By on August 4, 2016

2015 Ford Fiesta 1.0 EcoBoost, Image: © 2016 Mark Stevenson/The Truth About Cars

After scoring a stellar deal on our ’15 Ford Fiesta 1.0 EcoBoost, thanks to the advice of those who know more about the car buying process than I do, my girlfriend and I have put just over 3,000 miles on our diminutive hatchback.

In those 3,000 miles, the Fiesta has patiently allowed Jenn to hone her manual-transmission skills, been to the dealer once (more on that in a bit), carted us and our furry dependents around the province, and not once been close to an autocross course — though not due to my lack of trying.

2015 Ford Fiesta 1.0 EcoBoost, Image: © 2016 Jennifer Archibald/The Truth About Cars

This is one EcoBoost that lives up to its name

Ford’s family of EcoBoost engines proudly boast fuel economy ratings that many (including yours truly) think are — at best — optimistic. Ford’s twin-scroll turbocharged 2.0-liter EcoBoost powerplant, which powers the Edge Titanium I tested last year, is one of those engines. The turbo four is forced to work overtime to counter the Edge’s heft. I believe you could squeeze better fuel economy out of the larger V6 for the sole reason that it doesn’t need to work nearly as hard to get the Edge up to speed and keep it there.

But with the Fiesta, that’s not the case. If anything, the opposite is true.

Our first 1,000 miles didn’t return the mileage we expected. I blame that on a green engine and us driving the Fiesta in the city 95 percent of the time. Now that the Fiesta is seeing more highway miles, the observed fuel economy is staggering in the best of ways.

Equipped with the 1.0-liter EcoBoost three-cylinder engine, the Fiesta is officially rated at 36 miles per gallon on the combined cycle (31 city/43 highway). However, over the last 1,000 miles in an equal mix of city and highway driving, our Fiesta has returned 42.7 mpg.

Needless to say, we aren’t complaining.

I want more power, but the tuners aren’t interested

Even with its available grunt, the Fiesta could use a little more in the performance department.

If we lived in the UK or elsewhere in Europe, Mountune — a partner of Ford Performance — would be more than happy to sell us a mild, warranty-friendly tune to boost the 1.0 triple’s output to 133 horsepower and 158 lbs-ft of torque, an improvement of 10 hp and 33 lbs-ft. If we weren’t bothered by voiding the warranty, Mountune’s MR165 kit could crank the triple up to 163 hp and 181 lbs-ft — again, only if we lived in the UK or somewhere else in Europe.

In the United States and Canada, it’s a wholly different story.

There are differences between the ECU used in European Fiestas and those sold in the U.S. and Canada. Because of that, and the limited availability of the 1.0-liter engine in the Fiesta and Focus here, Mountune and Ford Performance don’t see much reason to develop a tune for it.

“The cost to develop a unique calibration from scratch would be in the tens of thousands of dollars. The only way we would be able to move forward is to have support from Ford on this project,” explained Ken Anderson, President of Mountune USA. “The 1.0-liter performance upgrade is not on Ford’s list of things to do.”

And if you thought that COBB might jump at the opportunity: no dice.

“We’ve even asked COBB to develop the AccessPort for us and there was no interest,” stated Anderson.

A representative for COBB stated the company’s Fusion project may have ruined possible future support for “oddball” motors like the EcoBoost triple.

“The bean counters need to have an adequate business case to support something like that,” said a COBB representative. “Fusion support may have ruined the possibility of future oddball support. We added support for 1.6- and 2.0-liter Fusions (a passion project of our lead Ford calibrator, who happens to own one) and we’ve only sold a handful.”

So, if you own a Fusion EcoBoost, go buy some tuners from COBB. I want more power and you’re ruining it for me.

Instrument panels are complex

Jack Baruth touched on the ever-evolving complexity of instrument panels and their associated idiot lights. Knowledge of each icon’s real-world analog is required to understand the meaning behind each warning light. In many cases, that real-world analog does not exist to those born after 1990, so the meanings behind those warning lights are lost.

My girlfriend was born in 1991.

A few weeks ago, Jenn sent me a text telling me that the engine temperature light had come on. She wasn’t sure what to do because she didn’t know what it was, so she looked up the light in the owner’s manual. I advised her to call roadside assistance to have the Fiesta towed to the closest dealer for an inspection.

The dealer kept our Fiesta over a weekend and put 50 miles (80 kilometers) on the car before coming to the conclusion that it’s nothing we should worry about as the technician could not reproduce the issue.

When Jenn picked up the car, she realized her error.

The Fiesta has a center-mounted digital display that shows mileage and other information, including engine temperature.

2015 Ford Fiesta Instrument Panel Display, Image: © 2016 Jennifer Archibald/The Truth About Cars

This was the first time she noticed the temperature display, and she thought it was a warning light. The gauge beside the temperature icon isn’t incredibly obvious unless you know what it replaces and represents.

We didn’t need to pay for the dealer visit, thankfully. However, the dealer couldn’t explain why they put so much mileage on our car, nor did they offer to make it right with a free service in the future or something similar. I told them we wouldn’t be back again.

Bye, bye welfare wheels

There’s one major gripe I have with the Fiesta, and it has to do with the wheels Ford decided to put on the EcoBoost model.

The Fiesta SE is equipped with stock alloys. They aren’t stunning, but they aren’t ugly, either. However, if you option the Fiesta SE with the SE EcoBoost Package, Ford deletes the alloys in favor of steel wheels. There is no option to add them again. I assume this is to reduce unsprung weight to increase fuel economy.

But steel wheels are boring, and wheel covers should be fired into the rivers of Hades.

Thanks to our friends at Discount Tire Direct, we are now in possession of a new set of Maxxim Winner wheels measuring in at 17 inches. Unfortunately, due to some logistical issues on my part, the wheels haven’t been fitted to the car.

Maxxim Winner wheel, Image: © 2016 Jennifer Archibald/The Truth About Cars

We’ll be wrapping the wheels in rubber provided by Michelin. Instead of providing a boring tire test where I go on and on about the virtues of the new tires, I simply have three questions in mind:

  1. Will the new Michelins, even with the reduced sidewall height, be as quiet or quieter than the stock Hankook Optimo H426s?
  2. Will larger wheels and wider rubber adversely affect fuel economy in a meaningful way?
  3. How will the Michelins wear over the long-term?

Once the wheels and tires are fitted, I’ll report back.

The biggest challenge yet

This weekend, we are moving to Oshawa.

It’s been an open secret if you’re a friend of mine on Facebook. That means over the next few months we’ll be featuring exclusive stories from the front line regarding labor negotiations between the Detroit Three and Unifor.

However, in the near term, it also means we will be driving the Fiesta for over 1,000 miles from Nova Scotia to our new home in Ontario over the course of the 18 hour trip. If that isn’t a proper test, I don’t know what is.

Mark Stevenson is the managing editor of The Truth About Cars. He is easily swayed into buying vehicles from brands that no longer exist. You can find him on Twitter and Facebook.

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125 Comments on “2015 Ford Fiesta 1.0 EcoBoost Long-Term Test – The First 3,000 Miles...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Instrument panels are complex…

    lol thank you for giving the B&B one more for the mental file if we happen to have to give someone a hand. Having a reputation as a “car guy” means that people tend to ask you about things that you have to stop and think about due to forgetting that not everyone has the basic “Cars 101” knowledge you have.

  • avatar

    I tried to buy one of these – the Ford dealer was insufferable.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Bummer about the tune. Aftermarket support is a top priority for my daily drivers. Plus I find the sound of triples, sixes and of course twelves way more interesting than those of 4s or 8s. Would an intake/exhaust void the warranty?

    • 0 avatar

      I don’t think it would because Ford Performance readily sells those parts for the Fiesta: https://performanceparts.ford.com/fiesta/

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      there’s really no such thing as “voiding the warranty.” they can deny a particular warranty *claim* if it’s shown that your modifications caused something to fail.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Are Canadian laws governing warranty different ?

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          that’s a good point, I keep forgetting this is a Canadian website. As far as I know, Canada has no federal equivalent to the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, and reading Ontario’s Consumer Protection Act I can’t find anything similar.

          so things might actually be quite different.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenn

            I don’t know about Canada, specifically, but my experience is that a dealer – an independent businessman, as I’m reminded when calling a manufacturer’s “customer service” phone number to complain – can avoid performing a warranty repair in any number of ways. After owning many new cars, I’ve almost never received cooperation for what should be an obvious warranty repair without hearing everything from the common “we couldn’t duplicate the problem” to “it’s within factory specs, there’s nothing we can do” or that, “they all do it, there’s nothing we can do” to the accusatory “YOU caused the problem by…” doing something I didn’t do. Or, having me leave the car with them, repeatedly, each time supposedly fixed, until I relent and live with the problem (or sell the car). I’ve grown, over the last 40+ years, to absolutely HATE auto dealerships and the sociopaths who operate them at every level (“though some, I assume, are decent people”).

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          I looked up a warranty guide for a Canada-market Fiesta, and the language is pretty similar to the US market. They won’t cover something under warranty if it was damaged by something you installed.

          • 0 avatar
            don1967

            It is similar up here in Canada. A modification must be reasonably shown to be the cause the failure if coverage is to be denied.

            That said, it’s a mistake to assume that power-boosting modifications won’t have far-reaching warranty consequences. Everything from oil seals to transmission parts are potentially affected, or so a manufacturer could argue.

    • 0 avatar
      JD23

      Some manufacturers (I’m looking at you, Audi) have an extremely broad definition of damage caused by an aftermarket modification. For example, Audi will deny all powertrain claims if an aftermarket exhaust is installed to avoid paying for a particularly expensive repair.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Thank you for ditching those horrible hub caps its was the first I noticed in the picture… they immediately screamed “CHEAP”.

    When I mounted gripper, wider rubber to my 350Z I noticed a 1 MPG drop. Rolling resistance be damned – I need that grip on track. Granted I could swap tires for events like my brother does on his Golf R but its not worth the effort since I live in south Florida and thus can run summer tires all year long. So given all the variables in fuel economy and the fact that the Fiesta already get excellent mileage you might not even notice.

    To solve your tune problem just perform an Euro ECU swap. Can there really be that much of a difference?

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    Do you know what Michelin tire will be going on those wheels?

    The probable answer to your three questions are yes, not really, and better than the Optimos.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    17’s on a Fiesta seems counter productive to me. I’m all for alloys but I wonder if you won’t regret that purchase.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      Why? The ST has 17s.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Right, the ST is a performance varient, meant to ride loud and harsh in exchange for grip and performance.

        On an economic minded version, I’d go with a 15″, get some sidewall for ride comfort, not have to worry about curbing, etc.

        My Verano looks amazing on its stock 18’s, but they are fragile, hard to park, ride worse, and the turbo has a crazy large turning circle which the base models dont have.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          I think it depends on the car/tires/wheels. My C-Max is much quieter with the 17s and all seasons vs the 15s with winter tires.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          15s aren’t a good option these days. Availability of good tires in 15″ sizes has fallen off a cliff. I want to find some 16″ “GS” wheels for my old Acura so I can get decent tires to replace the Wal-Mart crap on it now.

        • 0 avatar
          Ol Shel

          Agree totally on 15s for such a small car. Mazda showed a spec 3 a few years back and it looked fantastic on 15s with 205-225s in about a 50-series sidewall. With the right amount of stretch, some sidewall looks way more ‘race’ than these 30-series rubber bands.

    • 0 avatar

      So, to clarify:

      1) ST has 17s, as Adam stated.
      2) The car will probably get lowered using the Fiesta Handling Pack by Ford Performance at some point, so road comfort is likely to diminish anyway.
      3) We didn’t pay for the wheels. They were provided by Discount Tire Direct.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Thanks for clarifying Mark. If you are lowering it and tightening up the handling anyways, that makes more sense.

        Not trying to put down your choices, just thinking out loud.

        And kudos for using the opportunity and your personal vehicle to bring us first hand product info!

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Michelin – not as good as advertised. They develop a lot of cracks and even tread separation. Pirelli p4 four seasons – is probably the best all around tire today

        • 0 avatar

          I’ve had phenomenal luck with Michelin motorcycle tires. I can’t speak to the road tires — yet. Michelin are providing them for the purpose of testing, so we’ll see how they hold up.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            I actually got Pirelli for my bike as well, and I am very impressed. Beats Bridgestone Hoop easy. And I also had Bridgestone on my Mazda3 and now P4. I first installed P4 on 98 protege and was very impressed. I read again before installing on Mazda3 and they have great reviews (no wonder why!). I have Michelins on Highlander and my bro has 2 Accords with Michelins. They all have same problem – if they have long wear, they may crack before thread is worn. And another thing – Michelin makes lots of tires low resistance and they just don’t grab as well. Michelin are also pricey. They good, not great. Less noise than Bridgestone. And they wear “as warranty describes”, not like Continental – 20K under. May be now that they have to post the wear code, Continental got better? So far, outside cheap Chinese crap I have not seen anything worse than Dunlop.

            But you get it free. So, whats the talk about?

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            The one skill that anyone considering a motorcycle should develop is that of changing tires. I got a grand total of 3000K miles out of the OEM tires on my bike before the front developed a wear pattern that negatively affected steering and the rear flat-centered. If you ride a fair amount, its easy to get only one season out of a set of tires.

            It took me a bunch of different attempts to get good at changing tires, One needs only a few simple tools if using the zip-tie method (found on a number of youtube videos).

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            that’s because motorcycle tires are unfortunately still bias-ply.

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            No, Jim, most street MC tires are radials these days –

            I’m running the Brigestone Battlax S20’s on my Kawasaki:

            http://www.bridgestone.com/products/motorcycle_tires/products/category/index.html#sports

            Edit: The big improvement of radial bike tires is the same as for cars – more contact patch/traction, and much lower sensitivity to grooved pavement, seams in concrete and other irregularities. The construction isn’t exactly the same as car tires – just adapted for a machine that leans into corners.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “No, Jim, most street MC tires are radials these days –”

            Bridgestone’s own site says otherwise. there are plenty of bias-ply tires in their lineup, as well as Dunlop’s and Michelin’s.

            Though I will admit that there are more radials than I had thought.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          I like the Pirelli P7s better than the equivalent Michelins. I’ve been very happy with them on my C-Max.

        • 0 avatar
          burgersandbeer

          I’m pretty happy with the Pilot Super Sports. Michelin’s performance A/S rubber has a good reputation as well, though to your point I recently looked at a car with cracks on the shoulder of the rear tires like I have never seen before; tires were Michelin Pilot Sport A/S.

          I think my spare is a Pilot Sport A/S, I’ll have to check on it.

      • 0 avatar
        Pinzgauer

        The Fiesta handling pack actually maintains a great ride. Its basically the european suspension for the Fiesta. The car will handle alot better but still ride nicely. The US suspension tuning is alot softer.

        I am debating right now getting the handling pack or getting the suspension of an ST. I am probably going to get the ST suspension because I found a low mileage take off for pretty cheap.

    • 0 avatar
      focaltac

      The wheels look nice but going from 47.5 to 40mm offset will likely change steering feel and behavior. I stuck with 15s and found a cheap Slovakian alloy with 45mm offset. Weight is similar to OEM steels but they make more turbulence and I lost a mpg or two on the highway.

      The OEM Hankooks aren’t all that bad but I couldn’t take the tramlining. Continental’s TrueContact in 195/60 seemed logical and they’re a nice compromise. I’ve put 25,000 mostly-highway miles on this car in 10 months and am mostly happy. MPG average is around 42.5 in my mix. 87 octane works fine but spend a few cents more for top tier to reduce carbon buildup on the back of the intake valves!

      Also, peak efficiency with this engine is around 2500 rpm. It’ll return 45 mpg all day long if you follow the shift light and keep it at 55 or so on the highway. At 65 and up wind drag takes a toll.

      I’d skip performance tuning. That’s not the 1.0’s mission.

  • avatar
    Feds

    Wow, Halifax to Oshawa. Be ready for a culture shock. Although, Dartmouth to Oshawa is about equivalent.

    Welcome to Ontario!

  • avatar
    mikey

    I love my Eco Boost…..Mustang. …all the power I need . …I am a little disappointed with its thirst for fuel. City driving is okay,. Highway speeds 75 mph + even with 91 octane….not so good.. With just over 5000 miles on the clock, I’m thinking it may improve ??

    Mark……Welcome to the Shwa !!

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Concerning your tire choice it does depend on which Michelins you are looking at. The factory tires are LRR all season touring tires. Stick with an all season touring tire from Michelin and your MPG hit will be minimal and the tires will be quieter, last longer and have better traction. Switch to a HP or UHP tire and expect a huge drop in MPG and tire life but a huge increase in grip, road feel and overall handling.

    On my wife’s car I replaced the OE Michelin LRR tires with the Sport A/S 3 and the MPG took a big hit of darn near 10% and the new tires were the same size as the originals. Now grip was massively increased and I’d say it was worth it to me.

    So yeah expect at least a 2mpg drop if you don’t choose a pedestrian LRR tire.

    The switch to steel wheels was certainly not done as a MPG boost since the steelies do weigh significantly more than the Aluminum wheels, even if the Aluminum wheels are significantly larger.

    A funny antidote about steel vs aluminum wheels: This weekend my daughter was helping me do some clean up and rearranging in the garage. That included moving the stacks of winter tires. First up were her’s that are on steel wheels. We then moved her brother’s set of winter tires on their OE aluminum wheels. She said “holy crap ____’s tires are way lighter than mine. Both are 16×7 wearing 225/60 tires. I replied with that is why I’ve been telling you we need some Aluminum wheels for your car because those lighter wheels will improve your MPG, handling and braking. Note when we had discussed it earlier she said she had no desire for fancy aluminum wheels. Having to move them changed her mind. For the heck of it I went to Craigslist and searched the the tires and wheels section. Boom top of the list were some 17″ take offs with center caps and lugs a few miles away that had just been posted for the pricey sum of $100 for the set. Since her tires are at the 7/32″ mark she’ll be getting new winter tires come late fall that fit those 17”.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Ok now that I see that you are switching to the Premier A/S which is a LRR tire your mpg drop will probably be less than that 2 mpg mark assuming they aren’t significantly wider than the OE tire.

      • 0 avatar

        Some Hankook Optimo H426s are LRR tires, but the ones fitted to the Fiesta are not, AFAIK. I was looking that up this morning. Hankook offers the Optimo H426 as an LRR tire in 195 section, but not 185 section as fitted to the Fiesta.

        Also, while the Premier might offer some LRR features, it is not considered a LRR tire. I think the same is true for the Hankooks.

        Hankook’s LRR tire is the Enfren. Michelin’s summer LRR tire is the Energy Saver A/S.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          No go to tire rack and all Premier A/S are listed as LRR. You are correct on the ‘kooks I went by the some sizes are LRR and figured on the high mpg version Ford would spec LRR tires but apparently not in this case.

          The Energy Saver A/S is Michelin’s standard A/S LRR tire. The Premier A/S is Michelin’s Grand Touring A/S LRR tire. http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Michelin&tireModel=Premier+A%2FS

          • 0 avatar

            This is when tire labels get wishy washy.

            According to Tire Rack, the tire is part of Michelin’s Total Performance marketing, which includes low-rolling resistance features. However, it’s still not a full-on low-rolling-resistance tire.

            http://www.michelin.ca/experience/total-performance.page

            If you compare the Premier A/S and Energy Saver A/S on the Michelin site, you can see the Premier is more oriented toward comfort/performance vs. the Energy Saver, which is more oriented toward fuel savings.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            It may not be Michelin’s most effecient tire, ie it isn’t a Green X but that doesn’t mean that it isn’t a LRR tire. It tied for second in MPG vs other mfgs most efficient tire in that class.

            One other thing to keep in mind when calculating the mpg with the new tires in place is to check the Revs per mile of each and correct by that factor. When plus sizing up to 2-3% difference on OD is considered fine and quite common, just beacuse that is the way it works out dealing with 10mm, 5% and 1″ increments.

            When you are talking about a 15mpg SUV that amounts to a rounding error but at 42mpg 2% is knocking on 1 mpg

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The Energy Saver A/S are the factory tires on my C-Max. They have both the grip and the ride characteristics of the plastic wheels on a Matchbox. I’d happily take a 10% hit in electric range/fuel economy for a set of proper tires, but this is a leased car.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            If there’s any chance you’ll have worn those OE tires down by the time the lease is up, it might make sense to put new tires on now so you can give it back with the originals.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            rpn453, that’s a good idea. The car would just be so much better with a set of AS/3s or DWS06es on it.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            dal-

            My OEM C-Max tires made it 40K miles. The Pirellis that replaced them are so much better. Unlike the original set, they are not made out of cheese.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Any excuse for a tire upgrade is a good one! It’s a bonus if you can get some economic justification involved.

            Those would be my top choices as well.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Depends on the wheels. Some aluminum wheels are very light, some are most definitely not. Once you get into the 16″ and up range I would say that you will spend a LOT of money to get aluminum wheels that are lighter than steelies, as cheap cast wheels are heavy. Factory alloys especially tend to be VERY heavy, the 17’s on my 328! would make nice boat anchors.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yes some OE aluminum wheels are heavy, but in general still not heavier that the same size OE steelie.

        Since I had to weigh the 17″ CVPI steelies I have because someone on a forum I visit posted a wanted add I also pulled out one of those Mustang 17″ wheels I picked up this weekend.

        Steelie 28.4
        Aluminum 23.0

        or a ~20% weight reduction and yes both are the same advertised width and unfortunately those aluminum wheels come with the made in China cast into them.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Yep, cast Al wheels tend to be on the heavy side. Forged wheels are usually lighter, and much more expensive.

        Back in my S2000 days, the forged OEM BBS wheels were 4 pounds lighter than the cast AP1 Enkeis, and those were 16s.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Scoutdude,
      I do believe tyre selection is personal. Most people want certain attributes from tyres. If you like driving hard you might want a tyre that gives you certain handling qualities. Everything from sidewall stiffness to adhesion to suit how you want to drive.

      I have bought tyres that one person swears by and found them to be wanting. Not that the tyres are bad, more they just aren’t what I wanted from a tyre.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yes the “right” tire for one person is not necessarily the “right” tire for everyone. I was just answering the questions he posed in the article wondering what kind of difference he could expect from the switch. Personally I usually go with MP or UHP summer tires, on my cars for the summer and winter tires in the winter, though I have used UHP A/S tires as summer tires.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Did you get the TruKote when you bought the car?

  • avatar
    wumpus

    ” The turbo four is forced to work overtime to counter the Edge’s heft. I believe you could squeeze better fuel economy out of the larger V6 for the sole reason that it doesn’t need to work nearly as hard to get the Edge up to speed and keep it there.”

    Look at a BSHP graph sometime. Unless you are seriously suggesting that the engine is working significantly harder than half throttle at peak torque, working harder just makes the engine more efficient.

    A bit counter intuitive, but that’s how internal combustion works.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Well for years there were aftermarket and the ocassional factory fuel economy gauge which was nothing more than a vacuum gauge which showed high vacuum as high MPG. So the gauge reads its highest when you are sitting there idling and getting 0 mpg. So yeah unfortunately some people still think that high vacuum, ie closed throttle is when you get the best efficiency. Fact is that vacuum the engine creates is parasitic drag, which of course is why Turbos are the king of CAFE. You can size the turbo so that the car makes little to no vacuum (or even a touch of boost to force those pistons down) rather than sapping off power to create that vacuum during the operating conditions of the emissions/CAFE drive cycle.

      The root of the problem with real world turbo mpg is the old saying “power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely”. The fact is that many people use the extra power potential that the turbo creates.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        “The fact is that many people use the extra power potential that the turbo creates.”

        Or manufacturers have found a way to game CAFE with carefully designed engine displacement/turbo/transmission “Systems”, that can fail to deliver advertised MPG when driven in heavy traffic, hilly terrain, or are so woefully undersized for the weight of the vehicle that they’re forced to pull, that the driver would literally be blocking traffic trying to achieve the posted MPG rating.

        Sorry if it seems like a conspiracy theory, but the physics seems to bear it out.

        Oh, and Pokemon GO will turn into a giant cash grab and security nightmare, as well as being the riskiest way to get moderate exercise.

        Damn, I’d better hire a lawyer :-(

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Mark,
    The rims you chose look one thousand percent better than the usual factory fitted ones.

    I did the same to my vehicle and the difference made me feel proud that I actually did a good job in my selection.

    As for tweaking the EcoBoost, wouldn’t there be many businesses in Halifax or wherever you live that can boost your vehicles performance? Better still do it yourself. Guys where I work tend to play around with their cars alot. This is great as they are learning.

    I waited until my 3 year warranty ran out before making modifications, except for the suspension. I’m not really a big person for engine power changes unless you make changes downstream. Remember your drive train is rated to manage so much torque.

    • 0 avatar

      Thank you for the compliment!

      I’m sure I could take the Fiesta to a custom tuner, but then I’d have to say goodbye to my factory warranty. That’s why the Mountune products are so compelling. They a mild tunes that leave the factory warranty intact.

      I don’t want big numbers, but a mild boost in performance would be fantastic.

  • avatar
    aussiefalcon

    Just to clarify, you were upset that the dealer actually took the time and effort to test your car for the fault that you reported, didn’t charge you when they couldn’t find anything wrong-now because they won’t give you something else for free you won’t use them again?

    • 0 avatar

      There wouldn’t be a charge anyway as any troubleshooting is covered under warranty. There was nothing done by the dealer for which they could charge me.

      I’m pissed that the dealer can’t account for the 50 miles put on the vehicle while they held it over the weekend. The technician in charge of the car said he didn’t drive it that far. The service manager said they have no idea why the car accumulated that much mileage. If the service manager and technician don’t know why the car accumulated 50 miles in their care, why would I take it back there again, especially when they made no effort with any kind of goodwill? Would you take your vehicle to a dealer if said dealer was putting unneeded mileage on your car?

  • avatar
    aussiefalcon

    Fair enough if they are saying they don’t know why it was driven that far. I thought they may have tested it extensively , seeing it’s a three cylinder turbo charged car with a suspected overheating issue that’s all.

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    You wouldn’t need to be pining for a “tune” if Ford hadn’t gypped you out of cylinder #4 and gave you a proper 4-cylinder engine as God intended.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    What will you gain with 17″ wheels over the 15″ stock?
    Other than less money in your bank account, lower mpg, worse ride, possible bent wheels or damaged tires from potholes?

  • avatar
    jco

    so I recently spent 2500 miles over two weeks in two different Fiestas (thank you Hertz!). when i went to pick up the rental after dropping off my 16mpg 4Runner, I had a choice between an Elantra (no), a Sentra (had just rented one a month previous and liked it), or a white Fiesta hatchback. I jumped at the hatchback, despite the tire idiot light being on. I set out on an 800 mile drive the next morning, but not before filling up on $1.70 gas. over the 800 miles, the tire got louder, but the mpg gauge showed a consistent 41mpg average. I didn’t really believe it until I refilled and did the math. 41mpg. I got very close to 500 miles on one tank. I wasn’t even driving that conservatively. this one had 26,000 miles on it, and so did the tires. hertz informed me that should the one chewed up tire causing the noise and the air leak blow up, the cost was on me. so I found another Fiesta to drive home. this time a sedan with 600 miles on it. pretty sure the sedan is heavier and i had about 200 extra pounds of gear in it on the way back. the sedan got about 39mpg.

    I was really impressed with the car, though. the DCT in the Fiesta was much smoother than the one in the Focus I had also just rented. if there was a way to mess with the software to make it shift quicker, I’d love it. back to back with a VW DSG the difference in shift quality was night and day.

    But the Sync system was infuriating, and even if you option up a Fiesta to include the bigger touchscreen it’s still not as good as the import cars.

  • avatar
    cjpaul

    Mark, as you recall I have the identical car.

    Look up pumaspeed from UK for more power. They ship to US. Check Fiesta Faction board for more insight.

    http://www.fiestafaction.com/forums/forums/60-Fiesta-1-0L-EcoBoost?s=2badd3f31733c8fd09894dad1ee24f99

    You can try 93 octane, better air filter and larger cat back exhaust for a modest gain of power (5-8 hp).

    You’ll find the 17″ to lower your city mileage due to the extra mass and rotational inertia. I went with the 15″ Sparcos that are much lighter than stock wheels. City mileage seems to have improved.

  • avatar
    ravenchris

    MS, you should tell the GM and or owner what you do for work and ask again about the mystery miles.

    • 0 avatar

      I’d never do this, and I’ll tell you why.

      For the purpose of this test, I want to be treated just like any other dealership customer. I want to report back on what you folks would experience if you were in my shoes. Looking for preferential treatment is not reflective of the market.

  • avatar
    theoldguard

    I have driven a Fiesta four years. It has been a good car—except of course for PowerShud-d-d-er transmission. Fiesta 1.0 is good example of high specific output, and one presumes highly stressed, engine. Volvo is getting 300hp out of 2 liter? How long will that engine last? With all cars going to 4 cylinders, I am more and more wishing I had never owned BMW inline-6. After that, all inline-4’s were agricultural implements. Engine design and transmission calibration are aimed at fooling CAFE, and are hurting driver experience. My next car will probably be a Mazda 3. Magazines say that it is only car that is not trying to get in 6th great at 30mph. Every car I drive today has to be kicked in the butt constantly around town to get it out of top gear.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Mark…

    Ain’t sayin you are not skilled, but the ecoboost engines do require a style change.
    I know…I have two.
    And it took me awhile to get the engines to give me exactly what they advertised: power when needed, eco when not power.
    Right now my really heavy MKS is giving me an everyday ave of around 21 with 60 suburban/40 hwy.
    On the highway, and loaded like nobody ever loads, the car sitting as low as it can and the car stuffed with everything we need for our snowbird life changes, it gets 26 from FL to MO. Every damn time.

    Today…it is showing 25.3 on the dash ave mpg. The heavy MKS.

    Our 13 Escape right now is showing 27.1 ave. OK. It is slightly 60 hwy, 40 suburban. But that is pretty damn good for the little SUV.

    Both run 93 fuel. Sometimes, when nobody’s looking, I fill up with Marine fuel. This is, I think, a mid grade.

    People need to stay off the damn power. I know it is addicting. I know the control required to not feel the kick in the back…but IF you want the advertised MPS…you NEED to drive like the turbo engine requires.

    You cannot drive these like you do every other car.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    I’m surprised nobody has pointed out that putting 50 miles on a car brought in for a phantom temperature issue is potentially a reflection of excellent service. Perhaps they were just going to great lengths to reproduce a problem that didn’t originate with the car.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Yeah that could be the case if the tech that drew that ticket claimed that he didn’t put that many miles on it while diagnosing it.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        “The dealer kept our Fiesta over a weekend and put 50 miles (80 kilometers) on the car before coming to the conclusion that it’s nothing we should worry about as the technician could not reproduce the issue.”

        I’m not seeing support for your or Mark’s interpretation.

        “However, the dealer couldn’t explain why they put so much mileage on our car, nor did they offer to make it right with a free service in the future or something similar. I told them we wouldn’t be back again.”

        You don’t think the dealer said they put the miles on trying to duplicate the imaginary problem? You work on cars. Surely, you realize that the problems here are entirely with the users and the dealer is thanking their lucky stars they’ve seen the backs of them.

        • 0 avatar

          “You don’t think the dealer said they put the miles on trying to duplicate the imaginary problem?”

          I asked the service manager why they put 80 kilometers on the car during the weekend. The service manager spoke with the tech who stated he did not put that much mileage on the car. So, someone else within the dealership drove the car over the weekend or the technician is lying.

          If the dealer said, “We were attempting to duplicate the problem and took it for an extended diagnostic test drive,” I would have been fine with it. However, the dealer could not account for the extra mileage.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          The thing is that the Tech would get paid .2 or maybe .3 hrs for diagnosis tops so it is highly unlikely that he would take if for a 50mi drive in that time. If he wants to make money he isn’t going to spend a full hour trying to duplicate a mysterious problem. This of course is often at the root of the “can’t duplicate customer concern” on the work order.

  • avatar

    Looking forward to stories from Oshawa, Mark. You have a unique opportunity to capture the possible end of a long tradition of Canadian-built General Motors vehicles. You should try and connect with Mikey if possible.

  • avatar
    operagost

    I would think the steel wheels actually weigh more than alloy wheels of the same diameter and width. That’s why alloys of lower density metals were created for performance cars in the first place– to reduce unsprung weight. Now, your 17″ alloys are going to weigh more than the 15″ steelies, but that’s because they’re both taller and wider.

    The reason Ford deletes the alloys is because they assume someone who buys the smallest engine is trying to save money, not just be green.

  • avatar
    bobmaxed

    ST owner here. If I could have bought my car with any wheels and tires (that would fit) I would have gone with 16’s. If I was going to track the car the forums advise 15’s(though brake clearance may be an issue). The ST has some stock mods that limit the size of rubber. Stock is 205/40-17. A 205/45 or a 215/40 will fit if using the stock Alum rims (around 21 lbs I think).
    I bought my car used and discovered that I had one bent rim. I don’t care for the 40 series tires. If the budget can take it I’ll buy new 16″ wheels next spring, otherwise I’ll switch to 205/45’s.
    One disclaimer is that I’m an old fart who does not care for large wheels with oversize rubber bands for tires.

  • avatar
    focaltac

    The wheels look great but going from 47.5 to 40mm offset will likely change steering feel and behavior. I stuck with 15s and found a cheap Slovakian alloy with 45mm offset. Weight is similar to OEM steels but they make more turbulence and I lost a mpg or two at freeway speeds.

    The OEM Hankooks aren’t all that bad for cheap OEM – I couldn’t deal with the training and directional instability. Continental’s TrueContact in 195/60 seemed logical and they’re a nice compromise. I’ve put 25,000 mostly-highway miles on this car in 10 months and am mostly happy. MPG average is around 42.5 in my mix. 87 octane works fine but spend a few cents more for top tier to reduce carbon buildup on the back of the intake valves!

    Also, peak efficiency with this engine is around 2500 rpm. It’ll return 45 mpg all day long if you follow the shift light and keep it at 55 or so on the highway. At 65 and up wind drag takes a toll.
    I.
    I’d skip performance tuning. That just isn’t this car’s mission.

    Any resolution around the service department miles?

  • avatar
    Hoody123

    I own the pretty much identical car (I’ve still got the steelies too!) I just tonight rolled 51,000km (not bad for slightly over a year old) I adore this little car!

    I’ve averaged 4.7l/100km for all my driving where I didn’t have a roofbox on the car, that equates to almost exactly 50mpg (US), pretty impressive considering I’m not explicitly hypermiling (but I’m driving “considerately”). I’m most impressed by the fact this car doesn’t really drop off drastically when I go above 100km/h like other cars I’ve owned. I can get as low as 4.4l/100km driving like a granny, but zipping along at 115km/h with the AC yields 4.7ish.

    I did a 9300km roadtrip earlier this summer with a roofbox on the car. Car was fully loaded (3 people and camping gear for said 3 people), driving 80mph with AC cranked (we drove to Vegas from Ontario) I averaged 6.1l/100km which again, I thought was fantastic.

    I haven’t had a single issue with the car yet, just regular full synthetic oil changes.

  • avatar

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