By on June 28, 2016

Money (Frankleleon/Flickr)

Christmas is coming early for owners of polluting Volkswagen TDI models now that the automaker has agreed to pay up to $14.7 billion to settle claims in the diesel emissions scandal.

Volkswagen’s settlement with the federal government, owners and regulators will see it buy back some 475,000 2.0-liter diesel vehicles in the U.S. at pre-scandal values and offer their owners up to a cool $10,000 in extra compensation, according to figures reported by the New York Times.

Cash compensation varies depending on the age and model of the vehicle, but owners won’t see a payout of less than $5,100, the report said. Owners who ditched their TDI like a hot potato after the scandal became public are still eligible for compensation, but will only receive half of what’s being offered to existing owners.

Volkswagen will also forgive vehicle loans and pay off those acquired through third parties to the tune of 130 percent of what the owner would be eligible for under the buyback. Leases can be cancelled with no termination fee.

If they want to, owners of 2009-and-newer 2.0-liter diesel models can opt to have the manufacturer fix their vehicle to keep it on the road, though there could be drawbacks to that game plan. Older models would need fairly extensive work to bring the vehicle’s emissions levels into compliance, with power and fuel economy suffering as a result.

According to the settlement, the recall rate for the fix option must meet 85 percent. The Environmental Protection Agency hasn’t approved a mechanical fix for either the 2.0-liter or 3.0-liter diesels.

The EPA stated that owners will receive notices this fall, with the first buybacks occurring in October of this year.

Reaction to the settlement by lawmakers was strongly worded, to say the least. In a release from the EPA, Deputy Attorney General Sally Q. Yates stated, “By duping the regulators, Volkswagen turned nearly half a million American drivers into unwitting accomplices in an unprecedented assault on our atmosphere.”

She added, somewhat ominously (for Volkswagen), “This partial settlement marks a significant first step towards holding Volkswagen accountable for what was a breach of its legal duties and a breach of the public’s trust. And while this announcement is an important step forward, let me be clear, it is by no means the last.”

The massive price tag attached to the settlement — one of the costliest in U.S. history, and the largest for any automaker — tops early estimates by about $4.5 billion. Of the total cost of dealing with scandal fallout in the U.S., $10.03 billion will go towards the buyback and compensation program.

On the environmental front, the rest of Volkswagen’s settlement cash will be spent on remediation programs designed to make up for the air pollution emitted by its defeat device-fitted diesels since 2009. $2.7 billion goes to the EPA to create a fund for green projects, and $2 billion will be spent by the automaker on zero-emission vehicle projects.

If it creates marketable products, that could be money well spent for Volkswagen.

While the $14.7 billion wraps up the vehicle side of the scandal in the U.S. (reputation damage will take longer to fix), criminal penalties are still on the way. It’s a good thing the automaker set aside a larger amount of cash for the task at hand. The New York Times reports that penalties totaling $500 million could land on Volkswagen this week, the result of investigations by the Justice Department and the governments of 42 states, D.C. and Puerto Rico.

In a media release, Frank Witter, Volkswagen’s chief financial officer, stated, “Today’s announcement is within the scope of our provisions and other financial liabilities that we have already disclosed, and we are in a position to manage the consequences. It provides further clarity for our U.S. customers and dealers as well as for our shareholders. Settlements of this magnitude are clearly a very significant burden for our business.”

Financial regulators in the U.S. and the governments of various countries still haven’t asked for their pounds of flesh, so costs will continue to mount. The bulk of the company’s diesels went to European consumers, meaning settlements for untold amounts of money still loom. The wildly expensive U.S. settlement could embolden governments to take Volkswagen for all it has (or all it has left).

In Germany, authorities are investigating brand chief Herbert Diess and former CEO Martin Winterkorn to find out what they knew about the emissions cheating prior to the scandal.

[Image: Frankieleon/Flickr]

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103 Comments on “It’s a Cash Bonanza for Diesel Owners as Volkswagen Unloads Up to $14.7 Billion in the U.S....”


  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Here come the sharks. I wonder how much the lawyers are getting out of this. Also the author is correct about the overseas and European gov going after them. With the criminal stuff coming and Europe has not happened yet I can see this ending up 40 billion overall.
    SO the question for me is what do you do with the 10k grand you just got?

  • avatar
    Storz

    Does anyone have a link to anything official yet? All I see are news articles, but I would like to read the actual court documents, filings etc that came out today. Where are the news outlets getting this information?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    VW’s future EVs are pretty much vaporware, and they’ll be late to the party.

    As for current TDI owners: Don’t be romantically foolish enough to consider keeping your car because of its 45 mpg or torque. You can get a torquey gas car with slightly less mpg, without paying the diesel premium. And it’s not worth keeping a pariah with no resale value, even if it’s fixed.

    • 0 avatar

      Does it matter whether they build an EV for the US or not? The market for EV’s is mostly left-coast, where summer rolling blackouts have already occurred this month. July and August are going to be a nailbiter for those folks.

      Until we have a proper electric grid, EV’s future is a tenuous gamble that everybody involved – seller and buyer – are likely to lose.

      How many years will that infrastructure take to build? 20 years? 30? 50?

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Overburdening the grid is only a concern if you maximize the numbers for today.

        My former Leaf added about 25% to my electric consumption (+$20/month where I live). But with the plug-in take rate around 3% right now, that’s less than a 1% increase on the grid.

        It will take many years to really burden the grid. What’s happening on the left coast is unlikely to be meaningfully made worse from EVs, at least today.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        EV’s are bit like Unicorns, hard to find. Meanwhile VW Corporation is pumping out newer diesel engined vehicles. That aspect has not slowed down

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I might just turn around and buy the same thing I’m driving, in TSI guise. Or I might get something else.

      • 0 avatar
        seth1065

        Kyree,
        That thought has occurred to me for a sports wagon there is really nothing in that price range that competes, once the details come my way I have some hard thinking to do if I want another payment.

        • 0 avatar
          ijbrekke

          A sad truth about the American market. Somehow the wagon shape has become associated with “premium.” It’s the Sportwagen, Outback (kind of), or the used market.

          My Dad bought an AWD CTS wagon last year. Once you dismiss the gas mileage it’s pretty great.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I drove a Sportwagen with the TSI. Damned fine car.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I wonder if this settlement will be a turning point for VW in the US. If they’ll change their strategy and bring different, better products here.

        Probably not.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Less likely with the cash drain. Cuts into R&D and other investments. This is for VW a catastrophe. This hit their most passionate, ardent supporters and buyers to the point they are going to be asked to hand over their keys.

          This would be like Toyota having to go back to Prius owners and saying, “sorry, we lied to you, turn in your keys please for a check.”

          This is a kick in the balls to the fanbois and grrrls and it is going to hurt.

          This will impact VWs product and mix and strategy for years to come. If Brexit results in a tariff war with the UK, that will be the next pride obliterating kick to the groin.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Haha, I just imagined a little scenario when you mentioned the Prius.

            “Sorry customers, the secret to the Prius’ exceptional smoothness and economy is not -actually- hybrid technology, but a very de-tuned 3.0 I6 from our old Lexus range. We changed the engine cover and wrote hybrid on it.”

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            It would be a fantastic feat of packaging to stuff a JZ under the hood of a Prius.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The Japanese understand origami better than anybody! As evidenced by the exterior of the current Prius.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    This has been such a witch hunt. VW is the true victim here. And there are no true winners. Less emissions = more fuel used. More emissions = less fuel used.

    Essentially the government is being very hypocritical and basically wanting to rob Peter to pay Paul. For years the government has told us we had to reduce fuel consumption because a polar bear was dying somewhere. VW does exactly that and they are burned at the stake. Makes no sense what so ever.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Your equations are backwards, and so is your logic.

      VW systematically broke the law, regardless of what you think of the EPA.

      • 0 avatar

        Agreed. I’m sure not a fan of the EPA but what VW did is criminal.

        • 0 avatar
          JustPassinThru

          Yes, they broke the law.

          And the law was close to impossible to abide by.

          No, I’m not defending their fraud. I’m POINTING OUT how this builds – first you have crushing, imperious regulators; and then you have crony operators who figure they can game their way around it.

          And they got caught. And IMHO, we’re not seeing all of it, either – there’s probably payola in there, somewhere.

          This is how the modern Germans do business – because it’s the only way they CAN do business in their government-centric crushing welfare state. Large industries bribe and con their way through the regulatory labyrinth.

          And this, too, is partly why owing a modern German vehicle is so fraught with customer-relations problems and expensive repairs of proprietary parts; and of a network that operates under the moral code of a grave robber.

          And in the end it’s WHY Toyota, with their boring snoozemobiles, have such a strong following where VW and BMW and Daimler-Benz, have slowly lost market share. And why their cars are scrapped earlier and in better shape; and why so many of their customers become former customers.

          And, the “People’s” Car Works? Bankruptcy filing for VWoA in three…two…one…

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            JustPassinThru,
            Can you explain to me in plain English how the law was ‘close to impossible to abide by’?

            Did the EPA hold a gun to VW’s head and demand they sell diesels in the US that cheated? Why is it no other carmaker is accused of cheating on such a broad scale?

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            Is English not your first language?

            The specifics were made up with little or no input from engineers, by BUREAUCRATS. And to meet them, most manufacturers had to resort to wild adaptions – SUCH AS ADDING UREA, OF ALL THINGS, TO AFTERBURNERS.

            Imagine that. Someone thinks that breathing BURNED URINE is healthier than the exhaust of a tuned diesel engine.

            Truckers have had to scrap their very-expensive Cat and Cummins and Detroit Diesel engines because those less-than-ten-year-old engines cannot meet current standards and California will not grandfather them. Caterpillar has GIVEN UP – they no longer make diesel engines for road trucks. Others inject peewater, and have issues in that the naturally-lubricating sulfer found in diesel-grade fuel oil is now removed.

            So VW, accustomed to the German Way (which Maximum Bob, a BMW veteran, had commented on years ago) decided rather than to contort themselves for the amusement of bureaucrats, they’d try gamesmanship.

            And as I said before, I’ll bet graft was part of the package. Cheaper than engineering vaporware.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            the law was ‘close to impossible to abide by’

            Vogo, I’m with you on this. That’s an absurd statement. Every other company that wanted to sell diesel vehicles (like Mazda) simply saw that it couldn’t be done, and therefore chose not to. Everyone thought that VW was a miracle worker. No, they were just cheating, unlike everyone else who played fair.

            And what do you know, playing fair means not losing billions. Good for them.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            If the law is “nearly impossible” to meet, the correct response isn’t to commit massive fraud for nearly a decade.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            JustPassinThru,
            Nice job insulting my use of English. Less impressive showing how the law was close to impossible to abide by. All you did was rant about bureaucrat, to whom I suspect you are no friend.

            But the fact remains that the EPA rules were the same for all automakers, but only one chose to cheat on a huge scale, over multiple years and millions of vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            LIKE TTAC.COM ON FACEBOOK

            “BURNED URINE”… not exactly!
            From Wikipedia”
            Urea is used in SNCR and SCR reactions to reduce the NOx pollutants in exhaust gases from combustion from Diesel, dual fuel, and lean-burn natural gas engines. The BlueTec system, for example, injects a water-based urea solution into the exhaust system. The ammonia produced by the hydrolysis of the urea reacts with the nitrogen oxide emissions and is converted into nitrogen and water within the catalytic converter. Trucks and cars using these catalytic converters need to carry a supply of diesel exhaust fluid (DEF, also known as AdBlue), a mixture of urea and water.

            Urea is a biologically produced substance, and is also produced industrially in huge quantities, and is mostly used as fertilizer. It isn’t urine, but urine does contain urea.
            In automotive applications, a reaction between the nitrogen oxide and the urea produces nitrogen and water. Hey, a pollution reduction that works! It takes a lot of ignorance and coal-roller mentality to be against that. Clean air and clean water are good things.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            Nope, not defending lawbreaking. AS I SAID ABOVE.

            If you’re “insulted” by my puzzling over your inability to perceive…you must have a hard go of it. Density and sensitivity are a bad mix.

            Nice job of using PC Wikipedia to try to prove that urea isn’t body waste and it isn’t being burned somehow in these engines. If I cover feces with vanilla icing and serve it, does that not mean you’re being asked to eat dung?

            Clean air. Yeah. As determined by scientifically-ignorant BUREAUCRATS and the political stooges who pretend to be scientists.

            We’ve withstood a hundred years of diesel engines and our air is cleaner, not dirtier. Now the same people who tell us, without true scientific analysis, that we’re all gonna DIE from Glow Ball Warming…are telling us that adding p!ss to injected diesel fuel is gonna make the problem that isn’t there, better.

            Do you always believe what government bureaucrats tell you to do, as they’re making your life an ever-more expensive hell?

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Confused Welfare State? It is a Global Automotive Company, not Social Security

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            JustPassinThru,
            Do us all a favor and google a few images of Los Angeles air before the EPA started regulating pollution.

            On the one hand, it’s a sign of America’s extraordinary progress on environmental issues that people are so ignorant of the progress we’ve made. But we have to remember that these people occasionally vote, and often against their own interests.

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      You know that emissions come from fuel, right?

      The more fuel you burn the more products of combustion you generate.

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      VW essentially BEGGED the government to turn it into a witch hunt. If VW had fessed up when first confronted with the higher emissions, this would have turned out much better. A year of contempt and lies to pretty much every regulator involved, along with not-exactly-contrite behavior afterwards, guaranteed this eventual result.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        This.

        If we look at the really big auto scandals of the last two decades in order:

        VW – diesel emissions
        GM – ignition switches
        FCA – steering on RAM trucks
        TM – gas pedal design (not CTS return springs) and floor mat thickness
        FMC – cruise control relays
        FMC – exploding tires

        VW gets an F- in how they handled the crisis publicly, privately, and with regulators.

        GM – as soon as they were caught they did a massive recall, didn’t waste time on it, paid out millions to owners and settled over 90% of cases without going to court. The hold out cases are largely shams.

        TM – as soon as they were caught Toyoda san apologized, they did a massive recall on millions of vehicles and took it far further then they had to. They started off rough, but got it right

        FMC – once it was clear that TI cruise control relays were burning up cars, and garages the cars were parked in, and the houses attached to the garage, and the owners asleep in the house, they recalled over 10 million vehicles to replace the bad part. They didn’t F-around.

        FMC – exploding Explorer tires is more interesting. Personally, I feel Firestone got screwed here. It was Ford that was under inflating the tires out of specification per Firestone to improve the ride on the Explorer, The tires over heated from under inflation and blew out, the higher center of gravity resulted in catastrophic accidents. Ford adeptly passed the buck, and it was Firestone that didn’t play the game right, getting stuck holding the bag.

        VW basically did everything wrong every possible step of the way.

  • avatar
    nsk

    This from the DOJ press release: “In addition, because a straight buyback will not fully compensate consumers who owe more than their car is worth due to rapid depreciation, the FTC order provides these consumers with an option to have their loans forgiven by Volkswagen. Consumers who have third party loans have the option of having Volkswagen pay off those loans, up to 130 percent of the amount a consumer would be entitled to under the buyback (e.g., if the consumer is entitled to a $20,000 buyback, VW would pay off his/her loans up to a cap of $26,000).”

    I’m reading this right, it seems like an incentive to take out a 130% loan against a free-and-clear car, in order to pocket the 30% difference between the 09/2015 buyback value and the current loan payoff.

  • avatar
    Storz

    So just to be clear, we’re getting the

    “2.13 “Retail Replacement Value” shall mean, for a given Eligible Vehicle, the cost of retail
    purchase of a comparable replacement vehicle of similar value, condition, and mileage as of September
    17, 2015. ”

    and between $5100-10,000 in compensation beyond any buyback money?

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      That is what I’m trying to figure out. The New York Times reports that all owners will receive between $5,100-$10,000 in cash compensation, but I don’t see that anywhere in the Justice Dept’s release.

      https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/volkswagen-spend-147-billion-settle-allegations-cheating-emissions-tests-and-deceiving

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “$2.7 billion goes to the EPA to create a fund for green projects”

    The EPA’s total budget was $8 billion, and now they’ve got a nest egg it seems.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    A guy in my neighborhood has an affected vehicle. He’s looking forward to getting into one of the many leftover diesel Cruzes on dealer lots at no cost once the VW is dealt with.

    The sad thing for VW is that he’s perfectly satisfied with his Jetta as is.

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      I’m perfectly satisfied with our 2013 Passat TDI. Great long distance cruiser, good fuel economy, great rear leg room. However, it also has a could insurance claims against it that would have severely reduced its value come trade in/sale time. I’m also sort of done with Volkswagen as a brand for personal reasons beyond Dieselgate, so my goal is to be free of the brand by the end of the year.

    • 0 avatar
      Testacles Megalos

      I’m in that boat….my ’14 TDI wagon is a great car. VW figured out how to deliver a wagon that feels like an ’88 Audi 90 wagon with better mileage, better brakes, and better performance (and at 16k miles, better reliability) at a price less than the Audi would have cost 25-30 years ago. Problem is that Audis (and the MB wagons) have become over-contented bloatmobiles. Alternative? The Scoobie Forester used to be an attractive option but they’ve also become hypercontented and inflated size. The ’15 and later Jettas don’t feel as well-constructed (albeit my experinece has been in rentals).
      I will be taking the cash from VW – – I cannot see the “fixed” TdIs being anything other than an unsellable orphan car – the driveline is the problem, who’s going to supply repair parts?

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        I also had a ’14 SportWagen prior to the redesigned ’15 SportWagen.

        The only thing I disagree with you on is that the ’15 Jetta feels worse than previous models. The ’11 Jetta (which was the first year for this bodystyle), had been cost-cut to high hell, but VW slowly started adding back content, like the IRS and the replacement of the coarse 2.5-liter I5 with the 1.8-liter turbo (and later 1.4-liter turbo in non-hybrid models). The ’15 got an extensive facelift that makes it feel more premium than it ever did.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    I wonder if VW realizes that this is a LOT more money than they would have had to pay if they had not lied to, stonewalled, and shown nothing but contempt for the EPA, CARB, DoJ, and the public at large.

    If they had ‘fessed up as soon as CARB came to them with their concerns, it’s doubtful they’d be on the hook for anything more than a token fine and the stop-ship, and maybe a small cash payment. (They probably would not have had to fix the existing cars.)

    But after lying through their teeth for a whole year, and even AFTER the scandal broke, continuing to fight the EPA, along with STILL insisting that this was some sort of minor technical violation… well, they brought this on themselves.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    Am I reading this right?

    – Minimum $5,100 compensation.
    – Buy back of the car at some value based on mileage and condition.
    – Cancellation of the remainder of the loan?

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      I can’t find exact details of the loan stuff. Someone on reddit mentioned that it was loan forgiveness if people were upside down due to VW’s shenanigans. But I’m not sure about that.

      For my car (2012 DSG Sportwagen with 50583 miles on it today), I came up with a total compensation of $27307.13 using the documents in the FTC link below. I paid around $26xxx for it in 2012. I still owe about $7800 today so I’d really like to know if they’ll do anything to wipe out my loan.

      https://www.ftc.gov/enforcement/cases-proceedings/162-3006/volkswagen-group-america-inc

      • 0 avatar
        Jimal

        The announcement on the DOJ website is somewhat vague on this. My interpretation is that the proceeds from your buyback will be used to pay off the loan and that you’ll get whatever is left. In the case of VW Credit loans, the remaining balance will be forgiven and you’ll get the remainder. For third party loans, they will compensate consumers up to 130% of the pre-scandal value to cover anyone upside down on their loans. I don’t think you get both the buy back at the full pre-scandal value AND the loan forgiveness.

        I’m also confused by the cash compensation, which has been reported by the New York Times and others. I don’t see any reference to additional cash compensation in the DOJ release.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Good thing I financed through VW Credit…haha

          • 0 avatar
            Jimal

            Same here. Just did the math and after paying off what is left of the note, we’ll have about $10k to use for the next car, assuming the numbers of $5,100 – $10,000 additional cash compensation have been misreported.

    • 0 avatar
      ijbrekke

      My guess is the $5-10k is meant to cover anyone upside down on their loan.

    • 0 avatar
      nsk

      This was exactly my question. If accurate, then the settlement strikes me as extraordinarily generous to consumers.

      The buyback is supposedly based on 09/2015 value; there was no mention of mileage or condition.

      Cancellation / forgiveness of the remainder of the loan, up to a loan-to-value rate of 130%.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “in an unprecedented assault on our atmosphere”

    All of China and India beg to disagree.

  • avatar
    Storz

    The tables to calculate your buyback offer and compensation are available now

    https://www.ftc.gov/enforcement/cases-proceedings/refunds/volkswagen-settlement

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    Again, everyone is going on about their worthless TDIs, but I see no bargains. Searching the whole province on Autotrader, nothing seems to have changed in price. Even seeing dealerships selling new TDIs for full MSRP.

    So far haven’t seen any good way to buy in now and get a bargain.

    • 0 avatar
      Testacles Megalos

      Looking at the legal statements and the lay translations, it looks like any TdI owner who sells the car after June 28 is not eligible for financial compensation of any kind. So the new owner is? If so, TdIs suddenly increased in real value up to whatever VW is going to payout for the buyback + Owner Restitution.

  • avatar
    manny_c44

    My 2014 Jetta TDI is really a nice car. Great steering, great suspension, great economy, great torque, very spacious, there’s even adequate build quality for the upper TDI trims. I really beat my brain trying to find a car I would actually want to own for the 10 years necessary to justify a new car purchase and I think I chose well (scandal not withstanding). I never for a second wished I’d gone to an Asian brand for their budget wares.

    But after driving it for 20,000 miles…I feel it’s just not powerful enough and the car is too big in every direction. Now I’m looking at Miatas, Golf Rs, S3s and TTs…a 718 Cayman will be just about double the price of my TDI Jetta, worth the stretch maybe. If on top of all of this they offer incentives within the entire VAG group for new car purchases I will have a lot of tempting choices. I’ll be doing a lot of research and test drives in the next three months.

    • 0 avatar
      Testacles Megalos

      Don’t neglect a low-mile used Cayman, particularly the 986 versions. CPO cars or cars bought from dedicated Porsche owners (e.g. PCA members) will have been generally well-cared for machines.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    There were a number of us who were roasted for suggesting that VW would never have done the cheat in the first place if the issue could be resolved simply through software. That any fix would be costly, complicated, and would almost certainly impact one or a combination of fuel economy, performance and power, and/or longevity and service. So much so that the hit to one, or a combination of, would be unacceptable to the government and a majority of owners.

    We were told pish posh, some simple software and a few tweaks maybe – you’ll see.

    These buy back cars are coming to a third world country near you. There is no fixing them.

    • 0 avatar
      Storz

      They actually aren’t getting exported, read the settlement agreement there is a clause in there about what is to be done with the vehicles once they are turned in and it specifically states that exporting them is out of the question. Rendering them inoperable is the only option.

      “7.2.1. Vehicles Rendered Inoperable. All Eligible Vehicles returned to Settling Defendants through the Recall Program shall be rendered inoperable by removing the vehicle’s 9 APPENDIX A TO PARTIAL CONSENT DECREE MDL No. 2672 CRB (JSC) Case 3:15-md-02672-CRB Document 1605-1 Filed 06/28/16 Page 73 of 225 Engine Control Unit (“ECU”) and may be, to the extent possible, recycled to the extent permitted by law. No Eligible Vehicle that is rendered inoperable may subsequently be rendered operable except as allowed by and in compliance with subparagraph 7.2.3 below and Appendix B of this Consent Decree.”

  • avatar

    Interesting to read the details.

    I lost my TDi to a wreck in April, but since I owned it as of date x, I was able to get the $1,000 goodwill package…..

    which paid for most of my expense of getting a diesel particulate filter replaced…at 82k…and VW only took half as “goodwill”. I’m still $300 short.

    Probably won’t see any more…but at least in a bizarre way ended up not too much under.

    Everything south of the turbo was nonsense.

    • 0 avatar
      Whatnext

      Yep mine was hit and written off two weeks ago, Bad timing :(

    • 0 avatar
      Testacles Megalos

      This will be a real dilemma for those of use with these cars: we’ve got two years after the buybacks start to turn in our car and get paid the agreed price from Sept 17 2015, regardless of the car’s current age or mileage – correct me if I misunderstood the decree.

      So do I continue to drive a “free car” for a couple more years? Or should a garage my TdI now to minimize the risk of a loss if some bozo rams me?

      And if it does get totalled, what will my insurance company do? They’ll pay out the depreciated value based on the scandal. The difference between that and the 9/17/15 payout will be significant, and will go a long ways towards the car’s replacement. I read nothing in the agreement about this eventuality.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    So if the recall rate only has to hit 85%, then 15% of owners may be able to keep their VW operating in current condition, that’ll be an interesting vehicle to have 20 years from now.

  • avatar
    markf

    “unprecedented assault on our atmosphere” good grief, hyperbole much EPA? This episode just proves how useless these regulations are, VW skirts them and no one dies, the earth is not covered in badness and our atmosphere remains assaulted…..

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      summary: Boo clean, breathable air! Yay cheaters!

      Let’s ignore the fact that air pollution is estimated to kill 5 million annually.

      • 0 avatar
        markf

        So if VW had never been caught would anyone have noticed anything about the “assault on the atmosphere” I can’t type that statement without laughing.

        Please enlighten us how some one came up with 5 million deaths from air pollution? That is a number pulled out of thin (clean) air that no one can contest because it is so vague. While you are at it tell us how many people the dirty VWs killed before they got caught….

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          “Please enlighten us how some one came up with 5 million deaths from air pollution? That is a number pulled out of thin (clean) air that no one can contest because it is so vague.”

          It’s called Google:
          http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-35568249
          http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2014/air-pollution/en/
          https://www.iea.org/newsroomandevents/pressreleases/2016/june/energy-and-air-pollution.html
          https://www.sciencedaily.com/terms/air_pollution.htm

          See that? You came here to rant about how evil government bureaucrats are, and instead you actually learned something about the value of clean air and the people who help make it happen.

          • 0 avatar
            markf

            And reading is nice to!
            https://www.sciencedaily.com/terms/air_pollution.htm

            “The World Health Organization estimates that 4.6 million people die each year from causes directly attributable to air pollution.

            Many of these mortalities are attributable to indoor air pollution.”

            Don’t run your diesel in the living room and you should be ok……….

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