. I can load any of my skis into the back of my wagon without issue. I can load enough ski or cycling gear to go on vacation for a week in comfort and actually enjoy the drive along with the ride or skiing.

    I’ve changed addresses using only my wagon to transport my belongings.

    Using my wagon I’ve moved engines, gearboxes. I moved my MaxJax car lift with my wagon, sure I did it in two trips but, I did it. I moved my QuickJack in one shot. Having a low load height is nice when unloading a large chunk of steel without any help. I drew the line at moving a Handy motorcycle lift which would have required the hatch be open. I’ve moved all sorts of plants and mulch for landscaping projects.

    I’ve even towed another car around my driveway on a few occasions using my A4 wagon. The same car has seen three days on track at Watkins Glen, two at a winter driving school at Team O’Neil and one being autocrossed.

    I do not buy wagons to be different, I buy them because they are a mixture of fun to drive with the ability to haul just about any load I will want to haul on my own. Anything more and I will borrow a truck or van.

    As a kid we always had a wagon in the garage. It was at a very young age that the utility of wagons became obvious to me. It was more recently that I discovered wagons offer all of the handling capability of their platform shared sedan or hatchback variants but with greater hauling ability.

    With all of that said, the Mondeo wagon is pretty nice looking in the sport trim shown above. It would be nice to see another product offered to folks like myself.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “So, how about a 2018 Fusion Wagon Ford — perhaps with that slick six-speed manual your European customers enjoy?” As long as it’s brown, right?

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Nice looking wagon. I understand why Ford doesn’t bring it over. Most people want to sit up CUV/SUV high. I want my wagon to be a wagon, but I know I’m in the minority.

    Ford did a great job with the Focus chassis. It’s a shame they haven’t made that into a wagon format to compete with the Jetta 5 door.

    I’ll be looking to trade out of my e91 wagon next year and just started shopping. I want a size up from what I have. My wagon choices are pretty sparse (Subaru, Mercedes…. and that’s it.)

  • avatar
    turbobrick

    I want two things out of this:

    1) High hip point front seats like those in a Taurus so ingress/egress is easier.
    2) Rear AC vents in the back seat included in base trim.

    Because

    1) Modern sedans really are a pain in the ass to get out of. The distance between the outside world and the seat keeps getting longer while the seats are lower and have more and more aggressive side bolsters. Mazda6, I’m looking at you. Taurus on the other hand does this perfectly with it’s Command Seating.

    2) I live in the south. I have children. A station wagon gets REALLY hot and nothing makes you hate a car more than children whining about how uncomfortable it is for 6 months out of the year. Did I mention I have children? I don’t want to pay extra 5-8K to go up to a higher trim line I don’t want just to get an extra air duct and a couple of nozzles to keep my kids quiet. I’m looking at you, Subaru Outback, and Golf Alltrac.

    If I could buy this thing today for Fusion money I would. With real dollars. In Canyon Ridge or Kodiak Brown.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      There is the Flex. It comes in Kodiak Brown. The Flex has nice HVAC vents in the second and third rows.

      How come u no buy Flex?

      • 0 avatar
        turbobrick

        That part about getting one for Fusion money, mostly. Unless I want to get a Grand Caravan, it seems like I’m expected to drop 30K+ on this.

        I am going to buy one, just trying to find the right one. FWD SEL or LTD in Brown/Red/Blue, preferrably white slicktop, with Dune interior and nav would be nice.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “How come u no buy Flex?”

        because just like every other internet bulls**t artist, he wants his perfect unicorn car tailored just to his preferences, and offered for pennies on the dollar.

        and he still won’t buy it.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        The Flex no longer comes in Kodiak Brown. Bronzefire Metallic replaced it for 2016 (if they’re looking for a new one).

  • avatar
    phreshone

    I’m gonna need to replace the two 9-5 sportcombi’s at some point. I several long trips a year and would rather get 28+ mpg at 80 mph cruising through WY/UT/ID than 23mpg… Actually a newer tech engine should get 32+

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Yes we can!

  • avatar
    05lgt

    I read this sitting in a sporty manual AWD wagon. The average buyer isn’t the only buyer, or the market would have settled on one car we all drove long ago. A sporty wagon allows a dad to have fun without broadcasting “irresponsible”. I find the pictured wagon attractive, but interior packaging (utility) and driving dynamics join value on my list of questions needing answer before purchase decisions are made. I agree they dhould do it to claim the empty space. I might be a future customer.

    • 0 avatar
      Trucky McTruckface

      “The average buyer isn’t the only buyers, or the market would have settled on one car we all drove pretty much long ago.”

      Actually, I’m pretty sure it did settle. They’ve whittled it down to about three, anyway.

      Your Legacy wagon is perhaps the poster child for just how unviable station wagons have become. Now there’s a vehicle that cost its manufacturer almost nothing to produce and sell, relative to the lifted Outback version, but Subaru still gave up on it almost a decade ago. Not only that, but they even killed it off globally for the current generation.

  • avatar
    MWolf

    That looks damn nice! Alright, sedan sales are lackluster overall because people like the cargo versatility of other kinds of vehicles. A true wagon isn’t an option because there isn’t a selection right now. Just because someone is buying a crossover or SUV doesn’t mean they are loyal to that format, it just means it ticks a few of the right boxes. My logic here is that there has to be some out there who are thinking, “gee, I wish there was a choice that offered more convenience than a sedan, bigger than a hatch, and not have it be a crossover or SUV”.

    A sleek wagon version of something like a Fusion might be great. A sportier alternative to the current trend that offers better handling AND the cargo room and 5th door people seem to crave.

  • avatar
    shaker

    “So, how about a 2018 Fusion Wagon Ford — perhaps with that slick six-speed manual your European customers enjoy?”

    How ’bout this?

    Ford asks potential customers via Internet for a refundable deposit (a’la Model 3), gauges the response, and if it sees a good chance at profit, brings the wagon.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    Kia sits in a niche market with its boxy Soul, and Mazda does the same thing with its affordable roadster. Both the Optima and 6 are available in Europe as wagons. Niche players should be making niche products. Ford’s got SUV volume to chase.

  • avatar
    Pete Zaitcev

    They already sell a Fusion wagon, it’s called Edge. There’s also a Taurus wagon, known as Explorer, as well as Focus wagon, the Escape.

  • avatar
    galleman

    I’d buy a Fusion Wagon in a heart beat.
    But I saw one on I-70 coming back from Breckenridge 2 weeks ago.
    Was it a test car, a mule, or a Europen owner driving in the US?

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