By on April 21, 2016

Vehicle Virgins still

Always dreamed of becoming a YouTube sensation? Wish you could get millions of clicks and finance your life from it?

That dream is a reality for Parker Nirenstein, a 21-year-old automotive engineering student at the University of Michigan and star of YouTube’s Vehicle Virgins channel.

Young, tech-savvy entrepreneurs always draw a crowd, and the BBC is the latest to take notice of this creator of viral car videos. Filmed on his own time, featuring supercars one day or simple used car advice the next, the channel sometimes generates nearly $1,000 of revenue a day.

Not bad for a venture that started as a fun hobby, but don’t think goofing off with your iPhone will net you that kind of coin. Nirenstein employs multiple cameras, including a GoPro, to film his videos, and his growing online clout is making it easier to drive (and own) vehicles that are normally out of reach for most 21-year-olds.

Last year, revenue reached a point where Nirenstein could purchase his dream vehicle — a yellow 2004 Lamborghini Gallardo. The video where he describes the purchase now has over one million views.

His secret? Understanding the murky dynamic that makes online videos go viral. And putting in 40 hours of work per week on it, even while attending school or interning at Toyota or Ford. If you don’t put in the time, you won’t get the needed frequency and consistency out of your uploads.

“It wasn’t like I made an app and then got lucky and it exploded,” Nirenstein told the BBC. “It’s like, no, this took two and a half years of producing videos, and it just naturally started gaining more and more traffic. Hard work pays off.”

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72 Comments on “How to Get Rich Sort of Quick While Really Trying...”


  • avatar
    threeer

    But wait…he doesn’t sit at home and make $10,000/month??

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    This is HUUUGE in Russia, just a bunch of guys on youtube reviewing everyday cars, eventually working their way up to reviewing luxury cars, and oftentimes buying their own project vehicles that they take viewers through the trials and tribulations of sourcing parts, repairs inside cramped rented garages, etc. My current favorite is a guy in the small northern town of Kirovsk in the Murmansk Oblast, working on an beaten to death W140 S600 Benzo (bought for 100k rubles, ie $1500) on a wing and a prayer. With just basic hand tools and a frigid and leaky garage, he dove right into pulling the transmission and rebuilding/cleaning the valve body, etc. Major props. Some guys end up with super fancy cinematography/music/etc, but this guy just keeps it real.

    linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vbdzqgj1gSw

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      Your stories about Russia and Russians are appreciated. Thumbs up!

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      Soviet garage “sectors” as I like to call them are awesome. Wish we had something similar here I could really use one every once and awhile. Sure you have to drive through a mine field like road and the buildings look to built out of whatever scrap, bricks, etc that could be scrounged up there is something fantastic about the idea.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I have a ton of photos just like that Onus, my family owns a garage in Akademgorodok’s garage block, it houses our old Zaporozhets 966B.

        linkhttps://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpt1/t31.0-8/11884682_10205077305036624_8706106671950958482_o.jpg

        Infact, my dad originally bought the car mostly in order to get a garage (command economy, you had to prove a ‘need’ in order to buy one). Why want a garage? Easy, the root cellar. During the end of perestroika and through the collapse in the early 90s, our dacha-grown canned produce and jams, along with potatoes, cabbage, beets, and carrots kept us well fed in the winter. Every garage was built in three levels: ground floor, with a pit in the center for servicing the car, this made up the first undergound level. Then underneath that and off in the corner was an even deeper level, this was the root cellar. A nice 40ish degrees year round.

        Garage-block culture going back to Soviet times was really cool. Soviet cars inevitably needed constant attention, so all the guys would spend much of the weekend there wrenching on their Ladas, Moskvitches, Zaporozhets, Volgas, etc. The ‘social club’ aspect of hanging out and talking shop was a big element in all of this. People used to all pitch in and buy enough cosmoline to fill and entire trench, and then dip whole car bodies in this. There was no such thing as ‘taking your car to the mechanic’ in Soviet days, you were your own mechanic, or else took it to a friend’s or relative’s, or the garage-block expert who could be bribed with some vodka or construction materials.

        Things are very much alive when I went last summer, I borrowed some WD40 from a garage-neighbor to open our crusty and rusty padlock. Some garages are totally redone inside with spotless floors and walls. There’s lots of guys operating one-man shops out of there, including body repair and painting. Larger shops have engulfed 3-4 original width units, and are legit small businesses. The most similar thing I can think of in the US is the Iron Triangle in Queens. Similar sort of vibe.

        linkhttps://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtf1/t31.0-8/11947934_10205077304036599_5090236609321388783_o.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      cheezman88

      Makes me wonder about people like Tai Lopez sometimes. They keep their backgrounds so mysterious and drag out info to draw you in.

      Speaking of difficult working conditions, a few weeks ago i changed out the shocks/springs on my miata in a dusty garage that was just barely bigger than the car itself!

      • 0 avatar
        Bunter1

        A garage barely bigger than a Miata? I had an NA for 15 years, you are in a tool shed, nobody ever made a garage that small. ;^D
        Enjoy your ride, those are great cars and I plan to get another someday.

        Kudos to this young guy and his path to making some bucks.

        Bunter

      • 0 avatar
        Chan

        Media knows that wealth sells. Those without are curious about the lives of those with. Just a part of human nature, a curiosity as old as wealth has existed.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    “…the channel sometimes generates nearly $1,000 of revenue a day”

    That’s certainly a nice number and is very impressive for a 21 year old. But it’s nowhere near getting “rich”.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Nearly any 21 year old pulling down $1,000 per day 365 days per year would consider a “more than an average specialist physician with 12 to 15 years experience annual salary” as “rich.”

      *I am not sure what portion of that “$1,000 on SOME days” he keeps, however, and then there’s the time component.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        ‘Nearly any 21 year old pulling down $1,000 per day 365 days per year would consider a “more than an average specialist physician with 12 to 15 years experience annual salary” as “rich.”’

        Since the article was written for the TTAC audience, the comparison is invalid. There are a lot of former NBA players who, despite their astronomical salaries, are not rich. Income is not the same thing as wealth.

      • 0 avatar
        tekdemon

        Well in all fairness physicians have a fairly flat income curve-you get a giant jump in income after residency but then it’s pretty hard to increase your income by very much because of insurance companies constantly decreasing how much they’re paying. So a physician with 12 years of experience is usually not making a huge amount more than someone 3 years out of residency-they’ll make more but only a small amount more unless they happen to be an excellent businessperson who’s expanded their practice to have a ton of people working under them-but that has little to do with being a physician.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Even if he only made $500 per day, that’s $182,500 a year. For YouTube.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        Yes, but is it going to last? Just yesterday I was reading an article in the New Yorker that actually made the comparison between the enduring value of Beatles songs versus YouTube car videos.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The guy is 21 and still working on an engineering degree. That kind of income especially at a young age is exponential if managed well and he sounds bright enough to do just that. What do you mean by “getting rich”? Not everyone will pull down Bill Gates level of income.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        Rich, to me, means having enough money to live very comfortably off the investment income. Now, I suppose one could argue that his revenue-generating videos are a sort of capital, but that is not the same as holding millions of dollars worth of AAA bonds and blue-chip stocks.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Bunkie – fair enough but at 21 the kid has plenty of time to build up to your definition of rich.

        • 0 avatar
          Zero Cool

          Well, I agree with you. I’ve just discovered Vehicle Virgins on YouTube, and did a bit of research on this individual and came across this article/comment selection. This young-man is making tremendous money for what he does, YouTube is pretty much a goldmine if you can become one of the lucky creators who’s videos go viral. With that said, it was discovered Parker Nirenstein’s father is a billionaire from a past Silicon Valley startup. So, I’m sure this kid has a trust fund somewhere that allows himself to focus on youtube and initially purchase the Lamborghini he’s obtained.

          tl :DR/ this kid’s father is a billionaire tech guy.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I feel like this was written just to catch BTSR brags.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      BTSR Bait! BTSR Bait!

      • 0 avatar

        I’m currently earning a little over $2000 a month on Youtube.

        Many of my reviews on printers, computers and electronics do “well”, but I’m disappointed that my best videos are my angry rants where I get angry and just start talking over a slideshow.

        Bugatti Veyron v Hennessey Venom GT averages 1500 views per day and will hit 1 Million by year’s end.

        7 Hellcat Commandments (shoulda been 10) continues to put money in my pocket.
        That video earned over $500 a day when it went viral last year and put me on course for Dubai/ Seychelles – A Trip I never would have normally just went on. (Next trip is Colorado for reviewing and critiquing prototype vehicles and after that Montevideo Uruguay and Buenos Aires).

        I’m disappointed that SUPERCHARGED BLACK PEOPLE ISN’T DOING BETTER.

        Why the hell is “What I learned from Hellcat ownership” doing so much better?

        Youtube is hit or miss.

        But as long as those checks keep coming every 23rd – I’m gonna keep going till I can get the Jeep TRACKHAWK.

        Gotta get new vehicles early so you can capitalize on the sudden surges of views and histeria behind them.

        I gained 4000 subs since January.

        What’s amazing is that my cars pay for themselves – simply by timing the release of my new videos and gaming the system. I just use my non-Youtube income to pay my mortgage and expenses.

        Sure I attract criticism and envy but I’m so far beyond it all…I’m just in it for the MONEY and the LULZ.

        What I love about Youtube is that it gives ANYONE with a camera a chance to make money.

        I coined my own philosophy behind this:

        “To get rich, you simply need to get other people to give you their money or attention” To stay rich you have to figure out ways to keep the government out of your pocket when they come to take it back” – BIGTRUCKSERIESREVIEW

        I am become the media.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          A top speed HELLCAT run would earn you huge views!

          • 0 avatar

            And a trip to jail

          • 0 avatar
            Von

            Not if you find the right track. I don’t watch your videos normally, but I would for that.

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            BTSR is right in the sense that the big cat would need a lot of space to reach its terminal speed. It probably zings right up to 160 or 170 mph no problem then creeps there after. I cant imagine to many tracks in the US have the sort of straight away or banking to permit the Hellcat to do a top speed blast (Something like Ohio’s TRC facility if it still exists would be one of the few).

        • 0 avatar
          tekdemon

          Honestly BTSR if your channel was more focused on one topic you’d probably get more subscribers and more money. But good on you for actually doing all these videos, I put a few videos up back in the day and got a pretty good number of views on them for the dumbest things but had to take most of them down because of work policies. Maybe I’ll see you at some Long Island car events sometime lol.

        • 0 avatar
          Piston Slap Yo Mama

          BTSR, what looks like envy to you is actually criticism of your blowhard ego and herp-derp commentary.
          On a tangent, I’ve got a man-crush on Marty and Moog from Mighty Car Mods. Their YouTube videos are infinitely more watchable than yours – and never a post by them bragging about their channel being “bigger than TTAC’s” or other ridiculous BTSR tropes re. bank balances. They keep it classy. You might take notes.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    Good Lord, this kid and his lies again. He’s not rich from YouTube, he’s rich because his dad sold his company for hundreds of millions of dollars. His dad is some super rich tech guy. If he really made the money he claimed from YouTube, Saabkyle04 would be driving a LaFerrari and MKBHD would have a Veyron. He just pushes these self-made, YouTube money lies every chance he gets in the media.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That’s a good point. This guy has 265,000 subscribers. Saabkyle has 900,000.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Up until, 5 minutes ago I had no idea either of those two guys existed, and still know nothing about either one of them. But in general, 265,000 Gallardo intenders can easily be more valuable than 900,000 dudes interested in keeping old Saabs from falling apart.

        Per Click/Pageview/Subscriber type metrics meant a lot back when that was the only reliable data available to marketers. And when “The Internet” was more homogeneously college educated, upper middle class Westerners.

        Nowadays, there are at least 100-1 valuation differences between some identifiable pageviews and subscribers, versus others.

        And that’s leaving out insights available to the likes of Amazon, who are amassing lots of hard, actual purchase/spending data, to go along with webwide clickstreams gleaned from AWS.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      Born on third base, yet acts like he hit a triple.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Thanks, Venom.

      I’m glad someone called this guy’s bull$hit.

      *Steph sure could do a F**K LOT MORE DUE DILIGENCE before posting half the articles (whether this or VW or whatever) he has lately.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Please stop pretending like you were in the know. Also LOL @ $1000 a day not being rich. How much do you pull down a day?

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          You make no sense.

          Who are you even responding to?

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          A few minutes spent on Youtube’s sister website Google would suggest that the kid isn’t making anything close to $1,000 per day. Youtube doesn’t pay that much for that number of views.

          He’s obviously getting a lot of views for his channel and he deserves some respect for the effort, but those clicks aren’t nearly that lucrative. I am presuming that TTAC did not verify the figure, which it should have.

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        @DW,

        I mean even without the most basic of research I did, anyone should know this guy is lying. Chris Harris said he makes no money with YouTube, Matt Farah the same, /Drive the same, even Saabkyle04 was interviewed by one of the major news outlets sometime ago and I think he said that he made something like $100,000 a year, maybe $150,000 and he doesn’t have a partner and does massive numbers compared to this guy, and his videos are half an hour long, not 4 minutes long. Even TFLCar had to do fundraising through Patreon to raise money to do stuff, but somehow this magician is able to make gobs of money without breaking a sweat? Right…

        Even MKBHD who has something like 4 million viewers and hundreds of millions of views and shoots on a $50,000 RED camera said he was having trouble getting financing from the banks to get a new place and he gets people like Kobe Bryant and Neil deGrasse Tyson to come to interviews with him.

        • 0 avatar
          tekdemon

          Yeah I was really surprised by how little money a lot of these channels were making-TheSmokingTire recently went on reddit and explained all his #’s and apparently most videos only ever earn a few hundred dollars because of the money he’s spending on hiring a cameraman, etc.

          I think the people who make the most money are the ones doing videos that don’t cost a lot to make. Popular makeup vlogs or video game playthroughs that basically cost nothing to produce mean you get to keep almost all the revenue.

          Reviewing cars is probably not going to make you filthy rich unless you get so beloved that they sign you to go do Top Gear like Chris Harris.

          I’d probably have put more effort into my youtube efforts if I wasn’t already making nicely more than $1000 a day when I go to work, but maybe I’ll start a car channel for fun-so far I should have access to an E46 M3, the new Boxster Spyder, a Cayman S and a Miata. Maybe I should do a shootout and proclaim the Miata the best sports car to troll for views =P

    • 0 avatar
      ckb

      “Good Lord, this kid and his lies again. He’s not rich from YouTube, he’s rich because his dad sold his company for hundreds of millions of dollars. ”

      Wow, didn’t Bark just post a review intended as a parody of “those other guys” reposting mfg spec sheets and press releases? If this is the case, can we get an update/correction to this story?

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      This guy’s stuff is well beyond my limits of acceptable taste, but I don’t hold that against him. So, anyone have a source confirming that this kid is lying out of his mouth about his revenue?

      I know that other heavily viewed channels are good evidence (Matt Farah, Chris Harris, Saabkyle, etc.). Those guys wouldn’t be doing the things they are if YouTube were as lucrative as some claim.

      Vehicle Virgins seems to appeal to viewers who aren’t really advertisement targets. Anyone out of college would find his played-out-teenager-with-a-fast-car topics tiring. I wouldn’t be surprised if advertisement dollars are more carefully filtered nowadays, rather than just raw hit counts.

      • 0 avatar
        broISbest

        I don’t understand what would take 40 hours a week besides working to get access to some of the vehicles. This isn’t highly produced content.

      • 0 avatar
        hgrunt

        The ad dollars are beyond raw hit counts, it’s by user engagement. If I recall correctly, you’re paid based on a combination of how long and often people watch the entire video, and ad exposure (ie. if they skip the ad, or watch the whole thing). This also means that if you run AdBlock, they don’t get any revenue you’d otherwise provide them.

        In the Smoking Tire podcast, Farrah often brings up the topic of revenue from Youtube fairly regularly. The things he tends to stress the most are: Produce content consistently so people will keep coming back or subscribe, have an efficient workflow, so you don’t spend more time than you need to. There’s a couple more interesting points too, but I don’t want to post a wall of text here.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        yeah, there was one video that got linked from either Jalopnik or Opposite Lock from VV, and in the video they referred to a regular car meet up which is pretty close to me. The two things I thought immediately afterwards:

        1) I never knew about those meets, and
        2) I’m sure not going to go to one just to listen to some douches named “Parker” who are barely out of puberty brag about everything they think they know about cars.

  • avatar
    never_follow

    One of my favourite YT channels right now is Regular Car Reviews. The early episodes are a bit abstract, but it’s fun getting his take on absolutely random cars. Also, he loves his bikes, so they get reviewed as well.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      To each his own. He reviews some really interesting cars here and there, but I can’t stand the format. It’s a couple nuggets of useful insight buried under a landfill’s worth of derpity-derp jokes, all spoken in a derpity-derp voice.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Interesting to bring up, because RCR has a very similar number of views and subscribers, and he doesn’t have a Gallardo, he’s got an old Honda Fit and a rather plain Falcon.

      • 0 avatar
        Chan

        Having an online alias is a convenient way to be able to show off daddy’s money as your own.

        This trick is as old as the Internets. Similar stories all over car forums.

        I don’t like RCR’s format. But guys like him, Saabkyle, etc. are modest, honest and forthcoming about what they do and their resources.

  • avatar
    John

    Good for him – he’s busted his behind, and it’s paying off.

  • avatar
    redliner

    I love watching the very Aussi, somewhat immature Mighty Car Mods channel with Marty and Moog. It started small, but now they have official sponsors, and of course, they sell “MAAAAD!” swag. It’s a little heavy on “bro-factor” but entertaining non the less.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      Bro-ness is quite alright with me, as long as it’s self-aware. The Brits and Aussies are better at subtle humour. Seems like when Americans do this it ends up too big, exaggerated and crass.

  • avatar
    multicam

    I hit 200,000 subscribers!

    Where’s my theoretical money?!

  • avatar
    hgrunt

    Creating content people come back to, consistently over a long period of time, is no easy feat. I’m glad he can do this and make a few bucks in the meantime!

    Despite that, I ended up downloading an extension to remove his recommended videos because his SEO strategy bothers me a fair bit, the same way Petrolicious’s overuse of instragram filters and tracking shots, made me stop watching their videos.

    If you want lots of hits, make videos with titles like “How to buy a [exotic] before you turn 25” or “[n] things I [love/hate] about [exotic car]” preferably something desirable. Anything controversial and that provokes a lot of discussion will too.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      Don’t forget:

      Reactions to my [exotic car]
      What my GF….parents…..friends…..bathroom buddies…. think of my [exotic car]
      I crashed my [exotic car]
      How it feels to own a [exotic car]
      What I do to afford a [exotic car]
      Why I bought my [exotic car]
      Why I sold my [exotic car]

      Which is fine since high school kids want to see these things and have the idle time to debate these things. But the vast majority of working folk don’t give a crap. Working folk with disposable income are the ones that you want to target with advertising. This makes me wonder how YouTube allocates dollars to its content creators, is it just raw view/subscriber counts?

    • 0 avatar
      Cactuar

      YOU WON’T BELIEVE WHAT HAPPENS TO THIS USED LAMBO I BOUGHT!

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      Here’s the thing, all the top guys out there are honest about where their money comes from and never claim YouTube is where they got it. I think Shmee150 was in tech/electronics and now finance, Salomondrin in real estate, movies and investments, Saabkyle04 is a pharmacist, everyone on here has bought a product from Matt Farah’s very very wealthy father’s company and so on and so on. I have Adblock as do many many other people and I have almost never seen an ad on any of these channels. You have guys doing monstrous numbers with millions of viewers and they aren’t living like kings, but the kid with a few hundred thousand subscribers makes enough money to own an M5, a Lamborghini Gallardo, a new Mercedes S550, wear a $50,000 watch, pay $50,000 a year tuition, live in the most expensive apartment complex in Ann Arbor and take vacations to Monaco and stay in $500/night rooms? The BS from this kid is unbelievable and it stinks to high heaven.

      All the big car reviewers have been very open and transparent about the money they do or don’t make and the only person that claims they are making tons of money from this is this kid.

      • 0 avatar
        forzablu

        Venom did you go to Michigan? Landmark is hardly the most expensive complex in Ann Arbor and is probably within +15% of housing in similar location, with the exception of UTowers and some of the truly terrible apartments s bit farther NE of there. All I really take exception to with him is the awful AP he bought, and the mostly sad attempts I’ve witnessed of his to chat up girls at skeeps. The kid’s in one of the more shit houses at Mich–which gives you a sense of how “popular” he may have been.

        Painting him as some sort of trust fund brat is also disingenuous…IIRC he drove a e90 or an e46 330i in high school, then the e39 m5, then bought lambo after VV took off, and LEASED s-class based specifically off of YouTube revenue. With the exception of the lambo hardly truly exceptional cars for a college student–and price wise close to what many of his peers drive…a significant portion of the student body comes to school with run of the mill entry-mid level lux cars more costly than those. Even the lambo was nearly 11 years old, look at prices of 11 year old e-gear gallardo’s the cost of entry isn’t prohibitive for a 21 year old with no rent/health-care/tuition expenses etc, who’s had summer MechE internships (10-20k a summer at OEMs), easily could save enough to finance or purchase a used Gallardo. Remember many college students are in the same baseline situation as him, lack of expenses and internships, he ought to be commended for the extra initiative he took to create a viable YouTube business to give him the necessary income to live out some of his lame automotive fantasies. I think his partner, who doesn’t appear to come from a very wealthy family just purchased a Boss302 Laguna Seca…

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          I don’t know where you live, but growing up (also in Metro Detroit, like this lying brat) nobody, and I mean nobody I went to school with could have afforded anything close to the equivalent of those BMWs. even the kids whose parents bought them cars could pretty much only get them a well-used, cheap car. The only kids with nice cars were in the Grosse Points, and you bet your a$$ their parents bought the cars for them.

          So yeah, if he was driving BMWs in high school, then “bought” a Lambo afterwards, he’s living with pretty much no other expenses (i.e. mommy and daddy are still supporting him.) Hell, *I* could afford to *buy* a Lambo, but i cannot afford to *own* one.

          Others have already said his claims about YouTube revenue are likely BS. So yeah, he’s a “trust fund brat.” Like I said above, he was born on third base but is bragging about how he hit a triple.

  • avatar
    Von

    Once again, reading the B&B was more informative than the article itself. I didn’t know anything about this kid or how much youtube pays (other than BTSR’s occasional claims in the comments), but it seems pretty obvious the “mass media” and even the TTAC, which I do hold in higher regard when it comes to automotive topics, needs to do a bit more due diligence.

  • avatar
    phlipski

    This guy is who Doug Demuro wishes he can be when he grow’s up.

  • avatar
    mattfarah

    $1,000 a day? That is some Bull. Shit. I make videos for a living. This guy has half the subscribers I have, and half the total video views I have. He does not make that. Sure, he makes enough to buy an 04 Gallardo (assuming $80k value) if he has no other expenses, but the math simply does not add up on that. This kid makes no more than $80-90k a year off YouTube after taxes.

    • 0 avatar
      golfnotgolf

      It is too bad that the writer of this article has never listened to any of your podcasts, Matt. He might have at least thought twice before putting up all of this secondhand information.

  • avatar
    golfnotgolf

    I am pretty sure this will be the last Steph Willems article I ever read. He has written several pieces here that are just complete rubbish.

    Also, people like this Vehicle Virgins guy are why Matt Farah has to explain weekly why Youtube is not bringing in millions for him. Low miles, early Gallardos are $90k cars any day of the week. That should have been a hint to Willems that $1k a day is likely a lie.

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    $1,000 a day – give or take? Seems like a lot. There used to be a guy in Canada called Davidsfarm and once he became established, his income exploded. His secret was that he developed a very intense, loyal following. Content was jumping and wrecking cars, redneck ingenuity, and a slobbish lifestyle. He became the number one YouTuber in Canada. Those loyal fans visited his “farm” and clicked away at the ads. He would show checks online from YouTube in excess of $10K US a month. Success has its drawbacks as his past caught up with him. Anyone interested can read a bit about it on Encyclopedia Dramatica. Old videos of his fun still can be found, though the haters got him booted off of YouTube. All that said, it seems that Mr. Lambo has nowhere near the traffic, so his claims seem rather optimistic.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Maybe this is just me, but I can’t _stand_ video reviews, news segments and how-tos: I’d rather read about it. If I need help, I’ll take well-lit and labelled photos over shakeycam and wind-mic.

    And yes, I realize this makes me old.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      video reviews (especially of things like cars) can be helpful as an adjunct to a written article, kind of the way Alex Dykes does it. Some things are better shown than explained.

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