By on April 21, 2016

2017 Accord Hybrid

After a brief hiatus, the Honda Accord Hybrid is back, and it’s feeling good about itself. It thinks you’ll feel good about it, too.

Arriving this spring as a 2017 model, the Accord Hybrid hopes to capture more customers this time around. The previous generation proved to be something of a Jekyll-and-Hyde affair, with reviewers walking away reasonably impressed, or not so much.

The 2017 Accord Hybrid is sure it can erase nagging memories by offering more horsepower and efficiency than before. The next-generation two-motor hybrid system boasts 212 horsepower (up from 196), with the 2.0-liter Atkinson Cycle engine returning as the gas mill.

2017 Honda Accord Hybrid

The system is now good for one more mile per gallon in the city and two more on the highway, Honda claims, for a total of 49 mpg city/47 mpg hwy/48 mpg combined.

As before, the Accord Hybrid has three drive modes — EV Drive (at light loads and low speeds), conventional Hybrid Drive, and Engine Drive (where both motors drive the front wheels via a lock-up clutch).

Out back, Honda has freed up more trunk space (13.5 cubic feet) through use of a newly compact battery pack. Behind the wheel, Accord Hybrid drivers receive the full suite of Honda infotainment, connectivity and driver safety technology as standard equipment.

Sales of the previous Accord Hybrid were lackluster, with Honda moving less than 14,000 units in 2014, the model’s best year to date. With the 2017 edition, Honda wants to double those numbers.

[Images: Honda North America]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

59 Comments on “2017 Honda Accord Hybrid ‘Let’s Give This Another Shot’ Edition...”


  • avatar
    seth1065

    I thought the reviews on the accord Hybrid for 2015 were great , would look into it as a maybe replacement for my TDI

  • avatar
    djsyndrome

    2017 is likely the last year for the current-gen Accord. Why spend the money to launch it now when a year on it could return with the new model?

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    Insight 2: Electric Bugaloo

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Those are pretty amazing numbers.

    If those three modes are selectable, and even lockable, that would be pretty nice.

    For my next hybrid, I’m really going to scrutinize its driveability.

    • 0 avatar
      Highway27

      They aren’t really selectable (You can tell it to use EV mode, but it’s only really good for going across the parking lot), but you get a feel for when the car is going to do what. I find it exceptionally drivable, and the power switching is something I only think about as I’m trying to maximize mileage.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      It would be nice to have the modes selectable, but it’s not essential. If you want eco mode, just stay light enough on the throttle that the gas engine stays off. Press harder and the gas engine starts. If you want both the gas engine with electric assist, give it heavy throttle. At least that’s the way the Escape Hybrid works.

      I agree it would be nice to have a way to deliberately drain the battery, or alternatively hold the charge level in it. For instance, if one anticipates soon going up or down a steep long hill.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        “I agree it would be nice to have a way to deliberately…”

        A lot of the Insight I owners modified their cars to do just that. They called it manual IMA and it’s all spelled out on the 99mpg website. Really clever stuff and clever people; those guys were out on the fringe. But yeah… not gonna happen on any other car, not nowadays.

      • 0 avatar
        Highway27

        Like every Honda, it has an Eco button (that I keep on all the time). It pretty much is “tread lightly for economy, push harder for power”, but you can’t really make the gas engine stay off if the battery is drained (even with the EV mode button).

        One important thing different from your description of the Escape Hybrid is that the HAH is *always* electric drive only below 40 MPH. If the engine comes on, it’s to provide more electricity. When going over 40 MPH, the engine *can* directly connect to the driveshaft, but will alternate between powering from the engine and turning the engine off and powering by battery (I love the little surge it has when it revs the engine back up and then clutches it in). And if you need to accelerate harder, even above 40 MPH, it’s more likely to switch back to generating electricity with the engine and electric drive only to rev the engine higher.

        I’ve found that I can manipulate it a little bit as far as using more accelerator when I want the engine to come on ‘here’, rather than ‘there’. But in general, I just let it do what it wants.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      No offense, but I would posit that the computer in this car, as a product of the engineers and scientists who designed it, would know the best time to switch between modes. This isn’t like a transmission… you don’t know what the most efficient config is for all situations; that is not an intuitive thing.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        @sportyaccordy, don’t forget that drivability is also an important consideration when the designers figure out how to program the drivetrain.

        The designers can’t anticipate things like where your daily commute has a big hill or a little hill. But they do cater to the average driving public, most of whom, for example, have no idea that it’s even possible let alone a good idea to downshift your automatic transmission before driving down a long, steep mountain.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      Let’s see if the numbers hold up in the real world. On the last one, Consumer Reports got 40 mpg, which is right in with what they got for all the other midsized hybrids.

  • avatar
    jefmad

    Have they changed to back seat so that it can fold down? The last version had a fixed rear seat and that makes the car a non starter for me. Seems like a stupid thing, but I load things in my car all the time where I need the extra length the pass through provides.

    • 0 avatar
      notwhoithink

      The 2015 rear seats didn’t fold down because the pass-thru area is where the batteries were. It sounds like the battery compartment is a little smaller on the 2017, but I would not expect fold down seats in this one, either.

  • avatar
    Highway27

    I have a 2015 Honda Accord Hybrid, and I absolutely love the way it drives. I don’t know how much of the 2014 / 2015 sales were because of lack of interest or because of lack of supply. I ordered mine and had a two-month wait for it. The dealership I bought from would move their Hybrid Accords in under a week. The story I heard was that most of the supply was sent to Japan. In any case, it wasn’t aggressively marketed in the US, nor well-supplied.

    Personally I think the tech is just really neat. And while my drives aren’t the greatest for fuel economy (commute is 3.5 miles, average day I drive less than 20 miles total), I still get mid-40’s when it’s not cold (i.e. above 40 degrees F). There are compromises, like the lack of a fold-down seat, but hearing they’ve reduced the battery pack size is good.

    I’d recommend the car to anyone.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Seconded on the lack of supply. The ’14-’15 versions never came into supply/demand balance; I think Honda sold every one it could make. That’s still true in the used market… these are staggeringly hard to find used, with a surprising number of the ones out there being rebuilt/salvage. I expect this new one to be supply-limited too.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      That mileage is pretty good, since your drives aren’t long enough to “amortize” the gas used to heat up the car’s engine and hybrid systems.

      By comparison, awd Escape Hybrids used in summer in typical conditions average about 40mpg. But those probably would be longer average drives than yours. Winter is about 36-37.

      • 0 avatar
        brandloyalty

        I realized I made a mistake in the post above and need to correct it. I quoted Escape Hybrid mileage in Imperial (Canadian) numbers, while probably Highway 27 was using US numbers. Escape Hybrid mileage is more like 33mpg US. So unlike the new Rav4 Hybrid, the new HAH does considerably better than the Escape Hybrid.

        After a hilly low-speed 20 mile highway drive today, in warm weather, with some traffic jams and some city streets, and a “hot” fillup, the awd Escape Hybrid’s fuel readout says 36mpg US. The hot fillup means the mileage was recorded without using any gas to warm the thing up.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Best non luxury sedan money can buy.

  • avatar
    stryker1

    My 2014 accord gets decent enough mileage and gas prices are still sufficiently on the floor to make something like this a tough sell at the markup they want. Maybe in a couple of years when the thing drives itself and gas goes back to $3.50 a gallon?

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Not everyone buys a hybrid to save money. Some are happy to pay extra to use less gas, just as some are happy to pay extra to go around freeway offramps faster. In fact, some would choose hybrids (and ev’s) even if gas was free.

      • 0 avatar
        Highway27

        This was part of the reason I bought the Accord Hybrid, even though my driving is very light (I look to be at about 5500 miles per year). I want to use less gas even for the trips I take, and I really like the nifty tech in the car.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        Honestly, if you do mostly town driving, the hybrid is more pleasant to drive, since the engine is off for a good part of the time. If you’re sitting at a stoplight, it’s more pleasant for the engine to be off but to still have the climate control working.

        An EV is even better.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “The way with which Honda’s Magic Engineers have woven truly premium materials into the unassuming Hybrid package is worthy of more than $10,000 over the asking price, assuredly. Mercedes-Benz owners looked upon us with avarice in the Accord Hybrid as we zoomed by. We felt reassured, didn’t we, that we were in the best car on sale in America.”

    Look, I can write an Accord review too!

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I think I can count the number of prior model Accord Hybrids I’ve actually seen on one hand. Always noticed the blue in the grille.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      You LOOK at other cars that carefully? Safely? Or just at stops and in parking lots? I check out Escapes to see if they’re hybrids, but only if I have spare brain cycles. And the logos are bigger than Honda’s.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I LOOK at cars that carefully. My eye is always on detail, all the time, whether I’m in motion or not. I remember cars to the point where if it’s a particular car I see regularly on my commute (white D3 A8, burnt out driver’s parking lamp), (black G500 at the movie theatre), (Chevy Express with red/black LS logo for shipping company) that I tune them out, in order to notice cars I don’t see all the time. Like a white SLS convertible, or pristine aero Taurus GL wagon.

        • 0 avatar
          brandloyalty

          I’m impressed. It may be outside your scope of interests, but do you notice Escape Hybrids? Only about 3% of 2005-2012 Escapes were hybrids, and the 2010-2012’s don’t have the vent in the driver side cargo area window. I never noticed a single Escape Hybrid until I bought one.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I have noticed a couple, but they were the special green color reserved only for the Hybrid. Maybe have seen 2-3 of those.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I don’t usually notice Escape Hybrids if I’m in a car, but I definitely do on foot because they sound so different. They are very common around here (like all hybrids).

            I see some Accord Hybrids, but not nearly as many as I’d expect given the popularity of other hybrids here. (For example I think about half of the Lexus RXes I see here are hybrids.) I expect the supply challenges are to blame.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            City of Chicago uses a TON of them; from the CTA to department of transportation. Passed a white DOT 05-07 model this morning, there was rust forming around the right rear door. There’s also taxi’s running around of the second generation.

          • 0 avatar
            brandloyalty

            Most of the odd green shade are hybrids, but not all of them. When you see Escape taxis in streetscapes of cities such as New York, I believe all of them are Hybrids.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Does anybody know the hybrid battery kWh capacity? Color me jaded, but I’m suspicious that the engineers lost to the bean counters and sales people and Honda made the battery too small… just like they did in the Insight II and the Civic Hybrid II. But I’d like to be proved wrong.

    For a family sedan like this, about 1500kWh is a good minimum size.

    IMHO

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      1.5 million watt-hours? Hellz yes.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Finally, an EV with 5000 miles range, with range extender ICE included!

      Tesla can bite it!!

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        “Finally, an EV with 5000 miles range”

        Every one of you guys knows I really meant to type 1.5kWh (or 1500Wh). And I want every one of you to know that I appreciate the “love” in the sarcastic replies. Keep it coming ;)

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Sizing the battery in a hybrid is an interesting balancing act. Of course, the bigger the battery the more energy can be recaptured and reused. But of course larger batteries take up more space, cost more and weigh more. So do you undersize or oversize the battery?

      Hybrids driven at moderate speed with few interruptions in pace and few hills can get by with a small battery. Hybrids driven at widely varying speeds and up and down mountains benefit from a larger battery with more capacity. Maybe buyers some day will have a choice in battery capacity.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        @brandloyalty, everything you said is qualitatively true about sizing the battery.

        But there’s no denying that Honda screwed up BIG with the HCH II battery. Remember how they had to sneak in a firmware update to preserve the battery life in those? Bring your car in to the dealer for routine maintenance and the update basically used a lot LESS of the battery’s capacity, making for worse fuel economy and performance just to make sure more of the batteries would outlast the warranty period.

        That is what I’m getting at.

        I’d almost forgotten about the CRZ (OK, I had completely forgotten), but those cars came with an even battery + motor/generator that was proportionally even smaller.

        Anyway, I do miss things like autostop at traffic lights, regenerative braking, and coasting for “free” with zero engine (compression) braking.

        • 0 avatar
          brandloyalty

          The Escape Hybrid used the capacity of the battery between 40% and 63% of a full charge. Do you know what range the HAH used before and after the “update”? Certainly as you say, narrowing the charge range used will improve battery life but limit the benefit of the hybrid system.

          Bear in mind, the regeneration system is only one way that hybrids get better mileage. They also benefit from relatively small engines running on the Atkinson cycle, engine stop/start and cvt’s. So a change in the battery capacity used will alter mileage, but not by a whole lot.

          Were HAH’s experiencing battery failure or degradation? Certainly Escape Hybrid battery problems are almost non-existent.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            HCH II *Civic* Hybrid (2006-??), not *Accord* Hybrid. The Civic Hybrid II was the one with the undersized battery and the sneaky firmware update.

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    Honduh has had consistent problems building hybrids that rise to the EPA mileage ratings – the reskin of the prior model had issues to the tune of 7 mpg deficiencies. Most Honduh sycophant news outlets don’t post this news because it continues the long list of deceptive practices of Honduh including odometer issues, class action lawsuits, and a historic (that means zero) ability to get hybrid mileage that is promised.

    It is clear that if you want a hybrid, Honduh is a brand you want to avoid at all costs (unless you are an idiot and then you can try to fool your neighbors even as you, yourself, fail to get posted mileage).

    • 0 avatar
      ceipower

      Honda HYbrid? For whatever reason , Honda don’t get it. There’s only one reason to own a hybrid and Hondas always come off as a also ran. When the extended range Prius comes out in the fall of 2016 , it will most likely eat the Accord for lunch.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Fuelly disagrees with you. The bulk of owners are reporting between 40 and 45 mpg averages, but there are significant number of outliers all the way up to 50, and a few as high as 54. Most hybrids (whether Honda or not) require a lot of caution with the right foot to reach their EPA numbers, but this is not a situation like the C-Max where reaching the EPA rating is physically impossible.

      More importantly, Accord Hybrid owners are getting better mileage than the competition (Camry Hybrid and Sonata Hybrid).

      But your use of “Honduh” tells me you probably aren’t interested in actual facts.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    There’s a first-gen Insight in my town that was in a wreck. Rather than repairing the damage, the owner spray painted the car matte military green, got a vanity license plate reading “ECO TURD” and put it back on the road.

    Honda Hybrids have either been embarrassingly bad or shockingly good. The first-gen Insight was sort of a modern take on the old teardrop-shaped, two-stroke Saab 96: charming if you’re into goofy cars that sacrifice too much for efficiency. The CR-Z had the shape and MPG of a CRX but none of the driving fun. The second-gen Insight was an absolute dog turd of an attempt at a cut-rate Prius. The first- and second-gen Civic Hybrid was overpriced and underwhelming in power, MPG, and driving dynamics. But the first-gen Accord Hybrid was a great performance hybrid: for those who wanted an Accord V6 but with more power and more MPG. The second-gen was no powerhouse at 160 hp but shamed competitive midsize hybrids in MPG. And this newest gen appears to combine the virtues of both previous generations – ample scoot plus class-leading mileage.

    Takeaway: Honda does small hybrids very badly, and Accord hybrids very well…albeit at a price that ensures they sell approximately none. Bummer, I’d drive one.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      The first generation Insight was a beta test. It was “weird” enough that only early adopters would get them. Early adopters are more tolerant than most other customers when it comes to quirks, cost, and problems in general. Everybody was happy and wins.

      I haven’t decided how much of that car was Honda being savvy or unwittingly brilliant.

      #obvioustrollisobvious: only one Congressman owned a first generation Insight and he was a Republican.

  • avatar
    George B

    The main problem with the previous Accord Hybrid was the loss of trunk space. It had passenger space for four large men, but only had luggage space for two. The other problem was that it required gasoline prices up near $4/gallon for fuel savings to offset the extra cost within the life of the battery.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Manufacture’s are getting squeezed. Having to raise CAFE numbers and lower their carbon numbers, but consumers don’t want to pay more for it while gas prices are low. It’s a tough sell for Honda that is really not offering anything special, it is after all just another Accord, how ever nice that maybe.

  • avatar
    solo84

    Having worked at Honda when the 2014 Hybrid was released, I can tell you first hand that the lackluster sales number was due to non-existent inventory. The few that came into our inventory (I believe 10 total for the 2014-2105 model year) were all pre-sold once we had VIN’s handy.

  • avatar
    stuki

    With highway numbers like that, for a normal sized and looking car, I kind of wish Honda would just make the Atkinson engine available sans all the hybridization, with a Skyactive type max efficient manual behind it. Or, perhaps, Mazda adding an Atkinson engine to their already fairly optimized Otto lineup.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      This engine without electric assist would almost certainly feel gutless at low rpm and out of breath at high rpm.

      One of the big advantages of electric assist is that you can optimize your engine for greater efficiency in a narrower rev range. These engines don’t have to develop full torque right off idle or rev to 7000 rpm and the electric assist is why.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Hence the requirement for a slick shifting manual…

        Autos that need to shift all the time, are just annoying. Miata grade manuals behind engines that require constant attention to stay “on pipe”, just makes an otherwise boring and anodyne experience, more involving….. I guess it’s not the largest market niche out there, but it’s not nonexistent either.

        Honestly, wouldn’t a Cannonball Run record, restricted to just enough fuel to equal 40mpg and vehicles seating 5 comfortably, be an infinitely more relevant marketing metric, than some silly laptime around an anachronism in Germany?

        Best thing BarryO could ever do for automotive CO2 emissions, would be handing out presigned get-out-of-ticket-free pardons for every contestant. And let the gentlemen start their engines.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      When, for some reason, the Escape Hybrid’s battery is at the lowest charge level allowed, and you have some reason to floor it, almost nothing happens. Such as partway up a long steep hill at a fair speed, the battery will become discharged and the engine revs will increase to maintain speed. If you then need to speed up, you can press on the gas all you want but it has nothing left. Not only do these hybrids typically the ICE on the Atkinson cycle, which provides less power, but they often have a smaller ICE than typical for cars of that weight.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    No pricing info, that’s unfortunate. But from what I understand, Honda dealers are selling every single one they get their hands on, so don’t count on any discounts. The MKZ Hybrid starts at $35,190 (+dest.), and Ford’s putting $5500 on the hood. I might look there instead of at the Honda.

  • avatar
    mjjense

    I was reviewing the owner’s manual for the 2017 Honda Accord Hybrid and noticed on page 176 under the “Cargo Section” a warning to not carry a temporary spare in the trunk because a severe collision to the rear of the car could cause damage to the hybrid battery and cause a leak of flammable electrolytes. This was surprising because the marketing release by Honda states that the car is delivered with a temporary spare.

    This is a significant safety issue for me. Given the warning in the owner’s manual, I cannot buy a car that strongly warns against keeping a temporary spare in the trunk. My current vehicle had a blowout from a pot hole (2 years ago) and my prior truck had a blow out once (7 years ago). I will not own a car that does not come delivered with a temporary or full-sized spare. To have an owner’s manual specifically include a warning to not store a temporary spare is quite disconcerting given that I have a 7 year old that would be sitting in the backseat center with a battery full of highly flammable electrolytes just on the other side of the seat.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Oberkanone: There is joy to be found driving these as they were when they drove off the assembly line. 100HP to 175HP...
  • 80Cadillac: :D Far better than a LYRIQ!
  • EBFlex: In your case, I guess ignorance really is bliss. Shall we talk about the Explorer? Or should I just let Jim...
  • conundrum: Yeah, and this accident happened before the car crossed the start line of the race. It was as the field...
  • Art Vandelay: At the end of the day, we’d all be safer if you were driven around in a bus by a trained driver....

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber