By on August 12, 2016

2017 Lincoln MKZ Reserve Hybrid

With your left hand’s thumb, scroll through the steering wheel-mounted controls and select Settings. Move up to Driver Assist. Proceed to Drive Control. Then select Comfort.

Now your 2017 Lincoln MKZ Reserve Hybrid is a good ol’ fashioned barge of an American car, with enough rear end float to make pregnant women seasick. Firm? Far from it. That dip in the pavement half a mile ago is still causing the rear occupants’ bellies to teeter-totter as the MKZ attempts to locate its equilibrium.

Pair this menu selection with a prod of the Eco button to the right of the central touchscreen and you now have a modern Lincoln that mostly ignores throttle input, steers with remarkable lightness, and turns potholes into pillows. That sounds like the perfect Lincoln for a customer base that has all but gone extinct.

Fortunately, the refreshed MKZ Hybrid does not need to be driven in Comfort/Eco mode. In fact, the 2017 MKZ is at its best when, as is often the case, Lincoln allows the MKZ to manifest its deep-seated Ford Fusion roots.

So why not buy a Ford Fusion instead?

There are a few good reasons. Pre-refresh, the second-generation MKZ (initially known as the Zephyr in first-gen form) was easily criticized for an interior that bore few signs of upmarket intention aside from unnecessarily complicated controls. In terms of the latter, Lincoln has remedied that problem with an array of straightforward buttons for climate controls and Ford’s sensible, if not awe-inspiring, SYNC3. (You’ll still need to delve into deep menus with steering wheel controls for Drive Control and advanced safety system settings, however.)

2017 Lincoln MKZ Reserve Hybrid

As for the former complaint, material quality, particularly across the centre console, is much improved. Gone is the previous car’s matte grey, scratch-fantastic plastic. There are soft bits and metal pieces in all the right places. (Just don’t expect Lexus-levels of build quality: in hard right turns, the centre console’s cupholder cover in our MKZ Hybrid tester would flip open.)

MONEY
For those willing to pay far more than they would or could on a Fusion, the MKZ can also be optioned up as a genuinely sumptuous car.

On top of the 2017 MKZ Hybrid’s U.S. market $35,935 base price, spend another $4,500 for Reserve trim, $4,400 for a luxury package featuring a 20-speaker Revel audio system, $2,395 on a technology package filled with active safety kit, $2,995 for a vast panoramic glass roof, $595 for special 19-inch wheels, and $595 on hugely adjustable multi-contour massaging seats.

2017 Lincoln MKZ Reserve Hybrid

In this case, the $50,820 2017 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid is by no means merely a Ford Fusion by any other name.

Yet in an age of spectacularly equipped Kia Sportages, high-tech features and abundant levels of active safety technology are no longer enough to provide convincing arguments for luxury status.

QUIET LUXURY
Even under part throttle, the 2017 MKZ Hybrid’s 2.0-liter is often a raucous partner. Lincoln says the brand now majors on Quiet Luxury, and that may be true in other MKZs or in the new Continental, but quiet this hybrid is not.

Accelerating uphill on a highway on-ramp, the MKZ Hybrid doesn’t have to feel underpowered, but your right foot instinctively holds back to avoid drumming up intrusive droning. If carpool duty means there are Lexus ES300h owners in the back seat of your MKZ, you’ll be embarrassed.

There are hybrid dividends, of course. Our first week with a Lincoln MKZ Hybrid in March 2014 resulted in fuel economy readings 45 miles per gallon. With air conditioning cranked this week, the 2017 MKZ achieved an impressive 39 mpg. Remember, Lincoln doesn’t ask hybrid buyers to pay more. The 2.0-liter gas-only turbo is marketed with the same $35,935 base price.

2017 Lincoln MKZ Reserve Interior

Aside from the sometimes noisy powertrain, there are other niggling issues that cause the MKZ to feel insufficiently Lincoln-ized. The rear seat is by no means expansive, rear ingress is awkward, and the central hump is intrusive. All of that extra hybrid gear restricts trunk volume by 28 percent compared with the regular MKZ. The cooled seats positively roar when in use. Lincoln’s robotic massage therapist isn’t nearly as good at his job as the active bolster designer. Ford’s version of lane keeping assist lacks intelligence but is full of enthusiasm, regardless of its strength setting. Lincoln’s center-stack-mounted “shifter” tries hard to be different but manages to annoy and stand out because of cheap texture and operation. The Revel audio system sounds decidedly upmarket but doesn’t produce a great deal of volume.

And why is that grille so sad?

FOUNDATIONS
But there are strong Fusion undertones, and that’s certainly not a bad thing. Outside of Comfort and Eco modes and away from the Sport mode’s periodic harsh impacts, the 2017 Lincoln MKZ reminds me just how full of Euro Ford flair the Fusion truly is. Lively, nicely weighted steering mixes with a chassis that never tries hard to be sporty: it’s just balanced and communicative and capable of more than you’re likely to ever ask.

2017 Lincoln MKZ Reserve interior detail

It would be easy for an auto writer, one who wouldn’t dream of spending $50,820 on a midsize sedan that makes me look older than my father, to draw attention to the inherent value of the MKZ’s Ford Fusion foundation. But that is not what’s going on here. I have no problem appreciating the merits of sedans priced far higher than this MKZ, whether they’re based on mainstream transportation or share nothing but windshield wipers with proletarian automobiles.

The 2017 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid just doesn’t make a great $50,820 car — equipment upgrades and copious chrome don’t hide the fact that further fine-tuning is required to make the MKZ a viable high-dollar car.

Many, perhaps all, of the MKZ’s faults would nevertheless be easily overlooked at $37,895, the price at which a 2017 Ford Fusion Hybrid Platinum is equipped, in large part, like this very MKZ Hybrid.

[Images: © 2016 Timothy Cain/The Truth About Cars]

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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120 Comments on “2017 Lincoln MKZ Reserve Hybrid Review – Makes Me Want A Fusion...”


  • avatar
    shaker

    Remember when cars had little wheels and huge greenhouses and low MPG?

    Edit – fixed the above for more snark.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      and were truly built like crap?

      I mean it. One of our execs has a ’61 Continental. It’s a beautiful car, but once you get up close you can see how shoddily built it is.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Assuming it’s still showroom condition, that was the standard, the highest level of fit and finish for the era. Just four years earlier, they were still putting tube radios in cars – the first cheap transistor was invented in 1957 – and a half-decade later, we were putting men in space using 8-bit computers with 16K memory.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        There’s no doubt that a modern DFMA car is superior in almost every way to an “old boat”, but the “old boat” can be disassembled and reassembled with simple tools — Modern cars are sort of “snapped together”.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Being able to see out of your car, risks distracting you from your infotainment screen.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Lincoln needs a V6 hybrid system. 3.7L, 3.0T, 3.5T (for the SUVs), and V6 hybrid would be a good lineup. Hopefully better sales volumes will justify some greater investment.

    Leave the 4-cylinders to Ford and BMW.

    • 0 avatar
      yamahog

      Because the V6 hybrids set the sales charts ablaze, right? The V6 Accord hybrid, the Lexus GS hybrid, and the Infiniti hybrid sedan (M37h?) all sold poorly and were discontinued after a generation. Meanwhile, Toyota sells more hybrid camrys than V6 camrys.

      The inline-4 hybrid midsize sedans get around smartly with unreasonably good fuel efficiency. And the V6s don’t drink too much gas anymore. Adding a hybrid system to the v6 really increases the complexity and cost without making the car appreciably faster or more efficient.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “the Lexus GS hybrid, and the Infiniti hybrid sedan (M37h?) all sold poorly and were discontinued after a generation.”

        The Lexus and Infiniti V6 hybrids are still available on the GS, Q50, and Q70 lines. I don’t think Lexus has any plans to cancel its V6 and V8 hybrid programs.

        The V6 hybrids give about a 35% fuel economy increase over the nonhybrid V6 option and the V6 hybrids are considerably faster and more refined than the I4 alternatives. I’d also assume the $51K Lincoln would rather compete with the $60k Lexus than with the $27K Toyota.

        Ford’s I4 hybrid is fine on the Fusion but it doesn’t impress in this price class.
        ————–

        “Meanwhile, Toyota sells more hybrid camrys than V6 camrys.”

        But I bet Lexus sells more ES350s than ES300hs.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I’m not sure he has access to Internets.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I get the argument that a V6 hybrid would be risky, but I don’t see what the Camry has to do with anything. The MKZ doesn’t compete with the Camry (or it shouldn’t).

            I just don’t think that throwing the Fusion engine into a Lincoln and charging $50k (while needing $10k in incentives to actually sell) for it is going to help the brand move forward.

            If a V6 hybrid is that unpalatable, then build a better-than-Ford I4 hybrid.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    I will say this – that’s a very attractive car in gray. You could swap out the logos, and I think most non-car people would guess a European brand.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’d be at the dealer for a remedy for a console cover that doesn’t stay closed, even if the car was a KIA, let alone a LINCOLN.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Nice fix on the front end, but you missed the rear.

    The pricing on this is staggering. Ford – the higher you go, due to inflation or greed, the lower the residual will be.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      The rear is good, as it was before. No way would I buy new, but this is at the top of my used car shopping list in a few years (along with previous recent MY. I once liked sportyish cars, now I’m in the hinterlands for awhile, where its a 2 hour drive to multiple major cities. I bet the highway miles would melt away nicely in this.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      changing the rear of a car is a lot more involved than the front. the front clip is all bolt-on, the rear is structurally part of the unit body.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Nice review, Tim. One issue: the four low-res interior macro shots nested into a single picture is not very useful, especially if I am trying to spot build quality issues you mention in the review.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “So why not buy a Ford Fusion instead?”

    Because nobody puts on cufflinks to drive a Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Zephyr, like most Lincolns, is still very much a Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      @bumpy ii, I dunno, I was once chauffeured in a black Flex with a white roof and a black leather interior.

      Although I did not pay attention to the cuffs of the drivers uniform.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      I wore cufflinks today. Although, I’m not wearing them specifically to drive my C-Max.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Hows the post job loss transition been for you Adam?

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          Mostly good. I like my current job and I’m going to start contributing here.

          It’s been an adjustment because my wife and I both took pay cuts, but we are happier overall. We are both in good situations.

          I will also say that many people that I interact with on a daily basis here offered advice, or helped me in different ways. I appreciate it greatly.

          How about you Dave?

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            I’m well. Jumped both feet into being self employed and no regrets almost 6 months later.

            I think I’ve worn long pants 5 times in the last 6 months, to visit active sites that require PPE. Which is why your wearing of cufflinks caused me to ask how you were doing.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            Usually I am wearing a polo shirt and jeans on Fridays. I had a meeting with a vendor though. I’ll be back in jeans later this afternoon.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    “That sounds like the perfect Lincoln for a customer base that has all but gone extinct.”

    Wrong. Younger people who think they’ll stay young and live forever may think that, but Boomers who thought the same thing have been disabused of that notion.

    The truth is that MOST people over 50 don’t want a car that can get them through the twisties, they want a car that pampers their bad backs, aching knees, and ample butts, and the phenomenon called “aging” is creating new customers for that kind of car all the time.

    Not only that, those people have the money to buy cars that do just that. Car brands like Cadillac still don’t realize they’re marketing the wrong kind of car to a demographic that has no money, and losing a huge market of people who are turning to Lexus, Audi, and mid-level Mercedes models that can provide a reasonably comfortable soft ride without the wallow.

    That market will never go “extinct” because it’s being replenished all the time. A smart automaker will offer the styling and enough performance to market a car as youthful, while satisfying the pool of customers who need their bodies pampered and have the money to buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “The truth is that MOST people over 50 don’t want a car that can get them through the twisties, ”

      Over 50? That’s most people *in general.*

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        True, but people over 50 especially are more concerned with comfort, since those little twisties they suffered in their 20s and shrugged off tend to come back to haunt them in their later years. If most people want an appliance, they want a comfortable one, preferably one that looks luxurious. That’s why companies like Nash survived the depression, and Chrysler thrived: they built comfortable, low cost, low upkeep cars that looked much more expensive than their price.

        • 0 avatar
          Brunsworks

          Speaking as a guy with multiple spinal injuries, I agree completely. Unfortunately, it looks like Lincoln is still missing the mark.

        • 0 avatar

          Interestingly, my father (late 60s) recently opted for a much harder RDX (last-gen) over an Outback 3.6R, even though he lives in a town with bad roads. He didn’t care about the ride, he cared about the size, brand, and (some) of the features. My brother and I were the ones pulling for a soft-riding vehicle.

  • avatar
    319583076

    I can’t imagine a single reason anyone would willingly spend this much on a Lincoln when there are so many superior options available for the same cheddar.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      People lease this for $350/month or buy it used. Forget about the MSRP. It means mostly nothing. I agree that $50K is too much for an MKZ.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      I just checked Truecar and while this thing stickers at $50k you can get it for $42k. It may be helpful to review cars based on their actual selling price vs. MSRP.

      • 0 avatar
        rocketrodeo

        ^this. Typical transaction price is at least as relevant as MSRP.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        Agreed, actual selling price would be place to start when reviewing an auto. No one pays sticker price for an American branded auto. Sure there could be a few outliers. But, overall all take $3 to 12k off sticker. Even 2016 3 series is $4-6k off sticker.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Understood about MSRP, but that price is consistent everywhere. TrueCar is generally regional; YMMV. Also, if TrueCar says you can get it for $42k, you can get it for probably $40k.

        I’m waiting for a F-150 King Ranch Crew Cab to hit $35k….why not pamper yourself….

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      In the near luxury, entry-level luxury market with or without bonafide performance, I would buy/lease Mercedes, BMW, Lexus, or Cadillac for the same money.

      This car is not objectively competitive with what those brands offer and it’s not a bargain when compared against comparably equipped models from those brands.

      There’s no reason to buy this car unless you’re a weirdo that wants a Lincoln and refuses to drive a Fusion. I suppose that customer base exists, I’m not sure it’s a profitable base.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This is not the MKZ I’m interested in reading about. If I’m going to spend $50k on a Fusion, chances are I’m not willing to accept an intrusively droning engine and a lack of high-speed acceleration to improve mpg a bit.

    I want to know whether the MKZ 3.0T drives better or worse than the 2.7T Fusion Sport. It seems like these twin-turbo Fusion versions are taking an awfully long time to reach the public.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I can “Build Your Own” on the Ford site for a Fusion Sport, are they not on dealer lots already?

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      I will tackle this situation later this year. It’s hard to find a Fusion Sport right now. Most are ordered or in transit.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Do they actually exist? Seems like they (meaning both the MKZ 3.0T and Fusion Sport) have not yet been provided to the press, and I can’t find any in inventory at any dealers near me, not even “in transit.”

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          I drove an MKZ 3.0TT yesterday. My wife forgot something in the car we traded in and I needed to retrieve it. They had an MKZ 3.0TT and I took it for a quick spin.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Car you traded in? Does that mean you now have an EcoBoost Navigator?

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            No. Maybe in a few years. We bought another MkT. It was a Ford executive vehicle with 30K miles on it. Captains chairs in the back. The 2013+ MkTs are a significant improvement over the 2010-12s. They got all the updates and revisions from the 2011 Explorer.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I hope this one is black too!

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            It is Smoked Quartz Metallic. Basically the same color as this MKZ, I think. I was going to buy another black one, but this had the captains chairs and (a never been used) tow package.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            “It is Smoked Quartz Metallic.”

            Previously a Lincoln only color, then moved into the Ford stable…we’re rolling them down the line with the `17 U502’s.

            The test car is Magnetic Metallic.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            “Previously a Lincoln only color, then moved into the Ford stable…we’re rolling them down the line with the `17 U502’s.”

            Be careful on the South Side. Don’t get shot or accused of sexual harassment.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Congrats on the MKT!

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            “Be careful on the South Side. Don’t get shot or accused of sexual harassment.”

            Honestly I’m more worried about getting shot at different parts of the city than here (2 shot near Wrigley Field anyone?!); most everyone minds their business unless you’re on the wrong end of an election–to which I’m no longer part of the UAW so that doesn’t bother me.

            Now only if that rumor was true about buying land over in Indiana and leveling this place was true.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            Thanks dal.

            SC5door-

            You don’t like that 90 year old piece of $hit Ford calls a factory?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Fusion Sports!
          https://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/detail/675459672/overview/
          https://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/detail/676427491/overview/
          https://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/detail/675459486/overview/

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            At this point, most have someone’s name on them. They’ve been ordered. It’s hard to find one.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Figures. The PNW always gets everything last unless it’s a new Outback or Forester.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “At this point, most have someone’s name on them. They’ve been ordered. It’s hard to find one.”

            yep, the first one Corey linked to is an A-plan buy.

        • 0 avatar
          rocketrodeo

          Fusion Sports just hitting the streets now. Three people in the Facebook Ford Fusion club have taken delivery this past week. Seem to be a few in dealer inventory.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “Three people in the Facebook Ford Fusion club”

            And how much do I not want to go out to dinner with ANYBODY who’s a member of that?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The MKZ 3.0T AWD with the driver’s package is priced almost lockstep with the Q50 Red Sport.

      Some publication out there really needs to do a Charger RT vs Fusion Sport and MKZ 3.0t vs Q50 RS test.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      “I want to know whether the MKZ 3.0T drives better or worse than the 2.7T Fusion Sport.”

      Is any Fusion available with AWD? For me, this is the primary difference between the MKZ and the Fusion. Every high-hp FWD Ford/Lincoln I’ve driven has *awful* torque steer whereas the MKZ AWD has none whatsoever.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      I’m a bit nervous about all of these twin turbos being developed right now. Having worked on audi’s old 2.7tt all I can think of is what labor costs might be for longer haul owners. I really need to check out ford’s layout though, so I’m not condemning them outright.

      Anyone have a technical brief available to link?

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    My my, that leather certainly is of high quality. The seat bolster has many more creases in it than my seven year-old Infiniti does.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      I imagine a press car has many more people sliding into and out of it.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        It’s still one person at a time, for a few days at a time. There should not be that much wear in a brand new car.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I tend to think that’s poor tailoring, not wear. I saw a brand-new C-Max with a similar issue when I was shopping for mine. (Mine is assembled very well but has a noisy cooling fan that needs a warranty look when I can get around to it.)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            So the seat is that sloppy at the bolster to cause the wrinkling? At $50,000?

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            “So the seat is that sloppy at the bolster to cause the wrinkling? At $50,000?”

            There’s supposed to be a process that seats are heated to x degrees F to help prevent wrinkles, but I don’t know who makes these seats.

          • 0 avatar
            HotPotato

            Sure that’s not the AC compressor? Those modern compressors make a really loud nasty sound but it’s usually drowned out by engine noise.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        I dunno…I think I agree with these remarks on quality.
        Not sure if the more soft, the more tender.
        My MKS with what I feel is one of the better leathers, as good as Lexus, is always giving me trouble.
        First spotting.
        Then huge amounts of cracking or lines on the side driver seat.
        Then a simple wearing around the perforated front seat. The leather around the tiny holes near where my skin under my legs just lost the outer color.
        I have had to send for small bottles of matching touch up to hide.
        So, yes, it is fantastic to touch, but ridiculously fragile.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    This would be a good used car to buy after a couple of years especially one that has returned from a lease. This would be a lot of car for the money.

    • 0 avatar
      eighttrackmind

      I just picked one up last week. A 2013 with 36k miles. Had a $47k sticker, bought it CPO for $21k. It is not the best car on the market, not by a long shot. But it is a silly great car for the money. I’ll use almost every bit of the 100k mile bumper-to-bumper warranty coverage in the 3 remaining years, it’s getting an honest-to-goodness 37MPG average, with several trips over 40, and it has a ridiculous amount of tech for a $21k used car.

      Lane keep, adaptive LEDs with auto brights, cooled seats, and the pano roof are great candy to have on a car that delivers almost 40MPG.

  • avatar

    Why would I select this over the Fusion? Well for me, there are two reasons. One, I find the Lincoln to be much better looking (though the ’17 refresh helped the Fusion a little), and two, based on my observations, the assembly quality of the Fusion is atrocious compared to the MKZ. Here in SE Michigan where I live, Fusions are everywhere, and I cannot tell you how many I see with misaligned trunk lids and side trim. As for the MKZ, I’ve seen maybe three with slightly misaligned side trim.

    For the record, I do not work in the auto industry, though I do have my own little review site. I do love the direction Lincoln is going, and if my budget allowed, I would have, as a single guy in my early forties, gladly bought a new Lincoln, just because I like them.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    That’s better fuel economy than my Optima Hybrid. But I only paid $20k.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    I don’t know what the current Lincoln stores in this area offer, but a big reason to go with Lincoln, if offered, would be the dealership experience. Something to rival Lexus or Hyundai with the valet and concierge they are rolling out for Genesis. Here in Central Florida, none of the LIncoln Dealers are located close in to town, with one being in a not so nice area. A valet service that picks up cars for service and drops off loaners would go a long way to enhancing the value of ownership, not just because of what Lexus and Hyundai offer, but because Lincoln (in this particular market) starts with one hand tied behind its back (every other premium car dealer with the possible exception of Cadillac is relatively conveniently and centrally located). One thing I miss since the Fiat dealer I bought my car from closed was the service experience and that made owning the car more enjoyable. Now, I have to go get it serviced at the other dealer who is a CJD megastore and not nearly as enjoyable.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      “I don’t know what the current Lincoln stores in this area offer, but a big reason to go with Lincoln, if offered, would be the dealership experience.”

      They’ve got a Keurig.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        It’s fancier than a Keurig. It has this little espresso pod things and is full of milk and such too. It’s like a $2000 Keurig. Last time I was at the dealership for service, I was making coffee for people because I was the only Lincoln owner that didn’t fight the Nazis.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Yep, this part of the Lincoln deal is wildly uneven. In my area of Denver, they’ve upgraded one dealership so that it doesn’t look like a used-Kia outlet anymore, and while it’s not in a bad neighborhood, it’s not in the part of town you want to be in if you want to sell luxury cars. Plus, it’s right next door to Drive Time and a bunch of BHPH lots, so the good news is that the folks who can’t get bought on the Lincoln can just walk next door, but the bad news is that the neighbors don’t class things up much.

      But it’s still nowhere as near nice as the Lexus place. And the salesmen are all still old, fat guys in ugly suits.

      Not much changed.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Seems to me a question of what does it compete with.
    It doesn’t exactly compete with the Fusion because the options and engines are very different.

    I looked at the Avalon hybrid and it sells at its top around 45K…and it doesn’t have anywhere near the options the Lincoln does.

    I agree…I would never buy it because of the 4. IF it ws the large TT plus the hybrid, maybe. But these hybrids take away any truck volume. Without a proper trunk, none of these matter.

    • 0 avatar
      a5ehren

      Yeah, but that Avalon Hybrid Limited actually leaves lots well under 40k. The difference is enough to put them in different classes.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        well…that’s the limited.
        the bashing here seems to be about the top end MKZ and where it ends up.
        My point was at that level, nothing offers what it does.
        I am sure few MKZs leave the lot at the fully loaded price.

        I wonder what is the ave. priced MKZ.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Not sure if old news, but I just noticed that the Continental configurator is online. $45K for a base 3.7L FWD one, ~$56K for a 2.7T AWD, and ~$74K for a full-hog 3.0T AWD Black Label.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      And that takes Cadillac out behind the barn and beats it like Lincoln was it’s Daddy.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Well, it trounces the XTS anyway…

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I hate the XTS. Its on my sh!t list with the Mercedes GL and the X6M.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I think you meant CT6…

            The current “flagship” that costs so very much more than a Continental but does nothing better.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Nope, I mean the Impala XTS. It provides little the LaCrosse or the Impala don’t (but for much more money), looks worse than either, looks even more hideous as a hearse, and is not built with anything resembling what Cadillac quality should be.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I’d say the Continental is certainly better looking than the CT6, but the Caddy is going to be in a whole different class when it comes to the driving experience. Then again, no one’s reviewed the new Continental, so who knows, but I’d expect it to drive a lot like a MKS Ecoboost – not a bad thing, but not a car you could sell for upwards of $75,000.

            And I’m probably one of the few people that would LOVE me some XTS with the V-sport package, Corey. Wouldn’t mind the MKS Ecoboost either.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            @Freed

            Are you transforming into a Norm!?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Uhhhh….?

            You stumped me.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh my God it’s happening!

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Now I’m really stumped!

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      wow…seems rather high. 70K for it?????

      I looked after your post and built one.
      I am confused my the MPGs that show up when you chose engines.
      It, for some reason, show the 3.0 with better MPGs than the 2.7…?
      They are turbos and both twin, so why would the smaller get worse?

      My second opinion is never again.

      I purchased my MKS TT when the Taurus was still the FiveHundred. Then that friggin Mullaly comes out and promises us the return of the Taurus we should have always had. It turns out it is simply a more affordable MKS…and kills the MKS value.
      Plus it comes with a useable trunk opening.

      Ya…the MKS had way, way more stuff and better leather…but it killed the value.
      And I would rather have gotten a fully loaded SHO!

      Gonna wait now till we see the “new” Taurus.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    The price criticism is valid, but you can make the same criticism of the Lexus ES as well. You can also legitimately ask whether you wouldn’t be better off with a Toyota Avalon.

    Like Adam said…the sticker doesn’t matter, as these are all leased anyway.

  • avatar

    An off-lease low-mileage MKZ with a touch of B.S. ‘structural damage’ (like a dent on the trunk pan or rocker) is the still THE deal on a pre-owned midsizer and far superior to even a new Ford given Lincoln’s complimentary maintenance program and superior warranty coverage.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    To be honest IMO with so many saying great the Lexus ES interior is however the Avalon Interior is a better design overall with mostly equal quality.

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    I nearly leased one of these in 2015. It was the only vehicle that almost resembled my three Auroras. Only problem is that is it made in Hermosillo, Mexico.
    I do not buy Mexican cars.
    Ever. . .
    Wrong side of the wall.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    1) Nice to see that this Lincoln uses the same door lock buttons as my Mustang. Maybe the Lincoln coupe isn’t so far away after all.

    2) I fail to see how this is better than a $50K Genesis, which is not in any way based on an entry-level Sonata that can be had for $20K.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I think the front end design looked better on the old car than this new version. Was classy and flowed well. This looks more tacked on and busy.

    But then when the MKZ first arrived I didn’t like the style at all. Finally I am kinda diggin it and then they change the front end again.

  • avatar
    dreadnought

    Drove the 2017 2.0 T AWD version of this last week (twice). Been shopping it-I’m coming out of a 5-series (F10) lease that ended a year ago and driving my beater truck around in the interim.

    Also drove the 2016 version twice (once at a Lincoln event at a car show).

    I’d say this review is pretty accurate-though I definitely didn’t think the “comfort” setting was anywhere near as floaty as Mr. Cain did. It never reminded me of a luxo-barge no matter what setting it was in. It was a bit softer but not crazy soft, even in “comfort”.

    I agree about the about the center console, and the feel of the shifter buttons. That is a place where Lincoln should’ve invested a bit more money that would’ve have paid dividends. With the emphasis Lincoln places on the push button shifter you would think they would put more effort into making it feel higher quality, and with the console area opened up so much with the absence of the shifter-make that higher quality as well.

    The look, and to a lesser extent, the feel of the 2017 version’s console is somewhat improved, but it still seems somewhat cheap, and gives one a bad impression of the car. The rest of the interior actually seems pretty high quality-but the console is an area that you really notice-especially if you’re at a car show playing with the storage compartments and stuff-it brings down the whole interior. If they really had to cut costs somewhere in the interior-the console was not the place to do it.

    I think the reviewer’s overall impression of the chassis is pretty spot on. I will say that the steering weighting and feel, as well as the overall handling and ride of the 2017 seemed better than the 2016 I drove earlier-not sure why though. Were there any updates to steering and/or suspension for 2017?

    I haven’t driven the Fusion. I’ll admit the Fusion Platinum seems like a better value proposition vs. the Lincoln. I may check it out.

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