By on June 23, 2016

Ronnie's crashed Honda Fit, Image: © 2016 Ronnie Schreiber/The Truth About Cars

It’s been a stressful few weeks, but when I remember my children and grandchildren are healthy, everything else is gravy.

TTAC’s long-term test of the 2015 Honda Fit EX came to a sudden halt at 7,987 miles just after I began a left turn through three lanes of stopped traffic south of a red light on Groesbeck, a major road in Macomb County on the east side of Detroit.

I was going to a music store, but couldn’t remember exactly where it was, which landed me traveling in the wrong direction on Groesbeck. To effect a U-turn, I pulled into the left turn lane of the seven-lane highway to turn into some business frontage.

Perhaps I relied too much on the motorcyclist who stopped to let me turn and waved me through, or maybe the guy driving an Econoline 250 for a marine engine repair shop was going so fast in the curb lane that he wasn’t there when I checked, but he was certainly there when the nose of my Fit poked into that lane. The truck ripped off the plastic fascia of the Honda. When metal hit metal, the Fit’s bumper support tore a wide gash the length of the Econoline’s flank, ultimately chewing a chunk out of its rear tire.

At first I didn’t think it was a serious accident, but there was a strong odor, the airbag in the steering wheel had gone off, and something was obviously shoved into the engine and making an oscillating noise. As I pulled into the driveway and tried to gather my wits, a nice lady working for Honda asked me, via the Hondalink equipped infotainment system, if I was okay and if I needed her to call for emergency services.

Ronnie's crashed Honda Fit front-end close-up, Image: © 2016 Ronnie Schreiber/The Truth About Cars

The impact didn’t seem that severe. I don’t think the attitude of the car on the road even changed from the collision, and I wasn’t seriously injured. I had an abrasion on my left hand and wrist from the airbag, or maybe it was a slight burn from the propellant, and I later noticed some lower back pain, but I have a bad back and it could have been unrelated to the accident. The other driver said he was uninjured.

A couple of police officers from Fraser responded, as did a Macomb County sheriff’s deputy. I called AAA, the insurer for the car.

The Fit had been financed through a promissory note with The Bank of Mom and to protect her assets it was titled in her name and insured under her policy at the Automobile Club, where she’s been a member and paying for full collision coverage for decades. I believe that she’s insured her cars at AAA since the 1960s, and I wouldn’t be surprised if her total premiums paid reach into six figures. AAA has made a lot of money doing business with our family.

I’ve been driving for more than 40 years, but this was only the second time I’d seriously wrecked a car. I submarined a minivan stopped at a light (also on Groesbeck, maybe I should stay on my side of town) a few years back, which required about $2,500 worth of work on my old Saturn. Immediately after the accident, looking at the Fit, I figured the damages would be about double that. The headlights and radiator needed to be replaced, but there didn’t appear to be any structural damage other than the bumper support. The hood was crunched and both fenders were a bit askew.

The cops called for a wrecker, whose driver first loaded the Econoline onto the flatbed and then hooked the Fit up to his lift behind the bed. At the tow yard, I retrieved a few items from the car I’d bought during my interrupted shopping trip and waited for a ride from my son.

Ronnie's crashed Honda Fit front, Image: © 2016 Ronnie Schreiber/The Truth About Cars

I was cited for failure to yield right of way, but it will probably be dismissed because the other guy isn’t likely to show up at my court date. To add insult to injury, the City of Fraser sent me a bill for $18.30 for non-resident emergency services. Essentially, they charged me for the time of the cop who issued me a ticket. The notice said that they charge 12% interest per year. I plan on paying exactly $17.31 of that and leaving 99 cents on the account. By the time 12% on that $0.99 adds up to anything significant, the administrative costs of carrying that account and sending me regular bills will likely eat up that $18.30 — and I’ll be sure to let the folks running Fraser know that.

Yeah, my old shrink called me a “counter-puncher.” Oh well.

Ronnie's crashed Honda Fit with completely straight passenger cell, Image: © 2016 Ronnie Schreiber/The Truth About Cars

When I told Mark Stevenson, my boss here at TTAC, that I totaled the Fit, his response was “That will make an awesome article.” Thanks, Mark. My life is not complete without embarrassing myself in front of two million monthly pageviews.

Actually, I had already planned on writing about it. When I cleaned out the car, I brought along my 3D rig to record the wreckage for posterity. In recent years, Honda has promoted its use of what it calls Advanced Compatibility Engineering (ACE) body design. ACE was introduced about 10 years ago and is intended to absorb collision energy in a way that leaves the passenger cell unaffected, and the other vehicle less damaged. It uses four different grades of steel in the unibody — mild steel, high strength steel, advanced high strength steel, and ultra high strength steel — to keep things strong where they need to be rigid and soft where they need to crush. The latest development in the ACE architecture is selectively tempering different sections of a hot-stamped high strength steel parts. That allows those sections to be softer, reducing the number of parts and weight.

Honda's Advanced Compatibility Engineering body architecture in the 2016 Civic., Image: Honda

Though I said that the impact wasn’t severe, that was a subjective characterization. Objectively, the collision was severe enough to bend frame members and total the car. Walking around the wrecked Fit, I checked the panel gaps on the doors. Other than the deployed airbag, from the cowl and A pillar back, the car was in perfect shape. As far as I can tell, ACE does work. My Fit was totaled, but I’m okay. I’ll gladly eat that gravy.

It works well enough that I’m going to keep a record of the Fit’s VIN, because with just 8,000 miles on the drivetrain and a mostly intact body, I’m almost certain it will be back on the road with a salvage title.

I’ll report on TTAC’s long term 2015 Honda Fit EX 6MT test, the remix, once I get back from Texas.

[Images: © 2016 Ronnie Schreiber/The Truth About Cars, Honda]

Ronnie Schreiber edits Cars In Depth, a realistic perspective on cars & car culture and the original 3D car site. If you found this post worthwhile, you can get a parallax view over at Cars In Depth. – Thanks for reading – RJS

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175 Comments on “TTAC’s Long-Term Test 2015 Honda Fit: The Bell Tolls at 7,987 Miles...”


  • avatar
    VoGo

    Glad to hear you are well.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Takata’s latest airbag propellant: check.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        My wife formerly drove a 2007 Honda Fit and I drove a 2006 Acura RSX. Everytime I saw an article that said “Takata recall expanded!!!” I would check. The Fit and the RSX were never on the list. I think the 1st generation fit and the RSX were close to being the only Hondas from that vintage to NOT have the Takata airbags.

        • 0 avatar

          I think the 2G is not on it either. Takata is not the only bargain-basement airbag supplier and Honda used a different one.

          • 0 avatar
            Sketch

            2nd gen Fit is on the list. The dealership we bought my wife’s 2009 from said they had several in the back that they couldn’t sell because they were waiting on airbags. Customer cars apparently get priority. The previous owner had it done a few months before trading it in.

        • 0 avatar
          denvertsxer

          My 06 TSX hasn’t shown up on the list yet either.

  • avatar
    MBella

    That’s too bad, but glad that you are OK Ronnie.

  • avatar
    garuda

    HELLCAT HELL CAT! He He He HE HE HELL CAAAAATTTTTT!

    Im right, you are
    wrong, and I do not care about you.

    But I will tell you that I do not care about you multiple times… because that is what people who do not
    care about you do;

    insist that you know that you care not at all about
    them. HELL CAT!!

    Am I doing it right?

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    Yowch, that’s a sobering opening photograph; glad to learn you’re okay.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    I was the other party in a very similar collision years ago on Van Dyke approaching 12 Mile. I was in the rightmost lane traveling at a little below posted speed, and the cars in the two lanes to my left which had been waiting for the light to turn green waved through a guy driving (coincidentally) an Econoline. I T-boned him so hard the side doors were nearly opened fully inward. Thankfully he was the only one in the van and I hit it on the passenger side, and I was wearing my seatbelt (truck was pre-airbags.)

    You never, NEVER, make a left turn unless you can verify yourself that all oncoming lanes are clear. It doesn’t matter if someone waves you through, it’s your responsibility. Since that accident, I’ve steadfastly refused wave-throughs when making a left, to the point where if they insist I flip them the bird just to piss them off enough to get moving.

    “I was cited for failure to yield right of way, but it will probably be dismissed because the other guy isn’t likely to show up at my court date. ”

    There is zero chance you’ll get that ticket dismissed, especially since there was a collision you were assigned fault for. The citation and the police report are all they need. The other guy doesn’t have to show up for anything.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I’ve seen one of these happen. Good Samaritan stopped in the right lane of the two-lane road in her big van to let out an Accord wanting to make a difficult (busy street) left. Out the Accord comes, and WHAM hit in the LF fender and door by the left lane sedan which couldn’t see through the van to know the car was coming out.

      Best to just let traffic flow normally and not let your “kindness” interfere. She’d be able to pull out there eventually.

      • 0 avatar
        sco

        Totally with jimz and corey on this, your kindness in waving someone through when you dont have the full view of the situation could get them killed. I’ve personally seen several close calls, some at high speed. Please dont do this and please dont be angry with me when i refuse your invitation.

        • 0 avatar
          Silent Ricochet

          @sco

          Unfortunately, I agree. Kindness is, more often than not, dangerous on the road. Letting someone merge into your lane during a traffic jam is one thing, but I can’t tell you how many accidents I’ve seen happen from people coming to a complete halt on a 45 MPH road to let someone pull out in front of them.

          • 0 avatar
            burgersandbeer

            Good samaritans are indeed a menace on the road. I’ve also been on the other end of this accident, though traffic was moving fairly slowly anyway so I was almost able to stop. Just a tap and no damage to either car.

            The only time I’m letting someone take a left in front of me is when traffic is barely moving. And no way I’m waving anyone anywhere. I’ll leave the gap and give someone a few seconds to notice and take advantage if they think it’s safe, but that’s it.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            My grandmother had a similar accident several years ago, when someone else waved-through somebody, who she ended up T-boning. (Why her ’91 Tempo wasn’t totaled, God knows! The LKQ starboard headlight she got hazed almost a gold color almost immediately! She had worked for 30 years as a secretary in the underwriting department at AAA in Dearborn, so maybe that’s why they fixed the car. Did a reasonable job aside from that headlight!)

            Sounds like you had a mandatory appearance because of the prior incident, perhaps. Take the lumps, pay the ticket, get another Fit, and count your blessings!

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-Iron

        CoreyDL is a stupid piece of sh1t but she is right about this.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          “CoreyDL is a stupid piece of sh1t but she is right about this.’

          If you weren’t so stupid, poor and old you’d have probably just hired a Cessna to tow a banner saying I’M STUPID, POOR AND OLD, huh?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            He’s not going to let that go. Took that online slight to his reading comprehension quite badly.

    • 0 avatar
      srh

      There was a case in Oregon where a driver stopped to let two schoolchildren cross the road. He waved them across. They crossed, and were killed by a car hidden behind the good samaritan.

      Families sued the waver and won.

      Regardless, I don’t like the tone of this article. The author is clearly 100% at fault, but he seems to deflect blame (“Maybe the other guy was going too fast”). And not paying your $18.30 is not a counter-punch, it’s a jerk move that will probably backfire.

    • 0 avatar
      Advance_92

      It’s also not a good idea to speed along in the right lane when other lanes are stopped, particularly at intersections where you can’t see. But that’s if you want to avoid a crash rather than assert your rights (or more likely just weren’t paying attention).

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Had a similar incident the other week on a local road that is seeing horrible traffic due to a major Toledo-area I-75 junction being closed all summer. Two lanes of traffic stopped at a two-way intersection where the oncoming traffic has a protected left-turn into the street. I was coming the opposite way, wishing to turn right onto the street, and I slowed to a crawl as I came alongside the stopped cars. Sure enough, one of the drivers had waved someone through, but my stop was no more intense than sitting in a drive-through line (though the look on the woman’s face, eyes as wide as saucers, along with her dropping what I assume was a phone from her right hand, was priceless; should have smiled and waved)!

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    Glad to hear you are ok. The upside is that the Fit looks better now than it did before the accident.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Lol @ Fit looks better!

    • 0 avatar

      +1

      I’m really happy you walked away with nothing more than a case of embarassment and outrageous city fees.

      “When I told Mark Stevenson, my boss here at TTAC, that I totaled the Fit, his response was “That will make an awesome article.” Thanks, Mark. My life is not complete without embarrassing myself in front of two million monthly pageviews.”

      Heh. I love it.

      Edit: Also– good job, Honda engineers.

  • avatar
    cblais19

    That looks similar to how my ’12 Fit looked after the wife slid it into the back of a van during a snowy day here in Virginia. Despite some frame damage (and about 9k in estimated repairs) the insurance company decided not to total it, probably because the powertrain was intact. Never was quite as solid feeling afterward.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    No longer Fit for service………..?

  • avatar
    Joss

    Gosh darn that timing! Shame it didn’t happen to the old car Ronnie. But then you and your precious cargo may not have faired so well..

    Nobody got hurt that’s all that counts. Just a couple of smashed vehicles.

    • 0 avatar

      No precious cargo that day, just me and some stuff. I do sometimes watch my grandson on Tuesdays, but I didn’t have him that day, thank God. I doubt he’d have been hurt, I have a pretty good car seat (the same one that likely saved Jack’s son from injury in his bad wreck) but it would have been scary for him.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I’m glad that you’re mostly okay – at least as of now (you should probably get MRI of back in case you need to make a claim for PIP benefits).

    Do you know how fast you and/or the other driver was traveling at point of impact?

    A seemingly odd question, but humor me: Where was this Fit made? I’m not sure if it did well crash-wise b/c that would depend on such speeds and % of offset (if any) at point of impact.

    Groesbeck is a genuinely dangerous road from at least I-696 to 16 mile, for both conventional motorists and especially to motorcyclists (many bikers avoid it due to its well-deserved reputation for high speeds, illegal u-turns, major tractor-trailer traffic, and spotty road surface conditions and road debris).

    Finally, Fraser PD and the city in general are among the worst PDs and cities to have to deal with regarding most things. As an example, Fraser PD have had notorious speed traps set up along 15 mile road from Hayes to Horseback for years, because the speed limit goes from 40 to 35, and then down to 25, suddenly, and then back up to 55, suddenly, in 3 spots, within a one a on-half mile stretch.

    Fraser has a well-known reputation for using such speed traps and traffic enforce ent as a major source of city revenue (more so than most cities).

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      “I was cited for failure to yield right of way, but it will probably be dismissed because the other guy isn’t likely to show up at my court date. To add insult to injury, the City of Fraser sent me a bill for $18.30 for non-resident emergency services. Essentially, they charged me for the time of the cop who issued me a ticket.”

      On the traffic ticket dismissal, Fraser district court is one of the least likely municipal courts to dismiss tickets for any reason – including the failure of a witness to appear (judges/magistrates there have been known to adjourn hearings 3x or even more x to ensure a case can be prosecuted).

      • 0 avatar

        Having dealt with insurance companies and lawyers after an accident, Mr. Schreiber has already screwed himself where injury payments are concerned. If you tell anyone you weren’t hurt, or, that you’re not sure your pain was caused by an accident, you will have a very difficult time getting any accident related injuries paid even if they’re legitimate. The insurance company’s lawyer will trot out every person you told you were OK as their witness in court. It’s an uphill climb and you probably won’t prevail. In his case, he’s told thousands of people now.

        My lawyer suggests this after an accident: When asked if you are hurt, tell everyone that you “hurt everywhere.” It’s easily amendable later. A Judge or jury will understand when you testify that after the fact you discovered it was only your neck that got damaged, but it’s hard to convince a Judge or jury that your neck started hurting days or weeks later. And go get yourself checked out immediately. A walk in clinic will do. Emergency room even better. My lawyer says he’ll “drop kick them into the next century” if I do those things.

        Like Mr. Schreiber, I’m one of the good guys and wouldn’t normally ever think like that.

        Some time ago I found myself the meat in the sandwich in a 6 car interstate accordion-style accident. Traffic was stopped and I got hit from behind and shoved into the vehicle in front of me. I told the trooper working the scene that I seemed to be Ok. I was out and walking around but I was sore. A week later my neck was still hurting and I sought medical treatment for it. I never did get reimbursed for that.

        If a similar accident ever happens again my answer to “Are you hurt” will definitely be “I hurt EVERYWHERE!”

        • 0 avatar
          dlc

          Except Mr. Schreiber is 100% at fault for causing this collision, and he’s not going to be collecting any kind of bodily injury settlement even if he were severely hurt. There’s a reason we call these a “suckerhole.”

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Michigan has a truly unique auto insurance regulatory scheme. Michigan is a “no-fault” insurance state.

            Individuals injured in automotive accidents are entitled to PIP (personal injury protection benefits) for life, regardless as to who is at fault for causing the accident.

            This benefit doesn’t extend to traditional tort-type claims for alleged non-economic (i.e. pain & suffering) type losses, however, and certain criminal activities (I BELIEVE impaired driving is one such activity) can act as a bar towards receiving PIP benefits.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @DW

            I’m very much enjoying the spin off show from Grexit, Brexit, are you? Grexit season 5 was such a bore.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Remain will win. Whether by 4% or .04%.

            Some call me a conspiracy theorist but I’m really just a realist (realizing that the fix has been in).

            If it’s not at least somewhat close, it makes the fix too obvious.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Uh oh, DW Brexit prophecy defeated!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            They really make it good though even though you already know the ending!

            Kinda like all of those teen movies where the kid does something in a montage and then becomes awesome but still loses by 0.0001% while still learning a message about hard work (or something).

            Additional: Oh snap, the odds of remain plummeted! Wow, what a good show!

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Curious as to the speed also. Frontal airbags usually don’t deploy unless impact was 30 degrees off center….did you t-bone the van?

    • 0 avatar

      I was creeping, I’d estimate that he was doing at least 40. My Fit was Hecho en Mexico. They moved US market Fit production to Japan to free up capacity for the HR-V in Mexico.

      As for the dismissal, that’s what the cop told me. Yeah, I know. I was stunned after the accident and might have been more gullible than usual.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Trying and failing to remember: is Groesbeck medianed, with “Michigan Lefts,” like Gratiot and Van Dyke in that area? (My guess is “no,” based upon Ronnie’s story.) Perhaps I’m thinking of another north/south parallel artery east of Woodward whose name escapes me at the moment.

  • avatar
    April S

    It seems rather petty and juvenile not to pay the bill in full.

    • 0 avatar

      The result might be that you can’t renew your drivers license. Or that’s it’s revoked. Hopefully Speedlaw will weigh in and tell us.

    • 0 avatar
      210delray

      It wouldn’t be Ronnie if he passed up a chance to stick it to The Man. Glad he and the other driver are basically okay though.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        This. Ronnie loves every chance to be a nickel and dime rebel and thorn to administrative procedures.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Reminds me of the story about the guy who tried to pay a fine by writing the check on a pair of underwear.

          http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/1992-01-20/news/9201200328_1_underwear-speeding-ticket-jail

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That’s not the sort of roll of quarters they were after.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            A couple months ago, I saw something on the news where some twentysomething dude was ticketed for only a few over, and was still found guilty even after going to court. So he “arranged” to make payment at a later time (didn’t have a checkbook with him); he brought back the equivalent fine IN PENNIES, and with camera rolling, dumped the mountain of change on the clerk’s counter, flipped her the bird, and walked away, leaving the bewildered clerk to count it. (I believe it was eventually determined that he had overpaid by a couple bucks, but he didn’t ask for it back.)

            Downtown Toledo, OH, where I work, has two private parking-lot operators, both of whom have bad reputations for customer-service; a couple years ago, the one running the lot I use fired all their lot attendants, who usually would know who parked there on a daily basis, and would issue monthly tags in person (at which time after you presented your check and received the new permit, you’d put it in your car; the rule has always been that the permit for the month has to be on the mirror post (or at least visible in the windshield) by the fifth calendar-day; you could get away every so often without the visible permit if you forgot to transfer your permit if you were driving another car, as I was last Friday, or if you forgot to move the permit back to your car, as happened this past Monday — just left the freakin’ thing on my table at home after I had a service loaner while my car was being detailed). After they fired the lot attendants, they went to online payment for monthly parking, and have roving enforcers who are likely the ENVY of the baddest-‘tuded of any municipal meter maids!

            Which got me in trouble this week, because I had forgotten to put my permit in by the fifth this month, one and only one strike! (They kindly waived that ticket when I called their office.) So when I called their office to check on the notice I received on the car this Monday ($10), I was rudely told to go suck it!

            So like that guy at the top of this TL;DR, I almost went to get $10 in pennies to dump on their counter. Fortunately, I took the high road, and slapped a $10 bill down! I don’t want to lose any future goodwill the NEXT time I fvck up! ;-)

        • 0 avatar
          April S

          “Ronnie loves every chance to be a nickel and dime rebel and thorn to administrative procedures.”

          Right up there with the Founding Fathers

          (maybe in his mind)

        • 0 avatar
          Brunsworks

          In that case, I think the most appropriate thing to do is pay a penny over. That should ensure that he avoids any administrative penalties, but the cost to the city of Fraser to service that credit will be measurable if still insignificant. In my experience, the now-debtor will issue statements showing the credit of $.01 for some long period like 12 or 24 months and then petition (along with a bunch of similar tiny debts) to have it written off by some financial authority or other.

          Or a computer programmer and his two buddies in Texas (or one guy working for an arch-villain) will steal it.

      • 0 avatar
        Ubermensch

        “It wouldn’t be Ronnie if he passed up a chance to be an insufferable fuddy-duddy.”

        FTFY

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      And just not that smart in the long run.

      In addition to them possibly blocking license renewal it will get reported to the credit agencies.

      It will also likely show up if you get stopped later. That could be the difference between the cop giving a verbal warning to slow it down, writing that 83 in a 70 for 78 in a 70, and a cop going ahead and writing the ticket for as much as he can and seeing if there are any other tickets than can be added on.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      yeah, first responders don’t work for free. Don’t want your taxes raised? Great, get ready for a service fee. I her some fire departments are doing this too.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I’m sorry you were involved in a collision and the Fit was totaled, but I’m glad you’re okay to tell us the story. Really, that is a feat of modern engineering. Even 10 years ago, subcompact cars—in particular—were flimsy enough that a collision with any sort of substantial vehicle would have had you in traction, at best. But the Fit is quite safe.

    As for ACE, I remember Honda first advertising that on the 2006 Acura RDX, and then the 2007 Acura MDX. It does seem to work. And selectively tempering different portions of the same stamped component? That’s very intriguing. I’d love to learn more about how that’s done.

    • 0 avatar
      tsoden

      In 2007, Brilliance BC6 was crash tested and came out with a zero:

      https://youtu.be/Mbe5ILICT4M

      It is amazing how far we have advanced since then….

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        That made me physically ill to watch. And that wasn’t even a small overlap; that was a moderate overlap, on which every U.S.-market car since the early 2000s has performed well.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          The door bowed outward for safety! Gives the driver more room to move away from the tire coming toward him.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Lol.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            I have NEVER seen the entire structure fold like that did.

            Didja notice that the windshield was mostly intact?! :-O (I’ll bet that glass shard flying past the camera was headlight!)

            “Coming in SUV form to a Bruick dealer near you!”

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    Glad you’re both okay as well.

    I witnessed a very similar thing a couple years ago while driving my Taurus in Mobile, AL. Everyone stopped to let this 2nd gen Odyssey through, except a 2010-ish Escape in the far lane. It happened right behind me and the Odyssey was spun around so it was parallel to my car (he was also attempting to pull into a business, so he wasn’t at an angle when he was was struck).

    I asked the driver of the Odyssey if he was okay, he nodded yes, I saw the Escape driver get out (in my mirror) and start checking the damage to his vehicle, so I went ahead when the light changed and traffic in front of me moved.

    Ha, a Honda getting hit by a Ford during an attempt at the same manouver. I just realized that. Funny.

    Hopefully the biker who waived you in wasn’t being malicious.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The Odyssey driver thought he wa okay, but died later as the Ford Escape initiated “project iron dome sequencing” during the crash, in order to protect the life of the Ford vehicle driver and its occupants.

      I can’t get into details for security reasons, but that Honda Odyssey driver later died of two punctured lungs, a cerebral hematoma, 19 1/2 compound broken bones, and a sucking chest wound.

      Moral of story: If you want to come out of accidents without a scratch, regardless of speeds/circumstances of vehicular accidents, drive a Ford or literally gamble with your life and those of your passengers.

  • avatar
    deanst

    It drives me crazy when a car in one lane of traffic stops to let you turn, often blocking a sight line to perhaps 2 other lanes that have no idea what you are trying to do. Cars behind the stopped vehicle can get frustrated, while cars in the other lanes may still be moving quickly. The “courteous” driver has created a huge potential for an accident.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      I just wave back when someone tries to do that with me. They must think I’m a moron (…) but they eventually get the point.

      Most of the time, these people are holding-up dozens of people behind them, as well as the person going the other way.

      • 0 avatar
        dlc

        You can make the turn, just do it one lane at a time. Car waves you in, you move in front of THAT car and stop. Now see if the next lane is clear. And so on.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Yeah, I don’t make that turn. I wave them through, or wait them out. If every other lane is stopped, then I’ll go. Maybe it annoys some people, but I don’t have to worry about having an accident like this.

      Glad Ronnie’s OK though.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      A few years back here, one of the frustrated drivers in the backed up lane pulled into the other lane to go around and drove directly into the kid on a bicycle whom the “courteous” driver had stopped for. Killed him dead.

      That road now has a crosswalk with enough lighting that you can see it from space.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Exactly. I don’t trust people who stop when there are multiple lanes of traffic. If nothing else, someone from the stopped lane may get impatient and swerve into the free lane…just as I’m turning. And I’ll be rightly liable for it. Just wait until there’s a clear break in traffic or all lanes have stopped to let you through (which does happen).

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      After reading about a driver who was assessed 40% liability for waving a car through “stopped” traffic that was then hit by a lane splitter… I just stare blankly while they make all kinds of frustrated motions. I keep the intersection clear by not blocking it, but I DO NOT direct traffic. Ever. The courts took that away.

      Ronnie, if you see this, glad you’re OK. It makes me sad to see these little soldiers give their all to protect us, but … they do it so well now.

  • avatar
    bryanska

    I’ve seen the wave-in cause two accidents. Both screwed with the system of right-of-way.

    On a related note, just what is the deal with men waving other people on at stop signs? I mean in situations where the waver has obvious right of way? It’s always some douchey two-finger flick to one side, as if he’s doing someone a favor.

    I’m a guy, so I’m not being sexist, I’ve just never seen a woman do it.

    • 0 avatar
      everybodyhatesscott

      I don’t think anything drives me more crazy than the person who can’t figure out it’s their turn at a stop sign. It’s 5 oclock, everyone is sorta doing that half stop and it’s all doing fairly smoothly, then some guy or gal comes to a complete stop, then sorta half pulls out, then stops, then waves someone through, then sorta half goes through again screwing up the whole process.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Yeah, there’s room for courtesy with lane changes, perhaps, but not with right-of-way situations where there’s opposing traffic and the potential for a serious accident. When I’m on the road, I don’t behave in a manner that’s “polite”; I behave in a manner that’s predictable to other drivers and least likely to cause accidents. If you’re at a stop sign, it should be pretty clear who has the right of way.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        At 4-way stops, sometimes if it’s going to be “unclear” who got there first I will let myself roll forward a little longer to make myself last. The unsure drivers make me nuts.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          That’s a good idea. I’ll have to try that. There are two four-way stops that I deal with every morning when I come into the office.

        • 0 avatar
          bryanska

          yes! Exactly what i do, to make sure the situation is very clear.

          Sometimes when I’m pretty sure I got there first, I’ll gun it and go first. But that’s in about 10% of circumstances when I sense I’m on the cusp and it would be confusing, and I’m certain I got there first.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            I mentioned this a month or so back in this very forum: I do everything in my power to make sure I come to a stop dead last! Failing that, brights-blipping and horn-honking will get my point across! If you have the righ-of-way, you WILL use it if I have anything to do with it!

            And as I also stated: if nothing else, the driver to your right has the right-of-way, just as on the water or in the air!

      • 0 avatar
        PeriSoft

        “I don’t behave in a manner that’s “polite”; I behave in a manner that’s predictable to other drivers”

        This. When you’re in a small down in the sticks, drive polite if other people drive polite. But when you’re in Manhattan, drive like a f*cking a**hole, because that’s what everyone expect you to do, and it makes life far easier for everybody!

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          I have no issue driving like that in Dallas, whose drivers are extremely agressive, yet thoroughly untalented. I nearly sent a guy in a new GLC-Class into a guardrail while I was there a couple of weeks ago, because he kept tailgating me.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    That sucks!

    Are you planning on replacing the Fit with another one?

  • avatar
    michal1980

    1) your fault

    2) Bank of Mom, Moms insurance makes it sound like your 16, but then you claim to have 40 years of driving experience, which puts you in the 50s……

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      I was wondering about that too. Using Mom’s car as a long term test car?

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      3) No crap! Great deduction. But not if proven in court the truck was moving at a illegal limit.
      4) Your handle implies you’re an infant…by car years.

      My wife and I also used a little parent money years ago.
      We purchased our first home with”mom” money. However, the point was to pay our parents the interest at a slightly higher rate than the banks and thus have your family make the interest instead of a friggin bank.

      Its how the smart use money.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        It is one thing to borrow money from mom and another thing to put both the title to the car and the insurance for the car in her name.

        As an adult my wife and I just borrowed a substantial amount of money from the “Bank of Mom” for an investment property. We did it for the same reason of it gives us a lower cost and her a higher return. It is very secure for her since it represents only about 40% of the value of the house. However the house and insurance are in our name, but she has a county recorded mortgage lien on the property. We enlisted the services of a 3rd party servicing company that prepares the proper tax statements, balance, imposes late fees if appropriate, ect.

    • 0 avatar

      @michal1980:

      The writer just went through a miserable experience. What is being helped by your snarky comments?

  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    Glad everyone is OK, Ronnie.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick 2012

      Also, at least in Indiana, if the driver signaled to you, he may have owed you a duty of care.

      ‘Finding that a signaling driver may owe a duty of care to a third party motorist as a matter of law when his actions result in the reasonable reliance by the signaled driver that traffic is clear, we hold that the trial court did not err in denying the motions.’

      scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=13426645037200196460&hl=en&as_sdt=6&as_vis=1&oi=scholarr

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Indiana is so ignorant, I find myself glad quite often I don’t live there anymore.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          Indiana is essentially a chillier Mississippi with a couple instances of Dee-Troit tossed in.

          But I got no problem with slapping an overconfident idiot of a waver.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I think Indiana might have a worse governor than Mississippi as well. He’s backtracking the state into the 1880s.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            That’s an interesting combination.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            “He’s backtracking the state into the 1880s.”

            That and an ample supply of shotgun shells are what most Hoosiers want.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I get darn ‘spicious of them people who kin read stuff. Only mah preacher needs to do any reedin, an it’s in tha Bahble.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Hey, don’t get me wrong. It can be a great life if you’re white, male and healthy.

            I’d probably take it over our current trajectory unimpeded.

          • 0 avatar
            Nick 2012

            To be fair, Indiana’s judiciary is quite good when compared to other states. The court’s opinion only indicated that a duty existed, and didn’t apportion blame or liability based on the waiver’s conduct.

            Also, Indiana heavily relies on its state constitution, giving citizens broader rights than the Federal constitution in some key areas, such as search and seizure (the recent SCOTUS case allowing evidence obtained from a flatly illegal stop probably will not be relevant to state criminal law, as Indiana imposes a higher search and seizure standard) and free speech.

            In one (in)famous case, a drunk person screaming obscenities at the police for their actions in the middle of the night had her disorderly conduct conviction reversed because of her state constitutional right to almost absolute freedom of political expression (“We cannot conclude, however, that the harm they [neighbors and police] suffered rose above the level of a fleeting annoyance.”)

            law.justia.com/cases/indiana/supreme-court/1993/49s02-9311-cr-1197-4.html

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Real good small game huntin’ too.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I overall really like the people of Indiana. Now, there’s wild variations in who Hoosiers are, from inner city urban dwellers, union factory workers, farmers, suburbanites, etc. But for me, coming from crunchy granola Ithaca NY, it was a breath of fresh air to deal with people that are overall more grounded in more REAL everyday concerns (ie having a job, providing for their family). Versus having a fit when the hapless Cambodian restaurateur at the local farmers market accidentally put a non-vegan spring roll on a plate and tried to simply replace it with a correct vegan variant on said soiled plate (this really did happen).

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You’re exempt from my Indiana generalities by the way!

            Though certain parts of Indy have people who are very much -not- grounded in reality or normal concerns.

            *cough cough Carmel*

        • 0 avatar
          Nick 2012

          “Indiana is so ignorant…”

          We seem to vacillate between electing really good leaders or bone-heads. Gov. Daniels(R) objectively left the state better off than he found it, from privatizing assets, not being afraid to admit when privatization failed in some cases, breaking with orthodoxy to raise taxes for full-day kindergarten, etc.

          Then, we get people like Bob Morris, who refused to vote for a resolution for national Girl Scout day because, among other issues, “those considered role models by the Girl Scouts are all ‘feminists, lesbians, or Communists’ and claims that troops are no longer allowed to pray or sing Christmas Carols.”

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/20/bob-morris-indiana-law-ma_n_1289489.html

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Interesting. I think that’s a stupid rule, but interesting nevertheless. You wouldn’t be able to use it effectively unless the waver were stupid enough to actually stick around and disclose to the police that he waved you on…which is unlikely.

        Then again…

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Glad you’re ok, fortunately you didn’t make it far enough into the lane to test the resilience of the ultra high strength steel.

    What you experienced was what insurance adjusters call the “wave of death.” It is an extraordinarily common scenario and it’s not unheard of for the person doing the waving to be charged with some fault in the accident. That is, if they stick around – which they never do.
    My advice, never wave someone though and never accept a wave from someone if you can’t completely see the traffic in the lane. I avoid turning through stopped traffic at all cost.

    The most common scenario for accidents, by a significant magnitude, is at the end of ramps and turn/merge lanes. Where the person in front appears to be going and the person behind looks to see if the way is clear, not seeing that the person in front has stopped. I’d speculate that 3 out of every 5 claims I handled involved this scenario.

    • 0 avatar
      aycaramba

      That’s the scenario that got me in my then-new 2014 Accord. Pulling out of a parking lot into a merge lane, when the car ahead of me suddenly stops (cold feet about merging). I sit there for a bout 3 seconds, and in that time, the lady behind me pulls out of the parking lot and stops on the accelerator, likely looking over her left shoulder to merge. She never saw me stopped there and slammed into my family and me.

      Props to Honda for engineering a car to safely absorb the impact. Though my wife would disagree to some extent, as she still suffers neck and back problems.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Probably one or two punted into low-Earth orbit, never to be seen again!

  • avatar
    Notadude

    I’m glad you are okay, Ronnie.

    Your article is well timed for me because the Fit is the car I intend to replace my TDI Golf with. The picture of your car with the front crushed is more valuable than any dealer photo of a new, intact car. It’s surprising how well you were protected.

    Thanks for sharing.

    • 0 avatar
      garuda

      If I read the account of the collision right, most of the energy was a shearing force, and not a crushing force. If the Fit had more strength and mass in the part that was sheared off, then the driver would have endured more impact. As it is, with the parts taken off, the picture looks like the cabin was the epitome of strength, when in fact, very little of the total force was directed towards the cabin.
      Having said that, this is not an impact that is tested against for, which means the cabin strength shown here was isotropic, and is a good indication of overall strength.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Glad to hear your OK , metal can be replaced , people not so much, glad to hear the fit did it’s job, but for me size matters, my daughter is driving a Volvo wagon for a reason and it is size and safety.

  • avatar
    210delray

    My mother was involved in a wave-through crash about 5 years ago. She was exiting from a shopping center to make a left turn at a stop sign onto a 2-lane 35-mph road. A man going in one direction on the road waved her out. But she failed to check in the other direction, and was hit in the front fender and wheel.

    She was only shaken up, luckily not hit directly in the occupant compartment. Her 7-year-old Camry was totaled. Once those front unibody rails are bent sideways and the front suspension is destroyed on one side, it’s off to the scrapyard.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I thought I’ve seen on this very forum that if the firewall is even suspected of being compromised, the car is ausgespielt. This looks like enough lateral force could have crinkled it just a little.

      From the head-on picture, it almost looks as if the A-pillars were bowed just a hair — note the hatch-mark looking areas on the side of the windshield. That couldn’t be put right; hell, if there’s enough force to pop an airbag, I’m gonna fight with everything I’ve got to ensure that the car is written-off, as even if by some magic the car is bungee-corded and duct-taped to perfection where I can’t see it, my OCD WILL get the best of me, and every little chiggle from the sunglasses-holder will have me convinced somethings about to go seriously wrong!

      Ronnie, did the hazard flashers automatically activate? Honda doesn’t put this information in the O/Ms, but some forum commenters, on VTEC.net and maybe here, are sure they’ve seen that happen in crash tests. (I would assume the power locks opened as well, though newer Hondas pop them automatically when the driver’s door is opened.)

      Didn’t realize that the latest HondaLink had crash-notification built-in — kudos to them for doing so even on the Fit!

  • avatar

    When I read “submarined a minivan”, my first mental image was of a Dodge Caravan going underwater. Then I saw he was driving a Saturn and realized he just rear-ended it and went under the bumper.

  • avatar
    Shinoda is my middle name

    The author seems to be taking rather lightly an incident which, if the timing were slightly different, could have resulted in significant injury. In short, you were careless and deserved the ticket you received. I, too, agree that to contest the ticket and not pay the fine fully is childish, immature and petty. What’s worse, you blithely dismiss your inattentive driving, which puts others peoples health, property and even lives at risk. TTAC should be about safety first. I know we of the B&B can be rather cavalier about such things, but really, it is a personal performance failure if either you or your car or others don’t make it home in 100% the same condition they left home.

    Yeah, I know sh*t happens, but there is a lesson to be learned (especially if this is the second accident this driver has been in) and to treat this so fricking cavalierly indicates a disregard and an unwillingness to learn. . Put it another way: how would you have felt if the situation were reversed and the other driver was the one who turned in front of you? Would you be so blithe and carefree about it?

    • 0 avatar
      Stumpaster

      Jack has a name for you: narcissist. You don’t know what Ronnie meant by “curb lane”, nor do you know how fast a truck was moving. Just today I saw an Audi with ricer exhaust punch it past traffic in a “curb lane” which was really a shoulder.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Having plenty of experience with the traffic behavior of Econolines piloted by individuals who aren’t likely to show up a court date, I wouldn’t lose a lot of sleep over it.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      So, I’m just curious, how would you have wanted the article to be written? At what point would you say that Ronnie demonstrated an appropriate level of remorse or shame?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Riiiight, because you’ve never, ever, EVER made a mistake in traffic.

      Lighten up, dude.

    • 0 avatar

      If I gave the impression that I’m taking the accident lightly, you can blame my writing. Also, Mark Stevenson had to edit it down from almost 4,000 words. He did a great job but some of my personal reflections were left out.

      I try to learn from my experiences. I’ve spent considerable time reflecting on the accident, how it happened and what I can do to avoid something like it again. I’ve been trying to come up with a good explanation for how I could miss something as large as an E250 Econoline.

      It’s not fun wrecking a brand new car. It’s not fun having to clean out your personal stuff from a wrecked car in a lot somewhere.

      As for “especially if this is the second accident”. In more than 44 years of driving I’ve been in exactly two collisions that required calling the police or an insurance company. While that doesn’t make me the safest driver in the world, I’m probably no worse than average.

      I am, however, willing to expose myself to criticism. I didn’t have to write this post.

      As for contesting the ticket, that’s just common sense.

  • avatar
    Hoodedhawk1

    I think the “wave in” ought to be illegal on multi-lane roads. I never wave anyone in and when I leave a gap for others to turn across In front of me I usually regret it for the near disasters that unfold in front of me. I know its not always easy to make a left turn at a light and to turn around in a parking lot or go around the block, but it has to be safer when you want to go the opposite direction than shooting the gap by a “friendly” motorist. I always think to myself that if I get killed in an accident it will be because of some seemingly friendly motorist ignoring common sense and local traffic laws and allowing another motorist to do something really unsafe that results in a multi-car accident and somehow I end up dead as a result of the chaos. The moral of the story: don’t wave people thru or leave gaps on multi-lane roads. It is a recipe for disaster.

    • 0 avatar
      chuckrs

      This times 1000. After 40+ years driving, I have had enough experience with close calls in left turns across multiple lanes of traffic to spend the extra few minutes to turn at the next controlled intersection and double back. Beats spending a longer period of time dealing with an accident, injury, pranged vehicle, cops/courts and insurance.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Shazbat. Glad you’re OK and that the Fit took care of you. There are Fits in my family.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Glad to hear you are OK and you hurt anyone else in the accident. In my Past life I worked in a trauma center and there is no such thing as a little wreck especially if seat belts are not worn. Pictures of each MVA motor vehicle accident would be attached to the patient chart. Simply amazing how some people survive through those MVA’s.

    One question why play games and not pay your ticket/charges?

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      See my comment above!

      Did you try to contest things the last time?

      I learned the hard way that the best thing to do if someone else is at-fault and tries to weasel out of it in court is that I’d better be there if subpoenaed and make FVCKING SURE I have the opportunity to denigrate them in court to the fullest extent I can!

      In June of 2010, I was driving a body-shop loaner Focus through downtown Toledo to my work lot, and was T-boned at a signaled intersection by a TRANSIT BUS whose driver ran the light! Fortunately, I couldn’t get out of the driver’s door, or I may have inflicted very severe physical harm to that driver! Yes, I told him to do something to himself which should be a physical impossibility, even after the fvcktard told me “all I can say is: I’m sorry!” (I also sang a four-letter sonata to the sonuvabitch’s SUPERVISOR when he came to the scene, and had the gall to ask “how are you doing today?”) Had statements from four witnesses saying my light was greener than the average Sierra-Clubber!

      That ain’t the half of it; obviously, I was mad enough that, if I could have made it so that idiot would never get a job as a dishwasher at Wal-Mart ever again, MUCH LESS transporting the public, I would have! Two weeks later, I saw that the fvck had plead “not guilty,” and I was subpoenaed to appear in court. (Fortunately, just across the street from work — one hour, in and out! Boss said “get ’em, tiger!” Really..I shizzle you not!)

      The day before, I contacted the court simply to ask what to expect. They asked me if the insurance had fixed the car (at least in Ohio, a public entity is not liable, and my insurance company subrogates through the public entity for reimbursement); I said so, and they stated that I wouldn’t have to appear. The next day, that useless piece of bovine fecal material was able (probably with the help of his #%$&@ UNION) to plead to FAULTY BRAKES!!!! NO POINTS AGAINST HIS CDL!!!!!!!!!!!!! A!!!! SLAP!!!!!!!! ON!!!! The! Wrist!!

      Yep! Mr. Smith in his Civic can barrel into the side of poor Mrs. Jones’ Sonata, and get his desserts, but a municipal bus driver can barrel through red lights, leaving wrecks in his wake (even though he WAS on the brakes fully, and nothing so much as a seat-belt pretensioner was deployed in that Focus; though I recall that I was laying on the horn up to impact, which could have meant that my right hand could have been launched out the rear-window if the frontal bag had fired — the car was damaged enough that the left-front wheel was toast, and had to be towed — I was shaken up with a slight headache from clonking my noggin on the A-pillar and bruised from the seat belt), and he’ll lose a week’s worth of groceries (~$150, if memory serves)! No other penalty for endangering the lives of other drivers, as well as his passengers!

      Sorry mods, sorry B&B! Even six years later, this gives me the “hebee-jeebees!” I’ve said it before in this forum, and will say it again: I do not forgive someone else’s screwup on the road, and will make sure I’m fully-compensated if I am unfortunate enough to be on the receiving end of someone else’s stupidity! (And if necessary, I WILL APPEAR IN COURT to ensure said doorknob-who-obtained-driver’s-license-out-of-Cracker-Jack-box is made to own up for his/her mistake, from a financial side of things!)

      Lest I be seen as a BTSR-esque ogre-type, I will take my lumps if I fuck up, and will BEG AND PLEAD WITH ALL I’VE GOT to my insurance to make the other person whole again! Oh..you’ll put me in a YUGO, Mr. Nationwide??!! OK..how do I drive a stick IN TRAFFIC??!! (I can start from a stop with only slight herky-jerkiness, but..I have to COORDINATE MY LEFT FOOT AND RIGHT HAND??!! IN TRAFFIC???!!! BWAHAHAHAHAhahahahaha..haha..ha! (Ha!) ::Exits stage!::) I tried..and failed..to learn stick in my brother’s Integra! Uh, huh..if you can’t figure it out in a Honda product, be loud and proud, and say that “I can only drive slushboxes!”

      Whew! There..I feel better!

      Last year, my own Dad, from whom I got my temper and INTOLERANCE for crap like this, was in a non-fault accident, with a twentysomething driving his mother’s UNINSURED car!! And did NOTHING! The fvck got off SCOT-FREE, AFAIK!!! (Though Nationwide, I THINK, was able to have the kid’s license pulled!!) You folks don’t want to hear the brow-beating I gave him, beginning with not even a 911 call to the police (since he ASSUmed they didn’t respond to non-injury wrecks)!! His response? “You’re right! I was just STUNNED at the time!!”

      I get even! (I have been in anger-management therapy since 2009, and everyone, from friends and family to my colleagues, has seen the good results! :-) ) I’m still gonna be one mean motherfvcker if you mess up my ride!

      Ronnie, pay the ticket! “‘Fess up when you mess up,” learn from it, and move forward from it!

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    I am confused, I thought Derek’s grandma was driving a new Fit, or was it a Civic? You got lucky, Ronnie, congrats.

    I was in an identical accident. I was in a curb lane driving a cab, along three lanes of traffic, to get to a right hand turn. This happens very often out there. The traffic along my path let a left turn car through and I punched her side with my front.

    Now I am extra paranoid when someone lets me through for a left turn like that, I crawl past the first lane, poke my nose into the second, etc. I think this courtesy move is the most dangerous one out there if you are not the only lane who needs to give the courtesy. If everyone, including the motorcycle that yielded to Ronnie, just followed the rules, there would be no accident in Ronnie’s case.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      You have to assume that the person waving you through doesn’t have your best interests at heart. Most likely because they never considered your safety at all. Being courteous might make them feel better about themselves, but they probably didn’t check their mirrors to see any oncoming traffic in the other lanes.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        “they probably didn’t check their mirrors to see any oncoming traffic in the other lanes.”

        And, even if they did check their mirror, they can’t anticipate someone from behind them gunning it into the other lane. That’s one reason I quit switching to other lanes if I was in a lane that was stopped, when the other one was clear. You never know if someone’s going to turn in front of you, waved on by a well-meaning but foolish motorist.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          If I see a large gap between stopped cars in the left lane, and I slow down my approach in the right lane. I don’t know if anyone’s nosing their way into traffic. I live under the impression that other drivers are about to do something stupid.

          Not saying I don’t do stupid things, but that’s one reason I like to accelerate far ahead of traffic. It’s much safer to not drive in a pack.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            I do the same!

            Weirdly, I PANIC in some circumstances if I will possibly put someone else in a situation that ** I ** have zero-tolerance toward, as with last week, when I was in a dealer service-loaner while my avatar was being detailed. ($100 every damn time, $50 off public price, just because I bring my car back for oil-changes — what the hell!) Was in the left lane of I-475 in Toledo, and a Dodge Charger comes barreling up on my rear, even though I’m going seven-over! (In one of only a select few areas of Toledo freeway NOT besmirched by the all-powerful orange barrel!)

            Shizzle!

            Plant foot on floor, V6 in my slushbox-equipped Baruth-mobile hunkers down and skedaddles like a J35 should, slower traffic flies by to my right, and I’m in the right lane; BTSR (J/K! ;-) ) flies past, and I continue on!

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Glad you are OK, another few feet of forward travel and the accident would have been really serious. I see situations like this frequently at a particular intersection on my commute and it’s scary. There’s also a local crosswalk where the inside lane is packed but the outside lane is open, letting impatient people whiz straight through the crosswalk while others are stopped for the pedestrian. Someone is going to go through a windshield there someday.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Reminds me of when Regular Car Reviews’ Mr. Regular totaled his Toyota Echo. With the Patreon funds he bought an ’07 Fit.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I absolutely cannot listen to that man ponce about for ages the way he does. I only made it through one video (the import 190E), and that was rough.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick 2012

        RCR – the FIJI bottled water of automotive journalism.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Ouch, you picked one of the longest ones from his boring middle seasons. The trick with those is to put the speed on 1.5x or higher. Either that, or listen to the first season first, which is firmly in the “Weird part of YouTube” category.

        MY WIFE HAS TRICEPS NOW

        SHE NEVER PUTS THE WEIGHTS DOWN

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Haha, I picked it at random – because I had heard of the guy at that point recently, and I’m also interested in the 190E.

          I’d rather listen to Quentin Wilson blather on about it from old Top Gear. And THAT’S saying something.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        You and me both, I listened to a few but they just get repetitive quickly. Hes lucky to be in a position where he can panhandle strangers for a new car.

        As far as the 190E goes look at it as a mini-beta-prototype W124, neat lookers, actually fun to drive (drove a battered example myself), expect typical old Mercedes issues.

        Now pay me $100 so I can tell you about more cars!

  • avatar
    sco

    Just had this discussion with my wife the other day. I try not to leave any gaps that would encourage someone in a hurry to do something dangerous. my wife on the other intentionally leaves large gaps so she can avoid problems. Maybe a gender thing

  • avatar
    bryanska

    BTW, I drove a salvage title Fit for 45,000 miles without a single bout of trouble. The tires all wore as expected. I wouldn’t hesitate to look at a salvage title vehicle… especially a simple Honda Fit.

    Selling it was no issue. I got more than Blue Book. It helped that I paid $150 for a full detail including engine bay, kept a pile of receipts, and could prove that all the maintenance was up to date. I also waxed the car 3x/year and fixed everything that was broken before listing.

    I got a lot of calls with lowball offers commensurate with the salvage title and mileage. But I held out for the one car nut who appreciated all the care I took. And he paid every dollar I asked.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Glad Ronnie is OK.
    This is, however, one reason that I am more comfortable driving an SUV than a sedan. I can see through the windows of most cars and usually get more of a hint of what’s coming toward me in a left turn. That still didn’t stop me from trading in my SUV for a sedan last month..

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    Some grandfatherly advice grandfather…go around the block, use a controlled intersection, anything but instinct. Your situational awareness is declining. It’s ok to be a puncher but that’ll get your own ticket punched.

  • avatar
    cargogh

    Good to see how well it held together. I tried getting an EX 6 speed last week. I could only find a single manual 2016 EX in US. It was a blue one a thousand miles away in MN. Will have to order or wait.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    This! I see so many nitwits trying to make a left out of shopping center driveways across 4+ lanes of traffic for example. Make a right and get it over with, and turn left at the next controlled intersection. It’s not any slower, it lowers the risk of accident on the road, and it prevents traffic jams inside the parking lot near the exit.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “Make a right and get it over with, and turn left at the next controlled intersection.”

      Great Googly Moogly THIS!

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I know these people. They think the dedicated turn lane in the middle of the road is actually a merge lane. It’s a place to pull in and park, until you get merge with the flow of traffic. One of them nearly nailed me last week.

  • avatar
    Beelzebubba

    I am very glad to hear that no one was seriously injured. That’s all that really matters in the grand scheme. Hopefully the ticket will go away without costing you $$$ in fines and future insurance premiums.

    I’m hyper-vigilant when it comes to making left turns across traffic. I haven’t always been so careful, but I learned the hard way. In 2001, I was driving my 1994 Acura Legend on a road I traveled every day. When I got the green arrow, I started making my turn across two lanes of traffic without making sure that they were stopping (they had a red light). A huge utility ‘bucket’ truck ran the light and t-boned me at 40+mph! My right foot, ankle, hip, arm and shoulder were all broken or seriously damaged. The passenger side door and center console were pinning my right leg and they had to cut me out of the car. I required two surgeries to repair the injuries, but six months later I had fully recovered. I’m thankful for that, especially since everyone (cops, paramedics, tow truck driver, witnesses) couldn’t believe that anyone survived based on the car’s condition.

    I’ll never make that mistake again!

  • avatar
    truecarhipsterdouche

    Glad you’re ok. The biker, in some states, could be held responsible for the accident by law. When I wave someone on in situations like that…I make sure no cars are coming in either direction so the person entering or leaving the parking lot is safe. I’ve seen people wave people out with almost catastrophic results.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    I’ve always been impressed at how strong the Fit frames are in all sorts of crashes and roll-overs, there’s hardly any intrusion given the size of the car in some impressive collisions. But I’m skeeved out by how little rear-crush space there is… wish there was more published about rear-end crash safety in general.

  • avatar
    dartman

    I’m glad your o.k. The “Bank of Mom” financing, titling and insuring sounds fishy…particularly for a grown man with grandchildren. Insurers do not look kindly on attempts to reduce premiums by not listing primary drivers, primary garaging address, etc…no matter how long or how much money has been paid to them. Hopefully this was not the issue in your case.

    I am a “Bank of Dad” and co-signed loans to buy cars for my adult children while they attended college/grad school; I made every payment but it helped them establish solid credit histories. The titles were in both our names (required by lender)but the insurance (again paid by me) is in their names with current addresses.

    • 0 avatar

      Nothing is fishy or being hidden from the insurer. It would be hard to do that and discuss the matter in public here. Everything has been done with the oversight and approval of my mom’s power of attorney, who is also a magistrate.

  • avatar

    sounds like a frightening, upsetting experience.Sorry you had to go through that, glad you’re OK.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    You got off cheap. Fraser police aren’t know for being nice about most things. And they are almost totally broke(Fraser nearly shut down a few weeks ago). I would have that non-resident fee would have been much higher

  • avatar
    bikephil

    You paid for this car with a loan from your MOM?? What are you, 16 years old??

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    The Bank of Mom (or Bank of Mom and Dad) is a valuable resource, but you can protect the Bank of Mom much better if on the next car the title is in your name but Bank of Mom has a lein on the car, that way the Bank of Mom doesn’t have liability risk.

  • avatar
    Deontologist

    ACE by Honda is a farce. It simply means that Honda designs its cars to ACE current crash tests.

    The Honda Pilot has had ACE since 2009. It wasn’t until MY2016 when it started passing the IIHS small overlap crash test.

    Look below: the Pilot has been completely failing the small overlap crash test since MY2009 – the year ACE was introduced to the Pilot!

    http://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/vehicle/v/honda/pilot-4-door-suv/2016

    The Acura TLX also has ACE. Problem is that the Honda engineers were so dumb as to make its small overlap crash test rating get worse from MY2015 to MY2016!! In 2015, the TLX earned an acceptable in the small overlap test; in 2016, with reinforcement of the front hinge pillar, the crash test rating dropped, and Honda hasn’t even bothered to dispute the result.

    http://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/vehicle/v/acura/tlx-4-door-sedan

    Tl;dr: ACE means nothing. Honda can’t even seem to ace crash tests that have been out since 2012 (small overlap).

    • 0 avatar

      So, number one: you’re wrong.

      The main focus of ACE is to have crash structures of smaller vehicles equal those of bigger vehicles. That way when a Fit hits a Pilot, the structures meet at the same height above the ground, thus helping dissipate the impact.

      IIRC, Fit was one of the only small cars to pass the small overlap test.

      • 0 avatar
        Deontologist

        Right, ACE stands for advanced compatibility engineering, or something like that IIRC. Makes sense that you wouldn’t want a small car like the Fit to dive under a larger car like a Pilot during a crash. That would be catastrophic as the energy absorbing structures are bypassed. Just look at semi truck trailer underride collisions, the IIHS has good videos of dummies’ heads hitting semi truck metal. Bottom line, I know what ACE is.

        The author doesn’t. He describes it as:

        “In recent years, Honda has promoted its use of what it calls Advanced Compatibility Engineering (ACE) body design. ACE was introduced about 10 years ago and is intended to absorb collision energy in a way that leaves the passenger cell unaffected, and the other vehicle less damaged. It uses four different grades of steel in the unibody — mild steel, high strength steel, advanced high strength steel, and ultra high strength steel — to keep things strong where they need to be rigid and soft where they need to crush. The latest development in the ACE architecture is selectively tempering different sections of a hot-stamped high strength steel parts. That allows those sections to be softer, reducing the number of parts …”

        That’s pretty vague. He just described the general goal of any structural crash protection system. If you want to really characterize ACE you could throw in a picture of the Pilot’s structure and how it has a “double” bumper, one obviously designed to engage low riding cars and one to engage higher riding cars.

        http://hondanews.com/media_storage/new/2016pilot/body/body-03.jpg

        The author doesn’t correctly call out which part of the steel structure is ACE, and that’s only the front crash rails and bumper. Not the passenger cell.

        • 0 avatar
          Deontologist

          He could have even talked about how once his small car dove under a van and how ACE is meant to prevent that sort of thing. Of course he didn’t. Because he doesn’t know what ACE is.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Whatevs! It works!

        I’ve seen pics of various Hondas of recent vintage which were involved in accidents where the driver walked away with an airbag burn or two, but who were otherwise OK. A couple involved much larger vehicles, including a semi hit! (On boards such as VTEC.net and driveaccord.net.)

        Car? Buh-bye! Driver? Some at-fault, they paid their ticket, learned from it, and moved on.

        Including the service manager at my dealer, who was driving a 2008 Civic when someone driving an oncoming F-150 slid across into his lane. Impact speed about 30mph for each. (Said service manager was able to pivot the car to the left, but not as good as he would have wanted! No other pax aboard, but the cabin held together well enough that a direct head-on, perhaps, wouldn’t have made a difference.)

        Both drivers uninjured, both totaled, both walked away. (The man showed me the picture of the car, hanging on his office wall.)

        I can detect bovine feces a mile away! This wasn’t! (Happened to run into my broker while I was at the dealer later that day picking up the car, and asked him if he’d heard that story. He had! Both he and his wife drive Honda products (along with her gorgeous C5 ‘Vette convertible purchased as his 45th-anniversary gift to her), and they love ’em!)

        Fanboi??!! Hells-to-the-yessir! (And have stated same; I’ve also let ’em have it when deserved! See CrossTurd, 8th-Gen Accord, 2012 Civic, Acura ZDX,…!) Will other cars do as well as a Honda in a crash? Hopefully! :-)

  • avatar
    raincoconuts

    “I was cited for failure to yield right of way, but it will probably be dismissed because the other guy isn’t likely to show up at my court date. To add insult to injury, the City of Fraser sent me a bill for $18.30 for non-resident emergency services. Essentially, they charged me for the time of the cop who issued me a ticket. The notice said that they charge 12% interest per year. I plan on paying exactly $17.31 of that and leaving 99 cents on the account. By the time 12% on that $0.99 adds up to anything significant, the administrative costs of carrying that account and sending me regular bills will likely eat up that $18.30 — and I’ll be sure to let the folks running Fraser know that.”

    You cause the incident,van guy has a bad day, you tie up a cop to write up stupid and then refuse to pay all of 20 bucks to quite possibly a bankrupt City of Fraser. Bad Karma, next time something more than propellant may burn your cheap ass.

  • avatar
    daviel

    Don’t fight city hall pro se. Have a local lawyer handle it. Check your liability insurance. It’s certain that everybody in the Econoline van will claim an injury. Report the wreck to your own liability insurance carrier. I’m sure your boss has done the same for the magazine. Good luck. Daviel, J.D.

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